Page 1

Regional Campus Orientation Handbook 2010

Office of New Student Programs | 573-651-5166 | www.semo.edu/nsp/


Southeast Undergraduate Areas of Study HARRISON COLLEGE OF BUSINESS Accounting Administrative Assistant*** Administrative Systems Management Business Administration* Business Law* Economics Business Financial Entrepreneurship* Finance International Business Management Entrepreneurship Human Resources Management Management Marketing Integrated Marketing Communications Marketing Management Retail Management* Sales Management* Organizational Administration COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Early Childhood Education Elementary Education Art Cross Categorical English as Second Language-TESOL French German Language & Literature Mathematics Music Physical Education Science Social Studies Spanish Exceptional Child (Cross Categorical) Middle School Education Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies Secondary Education Agriculture Education Art Education Biology Education Business & Marketing Education Chemistry Education English Education Family & Consumer Sciences French Education German Education Industrial Education Mathematics Education Music Education Instrumental Vocal Physical Education Physics Education Social Studies Education Spanish Education Unified Science Education Biology Education Chemistry Education Physics Education

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Aerospace Studies* Athletic Training Child Care and Guidance** Head Start** Communication Disorders Criminal Justice Corrections Law Enforcement Security Management Social Rehabilitation & Treatment* Sociology* Criminology* Health Management Exercise Science Health Promotion Hospitality Management Human Environmental Studies Child Development Child Life Services* Child Studies* Dietetics Family Economics & Management* Family Studies Fashion Merchandising Gerontology* Interior Design Nutrition* Nursing (BSN) Nursing (RN to BSN) Physical Education Coaching* Pre-Physical Therapy Recreation Outdoor Adventure Leadership* Social Work Sport Management Substance Abuse Prevention* COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Anthropology Archaeology* Communication Studies Communication for Legal Professionals* Corporate Communication English Literature Small Press Publishing* TESOL* Writing Foreign Languages French German Spanish Geography* Global Studies Chinese Francophone Germanic Hispanic Japanese Historic Preservation History International Studies* Mass Communication Advertising Journalism Public Relations Radio Television and Film

Philosophy Political Science Public Administration* Pre-Law Psychology Applied* Developmental* Psychological Services* Religion* Women’s Studies* SCHOOL OF POLYTECHNIC STUDIES Agribusiness Agriculture Industry Animal Science Horticulture Plant & Soil Science Agriculture* Architectural Design* Commercial Photography Companion Animals* Computer Networking* Computer Technology** Automated Manufacturing Microcomputer Systems Technical Computer Graphics Design Drafting*** Electronics*** Electronic Technology* Engineering Technology Electrical & Control Mechanical/Manufacturing Systems Graphics Technology*** Graphic Communications Technology* Technology Management Computer & Multimedia Graphics Construction Mgmt. & Design Industrial Management Sustainable Energy Systems Mgmt. Technology Management Telecom/Computer Networking Pre-Architecture Pre-Veterinary Medicine Pre-Vocational Agriculture Education Soils* COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS Biology Biomedical Science General Biology Marine Biology Microbiology/Cellular/ Molecular/ Biotechnology Organismal/Ecological/Evolutionary Wildlife and Conservation Botany* Microbiology* Zoology* Chemistry ACS Certification Biochemistry Business DNA Analysis Forensic Chemistry General

Computer Information Systems Computer Science Engineering Physics Computer Applications Electrical Applications Mechanical Applications Environmental Science Biology Business Chemistry Environmental Health Geoprocessing & Soils Policy & Communication Environmental Soil Science* Environmental Studies* Geoscience* Mathematics Applied Math & Statistics Pure Math Medical Technology Physics Pre-Chiropractic Pre-Dentistry Pre-Engineering Pre-Medicine Pre-Optometry Pre-Pharmacy SCHOOL OF UNIVERSITY STUDIES General Studies Interdisciplinary Studies Undecided HOLLAND SCHOOL OF VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS Art (B.A.) Art (BFA) Digital Arts Graphic Design/Illustration Two-Dimensional Three-Dimensional Computer Imaging/Animation Art/Art History* Music (B.A.) Music (B.M.) Composition Instrumental Performance Vocal Performance Performing Arts (BFA) Acting/Directing Dance Design/Technology Musical Theatre Theatre and Dance (B.A.) Technical Theatre* *minor only **associate degree ***certificate program

Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter & AIM.

Welcome to your Southeast Missouri State University Regional Campus! Your first semester of college is going to be an exciting one! Please understand that, although you may be at a Regional Campus, you are still considered part of the Southeast community. The faculty and staff at Southeast encourage you to participate in as many activities as you are able to and to utilize all of the services that are at your disposal. This booklet provides information that will prove to be helpful as you continue your college career. Refer back to it as often as you need to during your tenure at Southeast. Please know that the entire Southeast community supports you in achieving your educational goals. We wish you success in accomplishing a smooth and enjoyable transition here at Southeast. Do not hesitate to contact us if we can be of any service to you during your future endeavors. Sincerely,

Dr. Theresa Haug-Belvin Director of Student Transitions

Table of Contents Jump Start Your Southeast Schedule................................................................................2 What is a College Degree at Southeast?..............................................................................2 Enrollment at your Regional Campus..................................................................................2 Regional Campuses............................................................................................................2 Course Placement...............................................................................................................2 Honors Program.................................................................................................................2 University Studies Program...............................................................................................3 Structure of the University Studies Program.......................................................................3 University Studies Student Checklist...................................................................................3 University Studies Program 100-200 Level Curriculum and Course Descriptions.....................................................................................................4 Transfer Student Information...........................................................................................6 University Studies 300-, 400- and 500-Level Courses.........................................................6 Student Financial Services................................................................................................7 To Access Your Student Account online...............................................................................7 Billing and Payment Information.......................................................................................7 Fee Schedule......................................................................................................................7 Installment Payment Plan Information..............................................................................7 Financial Probation/Suspension/Withdrawal.....................................................................8 Refund Information............................................................................................................8 Direct Deposit Program......................................................................................................8 Southeast e-mail Notifications...........................................................................................8 Questions...........................................................................................................................8 Financial Aid.......................................................................................................................9 Financial Aid Basics............................................................................................................9 Tips for the Financial Aid Process........................................................................................9

Student Resources............................................................................................................. 10 Kent Library........................................................................................................................ 10 Student Transitions............................................................................................................. 10 Career Linkages.................................................................................................................. 10 Learning Assistance Programs............................................................................................ 10 Educational Access Programs.............................................................................................. 10 Campus Health Clinic.......................................................................................................... 11 University Counseling Services........................................................................................... 11 Disability Support Services................................................................................................. 11 Southeast Bookstore.......................................................................................................... 11 University Police................................................................................................................. 11 Parking Services................................................................................................................. 11 Involvement Opportunities............................................................................................... 11 Center for Student Involvement.......................................................................................... 11 Student Government.......................................................................................................... 11 Student Activities Council................................................................................................... 11 Greek Life........................................................................................................................... 11 Campus Clubs & Student Organizations.............................................................................. 11 Residence Hall Association................................................................................................. 12 Athletics............................................................................................................................. 12 Recreation Services............................................................................................................ 12 Campus Ministries.............................................................................................................. 12 Frequently Asked Questions.............................................................................................. 13 Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)............................................................ 13

1


Southeast Undergraduate Areas of Study HARRISON COLLEGE OF BUSINESS Accounting Administrative Assistant*** Administrative Systems Management Business Administration* Business Law* Economics Business Financial Entrepreneurship* Finance International Business Management Entrepreneurship Human Resources Management Management Marketing Integrated Marketing Communications Marketing Management Retail Management* Sales Management* Organizational Administration COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Early Childhood Education Elementary Education Art Cross Categorical English as Second Language-TESOL French German Language & Literature Mathematics Music Physical Education Science Social Studies Spanish Exceptional Child (Cross Categorical) Middle School Education Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies Secondary Education Agriculture Education Art Education Biology Education Business & Marketing Education Chemistry Education English Education Family & Consumer Sciences French Education German Education Industrial Education Mathematics Education Music Education Instrumental Vocal Physical Education Physics Education Social Studies Education Spanish Education Unified Science Education Biology Education Chemistry Education Physics Education

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Aerospace Studies* Athletic Training Child Care and Guidance** Head Start** Communication Disorders Criminal Justice Corrections Law Enforcement Security Management Social Rehabilitation & Treatment* Sociology* Criminology* Health Management Exercise Science Health Promotion Hospitality Management Human Environmental Studies Child Development Child Life Services* Child Studies* Dietetics Family Economics & Management* Family Studies Fashion Merchandising Gerontology* Interior Design Nutrition* Nursing (BSN) Nursing (RN to BSN) Physical Education Coaching* Pre-Physical Therapy Recreation Outdoor Adventure Leadership* Social Work Sport Management Substance Abuse Prevention* COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Anthropology Archaeology* Communication Studies Communication for Legal Professionals* Corporate Communication English Literature Small Press Publishing* TESOL* Writing Foreign Languages French German Spanish Geography* Global Studies Chinese Francophone Germanic Hispanic Japanese Historic Preservation History International Studies* Mass Communication Advertising Journalism Public Relations Radio Television and Film

Philosophy Political Science Public Administration* Pre-Law Psychology Applied* Developmental* Psychological Services* Religion* Women’s Studies* SCHOOL OF POLYTECHNIC STUDIES Agribusiness Agriculture Industry Animal Science Horticulture Plant & Soil Science Agriculture* Architectural Design* Commercial Photography Companion Animals* Computer Networking* Computer Technology** Automated Manufacturing Microcomputer Systems Technical Computer Graphics Design Drafting*** Electronics*** Electronic Technology* Engineering Technology Electrical & Control Mechanical/Manufacturing Systems Graphics Technology*** Graphic Communications Technology* Technology Management Computer & Multimedia Graphics Construction Mgmt. & Design Industrial Management Sustainable Energy Systems Mgmt. Technology Management Telecom/Computer Networking Pre-Architecture Pre-Veterinary Medicine Pre-Vocational Agriculture Education Soils* COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS Biology Biomedical Science General Biology Marine Biology Microbiology/Cellular/ Molecular/ Biotechnology Organismal/Ecological/Evolutionary Wildlife and Conservation Botany* Microbiology* Zoology* Chemistry ACS Certification Biochemistry Business DNA Analysis Forensic Chemistry General

Computer Information Systems Computer Science Engineering Physics Computer Applications Electrical Applications Mechanical Applications Environmental Science Biology Business Chemistry Environmental Health Geoprocessing & Soils Policy & Communication Environmental Soil Science* Environmental Studies* Geoscience* Mathematics Applied Math & Statistics Pure Math Medical Technology Physics Pre-Chiropractic Pre-Dentistry Pre-Engineering Pre-Medicine Pre-Optometry Pre-Pharmacy SCHOOL OF UNIVERSITY STUDIES General Studies Interdisciplinary Studies Undecided HOLLAND SCHOOL OF VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS Art (B.A.) Art (BFA) Digital Arts Graphic Design/Illustration Two-Dimensional Three-Dimensional Computer Imaging/Animation Art/Art History* Music (B.A.) Music (B.M.) Composition Instrumental Performance Vocal Performance Performing Arts (BFA) Acting/Directing Dance Design/Technology Musical Theatre Theatre and Dance (B.A.) Technical Theatre* *minor only **associate degree ***certificate program

Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter & AIM.

Welcome to your Southeast Missouri State University Regional Campus! Your first semester of college is going to be an exciting one! Please understand that, although you may be at a Regional Campus, you are still considered part of the Southeast community. The faculty and staff at Southeast encourage you to participate in as many activities as you are able to and to utilize all of the services that are at your disposal. This booklet provides information that will prove to be helpful as you continue your college career. Refer back to it as often as you need to during your tenure at Southeast. Please know that the entire Southeast community supports you in achieving your educational goals. We wish you success in accomplishing a smooth and enjoyable transition here at Southeast. Do not hesitate to contact us if we can be of any service to you during your future endeavors. Sincerely,

Dr. Theresa Haug-Belvin Director of Student Transitions

Table of Contents Jump Start Your Southeast Schedule................................................................................2 What is a College Degree at Southeast?..............................................................................2 Enrollment at your Regional Campus..................................................................................2 Regional Campuses............................................................................................................2 Course Placement...............................................................................................................2 Honors Program.................................................................................................................2 University Studies Program...............................................................................................3 Structure of the University Studies Program.......................................................................3 University Studies Student Checklist...................................................................................3 University Studies Program 100-200 Level Curriculum and Course Descriptions.....................................................................................................4 Transfer Student Information...........................................................................................6 University Studies 300-, 400- and 500-Level Courses.........................................................6 Student Financial Services................................................................................................7 To Access Your Student Account online...............................................................................7 Billing and Payment Information.......................................................................................7 Fee Schedule......................................................................................................................7 Installment Payment Plan Information..............................................................................7 Financial Probation/Suspension/Withdrawal.....................................................................8 Refund Information............................................................................................................8 Direct Deposit Program......................................................................................................8 Southeast e-mail Notifications...........................................................................................8 Questions...........................................................................................................................8 Financial Aid.......................................................................................................................9 Financial Aid Basics............................................................................................................9 Tips for the Financial Aid Process........................................................................................9

Student Resources............................................................................................................. 10 Kent Library........................................................................................................................ 10 Student Transitions............................................................................................................. 10 Career Linkages.................................................................................................................. 10 Learning Assistance Programs............................................................................................ 10 Educational Access Programs.............................................................................................. 10 Campus Health Clinic.......................................................................................................... 11 University Counseling Services........................................................................................... 11 Disability Support Services................................................................................................. 11 Southeast Bookstore.......................................................................................................... 11 University Police................................................................................................................. 11 Parking Services................................................................................................................. 11 Involvement Opportunities............................................................................................... 11 Center for Student Involvement.......................................................................................... 11 Student Government.......................................................................................................... 11 Student Activities Council................................................................................................... 11 Greek Life........................................................................................................................... 11 Campus Clubs & Student Organizations.............................................................................. 11 Residence Hall Association................................................................................................. 12 Athletics............................................................................................................................. 12 Recreation Services............................................................................................................ 12 Campus Ministries.............................................................................................................. 12 Frequently Asked Questions.............................................................................................. 13 Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)............................................................ 13

1


Jumpstart Your Southeast Schedule This section will familiarize you with the advising and enrollment process at Southeast Missouri State University.

What is a College Degree at Southeast? ►►A minimum of 120 semester

hours of credit

•• Most courses are worth 3 semester hours of credit: A 3-hour course at the regional campuses typically meets Monday and Wednesday; Tuesday and Thursday, or one night a week every week of the 16 week semester. ►►University Studies

(General Education)

•• The University Studies Program is designed to provide knowledge, skills, and experiences that are necessary to enable students to lead full and productive lives as educated men and women. •• The program consists of a total of 51 hours. ►►A Major

•• A major is a specialized area of study in which a degree is earned. •• The hours required in a major can range from 30 to 50 or 60 hours. •• Majors with 30-40 hours generally require a minor.

►►A Minor

•• A minor is an area of study that can compliment your major and/or give you a broader base of knowledge. Majors with 30-40 hours generally require a minor. •• Minors can be completed whether required or not. •• Minors generally require between 15 and 21 hours.

►►A minimum grade point average

(GPA) of 2.0 overall

•• A minimum GPA of 2.0 in your major (transfer students must also have the minimum GPA of 2.0 in major courses taken at Southeast) and a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all coursework taken at Southeast •• Some degrees and majors have higher GPA requirements. Always check your degree audit report (DAR)* for specific GPA requirements. ►►CL sequence (MAPP and WP003

required for graduation)

•• CL001 CL004 – Career proficiencies – designed to assist students with career planning throughout college career •• MAPP assessment – General education assessment exam •• WP003–Writing proficiency assessment taken after 75 hours completed ►►Elective Credits

•• Elective courses are used as additional classes to complete the 120 hours needed for graduation. •• Electives may be any course in which a student has an interest. •• Students must meet all prerequisites required.

2

•• Taking a course in which you have an interest may help you to decide on a major. *Students may review their degree audit reports through the portal. Students are encouraged to review their degree audit reports with their advisors prior to choosing classes for the next semester. The degree audit report indicates what courses are required for the major, minor and University Studies. It also indicates the specific GPA requirements for the particular major/degree.

Enrollment at your Regional Campus How many classes should I take? You must enroll in 12 credit hours to be a full-time student. It is important not to overload yourself since the first semester will be a time of transition for you.

How should I choose a schedule? Your academic advisor will assist you with your course planning. A typical first-year student schedule may look like this: ►►UI 100 – First-Year Seminar: Course is required of

all beginning first-year students. Many sections with varying themes are offered and you will not find it difficult to fit a UI 100 in your schedule. ►►CL 001: Zero credit hour course taken in conjunction

with your UI 100 course. You will complete a career assessment inventory as an assignment in your UI 100 course. ►►MX 001: Zero credit hour general education

assessment exam ►►EN 099/ EN 100 and Math Course: Based on your

placement, your advisor will assist in selecting the appropriate English and Math courses. ►►University Studies Course/Major Course: The

subsequent pages have outlined the course descriptions for all 100-200- level University Studies courses. Some majors have specific University Studies courses required. Your advisor will assist you with selecting the appropriate University Studies courses.

Southeast Regional Campuses Southeast Missouri State University – Kennett 1230 First Street, Kennett, MO 63857 (573) 888-0513 mblanchard@semo.edu Southeast Missouri State University – Malden 700 North Douglass, Malden, MO 63863 (573) 276-4577 Toll-free: 1-888-213-4601 rhux@semo.edu Perryville Higher Education Center 108 South Progress Drive, Perryville, MO 63775 (573) 547-4143 phec@semo.edu Southeast Missouri State University – Sikeston 2401 N. Main, Sikeston, MO 63801-8530 (573) 472-3210 sikeston@semo.edu

University Studies Program

Course Placement EN 099 – Writing Skills Workshop (non-degree credit)

School of University Studies Kent Library 305 651-2298 univstudies@semo.edu www.semo.edu/ustudies

EN 100 – English Composition (University Studies Requirement)

Structure of the University Studies Program

EN 140 – Rhetoric & Critical Thinking (University Studies Requirement)

I. Theme: Understanding and Enhancing the Human Experience

English Placement Options

►►First Year Introductory Course (UI 100 First Year Seminar): An academic skills-centered seminar that introduces students to the University Studies Program and the value of

Center for Writing Excellence 651-2159 ustudies.semo.edu/writing

liberal education while addressing one of a variety of themes. Required of all students entering the University with 23 or fewer credit hours.............................................................. 3 hours ►►English Composition (EN 100 English Composition): Focus on techniques of effective written expression. Prerequisite: EN 099 or TL 110 or appropriate score on University

Placement Test. Pre- or co-requisite: TL 105 or appropriate score on University Placement Test...................................................................................................................................... 3 hours

Mathematics Placement Options

II. Theme: Acquisition of Knowledge: Gaining Perspectives on the Individual, Society and the Universe

MA 101 – ACT Math Subscore of 20 or below Logical Systems Course – ACT Math Subscore of 21 or above (University Studies Requirement) Department of Mathematics 651-2164 www5.semo.edu/math/

Jane Stephens Honors Program Eligibility Requirements: Students with less than 12 semester hours of college credit must have a cumulative high school grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.4 on a 4.0 scale (or its equivalent) and an ACT composite score of at least 25 (or its equivalent). Students who do not meet the initial criteria and transfer students may be admitted to the Stephens Honors Program after they have completed 12 semester hours of college credit with a cumulative college GPA of at least 3.25. The requirements to complete the Stephens Honors Program are 24 semester hours of honors credit with 6 hours at the upper-division level, a senior honors project, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25. The Jane Stephens Honors Program offers educational opportunities tailored to the needs, aspirations and motivations of students with superior intellectual and creative abilities. Honors students can earn honors credit by taking specially designated honors sections of courses or by contracting for honors credit in non-honors sections taught by honors faculty members. Honors sections emphasize creative and active learning with special attention to student initiative. In addition to special academic opportunities, the Stephens Honors Program offers co-curricular and social activities through which honors students can meet other members of the honors community and enjoy a more rewarding and enriching University experience. Dr. Craig Roberts, Director of Jane Stephens Honors Program Honors House located at 603 North Henderson 651-2513 honors@semo.edu www.semo.edu/honors/

The University Studies Program is a general education program designed to provide the knowledge, skills, and experiences that are necessary to enable students to lead full and productive lives as educated members of society. The program consists of a total of 51 hours.

►►The 100-200-level core curriculum is separated into three perspectives with four categories of courses in each perspective. One course is required from each

of the twelve categories.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 36 hours

Perspectives on Individual Expression Artistic Expression 3 hours Literary Expression 3 hours Oral Expression 3 hours Written Expression 3 hours

Perspectives on Natural Systems Behavioral Systems 3 hours Living Systems 3 hours Logical Systems 3 hours Physical Systems 3 hours

Perspectives on Human Institutions Development of a Major Civilization Economic Systems Political Systems Social Systems

3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours

III. Theme: Integration of Knowledge: Living in an Interdependent Universe ►►Each student takes two 300-level courses that integrate two or more categories of the core curriculum......................................................................................................................... 6 hours ►►Each student also takes a 400-level senior seminar that integrates two or more perspectives of the core curriculum and that requires students to demonstrate the ability

to do appropriate interdisciplinary scholarship and present it in both oral and written forms......................................................................................................................................... 3 hours Total 51 hours

University Studies Student Checklist List the University Studies courses as you take them to monitor your progress.

First Year Introductory Course (UI 100 First Year Seminar). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours English Composition (EN 100 English Composition). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours 100-200-Level Core Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 hours Perspectives on Individual Expression Artistic Expression

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Literary Expression

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Oral Expression

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Written Expression

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Perspectives on Natural Systems Behavioral Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Living Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Logical Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Physical Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Perspectives on Human Institutions Development of a Major Civilization

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Economic Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Political Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Social Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

300-Level Interdisciplinary

___________________________________________________

3 hours

___________________________________________________

3 hours

400-Level Senior Seminar

___________________________________________________

3 hours

3


Jumpstart Your Southeast Schedule This section will familiarize you with the advising and enrollment process at Southeast Missouri State University.

What is a College Degree at Southeast? ►►A minimum of 120 semester

hours of credit

•• Most courses are worth 3 semester hours of credit: A 3-hour course at the regional campuses typically meets Monday and Wednesday; Tuesday and Thursday, or one night a week every week of the 16 week semester. ►►University Studies

(General Education)

•• The University Studies Program is designed to provide knowledge, skills, and experiences that are necessary to enable students to lead full and productive lives as educated men and women. •• The program consists of a total of 51 hours. ►►A Major

•• A major is a specialized area of study in which a degree is earned. •• The hours required in a major can range from 30 to 50 or 60 hours. •• Majors with 30-40 hours generally require a minor.

►►A Minor

•• A minor is an area of study that can compliment your major and/or give you a broader base of knowledge. Majors with 30-40 hours generally require a minor. •• Minors can be completed whether required or not. •• Minors generally require between 15 and 21 hours.

►►A minimum grade point average

(GPA) of 2.0 overall

•• A minimum GPA of 2.0 in your major (transfer students must also have the minimum GPA of 2.0 in major courses taken at Southeast) and a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all coursework taken at Southeast •• Some degrees and majors have higher GPA requirements. Always check your degree audit report (DAR)* for specific GPA requirements. ►►CL sequence (MAPP and WP003

required for graduation)

•• CL001 CL004 – Career proficiencies – designed to assist students with career planning throughout college career •• MAPP assessment – General education assessment exam •• WP003–Writing proficiency assessment taken after 75 hours completed ►►Elective Credits

•• Elective courses are used as additional classes to complete the 120 hours needed for graduation. •• Electives may be any course in which a student has an interest. •• Students must meet all prerequisites required.

2

•• Taking a course in which you have an interest may help you to decide on a major. *Students may review their degree audit reports through the portal. Students are encouraged to review their degree audit reports with their advisors prior to choosing classes for the next semester. The degree audit report indicates what courses are required for the major, minor and University Studies. It also indicates the specific GPA requirements for the particular major/degree.

Enrollment at your Regional Campus How many classes should I take? You must enroll in 12 credit hours to be a full-time student. It is important not to overload yourself since the first semester will be a time of transition for you.

How should I choose a schedule? Your academic advisor will assist you with your course planning. A typical first-year student schedule may look like this: ►►UI 100 – First-Year Seminar: Course is required of

all beginning first-year students. Many sections with varying themes are offered and you will not find it difficult to fit a UI 100 in your schedule. ►►CL 001: Zero credit hour course taken in conjunction

with your UI 100 course. You will complete a career assessment inventory as an assignment in your UI 100 course. ►►MX 001: Zero credit hour general education

assessment exam ►►EN 099/ EN 100 and Math Course: Based on your

placement, your advisor will assist in selecting the appropriate English and Math courses. ►►University Studies Course/Major Course: The

subsequent pages have outlined the course descriptions for all 100-200- level University Studies courses. Some majors have specific University Studies courses required. Your advisor will assist you with selecting the appropriate University Studies courses.

Southeast Regional Campuses Southeast Missouri State University – Kennett 1230 First Street, Kennett, MO 63857 (573) 888-0513 mblanchard@semo.edu Southeast Missouri State University – Malden 700 North Douglass, Malden, MO 63863 (573) 276-4577 Toll-free: 1-888-213-4601 rhux@semo.edu Perryville Higher Education Center 108 South Progress Drive, Perryville, MO 63775 (573) 547-4143 phec@semo.edu Southeast Missouri State University – Sikeston 2401 N. Main, Sikeston, MO 63801-8530 (573) 472-3210 sikeston@semo.edu

University Studies Program

Course Placement EN 099 – Writing Skills Workshop (non-degree credit)

School of University Studies Kent Library 305 651-2298 univstudies@semo.edu www.semo.edu/ustudies

EN 100 – English Composition (University Studies Requirement)

Structure of the University Studies Program

EN 140 – Rhetoric & Critical Thinking (University Studies Requirement)

I. Theme: Understanding and Enhancing the Human Experience

English Placement Options

►►First Year Introductory Course (UI 100 First Year Seminar): An academic skills-centered seminar that introduces students to the University Studies Program and the value of

Center for Writing Excellence 651-2159 ustudies.semo.edu/writing

liberal education while addressing one of a variety of themes. Required of all students entering the University with 23 or fewer credit hours.............................................................. 3 hours ►►English Composition (EN 100 English Composition): Focus on techniques of effective written expression. Prerequisite: EN 099 or TL 110 or appropriate score on University

Placement Test. Pre- or co-requisite: TL 105 or appropriate score on University Placement Test...................................................................................................................................... 3 hours

Mathematics Placement Options

II. Theme: Acquisition of Knowledge: Gaining Perspectives on the Individual, Society and the Universe

MA 101 – ACT Math Subscore of 20 or below Logical Systems Course – ACT Math Subscore of 21 or above (University Studies Requirement) Department of Mathematics 651-2164 www5.semo.edu/math/

Jane Stephens Honors Program Eligibility Requirements: Students with less than 12 semester hours of college credit must have a cumulative high school grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.4 on a 4.0 scale (or its equivalent) and an ACT composite score of at least 25 (or its equivalent). Students who do not meet the initial criteria and transfer students may be admitted to the Stephens Honors Program after they have completed 12 semester hours of college credit with a cumulative college GPA of at least 3.25. The requirements to complete the Stephens Honors Program are 24 semester hours of honors credit with 6 hours at the upper-division level, a senior honors project, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25. The Jane Stephens Honors Program offers educational opportunities tailored to the needs, aspirations and motivations of students with superior intellectual and creative abilities. Honors students can earn honors credit by taking specially designated honors sections of courses or by contracting for honors credit in non-honors sections taught by honors faculty members. Honors sections emphasize creative and active learning with special attention to student initiative. In addition to special academic opportunities, the Stephens Honors Program offers co-curricular and social activities through which honors students can meet other members of the honors community and enjoy a more rewarding and enriching University experience. Dr. Craig Roberts, Director of Jane Stephens Honors Program Honors House located at 603 North Henderson 651-2513 honors@semo.edu www.semo.edu/honors/

The University Studies Program is a general education program designed to provide the knowledge, skills, and experiences that are necessary to enable students to lead full and productive lives as educated members of society. The program consists of a total of 51 hours.

►►The 100-200-level core curriculum is separated into three perspectives with four categories of courses in each perspective. One course is required from each

of the twelve categories.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 36 hours

Perspectives on Individual Expression Artistic Expression 3 hours Literary Expression 3 hours Oral Expression 3 hours Written Expression 3 hours

Perspectives on Natural Systems Behavioral Systems 3 hours Living Systems 3 hours Logical Systems 3 hours Physical Systems 3 hours

Perspectives on Human Institutions Development of a Major Civilization Economic Systems Political Systems Social Systems

3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours

III. Theme: Integration of Knowledge: Living in an Interdependent Universe ►►Each student takes two 300-level courses that integrate two or more categories of the core curriculum......................................................................................................................... 6 hours ►►Each student also takes a 400-level senior seminar that integrates two or more perspectives of the core curriculum and that requires students to demonstrate the ability

to do appropriate interdisciplinary scholarship and present it in both oral and written forms......................................................................................................................................... 3 hours Total 51 hours

University Studies Student Checklist List the University Studies courses as you take them to monitor your progress.

First Year Introductory Course (UI 100 First Year Seminar). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours English Composition (EN 100 English Composition). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours 100-200-Level Core Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 hours Perspectives on Individual Expression Artistic Expression

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Literary Expression

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Oral Expression

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Written Expression

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Perspectives on Natural Systems Behavioral Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Living Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Logical Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Physical Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Perspectives on Human Institutions Development of a Major Civilization

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Economic Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Political Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

Social Systems

___________________________________________________

3 hours

300-Level Interdisciplinary

___________________________________________________

3 hours

___________________________________________________

3 hours

400-Level Senior Seminar

___________________________________________________

3 hours

3


Perspectives on Individual Expression Artistic Expression (Choose ONE Course)

AR 108 Drawing in Society A course combining studio drawing with the study of how drawing incorporates and communicates the experiences and values of society. (3) AR 111 Ceramics: A Metaphor for Understanding Human Experience Ceramics, one of mankind’s oldest and lasting handicrafts, provides us with a record of human needs and aspirations through the ages. Pottery and other ceramic artifacts will be examined and compared for function, design, technique and decoration to gain enhanced understanding of cultures that created them. (3) AR 112 Perspectives in Art The course investigates the role and value of art as an essential human aesthetic experience. No prerequisites. (3) LI 205 The Art of Film A study of the major artistic components of film and how those components are used to convey ideas and meanings. Prerequisite: EN 100 or its equivalent. (3) MM 101 Theories of Music in Culture Fundamentals of music in resources and practices of Western and non-Western cultures. Prerequisites: None, but a strong knowledge of note reading is necessary. Previous musical performance experience is recommended. (3) MU 182 Music: An Artistic Expression An examination of music as artistic expression and an analysis of the role music has played in the human experience. (3) MU 190 Jazz Appreciation A journey through the various languages of Jazz—America’s unique art form-and the societal developments that have influenced Jazz music in the U.S.A. (3) PG 284 Photography Fundamentals The aesthetic and technical aspects of photography within an overall sociological construct are examined. Black and white photos are produced. (3) PL 203 Aesthetics and the Arts An introduction to the concepts, theories, literature, methods of criticism, and modes of perception appropriate to understanding the arts, developing aesthetic attitudes, and making reasoned aesthetic judgments. (3) TH 100 Theater Appreciation Promotes an appreciation for and an understanding of theater in contemporary society. Emphasizes the script, artist, and audience interaction. (3) TH 101 Acting for Non-Majors Acting as a form of self-expression. Emphasizes personal awareness, relaxation, concentration, coordination and integration, vocal skills, and scene study. (3)

Literary Expression (Choose ONE Course)

LI 220 Fiction and the Human Experience A study of short stories and novels by significant writers past and present. Prerequisite: EN 100. (3) LI 222 Mythic Dimensions of Literature A study of mythology and of literature with mythological themes. Prerequisite: EN 100. (3) LI 243 Children’s Literature Study of best forms of literature for children; development of criteria for judging children’s books. Does not count on major or minor in English. Prerequisite: EN 100 and EL 120. (3)

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LI 256 The Variety of Literature A survey of literature in all its variety--short stories, novels, poems, and drama. Emphasis on reading, analysis, and writing about literature. Prerequisite: EN 100. (3) PL 110 Readings in Philosophy An exploration of the main issues in philosophy through philosophical and literary readings. (3) RS 201 New Testament Literature A study of the literary genres and historical contexts of the New Testament writings. (3) RS 202 Old Testament Literature A historical and critical study of the literature of the Old Testament, using methods of modern biblical scholarship. (3) SN 220 Hispanic Literature Designed to develop ability to read Hispanic literary texts; to acquaint students with a selection of major Hispanic authors; to introduce basic concepts of literary analysis; to increase students’ ability to speak and understand Spanish through class discussions in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 200 or equivalent. (3) This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had exceptional high school preparation (4-5 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 9 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Oral Expression (Choose ONE Course)

FR 100 French Language and Culture I Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of Frenchspeaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French. (3) FR 120 French Language and Culture II Continued study of the culture of French-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French. Prerequisite: FR 100 or equivalent. (3) Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Language Retroactive Credit policy. FR 200 French Language and Culture III Continued study of French language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Prerequisite: FR 120 or equivalent. (3) This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in French (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy. GN 100 German Language and Culture I Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of Germanspeaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German. (3) GN 120 German Language and Culture II Continued study of the German-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German. Prerequisite: GN 100 or equivalent. (3) Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit Policy. GN 200 German Language and Culture III Continued study of German language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Prerequisite: GN 120 or equivalent. (3) This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in German (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

SC 105 Fundamentals of Oral Communication The development of proficiency in oral communication through the study of rhetorical theories, principles, and strategies. (3) SC 155 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication Consideration of the elementary principles involved in effective person to person communication. (3) SN 100 Spanish Language and Culture I Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of Spanishspeaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish. (3) SN 120 Spanish Language and Culture II Continued study of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 100 or equivalent. (3) Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Language Retroactive Credit policy. SN 200 Spanish Language and Culture III Continued study of Spanish language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Prerequisite: SN 120 or equivalent. (3) This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in Spanish (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy. SW 121 Helping Skills for the Human Services This course emphasizes the development of competence in interpersonal communication through the study of verbal communication principles and strategies, helping strategies, and the influence of gender and culture on communication. (3)

Written Expression EN 140 Rhetoric and Critical Thinking Focus on effective written expression in the context of a liberal education; emphasis upon critical thinking and the research paper. Prerequisite: EN 100 or advanced placement. (3)

Perspectives on Natural Systems Behavioral Systems

PY 151 Social Decision-Making Concepts, theories, and research that contribute to understanding, analyzing and evaluating people’s thinking and behavior in social psychological interactions. (3) PY 220 Psychological Development Across the Life Span Broad overview of human development across the life-span. Reciprocal nature of the individual/ environment interaction is emphasized. (3) PY 222 Development of the Adolescent The basic physical, cognitive, social and personality development of the adolescent period will be examined. Efforts will be made to understand current issues affecting adolescence in light of recent empirical and theoretical knowledge. (3)

Living Systems (Choose ONE Course)

BI 151 Biological Reasoning Use of scientific reasoning and evidence from various biological disciplines to test hypotheses about the common ancestry of organisms. (3) BS 103 Human Biology Emphasis on human cell, tissue, and organ system function. Discussions focus on a systems approach to human health and disease. Does not count on any major or minor in Biology Department. Prerequisite: SW 110 or equivalent. (3) BS 105 Environmental Biology Discussion of biological principles with application to environmental issues. (3) BS 107 Investigations in Biology Biological processes will be used to provide experience in scientific investigation and discussion of its implications and limitations. (3) BS 108 Biology for Living To acquaint students with and help them to understand some of the fundamental biological processes and problems which confront living organisms. (3) BS 218 Biological Science: A Process Approach This course applies scientific thought to structure, function, energetics, and ecology of living systems. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: BS 118; PH 218. (3) FN 235 Nutrition for Health This course examines, analyzes, and evaluates the relationships between the science of nutrition, health and well being. (3)

(Choose ONE Course)

Logical Systems

AN 100 Foundations of Human Behavior: Sex/Aggression Examines biological and cultural foundations of sex and aggression, with an emphasis on critical examination of the popular media. (3) HL 120 Health Perspectives Health topics with wide-ranging importance are examined. Issues are examined from various perspectives with special emphasis on the influence that individual health behavior decisions have on personal, societal and global health status. (3) PY 101 Psychological Perspectives on Human Behavior Examination of human behavior and experience from a psychological perspective. Application of psychological principles to understanding of human behavior. (3) PY/CF 120 The Child: Development/ Conception to Adolescence An overview of the social, cognitive, physical and emotional changes that occur from conception to adolescence. Application of principles of development to the understanding of child development and behavior. (3)

MA 118 Mathematics I Introduction to problem solving strategies, sets, whole numbers and their operations and properties, number theory, numeration systems, computer usage, and the historical significance and applications of these topics in the K-9 mathematics curriculum. Prerequisites: Credit for MA 101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. Declared education major in elementary, early childhood, exceptional child, middle school, or secondary mathematics or human environmental studies: child development option major. (3) MA 123 Survey of Mathematics A sampling of topics which mixes mathematics history, its mathematicians, and its problems with a variety of real-life applications. Prerequisites: Credit for MA 101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. (3)

(Choose ONE Course)

MA 134 College Algebra Functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, binomial theorem. Prerequisite: Credit for MA 101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. (3) MA 155 Statistical Reasoning Course will introduce statistical ideas to students. The student will reach an understanding of these statistical ideas, be able to deal critically with statistical arguments, and gain an understanding of the impact of statistical ideas on public policy and in other areas of academic study. Prerequisite: Credit for MA 101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. (3) PL 120 Symbolic Logic I A formal study of argument and inference, emphasizing the application of symbolic techniques to ordinary language. (3) Reminder: In order to receive a degree from Southeast, student must receive credit for MA 101/102 and pass the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, OR score at the appropriate level on placement tests to have the course(s) waived. This requirement should be completed before attempting any course in the Logical Systems category. This requirement applies to all students regardless of major selected. (See “Graduation Requirements” in the University Bulletin).

Physical Systems (Choose ONE Course)

CH 180 Chemistry in Our World The principles governing the systematic behavior of matter, with applications to life and living. One may not receive credit for both CH 180 and CH 181. Two lectures and three hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: MA 101 and or MA 102; completion of high school chemistry is recommended. (3) CH 181 Basic Principles of Chemistry A one semester survey of the fundamental principles and systematic behavior of matter. Four lecture plus two lab hours. One may not receive credit for both CH 181 and CH 185. Pre or co-requisite: MA 101 and or MA 102. (5) CH 185/005/085 General Chemistry I A study of atomic structure, chemical bonding, properties of matter and chemical reactions. Initial course in general chemistry sequence. Three lecture hours (CH 185), one recitation hour (CH 005), two lab hours (CH 085) must be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: MA 101 and/or MA 102. (5) GO 150/050 Earth Science: Environmental Hazards An examination of Earth’s systems, how they work, and how they relate to people, with emphasis on natural and man-made hazards to society. Two lectures, one lab per week. (3) PH 106 Physical Concepts An introduction to the concepts and principles governing the natural physical world and their relation to society. Emphasis on developing an appreciation for the role of science in our life. Does not count on a major or minor. (3) PH 109 Exploring the Universe An examination of the physical nature of planets, stars and galaxies, their interrelationships and evolutionary processes. Emphasis on the role of scientific inquiry in our present understanding of the Universe. (3) PH 120 Introductory Physics I Concepts and principles of natural phenomena, including geometric optics, mechanics, work and energy, and rotational motion, with emphasis on the investigative processes. Three lectures and 2 two-hour labs. Prerequisites: MA 133 and MA 134 or equivalent. (5)

PH 218 Physical Science: A Process Approach Major topics include atomic structure, elements and compounds, chemical reactions, mechanics and energy concepts of heat, light, sound, electricity and magnetism. Does not count for a physics major or minor. Prerequisite: BS 118. (3)

Perspectives on Human Institutions Development of a Major Civilization (Choose ONE Course)

EH 101 Early European Civilization Survey of the history of Early European Civilization from ancient times to the post-Columbian era. (3) EH 103 Modern European Civilization A survey of the history of European Civilization from the Old Regime to the present. (3) EH 115 Ancient Greece and Rome A study of the development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, their cultures, art, government, and religious beliefs. (3) WH 100 African Civilization A study of the development of African Civilization from ancient times to the present. (3) WH 125 Islamic Civilization A survey of the history of Islamic Civilization from the time of Muhammad until the present. (3) WH 130 Latin American Civilization A survey of Latin American civilization from Pre-Columbian times to the present with emphasis on the mixture of cultures and the struggle for modernity, including an examination of cultural, social,economic and political forces which have shaped Latin American Civilization. (3) US 105 American History I A study of the history of the United States from colonial beginnings to 1900. (3) US 107 American History II A study of the history of the United States from 1900 to the present. (3)

Economic Systems (Choose ONE Course)

AG 201 World Food and Society Food production and distribution in the advancement of societies in developed and developing countries. (3) EC 101 Economic Problems and Policies An introduction to the domestic and international economic problems facing the United States today and an analysis if the policies designed to alleviate these problems. (3) EC 215 Principles of Microeconomics U. S. market economic system. Demand, supply, competition, pricing, resource allocation concepts applied to issues in business, labor, and public policy. Prerequisites: AD 101 or BA 100 with a minimum grade of ‘C’ or IE 102; MA 134 or equivalent. (3) FE 200 Family Resource Management A study of basic family management concepts and decision making within the context of the family system. Emphasis is placed on application in the management of human and economic resources in achieving goals. (3) MN 220 Engineering Economic Analysis Engineering economic topics include the effects of the time-value of money, concepts of equivalence, replacement analysis, cost/benefit analysis, tax consequences and cost of capital depreciation related to a manufacturing or engineering environment. Prerequisite: MA 134. (3)

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Perspectives on Individual Expression Artistic Expression (Choose ONE Course)

AR 108 Drawing in Society A course combining studio drawing with the study of how drawing incorporates and communicates the experiences and values of society. (3) AR 111 Ceramics: A Metaphor for Understanding Human Experience Ceramics, one of mankind’s oldest and lasting handicrafts, provides us with a record of human needs and aspirations through the ages. Pottery and other ceramic artifacts will be examined and compared for function, design, technique and decoration to gain enhanced understanding of cultures that created them. (3) AR 112 Perspectives in Art The course investigates the role and value of art as an essential human aesthetic experience. No prerequisites. (3) LI 205 The Art of Film A study of the major artistic components of film and how those components are used to convey ideas and meanings. Prerequisite: EN 100 or its equivalent. (3) MM 101 Theories of Music in Culture Fundamentals of music in resources and practices of Western and non-Western cultures. Prerequisites: None, but a strong knowledge of note reading is necessary. Previous musical performance experience is recommended. (3) MU 182 Music: An Artistic Expression An examination of music as artistic expression and an analysis of the role music has played in the human experience. (3) MU 190 Jazz Appreciation A journey through the various languages of Jazz—America’s unique art form-and the societal developments that have influenced Jazz music in the U.S.A. (3) PG 284 Photography Fundamentals The aesthetic and technical aspects of photography within an overall sociological construct are examined. Black and white photos are produced. (3) PL 203 Aesthetics and the Arts An introduction to the concepts, theories, literature, methods of criticism, and modes of perception appropriate to understanding the arts, developing aesthetic attitudes, and making reasoned aesthetic judgments. (3) TH 100 Theater Appreciation Promotes an appreciation for and an understanding of theater in contemporary society. Emphasizes the script, artist, and audience interaction. (3) TH 101 Acting for Non-Majors Acting as a form of self-expression. Emphasizes personal awareness, relaxation, concentration, coordination and integration, vocal skills, and scene study. (3)

Literary Expression (Choose ONE Course)

LI 220 Fiction and the Human Experience A study of short stories and novels by significant writers past and present. Prerequisite: EN 100. (3) LI 222 Mythic Dimensions of Literature A study of mythology and of literature with mythological themes. Prerequisite: EN 100. (3) LI 243 Children’s Literature Study of best forms of literature for children; development of criteria for judging children’s books. Does not count on major or minor in English. Prerequisite: EN 100 and EL 120. (3)

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LI 256 The Variety of Literature A survey of literature in all its variety--short stories, novels, poems, and drama. Emphasis on reading, analysis, and writing about literature. Prerequisite: EN 100. (3) PL 110 Readings in Philosophy An exploration of the main issues in philosophy through philosophical and literary readings. (3) RS 201 New Testament Literature A study of the literary genres and historical contexts of the New Testament writings. (3) RS 202 Old Testament Literature A historical and critical study of the literature of the Old Testament, using methods of modern biblical scholarship. (3) SN 220 Hispanic Literature Designed to develop ability to read Hispanic literary texts; to acquaint students with a selection of major Hispanic authors; to introduce basic concepts of literary analysis; to increase students’ ability to speak and understand Spanish through class discussions in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 200 or equivalent. (3) This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had exceptional high school preparation (4-5 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 9 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Oral Expression (Choose ONE Course)

FR 100 French Language and Culture I Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of Frenchspeaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French. (3) FR 120 French Language and Culture II Continued study of the culture of French-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French. Prerequisite: FR 100 or equivalent. (3) Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Language Retroactive Credit policy. FR 200 French Language and Culture III Continued study of French language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Prerequisite: FR 120 or equivalent. (3) This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in French (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy. GN 100 German Language and Culture I Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of Germanspeaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German. (3) GN 120 German Language and Culture II Continued study of the German-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German. Prerequisite: GN 100 or equivalent. (3) Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit Policy. GN 200 German Language and Culture III Continued study of German language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Prerequisite: GN 120 or equivalent. (3) This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in German (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

SC 105 Fundamentals of Oral Communication The development of proficiency in oral communication through the study of rhetorical theories, principles, and strategies. (3) SC 155 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication Consideration of the elementary principles involved in effective person to person communication. (3) SN 100 Spanish Language and Culture I Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of Spanishspeaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish. (3) SN 120 Spanish Language and Culture II Continued study of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 100 or equivalent. (3) Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Language Retroactive Credit policy. SN 200 Spanish Language and Culture III Continued study of Spanish language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. Prerequisite: SN 120 or equivalent. (3) This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in Spanish (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy. SW 121 Helping Skills for the Human Services This course emphasizes the development of competence in interpersonal communication through the study of verbal communication principles and strategies, helping strategies, and the influence of gender and culture on communication. (3)

Written Expression EN 140 Rhetoric and Critical Thinking Focus on effective written expression in the context of a liberal education; emphasis upon critical thinking and the research paper. Prerequisite: EN 100 or advanced placement. (3)

Perspectives on Natural Systems Behavioral Systems

PY 151 Social Decision-Making Concepts, theories, and research that contribute to understanding, analyzing and evaluating people’s thinking and behavior in social psychological interactions. (3) PY 220 Psychological Development Across the Life Span Broad overview of human development across the life-span. Reciprocal nature of the individual/ environment interaction is emphasized. (3) PY 222 Development of the Adolescent The basic physical, cognitive, social and personality development of the adolescent period will be examined. Efforts will be made to understand current issues affecting adolescence in light of recent empirical and theoretical knowledge. (3)

Living Systems (Choose ONE Course)

BI 151 Biological Reasoning Use of scientific reasoning and evidence from various biological disciplines to test hypotheses about the common ancestry of organisms. (3) BS 103 Human Biology Emphasis on human cell, tissue, and organ system function. Discussions focus on a systems approach to human health and disease. Does not count on any major or minor in Biology Department. Prerequisite: SW 110 or equivalent. (3) BS 105 Environmental Biology Discussion of biological principles with application to environmental issues. (3) BS 107 Investigations in Biology Biological processes will be used to provide experience in scientific investigation and discussion of its implications and limitations. (3) BS 108 Biology for Living To acquaint students with and help them to understand some of the fundamental biological processes and problems which confront living organisms. (3) BS 218 Biological Science: A Process Approach This course applies scientific thought to structure, function, energetics, and ecology of living systems. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: BS 118; PH 218. (3) FN 235 Nutrition for Health This course examines, analyzes, and evaluates the relationships between the science of nutrition, health and well being. (3)

(Choose ONE Course)

Logical Systems

AN 100 Foundations of Human Behavior: Sex/Aggression Examines biological and cultural foundations of sex and aggression, with an emphasis on critical examination of the popular media. (3) HL 120 Health Perspectives Health topics with wide-ranging importance are examined. Issues are examined from various perspectives with special emphasis on the influence that individual health behavior decisions have on personal, societal and global health status. (3) PY 101 Psychological Perspectives on Human Behavior Examination of human behavior and experience from a psychological perspective. Application of psychological principles to understanding of human behavior. (3) PY/CF 120 The Child: Development/ Conception to Adolescence An overview of the social, cognitive, physical and emotional changes that occur from conception to adolescence. Application of principles of development to the understanding of child development and behavior. (3)

MA 118 Mathematics I Introduction to problem solving strategies, sets, whole numbers and their operations and properties, number theory, numeration systems, computer usage, and the historical significance and applications of these topics in the K-9 mathematics curriculum. Prerequisites: Credit for MA 101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. Declared education major in elementary, early childhood, exceptional child, middle school, or secondary mathematics or human environmental studies: child development option major. (3) MA 123 Survey of Mathematics A sampling of topics which mixes mathematics history, its mathematicians, and its problems with a variety of real-life applications. Prerequisites: Credit for MA 101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. (3)

(Choose ONE Course)

MA 134 College Algebra Functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, binomial theorem. Prerequisite: Credit for MA 101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. (3) MA 155 Statistical Reasoning Course will introduce statistical ideas to students. The student will reach an understanding of these statistical ideas, be able to deal critically with statistical arguments, and gain an understanding of the impact of statistical ideas on public policy and in other areas of academic study. Prerequisite: Credit for MA 101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. (3) PL 120 Symbolic Logic I A formal study of argument and inference, emphasizing the application of symbolic techniques to ordinary language. (3) Reminder: In order to receive a degree from Southeast, student must receive credit for MA 101/102 and pass the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, OR score at the appropriate level on placement tests to have the course(s) waived. This requirement should be completed before attempting any course in the Logical Systems category. This requirement applies to all students regardless of major selected. (See “Graduation Requirements” in the University Bulletin).

Physical Systems (Choose ONE Course)

CH 180 Chemistry in Our World The principles governing the systematic behavior of matter, with applications to life and living. One may not receive credit for both CH 180 and CH 181. Two lectures and three hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: MA 101 and or MA 102; completion of high school chemistry is recommended. (3) CH 181 Basic Principles of Chemistry A one semester survey of the fundamental principles and systematic behavior of matter. Four lecture plus two lab hours. One may not receive credit for both CH 181 and CH 185. Pre or co-requisite: MA 101 and or MA 102. (5) CH 185/005/085 General Chemistry I A study of atomic structure, chemical bonding, properties of matter and chemical reactions. Initial course in general chemistry sequence. Three lecture hours (CH 185), one recitation hour (CH 005), two lab hours (CH 085) must be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: MA 101 and/or MA 102. (5) GO 150/050 Earth Science: Environmental Hazards An examination of Earth’s systems, how they work, and how they relate to people, with emphasis on natural and man-made hazards to society. Two lectures, one lab per week. (3) PH 106 Physical Concepts An introduction to the concepts and principles governing the natural physical world and their relation to society. Emphasis on developing an appreciation for the role of science in our life. Does not count on a major or minor. (3) PH 109 Exploring the Universe An examination of the physical nature of planets, stars and galaxies, their interrelationships and evolutionary processes. Emphasis on the role of scientific inquiry in our present understanding of the Universe. (3) PH 120 Introductory Physics I Concepts and principles of natural phenomena, including geometric optics, mechanics, work and energy, and rotational motion, with emphasis on the investigative processes. Three lectures and 2 two-hour labs. Prerequisites: MA 133 and MA 134 or equivalent. (5)

PH 218 Physical Science: A Process Approach Major topics include atomic structure, elements and compounds, chemical reactions, mechanics and energy concepts of heat, light, sound, electricity and magnetism. Does not count for a physics major or minor. Prerequisite: BS 118. (3)

Perspectives on Human Institutions Development of a Major Civilization (Choose ONE Course)

EH 101 Early European Civilization Survey of the history of Early European Civilization from ancient times to the post-Columbian era. (3) EH 103 Modern European Civilization A survey of the history of European Civilization from the Old Regime to the present. (3) EH 115 Ancient Greece and Rome A study of the development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, their cultures, art, government, and religious beliefs. (3) WH 100 African Civilization A study of the development of African Civilization from ancient times to the present. (3) WH 125 Islamic Civilization A survey of the history of Islamic Civilization from the time of Muhammad until the present. (3) WH 130 Latin American Civilization A survey of Latin American civilization from Pre-Columbian times to the present with emphasis on the mixture of cultures and the struggle for modernity, including an examination of cultural, social,economic and political forces which have shaped Latin American Civilization. (3) US 105 American History I A study of the history of the United States from colonial beginnings to 1900. (3) US 107 American History II A study of the history of the United States from 1900 to the present. (3)

Economic Systems (Choose ONE Course)

AG 201 World Food and Society Food production and distribution in the advancement of societies in developed and developing countries. (3) EC 101 Economic Problems and Policies An introduction to the domestic and international economic problems facing the United States today and an analysis if the policies designed to alleviate these problems. (3) EC 215 Principles of Microeconomics U. S. market economic system. Demand, supply, competition, pricing, resource allocation concepts applied to issues in business, labor, and public policy. Prerequisites: AD 101 or BA 100 with a minimum grade of ‘C’ or IE 102; MA 134 or equivalent. (3) FE 200 Family Resource Management A study of basic family management concepts and decision making within the context of the family system. Emphasis is placed on application in the management of human and economic resources in achieving goals. (3) MN 220 Engineering Economic Analysis Engineering economic topics include the effects of the time-value of money, concepts of equivalence, replacement analysis, cost/benefit analysis, tax consequences and cost of capital depreciation related to a manufacturing or engineering environment. Prerequisite: MA 134. (3)

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Political Systems (Choose ONE Course)

PS 103 United States Political Systems Institutions and processes of national and state government, including an analysis of the United States and Missouri Constitutions. (3) PS 104 Comparative Political Systems The institutions, cultures and practices of democratic and nondemocratic governments, including the United States, and an analysis of the Missouri Constitution. (3)

Social Systems (Choose ONE Course)

AN 101 Observing Other Cultures Students will learn and apply scientific methods of observing cultural and social behavior. Provides foundation for anthropological study of culture. (3) CD 110 Language and Culture of the Deaf A study of the history and culture of the deaf, including an introduction to Signed English designed to enable students to communicate with and develop a basic understanding of persons in the deaf community. (3) CF 102 Relationships in the 21st Century Insights into relating to others through the framework of dating, committed relationships, family and friends. (3) GG 150 People and Places of the World Spatial treatment of ethnic diversity of the world’s macro cultures (e.g. Europe) and contemporary social problems associated with economic development. (3) GG 180 Cultural Geography Study of the interrelationship of the components of human cultures, i.e., belief, social and material systems. Emphasis on social geographic principles and issues. (3)

Student Financial Services

MC 101 Mass Communication and Society An examination of the media in the United States, emphasizing what impact they have upon society. (3) PE 201 Sport and Society The study of interrelationships between society, culture, values and sport, and the ways in which they influence one another. (3) PL 245 Social Philosophy A study of basic concepts theories and issues in the organization of society, with attention to the problems of justice and economic distribution. (3) RC 100 Leisure in a Diverse Culture Study of leisure and its impact on contemporary culture, diverse populations, and the lives of individuals. (3) RS 101 World Religions A study of major world religions, including an examination of various definitions and characteristics of religion as exemplified in the histories of religions and their impact on societies. (3) SE 275/ EL 274 Diversity in America’s Schools Exploration of race, ethnicity, social class, and gender issues in schooling today. (3) SO 102 Society, Culture and Social Behavior A series of lectures, projects and group discussions analyzing the impact of society and culture on human social behavior. (3) SO 120 Cities and Society An analysis of urbanization, including city life and problems, land use patterns and the future of the city. (3 SW 207 Understanding Social and Cultural Diversity This course explores knowledge, understanding, affirmation and respect for people from diverse backgrounds within their cultural contexts at the interpersonal level. (3)

To access your student account online:

6

UI 342 Modern Political Thought* UI 343 Transcultural Experience* UI 344 Plants and Humanity* UI 345 Nonverbal Communication* UI 350 Middle East Politics* UI 352 Medical Ethics* UI 354 Lifestyle Enhancement* UI 355 Consumer and the Market* UI 368 Mind, Meaning and Value* UI 371 Government and Business* UI 372 Earthquakes and Society* UI 375 European Film* UI 382 History and Philosophy of American Mass Media UI 384 History of the Musical UI 387 Environmental Law and Public Policy* *See Handbook online for pre requisite 400-Level Senior Seminar Courses UI 400 Business and Ethics* UI 401 American Cultural Landscapes: Regional Architecture and Settlement Systems*

Incidental Fees

General Fees

Tech/Maint Fees

Total

Hours

Incidental Fees

General Fees

Total

1

$119.00

$5.00

$8.50

$132.50

1

$188.80

$23.70

$212.50

238.00

10.00

17.00

265.00

2

377.60

47.40

425.00

►►Double click on “Self Service” link

15.00

25.50

397.50

3

566.40

71.10

637.50

►►Select “Student”

4

476.00

20.00

34.00

530.00

4

755.20

94.80

850.00

944.00

118.50

1,062.50

►►Select “Student Records”

5

595.00

25.00

42.50

662.50

5

►►Select “Account Summary”

6

714.00

30.00

51.00

795.00

6

1,132.80

142.20

1,275.00

Other options available from the Account Summary menu include Installment Payment Plan setup, access to account detail from current and prior semesters, and Direct Deposit setup/ adjustments for student refunds.

Billing and Payment Information Fall billing statements are mailed the first week of July and are typically due in early August. Spring billing statements are mailed the first week of December and are typically due in early January. The first bill of the semester is always mailed to the student’s permanent address. All subsequent bills are mailed to the student’s local or temporary address (including the on campus address, if applicable); unless a billing address has been specified in writing or updated online through the Southeast portal (Students tab/Personal Information).

500-Level Senior Seminar Courses UI 500 History of the English Language (See Handbook online for pre requisite) UI 501 Principles of Language

Hours

357.00

window will open

UI 402 Music and World Cultures* UI 410 Manufacturing Research in a Global Society* UI 412 American Health Care Systems & Issues* UI 416 Planetary Exploration* UI 422 Scientific Reasoning* UI 425 Persuasion* UI 427 Service and Community UI 429 Environmental Ethics* UI 430 Aging Successfully: Critical Issues Facing the Individual in the 21st Century* UI 432 Shakespeare’s History Plays & Comedies & the Human Condition* UI 435 Literature of Sport UI 438 The Nature and Growth of Mathematical Thought *See Handbook online for pre requisite

Upper Level South Campuses (300+)

2

►►Click on “Account Summary” button – a new

Transfer students (who have 24 or more college credit hours, not including dual-credit hours) have the option of attending a Transfer Student orientation or making their own advising appointment. Transfer students will work with their academic advisor to schedule their classes. Listed below are the 300-, 400- and 500-level University Studies courses. Academic advisors will assist students with pre-requisite information.

Lower Level South Campuses (001-299)

3

►►Select the Students tab

Transfer Student Information University Studies 300-Level Courses IU 300 Cyberlaw IU 301 Historical Perspective: American Agriculture* IU 304 Gender and Intimacy* IU 305 Entrepreneurship UI 300 Drugs and Behavior UI 301 Managerial Communication Processes UI 308 Cultural and Physical Landscapes of the World* UI 309 Crime and Human Behavior* UI 310 The American Musical Experience* UI 317 Human Sexuality* UI 318 Earth Science: A Process Approach UI 319 Science, Technology and Society* UI 320 The Modern Presidency UI 330 Experimental Methods in Physics and Engineering I* UI 331 Biochemistry I* UI 332 Images of Women in Literature* UI 336 Religion in America* UI 337 Issues in Modern Architecture* UI 339 North American Indians* UI 340 Housing Perspectives*

Fee Schedule Fall 2010 • Spring 2011 • Summer 2011

Student Accounts Academic Hall 123 Phone: 651-2253 Fax: 651-5006 sfs@semo.edu www.semo.edu/financing/index.htm

Southeast accepts payment by cash, check, money order or credit card (MasterCard, Visa, or Discover). Payments can be mailed, made in person, by phone for debit or credit card payments, check payments on-line through the Southeast portal, or placed in the drop box at the Cashier’s Office in Academic Hall. You may make an online payment (with your checking account) at http://portal.semo.edu by logging in with your SE key and password.

Installment Payment Plan Information For your convenience, Southeast offers an Installment Payment Plan (IPP). IPPs are arranged through Student Financial Services, and can be set up online when making your first payment of the semester. IPP information is included with the first billing statement of the fall and spring semesters. The IPP is not available for summer. These options are available online through the My Southeast Portal for the students to choose, including the ability to review a “pre-calculation” screen prior to selecting and enrolling in that option. Enrollment in the IPP is required for each semester. Students may also sign up for one of the payment options by indicating their choice on their Statement of Account and Class Schedule (billing statement) and returning it along with the appropriate payment, by the payment due date.

7

833.00

35.00

59.50

927.50

7

1,321.60

165.90

1,487.50

8

952.00

40.00

68.00

1,060.00

8

1,510.40

189.60

1,700.00

9

1,071.00

45.00

76.50

1,192.50

9

1,699.20

213.30

1,912.50

1,888.00

237.00

2,125.00

10

1,190.00

50.00

85.00

1,325.00

10

11

1,309.00

55.00

93.50

1,457.50

11

2,076.80

260.70

2,337.50

12

1,428.00

60.00

102.00

1,590.00

12

2,265.60

284.40

2,550.00

13

1,547.00

65.00

110.50

1,722.50

13

2,454.40

308.10

2,762.50

14

1,666.00

70.00

119.00

1,855.00

14

2,643.20

331.80

2,975.00

2,832.00

355.50

3,187.50

15

1,785.00

75.00

127.50

1,987.50

15

16

1,904.00

80.00

136.00

2,120.00

16

3,020.80

379.20

3,400.00

3,209.60

402.90

3,612.50

3,398.40

426.60

3,825.00

17

2,023.00

85.00

144.50

2,252.50

17

18

2,142.00

90.00

153.00

2,385.00

18

Textbook Rental–per UG course Application for Admission

30.00

Installment Payment Plan –2 Pmts

15.00

Installment Payment Plan –3 Pmts

20.00

Installment Payment Plan –4 Pmts

25.00

ITV Fee

**Special Course Fees may apply. Please see detailed listing online: http://www.semo.edu/ pdf/sfs/SFS_FY09SpecialCourseFees_2008.pdf

$23.86

Students should refer to the Southeast Web site www.semo.edu/cs/financing/fees.htm for additional fees and current policies.

5.50 per credit hour

Web/Webinar Fee

***All fees and financial policies are subject to change by the Board of Regents without prior notice.

12.50 per credit hour

Installment Payment Plan (IPP) Due Dates 2 Payments

Aug./Jan. 3*

Sept./Feb. 20*

N/A

N/A

3 Payments

Aug./Jan. 3*

Sept./Feb. 20*

Oct./March 20*

N/A

4 Payments

Aug./Jan. 3*

Sept./Feb. 20*

Oct./March 20*

Nov./April 20*

*Estimated Dates Non Refundable Enrollment Fee 2 Payments: $15.00

3 Payments: $20.00

4 Payments: $25.00

7


Political Systems (Choose ONE Course)

PS 103 United States Political Systems Institutions and processes of national and state government, including an analysis of the United States and Missouri Constitutions. (3) PS 104 Comparative Political Systems The institutions, cultures and practices of democratic and nondemocratic governments, including the United States, and an analysis of the Missouri Constitution. (3)

Social Systems (Choose ONE Course)

AN 101 Observing Other Cultures Students will learn and apply scientific methods of observing cultural and social behavior. Provides foundation for anthropological study of culture. (3) CD 110 Language and Culture of the Deaf A study of the history and culture of the deaf, including an introduction to Signed English designed to enable students to communicate with and develop a basic understanding of persons in the deaf community. (3) CF 102 Relationships in the 21st Century Insights into relating to others through the framework of dating, committed relationships, family and friends. (3) GG 150 People and Places of the World Spatial treatment of ethnic diversity of the world’s macro cultures (e.g. Europe) and contemporary social problems associated with economic development. (3) GG 180 Cultural Geography Study of the interrelationship of the components of human cultures, i.e., belief, social and material systems. Emphasis on social geographic principles and issues. (3)

Student Financial Services

MC 101 Mass Communication and Society An examination of the media in the United States, emphasizing what impact they have upon society. (3) PE 201 Sport and Society The study of interrelationships between society, culture, values and sport, and the ways in which they influence one another. (3) PL 245 Social Philosophy A study of basic concepts theories and issues in the organization of society, with attention to the problems of justice and economic distribution. (3) RC 100 Leisure in a Diverse Culture Study of leisure and its impact on contemporary culture, diverse populations, and the lives of individuals. (3) RS 101 World Religions A study of major world religions, including an examination of various definitions and characteristics of religion as exemplified in the histories of religions and their impact on societies. (3) SE 275/ EL 274 Diversity in America’s Schools Exploration of race, ethnicity, social class, and gender issues in schooling today. (3) SO 102 Society, Culture and Social Behavior A series of lectures, projects and group discussions analyzing the impact of society and culture on human social behavior. (3) SO 120 Cities and Society An analysis of urbanization, including city life and problems, land use patterns and the future of the city. (3 SW 207 Understanding Social and Cultural Diversity This course explores knowledge, understanding, affirmation and respect for people from diverse backgrounds within their cultural contexts at the interpersonal level. (3)

To access your student account online:

6

UI 342 Modern Political Thought* UI 343 Transcultural Experience* UI 344 Plants and Humanity* UI 345 Nonverbal Communication* UI 350 Middle East Politics* UI 352 Medical Ethics* UI 354 Lifestyle Enhancement* UI 355 Consumer and the Market* UI 368 Mind, Meaning and Value* UI 371 Government and Business* UI 372 Earthquakes and Society* UI 375 European Film* UI 382 History and Philosophy of American Mass Media UI 384 History of the Musical UI 387 Environmental Law and Public Policy* *See Handbook online for pre requisite 400-Level Senior Seminar Courses UI 400 Business and Ethics* UI 401 American Cultural Landscapes: Regional Architecture and Settlement Systems*

Incidental Fees

General Fees

Tech/Maint Fees

Total

Hours

Incidental Fees

General Fees

Total

1

$119.00

$5.00

$8.50

$132.50

1

$188.80

$23.70

$212.50

238.00

10.00

17.00

265.00

2

377.60

47.40

425.00

►►Double click on “Self Service” link

15.00

25.50

397.50

3

566.40

71.10

637.50

►►Select “Student”

4

476.00

20.00

34.00

530.00

4

755.20

94.80

850.00

944.00

118.50

1,062.50

►►Select “Student Records”

5

595.00

25.00

42.50

662.50

5

►►Select “Account Summary”

6

714.00

30.00

51.00

795.00

6

1,132.80

142.20

1,275.00

Other options available from the Account Summary menu include Installment Payment Plan setup, access to account detail from current and prior semesters, and Direct Deposit setup/ adjustments for student refunds.

Billing and Payment Information Fall billing statements are mailed the first week of July and are typically due in early August. Spring billing statements are mailed the first week of December and are typically due in early January. The first bill of the semester is always mailed to the student’s permanent address. All subsequent bills are mailed to the student’s local or temporary address (including the on campus address, if applicable); unless a billing address has been specified in writing or updated online through the Southeast portal (Students tab/Personal Information).

500-Level Senior Seminar Courses UI 500 History of the English Language (See Handbook online for pre requisite) UI 501 Principles of Language

Hours

357.00

window will open

UI 402 Music and World Cultures* UI 410 Manufacturing Research in a Global Society* UI 412 American Health Care Systems & Issues* UI 416 Planetary Exploration* UI 422 Scientific Reasoning* UI 425 Persuasion* UI 427 Service and Community UI 429 Environmental Ethics* UI 430 Aging Successfully: Critical Issues Facing the Individual in the 21st Century* UI 432 Shakespeare’s History Plays & Comedies & the Human Condition* UI 435 Literature of Sport UI 438 The Nature and Growth of Mathematical Thought *See Handbook online for pre requisite

Upper Level South Campuses (300+)

2

►►Click on “Account Summary” button – a new

Transfer students (who have 24 or more college credit hours, not including dual-credit hours) have the option of attending a Transfer Student orientation or making their own advising appointment. Transfer students will work with their academic advisor to schedule their classes. Listed below are the 300-, 400- and 500-level University Studies courses. Academic advisors will assist students with pre-requisite information.

Lower Level South Campuses (001-299)

3

►►Select the Students tab

Transfer Student Information University Studies 300-Level Courses IU 300 Cyberlaw IU 301 Historical Perspective: American Agriculture* IU 304 Gender and Intimacy* IU 305 Entrepreneurship UI 300 Drugs and Behavior UI 301 Managerial Communication Processes UI 308 Cultural and Physical Landscapes of the World* UI 309 Crime and Human Behavior* UI 310 The American Musical Experience* UI 317 Human Sexuality* UI 318 Earth Science: A Process Approach UI 319 Science, Technology and Society* UI 320 The Modern Presidency UI 330 Experimental Methods in Physics and Engineering I* UI 331 Biochemistry I* UI 332 Images of Women in Literature* UI 336 Religion in America* UI 337 Issues in Modern Architecture* UI 339 North American Indians* UI 340 Housing Perspectives*

Fee Schedule Fall 2010 • Spring 2011 • Summer 2011

Student Accounts Academic Hall 123 Phone: 651-2253 Fax: 651-5006 sfs@semo.edu www.semo.edu/financing/index.htm

Southeast accepts payment by cash, check, money order or credit card (MasterCard, Visa, or Discover). Payments can be mailed, made in person, by phone for debit or credit card payments, check payments on-line through the Southeast portal, or placed in the drop box at the Cashier’s Office in Academic Hall. You may make an online payment (with your checking account) at http://portal.semo.edu by logging in with your SE key and password.

Installment Payment Plan Information For your convenience, Southeast offers an Installment Payment Plan (IPP). IPPs are arranged through Student Financial Services, and can be set up online when making your first payment of the semester. IPP information is included with the first billing statement of the fall and spring semesters. The IPP is not available for summer. These options are available online through the My Southeast Portal for the students to choose, including the ability to review a “pre-calculation” screen prior to selecting and enrolling in that option. Enrollment in the IPP is required for each semester. Students may also sign up for one of the payment options by indicating their choice on their Statement of Account and Class Schedule (billing statement) and returning it along with the appropriate payment, by the payment due date.

7

833.00

35.00

59.50

927.50

7

1,321.60

165.90

1,487.50

8

952.00

40.00

68.00

1,060.00

8

1,510.40

189.60

1,700.00

9

1,071.00

45.00

76.50

1,192.50

9

1,699.20

213.30

1,912.50

1,888.00

237.00

2,125.00

10

1,190.00

50.00

85.00

1,325.00

10

11

1,309.00

55.00

93.50

1,457.50

11

2,076.80

260.70

2,337.50

12

1,428.00

60.00

102.00

1,590.00

12

2,265.60

284.40

2,550.00

13

1,547.00

65.00

110.50

1,722.50

13

2,454.40

308.10

2,762.50

14

1,666.00

70.00

119.00

1,855.00

14

2,643.20

331.80

2,975.00

2,832.00

355.50

3,187.50

15

1,785.00

75.00

127.50

1,987.50

15

16

1,904.00

80.00

136.00

2,120.00

16

3,020.80

379.20

3,400.00

3,209.60

402.90

3,612.50

3,398.40

426.60

3,825.00

17

2,023.00

85.00

144.50

2,252.50

17

18

2,142.00

90.00

153.00

2,385.00

18

Textbook Rental–per UG course Application for Admission

30.00

Installment Payment Plan –2 Pmts

15.00

Installment Payment Plan –3 Pmts

20.00

Installment Payment Plan –4 Pmts

25.00

ITV Fee

**Special Course Fees may apply. Please see detailed listing online: http://www.semo.edu/ pdf/sfs/SFS_FY09SpecialCourseFees_2008.pdf

$23.86

Students should refer to the Southeast Web site www.semo.edu/cs/financing/fees.htm for additional fees and current policies.

5.50 per credit hour

Web/Webinar Fee

***All fees and financial policies are subject to change by the Board of Regents without prior notice.

12.50 per credit hour

Installment Payment Plan (IPP) Due Dates 2 Payments

Aug./Jan. 3*

Sept./Feb. 20*

N/A

N/A

3 Payments

Aug./Jan. 3*

Sept./Feb. 20*

Oct./March 20*

N/A

4 Payments

Aug./Jan. 3*

Sept./Feb. 20*

Oct./March 20*

Nov./April 20*

*Estimated Dates Non Refundable Enrollment Fee 2 Payments: $15.00

3 Payments: $20.00

4 Payments: $25.00

7


Additionally, the IPP will calculate ALL CURRENT SEMESTER CHARGES for the installment amounts. The first payment of each plan will include the first installment, plus associated costs to enroll in the specific plan, plus any prior semester charges (if applicable). Past due charges cannot be placed on the IPP but must be paid on or before the time the IPP enrollment is submitted. Students will be sent monthly billing statements for the installments due, plus any additional charges that may have recalculated their amount due. Payments must be received and receipted by the end of business on the due dates. Failure to make payments on time will result in assessment of late fees and possible class cancellation. Please contact Student Financial Services Office with any questions.

Financial Probation/ Suspension/Withdrawal If a student’s account is past due, the student may be placed on “financial probation.” If the account is not brought current by the probation deadline, the student may be placed on “financial suspension.” If placed on “financial suspension,” they will not be allowed to attend classes, take exams, or participate in University sanctioned events. When, after University efforts to notify the student of financial suspension, the student does not take appropriate action to pay delinquent charges, the student may be administratively withdrawn from the University.

Refund Information Students can withdraw from the University or drop specific classes using the web registration system, until the published “Last Day to Drop a Class.” After that date, students must contact the Office of the Registrar. The effective date of the withdrawal/dropped class is the date the class or classes are deleted from the student’s record. If dropping a class online, be sure to complete the transaction and review your schedule to make certain the class is dropped.

Based on the withdrawal/dropped class effective date, the following refund schedules for fees will apply: Sixteen-Week Sessions (Fall/Spring) Percentage of Fee Refunded Through the first week of the semester Second week of the semester Third week of the semester Fourth week of the semester After the fourth week of the semester Six & Eight-Week Sessions (Fall/Spring/Summer)

Percentage of Fee Refunded

Through the first week of the session Through the first day of the second week Remainder of the second week of the session After the second week of the session Four-Week Sessions (Summer)

100% 70% 50% 0%

Percentage of Fee Refunded

Through the first two days of the session Remainder of the first week of the session After the first week of the session

100% 50% 0%

For additional information regarding refunds and withdrawals, please visit: www.semo.edu/cs/financing/refunds.htm

Direct Deposit Program All credit balance refunds on student accounts are eligible for direct deposit. A refund resulting from excess student Financial Aid or overpayment of your student account will be transferred automatically to the student’s checking or savings account. The Direct Deposit bank account information will remain on your account until you have removed it. If you change account numbers or close your account, you must contact Student Financial Services in writing or update/stop your direct deposit bank account information online through your Account Summary on the portal Web site at portal.semo.edu.

For students withdrawing from all classes, Student Financial Services will refund fees approximately three weeks after the withdrawal is processed. A “Request for Refund of Credit Balance” form, available at the Student Financial Services Office, MUST be completed by the student fully withdrawing to initiate the processing of a refund check. All balances due to the University as a result of other obligations will be deducted from the amount to be refunded. Any remaining balance due the student will be mailed to the student’s permanent address.

Southeast e-mail Notifications

Southeast Missouri State University complies with Federal regulations regarding refunds on student accounts having Federal Title IV program funds applied to the account. Federal regulations mandate the amount and order of Federal Title IV funds that must be returned to the student’s lender (in the case of a student loan) or to the Pell Grant or the Perkins loan when a student withdraws from the University. In some cases, the mandated return of Federal Title IV funds to the student’s lender, Pell Grant or Perkins loan will leave an unpaid balance on the student’s account, for which the student is responsible.

Questions?

Student Financial Services will send important information and/or warning notices to your Southeast e-mail account. Failure to check your University assigned e-mail account can cause vital information to be missed. ***Please be sure to check your University student e-mail account on a regular basis.***

General Billing Information Student Financial Services 573-651-2253 www.semo.edu/cs* sfs@semo.edu

Financial Aid

Student Financial Services 573-651-2253 www.semo.edu/cs* sfs@semo.edu

Class Schedule

Registrar’s Office 573-651-2250 www.semo.edu/registrar registrar@semo.edu

8

100% 70% 60% 50% 0%

Housing Assignment Residence Life 573-651-2274 www.semo.edu/housing residencelife@semo.edu

Parking Permit

Financial Aid

Department of Public Safety 573-651-2310 www5.semo.edu/dps dps@semo.edu

Academic Hall 123 Phone: 651-2253 Fax: 651-5006 sfs@semo.edu www6.semo.edu/sfs Federal School Code: 002501

Student Insurance

Financial Aid Basics

Student Assurance Svcs Insurance Company 800-328-2739 www.sas-mn.com

Unsure of what department you need? Campus Switchboard 573-651-2000 www.semo.edu/atoz/index.asp *click on “Financing Your Education”

The most important form to complete for financial aid consideration is the FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA). This is an online application. If you are unable to complete the form on-line you may request a paper copy by contacting the Department of Education at 1-800-433-3243. The FAFSA, available on the Internet (FAFSA on the Web – www.fafsa.ed.gov) is required in order to receive any type of federal financial aid, many types of state aid, as well as some types of institutional aid. Results of the 2010-2011 FAFSA, sent to you as a Student Aid Report (SAR) and to the school electronically, will be used by our office to determine your eligibility for various federal aid programs for the fall 2010, spring 2011, and summer 2011 semesters. Even if you do not qualify for any grant programs, you may still be eligible for financial aid in the form of student loans, parent loans, and/or work. For many students, federal and state programs offer the largest pool of aid money.

Federal Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (National Smart Grant) – a grant program

for Pell eligible, full-time undergraduate students in their third and fourth year of college who are majoring in physical, life or computer sciences, mathematics, technology, or engineering or in a foreign language deemed critical to national security. A minimum 3.0 GPA is required. These awards are up to $4000 per year. The 2010-2011 academic year is the last year this program will be available.

Teach Grant – a federal grant beginning fall 2008 for students pursuing a baccalaureate or masters degree in Education. The FAFSA is required. This grant requires a service obligation to teach full-time as a highly qualified teacher in a high-need field for at least four years after completing the eligible program. Failure to meet the service obligation results in the total grant becoming a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan. Maximum grant awards range from $1000 for less than half-time enrollment to $4000 for full-time enrollment. Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) – as its name

Federal and state governments are not the only sources of financial assistance. For example, Southeast maintains a variety of scholarship programs. Information and applications for these scholarships are available through the Student Financial Services office and on-line at www.semo.edu/ financing/index.htm. Also, there are a large number of local and regional scholarships available to qualified students. Qualifications for scholarships may require that the recipient demonstrate financial need as determined by the FAFSA or at least have a completed FAFSA on file with the institution. Some good reference sources for locating scholarships and other aid programs are your high school, local businesses or organizations, books and magazines available at many bookstores or your local library, and various Web sites on the Internet.

Stafford Loans (subsidized and unsubsidized) and Parent Loans (PLUS). These loans are low-interest and have a 10year repayment option. Your FAFSA information along with other financial aid eligibility determines what kind of loan you are eligible to receive.

Federal Pell Grant – the most widely known

Federal Perkins Loan – a low interest

grant program. This form of aid is need-based and is determined by your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) as calculated by the FAFSA information you supply. For the 2009-2010 academic year the maximum award is $5350. The U.S. Department of Education estimates the maximum Pell Grant for 2010-2011 will be $5550.

Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) – a grant program for first- and second-

year undergraduate students. Only students graduating from high school after January 1, 2005 can be considered. This grant is in addition to the student’s Federal Pell Grant. Awards are up to $750 for first-year students and up to $1300 for second-year students. Students must have successfully completed a rigorous high school program recognized by the Secretary of Education. Full-time enrollment is required and second-year students must have a 3.0 GPA. The 2010-2011 academic year is the last year this program will be available.

implies this is a supplemental grant program. This program is need-based and eligibility is usually limited to recipients of the Federal Pell Grant. Funding may not be sufficient to cover all eligible applicants. Priority will be given to those who apply early and meet all eligibility requirements. This grant is also determined by the EFC and the March 1 FAFSA application deadline is required for consideration.

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs – this program includes Federal

need-based loan funded by the federal government and administered through the institution. This program is for students with high need as determined by the FAFSA. Priority application deadline is March 1 each year.

Federal Work Study – a need-based employment program for students. There are two advantages for students who are eligible for the FWS program at Southeast: most departments on campus want to hire students who have been awarded FWS due to a break in the payroll costs to them; and students who work and earn FWS monies report those funds on the FAFSA the following year and the funds are then excluded from the calculation that determines the expected student contribution. This program has a FAFSA priority application deadline of March 1 each year.

Access Missouri Award – a state of Missouri grant available to Missouri residents who complete the FAFSA by April 1, 2010. Additionally students must be enrolled full-time, maintain satisfactory academic progress, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 and have an EFC of 12,000 or less. Awards for 2009-2010 ranged from $1000 to $1680. The Missouri Department of Higher Education determines initial eligibility and the maximum award amounts annually.

Tips for the Financial Aid Process ►►File your 2010-2011 FAFSA by March 1, 2010 for

priority processing and before May 1, 2010 to allow sufficient time to process aid prior to the first billing due date for the fall semester (usually August 1).

►►Read all mail sent or e-mailed to you from our office. Our

office will correspond with you through your Southeast e-mail account or through regular mail delivered via the U.S. Postal Service. Be sure to activate your e-mail account so you don’t miss important information. It may include information that could affect your aid eligibility. Additionally, it is important that Southeast has your current address at all times. Changes can be made on-line through My Southeast Self-Service or at the Registrars Office (573-651-2250). ►►Keep copies of your and your parents’ tax information

(including W-2s). Since approximately 30% of all students who apply for financial aid are chosen for verification, you may need to provide our office with this documentation. ►►Don’t assume that financial aid alone will cover your bill.

Financial aid is financial assistance and often will not cover your costs entirely. Be prepared to have some cash when you begin school in August. Refunds from your financial aid are often not available until the third or fourth week of the semester. ►►Be aware that the number of hours you take in a

semester may affect how much aid you are eligible to receive or continue to receive. Like other schools, we are required to make sure that you are making satisfactory progress if you are receiving financial aid. Read the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy provided with your financial aid award letter. ►►Understand that government/state regulations and

funding do change. This may mean small or large changes in the aid programs for which you are eligible. These changes are beyond our control; however, we will try to keep you informed. As stated previously, watch your e-mail for any updates that affect you. ►►Ask questions. Our office employs many highly

experienced people with extensive backgrounds in financial aid programs. They are here to help you through the process of applying and receiving aid. Also, if you receive conflicting information from other sources, make sure you contact us to get your situation resolved.

9


Additionally, the IPP will calculate ALL CURRENT SEMESTER CHARGES for the installment amounts. The first payment of each plan will include the first installment, plus associated costs to enroll in the specific plan, plus any prior semester charges (if applicable). Past due charges cannot be placed on the IPP but must be paid on or before the time the IPP enrollment is submitted. Students will be sent monthly billing statements for the installments due, plus any additional charges that may have recalculated their amount due. Payments must be received and receipted by the end of business on the due dates. Failure to make payments on time will result in assessment of late fees and possible class cancellation. Please contact Student Financial Services Office with any questions.

Financial Probation/ Suspension/Withdrawal If a student’s account is past due, the student may be placed on “financial probation.” If the account is not brought current by the probation deadline, the student may be placed on “financial suspension.” If placed on “financial suspension,” they will not be allowed to attend classes, take exams, or participate in University sanctioned events. When, after University efforts to notify the student of financial suspension, the student does not take appropriate action to pay delinquent charges, the student may be administratively withdrawn from the University.

Refund Information Students can withdraw from the University or drop specific classes using the web registration system, until the published “Last Day to Drop a Class.” After that date, students must contact the Office of the Registrar. The effective date of the withdrawal/dropped class is the date the class or classes are deleted from the student’s record. If dropping a class online, be sure to complete the transaction and review your schedule to make certain the class is dropped.

Based on the withdrawal/dropped class effective date, the following refund schedules for fees will apply: Sixteen-Week Sessions (Fall/Spring) Percentage of Fee Refunded Through the first week of the semester Second week of the semester Third week of the semester Fourth week of the semester After the fourth week of the semester Six & Eight-Week Sessions (Fall/Spring/Summer)

Percentage of Fee Refunded

Through the first week of the session Through the first day of the second week Remainder of the second week of the session After the second week of the session Four-Week Sessions (Summer)

100% 70% 50% 0%

Percentage of Fee Refunded

Through the first two days of the session Remainder of the first week of the session After the first week of the session

100% 50% 0%

For additional information regarding refunds and withdrawals, please visit: www.semo.edu/cs/financing/refunds.htm

Direct Deposit Program All credit balance refunds on student accounts are eligible for direct deposit. A refund resulting from excess student Financial Aid or overpayment of your student account will be transferred automatically to the student’s checking or savings account. The Direct Deposit bank account information will remain on your account until you have removed it. If you change account numbers or close your account, you must contact Student Financial Services in writing or update/stop your direct deposit bank account information online through your Account Summary on the portal Web site at portal.semo.edu.

For students withdrawing from all classes, Student Financial Services will refund fees approximately three weeks after the withdrawal is processed. A “Request for Refund of Credit Balance” form, available at the Student Financial Services Office, MUST be completed by the student fully withdrawing to initiate the processing of a refund check. All balances due to the University as a result of other obligations will be deducted from the amount to be refunded. Any remaining balance due the student will be mailed to the student’s permanent address.

Southeast e-mail Notifications

Southeast Missouri State University complies with Federal regulations regarding refunds on student accounts having Federal Title IV program funds applied to the account. Federal regulations mandate the amount and order of Federal Title IV funds that must be returned to the student’s lender (in the case of a student loan) or to the Pell Grant or the Perkins loan when a student withdraws from the University. In some cases, the mandated return of Federal Title IV funds to the student’s lender, Pell Grant or Perkins loan will leave an unpaid balance on the student’s account, for which the student is responsible.

Questions?

Student Financial Services will send important information and/or warning notices to your Southeast e-mail account. Failure to check your University assigned e-mail account can cause vital information to be missed. ***Please be sure to check your University student e-mail account on a regular basis.***

General Billing Information Student Financial Services 573-651-2253 www.semo.edu/cs* sfs@semo.edu

Financial Aid

Student Financial Services 573-651-2253 www.semo.edu/cs* sfs@semo.edu

Class Schedule

Registrar’s Office 573-651-2250 www.semo.edu/registrar registrar@semo.edu

8

100% 70% 60% 50% 0%

Housing Assignment Residence Life 573-651-2274 www.semo.edu/housing residencelife@semo.edu

Parking Permit

Financial Aid

Department of Public Safety 573-651-2310 www5.semo.edu/dps dps@semo.edu

Academic Hall 123 Phone: 651-2253 Fax: 651-5006 sfs@semo.edu www6.semo.edu/sfs Federal School Code: 002501

Student Insurance

Financial Aid Basics

Student Assurance Svcs Insurance Company 800-328-2739 www.sas-mn.com

Unsure of what department you need? Campus Switchboard 573-651-2000 www.semo.edu/atoz/index.asp *click on “Financing Your Education”

The most important form to complete for financial aid consideration is the FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA). This is an online application. If you are unable to complete the form on-line you may request a paper copy by contacting the Department of Education at 1-800-433-3243. The FAFSA, available on the Internet (FAFSA on the Web – www.fafsa.ed.gov) is required in order to receive any type of federal financial aid, many types of state aid, as well as some types of institutional aid. Results of the 2010-2011 FAFSA, sent to you as a Student Aid Report (SAR) and to the school electronically, will be used by our office to determine your eligibility for various federal aid programs for the fall 2010, spring 2011, and summer 2011 semesters. Even if you do not qualify for any grant programs, you may still be eligible for financial aid in the form of student loans, parent loans, and/or work. For many students, federal and state programs offer the largest pool of aid money.

Federal Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (National Smart Grant) – a grant program

for Pell eligible, full-time undergraduate students in their third and fourth year of college who are majoring in physical, life or computer sciences, mathematics, technology, or engineering or in a foreign language deemed critical to national security. A minimum 3.0 GPA is required. These awards are up to $4000 per year. The 2010-2011 academic year is the last year this program will be available.

Teach Grant – a federal grant beginning fall 2008 for students pursuing a baccalaureate or masters degree in Education. The FAFSA is required. This grant requires a service obligation to teach full-time as a highly qualified teacher in a high-need field for at least four years after completing the eligible program. Failure to meet the service obligation results in the total grant becoming a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan. Maximum grant awards range from $1000 for less than half-time enrollment to $4000 for full-time enrollment. Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) – as its name

Federal and state governments are not the only sources of financial assistance. For example, Southeast maintains a variety of scholarship programs. Information and applications for these scholarships are available through the Student Financial Services office and on-line at www.semo.edu/ financing/index.htm. Also, there are a large number of local and regional scholarships available to qualified students. Qualifications for scholarships may require that the recipient demonstrate financial need as determined by the FAFSA or at least have a completed FAFSA on file with the institution. Some good reference sources for locating scholarships and other aid programs are your high school, local businesses or organizations, books and magazines available at many bookstores or your local library, and various Web sites on the Internet.

Stafford Loans (subsidized and unsubsidized) and Parent Loans (PLUS). These loans are low-interest and have a 10year repayment option. Your FAFSA information along with other financial aid eligibility determines what kind of loan you are eligible to receive.

Federal Pell Grant – the most widely known

Federal Perkins Loan – a low interest

grant program. This form of aid is need-based and is determined by your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) as calculated by the FAFSA information you supply. For the 2009-2010 academic year the maximum award is $5350. The U.S. Department of Education estimates the maximum Pell Grant for 2010-2011 will be $5550.

Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) – a grant program for first- and second-

year undergraduate students. Only students graduating from high school after January 1, 2005 can be considered. This grant is in addition to the student’s Federal Pell Grant. Awards are up to $750 for first-year students and up to $1300 for second-year students. Students must have successfully completed a rigorous high school program recognized by the Secretary of Education. Full-time enrollment is required and second-year students must have a 3.0 GPA. The 2010-2011 academic year is the last year this program will be available.

implies this is a supplemental grant program. This program is need-based and eligibility is usually limited to recipients of the Federal Pell Grant. Funding may not be sufficient to cover all eligible applicants. Priority will be given to those who apply early and meet all eligibility requirements. This grant is also determined by the EFC and the March 1 FAFSA application deadline is required for consideration.

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs – this program includes Federal

need-based loan funded by the federal government and administered through the institution. This program is for students with high need as determined by the FAFSA. Priority application deadline is March 1 each year.

Federal Work Study – a need-based employment program for students. There are two advantages for students who are eligible for the FWS program at Southeast: most departments on campus want to hire students who have been awarded FWS due to a break in the payroll costs to them; and students who work and earn FWS monies report those funds on the FAFSA the following year and the funds are then excluded from the calculation that determines the expected student contribution. This program has a FAFSA priority application deadline of March 1 each year.

Access Missouri Award – a state of Missouri grant available to Missouri residents who complete the FAFSA by April 1, 2010. Additionally students must be enrolled full-time, maintain satisfactory academic progress, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 and have an EFC of 12,000 or less. Awards for 2009-2010 ranged from $1000 to $1680. The Missouri Department of Higher Education determines initial eligibility and the maximum award amounts annually.

Tips for the Financial Aid Process ►►File your 2010-2011 FAFSA by March 1, 2010 for

priority processing and before May 1, 2010 to allow sufficient time to process aid prior to the first billing due date for the fall semester (usually August 1).

►►Read all mail sent or e-mailed to you from our office. Our

office will correspond with you through your Southeast e-mail account or through regular mail delivered via the U.S. Postal Service. Be sure to activate your e-mail account so you don’t miss important information. It may include information that could affect your aid eligibility. Additionally, it is important that Southeast has your current address at all times. Changes can be made on-line through My Southeast Self-Service or at the Registrars Office (573-651-2250). ►►Keep copies of your and your parents’ tax information

(including W-2s). Since approximately 30% of all students who apply for financial aid are chosen for verification, you may need to provide our office with this documentation. ►►Don’t assume that financial aid alone will cover your bill.

Financial aid is financial assistance and often will not cover your costs entirely. Be prepared to have some cash when you begin school in August. Refunds from your financial aid are often not available until the third or fourth week of the semester. ►►Be aware that the number of hours you take in a

semester may affect how much aid you are eligible to receive or continue to receive. Like other schools, we are required to make sure that you are making satisfactory progress if you are receiving financial aid. Read the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy provided with your financial aid award letter. ►►Understand that government/state regulations and

funding do change. This may mean small or large changes in the aid programs for which you are eligible. These changes are beyond our control; however, we will try to keep you informed. As stated previously, watch your e-mail for any updates that affect you. ►►Ask questions. Our office employs many highly

experienced people with extensive backgrounds in financial aid programs. They are here to help you through the process of applying and receiving aid. Also, if you receive conflicting information from other sources, make sure you contact us to get your situation resolved.

9


Student Resources

Provides: ►►Advocacy to students and their rights ►►Support for initiatives designed to recruit and retain

students of color ►►Support and promotion of multiculturalism and diversity

Kent Library 651-2230 | http://library.semo.edu

What if I need help? You can get help from a librarian by e-mail, by phone, or by coming to the reference desk at the Cape Girardeau campus. You can also set up an individual appointment called a research consultation. Call (573) 651-2230 or visit http://library.semo.edu/learn/askus.shtml. You can also help yourself by using the interactive Library tutorial, Searchpath. Six different modules will take you through the research process, teaching you how to use the Library’s services and resources. Access Searchpath at http://library.semo.edu/searchpath/. A research guide is provided for each major on campus. These guides will lead you to the best databases and Web sites for your subject, and will show you how to look for books on that subject. Access them at http://library.semo.edu/learn/guides.asp. A special section of the Kent Library Web site is devoted to distance learners who take classes at Kennett, Malden, Sikeston, Perryville, online or at other Missouri locations. You will find tips and tricks for distance learners, as well as visuals to help you along at http://library.semo.edu/get/distance/index.shtml If you are experiencing extenuating circumstances that prohibit you from accessing or retrieving materials, please contact the reference desk to request special accommodations. Call (573) 651-2230 or visit http://library.semo.edu/learn/askus.shtml.

How can I check out books and videos/DVDs if I don’t come to the Cape Girardeau Campus? Items that are from Kent Library’s General Collection, the Instructional Materials Center and the Government Documents Collection can all be requested through the Kent Library Catalog. Once requested, items may be shipped to Kennett, Malden, Sikeston, Perryville, Three Rivers Community College or Mineral Area College. Videos and DVDs from our collection of over 11,000 items can also be requested and delivered. http://galahad.missouri.edu/search~S3.

Starting a project and need to get some background information? Kent Library subscribes to the Credo Reference and the Oxford Reference Collections. Between these two collections, you can find definitions, encyclopedia entries, illustrations, and biographies in over 500 reference books. These books are high quality and trustworthy, unlike many sites you may find on the Web. Kent Library also has Oxford Music Online and Oxford Art Online. These collections have definitions, biographies, images and sound clips. CQ Researcher and the Issues and Controversies database provide information about current issues. Use the Quick Facts & Reference Shelf webpage (http://library.semo.edu/find/quick_info.shtml) to start using these completely online resources.

Journal, Magazines & Newspapers Kent Library provides access to over 20,000 journals, magazines, and newspapers through our Library subscription databases. These databases include peerreviewed journals, which some professors may ask you to use in your research. Start at the Find Articles webpage (http://library.semo.edu/find/articles.asp) , select a database right for your topic, search for an article and print out the full text, all from your living room. To access the Library subscription databases, Southeast students will log in using Last Name and Southeast identification number + SEMO. Example: S012345678semo

Wrap it Up! Kent Library provides: ►►Personal help with finding information ►►Tutorials and guides to help you learn on your own ►►A collection that comes to you. Request books and

videos/DVDs ►►Fast book delivery from libraries across the state ►►Online book renewals ►►Background information from online reference

books and sites ►►Full-text articles from Library subscription databases that

you can print out at home

Student Transitions Memorial Hall 210 | 651-2579 | www.semo.edu/transitions

Southeast Missouri State University students may also request books that are in the MOBIUS system. MOBIUS is a group of public, college and university libraries across the state of Missouri who agree to share their book collection. http://mobius.missouri.edu/search

Student Transitions coordinates the University’s efforts to assist students at important transition points in their academic careers at Southeast, from immediately after admission to the University until post-graduation. The departments within Student Transitions include:

Can I do my research from home?

►►New Student Programs − coordinates First STEP

YES! You can do your research from home, the public library, an internet café – anywhere you can get an internet connection. As previously mentioned, you can use the Kent Library Catalog to find items in Kent Library, request them and have them delivered to a location near you. You can also access the MOBIUS catalog online and search millions of items to find a book that is right for you. You can even renew books online by using the View Your Record feature of the Kent Library Catalog (https://galahad.mobius.umsystem.edu/patroninfo).

10

orientation, Transfer Student orientation and Opening Week activities ►►Career Linkages − services include career assistance,

career exploration, career advising, resume/cover letter review, job search assistance, interviewing assistance, career resources library, career events, job postings and internship opportunities

►►Career Proficiencies (CL001-CL004) − all students must

meet a series of 0 credit hour career proficiency checks that foster successful student transitions at Southeast. Students will work with their academic advisors to sign up for the correct proficiency check.

Career Linkages University Center 206 651-2583 | www.semo.edu/careerlinkages Career Linkages seeks to educate students and alumni through career exploration and planning, incorporating experiential learning experiences to assist with the facilitation of employment opportunities and graduate/ professional school in collaboration with employers, the Division of Workforce Development and the University community. Students interested in an on- or off-campus job may view current job listings at www.semo.edu/careerlinkages/ students/part_time.htm. Questions can be directed to Career Linkages.

Learning Assistance Programs University Center 302 | 651-2273 | www.semo.edu/lapdss Learning Assistance Programs (LAP) is designed to help students become independent and active learners and to achieve academic success. Learning Assistance Programs proactively and intrusively assists students in identifying barriers to their success and identifying ways to address those barriers. Programs include: ►►University Tutorial Services – appointment based tutoring

with certified learning assistants ►►Supplemental Instruction – targeted study sessions

for high risk/high failure courses, led by a student who previously excelled in the course

►►Assurance of equal access and opportunity for all students

►►Group therapy topics include relationships,

self-esteem, sexual assault/abuse, sexual orientation and eating disorders. ►►Substance Abuse Prevention and Education (SAPE)

provides individual assessment, treatment referral services, educational outreach and consultation services at no cost for enrolled students.

Campus Health Clinic: A Service of Southeast Missouri Hospital

Disability Support Services

Crisp Hall 101 | 651-2270 | www4.semo.edu/chc/

Disability Support Services is the institutionally recognized program designated to provide both federally mandated services as well as proactive services for students with disabilities, through ensuring equal access. By providing leadership, advocacy, mediation, and guidance to students with disabilities, Disability Support Services assists registered students with identifying barriers to their success and thusly identifying ways to address those barriers.

Services Available: ►►Registered Nurses: Provide walk-in health care for

students, no appointment needed, $10 fee may be paid at time of service or billed to student account ►►Family Nurse Practitioner: Allergy shots, treatment

for illnesses, infections, STDs, depression, sprains, strains, pap and pelvic exams by appointment. Charges may be billed to student’s health insurance and/or student account. ►►Laboratory Services: Billed to student’s health insurance

and/or student account ►►Over the Counter Medications: Available for purchase

and may be paid for at time of purchase or billed to student account ►►Southeast Missouri Hospital offers 24-hour emergency

services. Emergency Room charges apply

Counseling Services Dearmont Hall B1 | 986-6191 | www6.semo.edu/ucs/ Counseling Services Available: ►►Licensed therapists (counselors and social workers)

provide individual counseling, group therapy, educational outreach and consultation services. By appointment and no cost for enrolled students.

University Center 302 | 651-2273 | www.semo.edu/lapdss

Through the provision of services and programs both in person and online, Disability Support Services strives to develop and retain Southeast students by: ►►Encouraging students to achieve to their highest

personal potential ►►Fostering a sense of responsibility and commitment to

personal growth ►►Developing transferable skills useful in and out of the

academic setting

Southeast Bookstore Offers: ►►Balloon bouquets ►►Graduation announcements ►►Fax Service-Incoming and Outgoing ►►Academic priced computer software ►►Southeast apparel ►►Graduate textbooks ►►Study guides, course packets, supplementary

materials for classes ►►Banking services provided by Commerce Bank

Students are allowed to charge $500 per semester, with a $10 minimum per use. Students must be active in the semester for which the charge is being used, and have no University delinquencies on the account. These charges will appear on the student’s University bill.

University Police Dearmont Hall – D Wing | 651-2215 | www5.semo.edu/dps Open 24 hours a day The Department of Public Safety (DPS) serves as the police agency on campus at Southeast. The Department provides 24-hour assistance, including emergency help and crime prevention programs.

Parking Services Dearmont Hall – D Wing 651-2310 | www5.semo.edu/dps/parking

►►Advocating for at-risk students

Parking Information:

►►Distributing information about access and

►►Visitors, guests and parents of the University are

reducing barriers

Southeast Bookstore University Center First Floor 651-2220 | www2.semo.edu/bookstore

encouraged to obtain a free temporary parking permit from Parking Services when they visit campus. ►►The University provides a shuttle system that services

both the main campus and River Campus. The shuttles run Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m.-2 a.m., SaturdaySunday from 5 p.m.-2 a.m. All University shuttles are accessible for people with disabilities.

Involvement Opportunities

►►College Success Plans – individualized semester long

plans to develop academic and personal success ►►College Success Seminars – academic and life skills

workshops provided throughout the semester ►►Learning Style Inventories – identify preferred learning

styles and areas of academic challenges

Educational Access Programs University Center 414/Towers Complex 110 986-6135/986-6040 | www4.semo.edu/EAP/ Educational Access Programs provides leadership and direction for University retention efforts for minority students by developing and implementing specific programs designed to impact the students’ retention, academic success, campus and systemic integration and graduation rate. The office provides leadership in administration of mentoring, academic support and intervention, and financial aid programs for U.S. ethnic minorities.

Center for Student Involvement University Center – Second Floor 651-2896 | www.semo.edu/leadership/csi.htm The Center for Student Involvement (CSI) provides office space and resources to the University’s student organizations. The CSI is home to Student Government, Student Activities Council, three Greek Councils, select Greek chapters, Emerging Leaders and Alpha Phi Omega. The CSI resource area contains marketing tools such as a laminator, die cut machine, poster machine and more. The CSI houses a TV lounge, wireless laptops and e-mail stations for use by Southeast students.

Student Government Center for Student Involvement www2.semo.edu/studentgov Student Government is designed to allow students to represent their peer students in providing services and making recommendations to the University administration for the betterment of the campus community.

Student Activities Council Center for Student Involvement www2.semo.edu/sac Student Activities Council (SAC) is the largest student programming organization at the University. SAC plans and facilitates a wide variety of educational, social, cultural and recreational programs for the campus community.

Greek Life Center for Student Involvement www4.semo.edu/uc/greek Southeast offers 19 national fraternities and sororities and are governed by three separate councils. The National PanHellenic Council (historically African-American fraternities and sororities), Panhellenic (sororities) and the Interfraternity Council (fraternities) are the governing bodies of their respective systems. Fraternities and sororities provide a unique experience with a great balance of academics, service, athletics and social activities.

Campus Clubs & Student Organizations Center for Student Involvement www.semo.edu/leadership/studentorgs Co-curricular opportunities abound at the University and reflect the campus community’s diverse interests. Opportunities for involvement exist in over 100 registered student organizations as well as in a wide variety of University committees and special projects. Students who become involved with an organization gain valuable experience in leading groups, understanding business practices, refining personal skills, socialization, budget and event planning.

11


Student Resources

Provides: ►►Advocacy to students and their rights ►►Support for initiatives designed to recruit and retain

students of color ►►Support and promotion of multiculturalism and diversity

Kent Library 651-2230 | http://library.semo.edu

What if I need help? You can get help from a librarian by e-mail, by phone, or by coming to the reference desk at the Cape Girardeau campus. You can also set up an individual appointment called a research consultation. Call (573) 651-2230 or visit http://library.semo.edu/learn/askus.shtml. You can also help yourself by using the interactive Library tutorial, Searchpath. Six different modules will take you through the research process, teaching you how to use the Library’s services and resources. Access Searchpath at http://library.semo.edu/searchpath/. A research guide is provided for each major on campus. These guides will lead you to the best databases and Web sites for your subject, and will show you how to look for books on that subject. Access them at http://library.semo.edu/learn/guides.asp. A special section of the Kent Library Web site is devoted to distance learners who take classes at Kennett, Malden, Sikeston, Perryville, online or at other Missouri locations. You will find tips and tricks for distance learners, as well as visuals to help you along at http://library.semo.edu/get/distance/index.shtml If you are experiencing extenuating circumstances that prohibit you from accessing or retrieving materials, please contact the reference desk to request special accommodations. Call (573) 651-2230 or visit http://library.semo.edu/learn/askus.shtml.

How can I check out books and videos/DVDs if I don’t come to the Cape Girardeau Campus? Items that are from Kent Library’s General Collection, the Instructional Materials Center and the Government Documents Collection can all be requested through the Kent Library Catalog. Once requested, items may be shipped to Kennett, Malden, Sikeston, Perryville, Three Rivers Community College or Mineral Area College. Videos and DVDs from our collection of over 11,000 items can also be requested and delivered. http://galahad.missouri.edu/search~S3.

Starting a project and need to get some background information? Kent Library subscribes to the Credo Reference and the Oxford Reference Collections. Between these two collections, you can find definitions, encyclopedia entries, illustrations, and biographies in over 500 reference books. These books are high quality and trustworthy, unlike many sites you may find on the Web. Kent Library also has Oxford Music Online and Oxford Art Online. These collections have definitions, biographies, images and sound clips. CQ Researcher and the Issues and Controversies database provide information about current issues. Use the Quick Facts & Reference Shelf webpage (http://library.semo.edu/find/quick_info.shtml) to start using these completely online resources.

Journal, Magazines & Newspapers Kent Library provides access to over 20,000 journals, magazines, and newspapers through our Library subscription databases. These databases include peerreviewed journals, which some professors may ask you to use in your research. Start at the Find Articles webpage (http://library.semo.edu/find/articles.asp) , select a database right for your topic, search for an article and print out the full text, all from your living room. To access the Library subscription databases, Southeast students will log in using Last Name and Southeast identification number + SEMO. Example: S012345678semo

Wrap it Up! Kent Library provides: ►►Personal help with finding information ►►Tutorials and guides to help you learn on your own ►►A collection that comes to you. Request books and

videos/DVDs ►►Fast book delivery from libraries across the state ►►Online book renewals ►►Background information from online reference

books and sites ►►Full-text articles from Library subscription databases that

you can print out at home

Student Transitions Memorial Hall 210 | 651-2579 | www.semo.edu/transitions

Southeast Missouri State University students may also request books that are in the MOBIUS system. MOBIUS is a group of public, college and university libraries across the state of Missouri who agree to share their book collection. http://mobius.missouri.edu/search

Student Transitions coordinates the University’s efforts to assist students at important transition points in their academic careers at Southeast, from immediately after admission to the University until post-graduation. The departments within Student Transitions include:

Can I do my research from home?

►►New Student Programs − coordinates First STEP

YES! You can do your research from home, the public library, an internet café – anywhere you can get an internet connection. As previously mentioned, you can use the Kent Library Catalog to find items in Kent Library, request them and have them delivered to a location near you. You can also access the MOBIUS catalog online and search millions of items to find a book that is right for you. You can even renew books online by using the View Your Record feature of the Kent Library Catalog (https://galahad.mobius.umsystem.edu/patroninfo).

10

orientation, Transfer Student orientation and Opening Week activities ►►Career Linkages − services include career assistance,

career exploration, career advising, resume/cover letter review, job search assistance, interviewing assistance, career resources library, career events, job postings and internship opportunities

►►Career Proficiencies (CL001-CL004) − all students must

meet a series of 0 credit hour career proficiency checks that foster successful student transitions at Southeast. Students will work with their academic advisors to sign up for the correct proficiency check.

Career Linkages University Center 206 651-2583 | www.semo.edu/careerlinkages Career Linkages seeks to educate students and alumni through career exploration and planning, incorporating experiential learning experiences to assist with the facilitation of employment opportunities and graduate/ professional school in collaboration with employers, the Division of Workforce Development and the University community. Students interested in an on- or off-campus job may view current job listings at www.semo.edu/careerlinkages/ students/part_time.htm. Questions can be directed to Career Linkages.

Learning Assistance Programs University Center 302 | 651-2273 | www.semo.edu/lapdss Learning Assistance Programs (LAP) is designed to help students become independent and active learners and to achieve academic success. Learning Assistance Programs proactively and intrusively assists students in identifying barriers to their success and identifying ways to address those barriers. Programs include: ►►University Tutorial Services – appointment based tutoring

with certified learning assistants ►►Supplemental Instruction – targeted study sessions

for high risk/high failure courses, led by a student who previously excelled in the course

►►Assurance of equal access and opportunity for all students

►►Group therapy topics include relationships,

self-esteem, sexual assault/abuse, sexual orientation and eating disorders. ►►Substance Abuse Prevention and Education (SAPE)

provides individual assessment, treatment referral services, educational outreach and consultation services at no cost for enrolled students.

Campus Health Clinic: A Service of Southeast Missouri Hospital

Disability Support Services

Crisp Hall 101 | 651-2270 | www4.semo.edu/chc/

Disability Support Services is the institutionally recognized program designated to provide both federally mandated services as well as proactive services for students with disabilities, through ensuring equal access. By providing leadership, advocacy, mediation, and guidance to students with disabilities, Disability Support Services assists registered students with identifying barriers to their success and thusly identifying ways to address those barriers.

Services Available: ►►Registered Nurses: Provide walk-in health care for

students, no appointment needed, $10 fee may be paid at time of service or billed to student account ►►Family Nurse Practitioner: Allergy shots, treatment

for illnesses, infections, STDs, depression, sprains, strains, pap and pelvic exams by appointment. Charges may be billed to student’s health insurance and/or student account. ►►Laboratory Services: Billed to student’s health insurance

and/or student account ►►Over the Counter Medications: Available for purchase

and may be paid for at time of purchase or billed to student account ►►Southeast Missouri Hospital offers 24-hour emergency

services. Emergency Room charges apply

Counseling Services Dearmont Hall B1 | 986-6191 | www6.semo.edu/ucs/ Counseling Services Available: ►►Licensed therapists (counselors and social workers)

provide individual counseling, group therapy, educational outreach and consultation services. By appointment and no cost for enrolled students.

University Center 302 | 651-2273 | www.semo.edu/lapdss

Through the provision of services and programs both in person and online, Disability Support Services strives to develop and retain Southeast students by: ►►Encouraging students to achieve to their highest

personal potential ►►Fostering a sense of responsibility and commitment to

personal growth ►►Developing transferable skills useful in and out of the

academic setting

Southeast Bookstore Offers: ►►Balloon bouquets ►►Graduation announcements ►►Fax Service-Incoming and Outgoing ►►Academic priced computer software ►►Southeast apparel ►►Graduate textbooks ►►Study guides, course packets, supplementary

materials for classes ►►Banking services provided by Commerce Bank

Students are allowed to charge $500 per semester, with a $10 minimum per use. Students must be active in the semester for which the charge is being used, and have no University delinquencies on the account. These charges will appear on the student’s University bill.

University Police Dearmont Hall – D Wing | 651-2215 | www5.semo.edu/dps Open 24 hours a day The Department of Public Safety (DPS) serves as the police agency on campus at Southeast. The Department provides 24-hour assistance, including emergency help and crime prevention programs.

Parking Services Dearmont Hall – D Wing 651-2310 | www5.semo.edu/dps/parking

►►Advocating for at-risk students

Parking Information:

►►Distributing information about access and

►►Visitors, guests and parents of the University are

reducing barriers

Southeast Bookstore University Center First Floor 651-2220 | www2.semo.edu/bookstore

encouraged to obtain a free temporary parking permit from Parking Services when they visit campus. ►►The University provides a shuttle system that services

both the main campus and River Campus. The shuttles run Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m.-2 a.m., SaturdaySunday from 5 p.m.-2 a.m. All University shuttles are accessible for people with disabilities.

Involvement Opportunities

►►College Success Plans – individualized semester long

plans to develop academic and personal success ►►College Success Seminars – academic and life skills

workshops provided throughout the semester ►►Learning Style Inventories – identify preferred learning

styles and areas of academic challenges

Educational Access Programs University Center 414/Towers Complex 110 986-6135/986-6040 | www4.semo.edu/EAP/ Educational Access Programs provides leadership and direction for University retention efforts for minority students by developing and implementing specific programs designed to impact the students’ retention, academic success, campus and systemic integration and graduation rate. The office provides leadership in administration of mentoring, academic support and intervention, and financial aid programs for U.S. ethnic minorities.

Center for Student Involvement University Center – Second Floor 651-2896 | www.semo.edu/leadership/csi.htm The Center for Student Involvement (CSI) provides office space and resources to the University’s student organizations. The CSI is home to Student Government, Student Activities Council, three Greek Councils, select Greek chapters, Emerging Leaders and Alpha Phi Omega. The CSI resource area contains marketing tools such as a laminator, die cut machine, poster machine and more. The CSI houses a TV lounge, wireless laptops and e-mail stations for use by Southeast students.

Student Government Center for Student Involvement www2.semo.edu/studentgov Student Government is designed to allow students to represent their peer students in providing services and making recommendations to the University administration for the betterment of the campus community.

Student Activities Council Center for Student Involvement www2.semo.edu/sac Student Activities Council (SAC) is the largest student programming organization at the University. SAC plans and facilitates a wide variety of educational, social, cultural and recreational programs for the campus community.

Greek Life Center for Student Involvement www4.semo.edu/uc/greek Southeast offers 19 national fraternities and sororities and are governed by three separate councils. The National PanHellenic Council (historically African-American fraternities and sororities), Panhellenic (sororities) and the Interfraternity Council (fraternities) are the governing bodies of their respective systems. Fraternities and sororities provide a unique experience with a great balance of academics, service, athletics and social activities.

Campus Clubs & Student Organizations Center for Student Involvement www.semo.edu/leadership/studentorgs Co-curricular opportunities abound at the University and reflect the campus community’s diverse interests. Opportunities for involvement exist in over 100 registered student organizations as well as in a wide variety of University committees and special projects. Students who become involved with an organization gain valuable experience in leading groups, understanding business practices, refining personal skills, socialization, budget and event planning.

11


Residence Hall Association Towers Complex 111 | 651-2330 | www4.semo.edu/rha RHA is the governing body for all campus residents and oversees the Hall Councils in each building. RHA membership is open to all residents and includes formal representation from each hall. RHA meets every week and residents are encouraged to attend.

►►The Student Aquatic Center is located just behind the

SRC-North and features a 6-lane lap pool, a whirlpool spa, leisure pool including a climbing wall, zip line and rope swing. ►►The Outdoor Recreation Complex is located on the corner

of Sprigg and Bertling streets and features five lighted softball/soccer/flag football fields, tennis courts, ropes course, restrooms, and picnic shelters. Outdoor sand volleyball courts are located at the Towers Complex and Parker field. All facilities are available for rent.

Recent achievements of RHA include working to provide unlimited laundry access to all on-campus residents; working with the Office of Residence Life to increase security measures on campus; helping to address student concerns in the residence halls and food service areas; and assisting students in attending regional and national leadership conferences.

►►Utilization Requirements: All students enrolled in at least

Athletics

►►Sport Clubs: Sport Clubs are student initiated and led

651-2227 | www.GoSoutheast.com Southeast Missouri State University is a member of the Ohio Valley Conference and participates in 15 intercollegiate sports.

Women's Sports Basketball Cross Country Gymnastics Soccer Softball Tennis Track Volleyball

651-5030 986-7301 651-2604 986-6013 651-2993 986-1314 986-7302 986-6140

Men's Sports Baseball Basketball Cross Country Football Track

651-2645 651-5030 986-7301 651-2110 986-7302

Cheer and Dance Cheerleaders 291-8786 Sundancers 450-9289

Recreation Services Student Recreation Center –North (SRC-N) Student Recreation Center-South (SRC-S) Student Aquatic Center (SAQ) 651-2105 | www.semo.edu/recservices ►►Facility Information: The Department of Recreation

Services is your home to all things recreational on the Southeast campus! Join us at any of our three facilities on campus: SRC-North, SRC-South, and the SAQ. ►►The SRC-North is located just west of the Show Me

Center and is a 94,000 square foot facility consisting of a free-weight room, cardiovascular equipment, racquetball courts, indoor walking/jogging track, basketball and volleyball courts, fitness studio, indoor climbing wall and locker rooms. An Outdoor Shop is located within the SRC-N with a wide variety of equipment available for rent. The SRC-N also offers the Southeast Challenge that facilitates team building and Outdoor Adventure trips. ►►The SRC-South is located south of Houck Stadium and

is a 25,000 square foot facility consisting of cardiovascular equipment, a small free-weight room, selectorized weight equipment, indoor walking/jogging track, one basketball/volleyball court and locker rooms.

one credit hour and paying general student fees are eligible to use facilities. Students and members must present valid Redhawks IDs to enter all facilities. organizations created to provide additional opportunities for participation in unique sports instruction and experiences. Sport Clubs are open to all Southeast students/faculty/staff with all skill levels from novice to expert. Sport Clubs are formed by individuals motivated by a common interest and desire to participate in a recreational, instructional or competitive activity. Please visit the Department of Recreation Services Web site for Club listings and more information. ►►Intramural Sports: The Department of Recreation Services

provides individual, dual, team and co-rec (coed) recreation offerings as well as recreational, competitive, Greek, and residence hall divisions of play. Teams can be organized within Greek organizations, residence halls, and independent groups. The department will match you up with a team if you have no one to play with and need help locating a team or individual that shares your interest in an event! Please visit the Department of Recreation Services Web site for more information. ►►Fitness & Wellness: Fitness & Wellness offers over 20

group fitness classes weekly, ranging from step, core strength, indoor cycling, water classes and yoga. Classes are offered several times throughout the day, Monday through Friday. We offer fitness assessments, personal and buddy training sessions, nutrition counseling, massage therapy, exercise incentive programs, wellness seminars, American Red Cross CPR and First Aid classes and fitness instructor/personal trainer courses.

Campus Ministries www.semo.edu/cs/studentlife/ministries.htm We offer opportunities for Christian students through denominational and interdenominational campus ministries as well as opportunities for students who are Jewish, Muslim or Pagan. The Association of Campus Ministries will work with other faith perspectives in developing opportunities for spiritual development as well.

Association of Campus Ministries ►►Baptist Student Center

(573) 335-6489 ►►Baptist Student Union

(573) 339-3399 www.southeastbsu.com/ ►►Campus Outreach

(573) 587-9583 ►►Catholic Campus Ministries

(573) 335-3899 www5.semo.edu/ccm ►►Church of Christ College Outreach

(573) 335-4619 ►►Corpus Christi Episcopal Campus Ministry

(573) 335-2997 www.capeepiscopalchurch.org/ ►►Intervarsity Christian Fellowship

(573) 979-1490 www.ivsouth.org/ ►►IT Student Ministry

(573) 651-5420 www6.semo.edu/itsm/ ►►Jewish Awareness Group

www5.semo.edu/jag ►►Lutheran Student Fellowship

(573) 334-5375 www.lutheransonline.com/chapelofhope ►►Regeneration Collegiate Christian Ministries

(573) 335-6489 www6.semo.edu/rccm

Where do I pick up my textbooks at my Regional Campus? Textbooks can be checked out from the main office at your Regional Campus. Where do I park and do I need a parking permit at my Regional Campus? You will not need a special permit to park at your Regional Campus. You may park anywhere in the lot that is not otherwise designated as special parking, for example, Handicapped Parking. If I plan to visit the Cape Girardeau campus, where can I park? When visiting the Cape Girardeau campus, stop by the Department of Public Safety and pick up a Visitors Parking Tag. Let the Department of Public Safety know where you plan on parking and they will specify that information on your Visitors Tag. The Department of Public Safety is open twenty four hours a day, seven days a week. Where do I pick up my Southeast Student ID (Redhawks Card)? If you are a new student or have never had a Redhawks Card, your campus’ main office can take your picture and assist you in obtaining your Redhawks Card. The picture will be e-mailed to the Cape Girardeau campus and uploaded to Redhawks Card Services. Once the picture is received and the card is generated, it will be returned via campus mail to your campus’ main office for distribution. Please allow 3-5 business days between having your picture made to returning to pick up your ID. If you have a Redhawks Card and need a replacement due to damage, loss, name change, etc. please refer to www6.semo.edu/idservices/. Your campus’ main

office will coordinate the process for replacement like stated above. How do I access my Southeast e-mail address and the My Southeast Portal? Your Southeast e-mail address is known as your SE Key. Your SE Key will allow you to access your e-mail, computers and printing in open computer labs, student web publishing, and the My Southeast Portal. To access your SE Key you first must activate it. Go to portal.semo.edu and click “SE Key Activation.” Follow the directions and if you experience any difficulties, please contact the Information Technology Help Desk at 651-4357 or helpdesk@semo.edu. Do I need to use my SE Key? Absolutely! Many Southeast faculty members will require you to check your SE Key regularly. What if I need to conduct research for a paper but I am unable to travel to Kent Library on the Cape Girardeau campus? You may access the Kent Library research databases from your computer at home or on the computers in the lab at your Regional Campus. Go to library.semo.edu/ and click on one of the “Find” buttons to begin your research. Is there any place on campus that offers tutoring or other academic services? Contact the Learning Assistance Programs on the Cape Girardeau campus in the University Center Room 302 for additional information on academic services. 651-2273 | www6.semo.edu/lapdss/ | lapdss@semo.edu Is there a place on campus I can go for health or counseling services? Contact the Campus Health Clinic on the Cape Girardeau

campus in Crisp Hall 101, 651-2270. University Counseling & Disability Support Services on the Cape Girardeau campus is located in Dearmont Hall B1. 986-6191 | www4.semo.edu/chc/ | chc@semo.edu. Is there a place on campus I find out about minority student services? Contact Educational Access Programs on the Cape Girardeau campus in the University Center Room 310. 986-6135 | www4.semo.edu/EAP/ | minstuprog@semo.edu. If I have a question about a technology issue is there anyone I can call? Contact the Information Technology Help Desk on the Cape Girardeau campus, 651-HELP, www6.semo.edu/infotech/, helpdesk@semo.edu. Who would I contact if I needed careerrelated assistance? Contact Career Linkages on the Cape Girardeau campus, 651-2583, www.semo.edu/careerlinkages/, careerlinkages@semo.edu. Who should I contact for further information about the University Honors Program? Contact Dr. Craig Roberts, Director of the University Honors Program, 651-2513, www.semo.edu/honors/, honors@semo.edu. Who would I contact if I wanted to get involved with a student organization on campus? Contact the Center for Student Involvement (CSI) on the Cape Girardeau campus, 651-2280, www.semo.edu/leadership/csi.htm.

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

►►United Methodist Campus Ministries

(573) 651-4550 www.semo.edu/wesleyhouse/

Groups Registered with Student Government ►►Cape Grove Pagan Student

(573) 225-0456 ►►Fellowship of Christian Athletes

(573) 986-6844 ►►Latter Day Saints

(573) 651-2796

Groups in Formation ►►ELCA Campus Ministry

(573) 651-2731 ►►First Christian Church

(573) 335-3422 ►►First General Baptist

(573) 334-2234 ►►First Presbyterian Church

(573) 335-2579 ►►Muslim Student Organization

(573) 651-2505

12

Frequently Asked Questions

What is FERPA? FERPA protects the privacy of student records. It was designed to allow parents of students or students who are either 18 or attend a post-secondary institution access to their educational records and limit the transferability of a student’s records without the individual’s consent. What is a student record? A student record means any information or data on a person who has attended or is attending Southeast Missouri State University. What does this mean for parents? When a student turns 18 or enrolls at Southeast, control of the rights granted under FERPA transferred to the student. Southeast will only release a student’s educational records with the consent of the student. Records include grade reports, transcripts and judicial reports. What about judicial records? Judicial records are considered educational records and are protected FERPA. You may become aware that your student has been found in violation of the University’s Code of Student Conduct if a judicial fine shows up on his/her student account.

FERPA does allow the University to notify a parent or guardian when a student under the age of 21 has been found in violation of University alcohol or drug rules. If your student is in this situation, you will receive a letter from the Dean of Students indicating that your student has committed a violation and has been issued a disciplinary sanction but no other specific details will be given. If you contact the Office of Judicial Affairs to inquire about the nature of the judicial fine, you will be informed that your student must sign a Release of Information Authorization in order for a staff member to discuss the violation with you. What if my student visits University Counseling Services? Services provided by University Counseling Services are confidential. Federal and state laws along with professional ethical standards prohibit the disclosure of any information provided unless University Counseling Services has received the student’s written consent to release their information. There are exceptions to the confidentiality laws and standards: ►►If a Counseling Services caregiver believes the student is

in clear and imminent danger of harm, the caregiver is legally obligated to inform proper authorities in order to help prevent the harm from occurring.

►►If a student provides information to a caregiver

indicating someone under the age of 18 is being abused, the caregiver is legally required to notify the proper authorities. ►►In rare cases a court may order a caregiver to disclose

information about a student. ►►If a student is under 17 ½ years of age, parents or legal

guardians may have access to treatment records. Will I be notified if my student is physically hurt? In most cases if the student is seriously hurt on campus the Office of Public Safety responds to most serious injuries. Protocols around notification would be governed by the same standards of confidentiality in the above question with some exceptions: ►►If the student is unconscious or unresponsive, the parent

or guardian may receive a call from emergency workers at the hospital or from the Dean of Students. ►►If the student has an injury resulting from a second

alcohol violation to the Student Code of Conduct, the family will receive a call and a letter from the Dean of Students.

13


Residence Hall Association Towers Complex 111 | 651-2330 | www4.semo.edu/rha RHA is the governing body for all campus residents and oversees the Hall Councils in each building. RHA membership is open to all residents and includes formal representation from each hall. RHA meets every week and residents are encouraged to attend.

►►The Student Aquatic Center is located just behind the

SRC-North and features a 6-lane lap pool, a whirlpool spa, leisure pool including a climbing wall, zip line and rope swing. ►►The Outdoor Recreation Complex is located on the corner

of Sprigg and Bertling streets and features five lighted softball/soccer/flag football fields, tennis courts, ropes course, restrooms, and picnic shelters. Outdoor sand volleyball courts are located at the Towers Complex and Parker field. All facilities are available for rent.

Recent achievements of RHA include working to provide unlimited laundry access to all on-campus residents; working with the Office of Residence Life to increase security measures on campus; helping to address student concerns in the residence halls and food service areas; and assisting students in attending regional and national leadership conferences.

►►Utilization Requirements: All students enrolled in at least

Athletics

►►Sport Clubs: Sport Clubs are student initiated and led

651-2227 | www.GoSoutheast.com Southeast Missouri State University is a member of the Ohio Valley Conference and participates in 15 intercollegiate sports.

Women's Sports Basketball Cross Country Gymnastics Soccer Softball Tennis Track Volleyball

651-5030 986-7301 651-2604 986-6013 651-2993 986-1314 986-7302 986-6140

Men's Sports Baseball Basketball Cross Country Football Track

651-2645 651-5030 986-7301 651-2110 986-7302

Cheer and Dance Cheerleaders 291-8786 Sundancers 450-9289

Recreation Services Student Recreation Center –North (SRC-N) Student Recreation Center-South (SRC-S) Student Aquatic Center (SAQ) 651-2105 | www.semo.edu/recservices ►►Facility Information: The Department of Recreation

Services is your home to all things recreational on the Southeast campus! Join us at any of our three facilities on campus: SRC-North, SRC-South, and the SAQ. ►►The SRC-North is located just west of the Show Me

Center and is a 94,000 square foot facility consisting of a free-weight room, cardiovascular equipment, racquetball courts, indoor walking/jogging track, basketball and volleyball courts, fitness studio, indoor climbing wall and locker rooms. An Outdoor Shop is located within the SRC-N with a wide variety of equipment available for rent. The SRC-N also offers the Southeast Challenge that facilitates team building and Outdoor Adventure trips. ►►The SRC-South is located south of Houck Stadium and

is a 25,000 square foot facility consisting of cardiovascular equipment, a small free-weight room, selectorized weight equipment, indoor walking/jogging track, one basketball/volleyball court and locker rooms.

one credit hour and paying general student fees are eligible to use facilities. Students and members must present valid Redhawks IDs to enter all facilities. organizations created to provide additional opportunities for participation in unique sports instruction and experiences. Sport Clubs are open to all Southeast students/faculty/staff with all skill levels from novice to expert. Sport Clubs are formed by individuals motivated by a common interest and desire to participate in a recreational, instructional or competitive activity. Please visit the Department of Recreation Services Web site for Club listings and more information. ►►Intramural Sports: The Department of Recreation Services

provides individual, dual, team and co-rec (coed) recreation offerings as well as recreational, competitive, Greek, and residence hall divisions of play. Teams can be organized within Greek organizations, residence halls, and independent groups. The department will match you up with a team if you have no one to play with and need help locating a team or individual that shares your interest in an event! Please visit the Department of Recreation Services Web site for more information. ►►Fitness & Wellness: Fitness & Wellness offers over 20

group fitness classes weekly, ranging from step, core strength, indoor cycling, water classes and yoga. Classes are offered several times throughout the day, Monday through Friday. We offer fitness assessments, personal and buddy training sessions, nutrition counseling, massage therapy, exercise incentive programs, wellness seminars, American Red Cross CPR and First Aid classes and fitness instructor/personal trainer courses.

Campus Ministries www.semo.edu/cs/studentlife/ministries.htm We offer opportunities for Christian students through denominational and interdenominational campus ministries as well as opportunities for students who are Jewish, Muslim or Pagan. The Association of Campus Ministries will work with other faith perspectives in developing opportunities for spiritual development as well.

Association of Campus Ministries ►►Baptist Student Center

(573) 335-6489 ►►Baptist Student Union

(573) 339-3399 www.southeastbsu.com/ ►►Campus Outreach

(573) 587-9583 ►►Catholic Campus Ministries

(573) 335-3899 www5.semo.edu/ccm ►►Church of Christ College Outreach

(573) 335-4619 ►►Corpus Christi Episcopal Campus Ministry

(573) 335-2997 www.capeepiscopalchurch.org/ ►►Intervarsity Christian Fellowship

(573) 979-1490 www.ivsouth.org/ ►►IT Student Ministry

(573) 651-5420 www6.semo.edu/itsm/ ►►Jewish Awareness Group

www5.semo.edu/jag ►►Lutheran Student Fellowship

(573) 334-5375 www.lutheransonline.com/chapelofhope ►►Regeneration Collegiate Christian Ministries

(573) 335-6489 www6.semo.edu/rccm

Where do I pick up my textbooks at my Regional Campus? Textbooks can be checked out from the main office at your Regional Campus. Where do I park and do I need a parking permit at my Regional Campus? You will not need a special permit to park at your Regional Campus. You may park anywhere in the lot that is not otherwise designated as special parking, for example, Handicapped Parking. If I plan to visit the Cape Girardeau campus, where can I park? When visiting the Cape Girardeau campus, stop by the Department of Public Safety and pick up a Visitors Parking Tag. Let the Department of Public Safety know where you plan on parking and they will specify that information on your Visitors Tag. The Department of Public Safety is open twenty four hours a day, seven days a week. Where do I pick up my Southeast Student ID (Redhawks Card)? If you are a new student or have never had a Redhawks Card, your campus’ main office can take your picture and assist you in obtaining your Redhawks Card. The picture will be e-mailed to the Cape Girardeau campus and uploaded to Redhawks Card Services. Once the picture is received and the card is generated, it will be returned via campus mail to your campus’ main office for distribution. Please allow 3-5 business days between having your picture made to returning to pick up your ID. If you have a Redhawks Card and need a replacement due to damage, loss, name change, etc. please refer to www6.semo.edu/idservices/. Your campus’ main

office will coordinate the process for replacement like stated above. How do I access my Southeast e-mail address and the My Southeast Portal? Your Southeast e-mail address is known as your SE Key. Your SE Key will allow you to access your e-mail, computers and printing in open computer labs, student web publishing, and the My Southeast Portal. To access your SE Key you first must activate it. Go to portal.semo.edu and click “SE Key Activation.” Follow the directions and if you experience any difficulties, please contact the Information Technology Help Desk at 651-4357 or helpdesk@semo.edu. Do I need to use my SE Key? Absolutely! Many Southeast faculty members will require you to check your SE Key regularly. What if I need to conduct research for a paper but I am unable to travel to Kent Library on the Cape Girardeau campus? You may access the Kent Library research databases from your computer at home or on the computers in the lab at your Regional Campus. Go to library.semo.edu/ and click on one of the “Find” buttons to begin your research. Is there any place on campus that offers tutoring or other academic services? Contact the Learning Assistance Programs on the Cape Girardeau campus in the University Center Room 302 for additional information on academic services. 651-2273 | www6.semo.edu/lapdss/ | lapdss@semo.edu Is there a place on campus I can go for health or counseling services? Contact the Campus Health Clinic on the Cape Girardeau

campus in Crisp Hall 101, 651-2270. University Counseling & Disability Support Services on the Cape Girardeau campus is located in Dearmont Hall B1. 986-6191 | www4.semo.edu/chc/ | chc@semo.edu. Is there a place on campus I find out about minority student services? Contact Educational Access Programs on the Cape Girardeau campus in the University Center Room 310. 986-6135 | www4.semo.edu/EAP/ | minstuprog@semo.edu. If I have a question about a technology issue is there anyone I can call? Contact the Information Technology Help Desk on the Cape Girardeau campus, 651-HELP, www6.semo.edu/infotech/, helpdesk@semo.edu. Who would I contact if I needed careerrelated assistance? Contact Career Linkages on the Cape Girardeau campus, 651-2583, www.semo.edu/careerlinkages/, careerlinkages@semo.edu. Who should I contact for further information about the University Honors Program? Contact Dr. Craig Roberts, Director of the University Honors Program, 651-2513, www.semo.edu/honors/, honors@semo.edu. Who would I contact if I wanted to get involved with a student organization on campus? Contact the Center for Student Involvement (CSI) on the Cape Girardeau campus, 651-2280, www.semo.edu/leadership/csi.htm.

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

►►United Methodist Campus Ministries

(573) 651-4550 www.semo.edu/wesleyhouse/

Groups Registered with Student Government ►►Cape Grove Pagan Student

(573) 225-0456 ►►Fellowship of Christian Athletes

(573) 986-6844 ►►Latter Day Saints

(573) 651-2796

Groups in Formation ►►ELCA Campus Ministry

(573) 651-2731 ►►First Christian Church

(573) 335-3422 ►►First General Baptist

(573) 334-2234 ►►First Presbyterian Church

(573) 335-2579 ►►Muslim Student Organization

(573) 651-2505

12

Frequently Asked Questions

What is FERPA? FERPA protects the privacy of student records. It was designed to allow parents of students or students who are either 18 or attend a post-secondary institution access to their educational records and limit the transferability of a student’s records without the individual’s consent. What is a student record? A student record means any information or data on a person who has attended or is attending Southeast Missouri State University. What does this mean for parents? When a student turns 18 or enrolls at Southeast, control of the rights granted under FERPA transferred to the student. Southeast will only release a student’s educational records with the consent of the student. Records include grade reports, transcripts and judicial reports. What about judicial records? Judicial records are considered educational records and are protected FERPA. You may become aware that your student has been found in violation of the University’s Code of Student Conduct if a judicial fine shows up on his/her student account.

FERPA does allow the University to notify a parent or guardian when a student under the age of 21 has been found in violation of University alcohol or drug rules. If your student is in this situation, you will receive a letter from the Dean of Students indicating that your student has committed a violation and has been issued a disciplinary sanction but no other specific details will be given. If you contact the Office of Judicial Affairs to inquire about the nature of the judicial fine, you will be informed that your student must sign a Release of Information Authorization in order for a staff member to discuss the violation with you. What if my student visits University Counseling Services? Services provided by University Counseling Services are confidential. Federal and state laws along with professional ethical standards prohibit the disclosure of any information provided unless University Counseling Services has received the student’s written consent to release their information. There are exceptions to the confidentiality laws and standards: ►►If a Counseling Services caregiver believes the student is

in clear and imminent danger of harm, the caregiver is legally obligated to inform proper authorities in order to help prevent the harm from occurring.

►►If a student provides information to a caregiver

indicating someone under the age of 18 is being abused, the caregiver is legally required to notify the proper authorities. ►►In rare cases a court may order a caregiver to disclose

information about a student. ►►If a student is under 17 ½ years of age, parents or legal

guardians may have access to treatment records. Will I be notified if my student is physically hurt? In most cases if the student is seriously hurt on campus the Office of Public Safety responds to most serious injuries. Protocols around notification would be governed by the same standards of confidentiality in the above question with some exceptions: ►►If the student is unconscious or unresponsive, the parent

or guardian may receive a call from emergency workers at the hospital or from the Dean of Students. ►►If the student has an injury resulting from a second

alcohol violation to the Student Code of Conduct, the family will receive a call and a letter from the Dean of Students.

13


FALL SEMESTER 2010 STUDENTS WITH FINANCIAL AID SHOULD BE AWARE THAT IT MAY BE AFFECTED IF THEY DROP BELOW THE REQUIRED NUMBER OF HOURS

PAYMENT DUE AUGUST 6, 2010 FEE PAYMENT INFORMATION Students who have registered for classes by July 24 for Fall 2010 semester must have all fees and charges (including room and meals) paid by August 6 using any of the payment methods listed below. Failure to pay account balances by August 6 will result in cancellation of class schedule and/or room assignments.

Calendar Registration Begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mon. Apr. 05 REGISTRATION CLOSES UNTIL AUGUST 6, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sat. July 24 REGISTRATION REOPENS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Aug. 06 Textbook Services Begins Distributing Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mon. Aug. 16 Classes Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mon. Aug. 23

Students who register for or add classes on or after August 6 must have all related fees and charges resulting from this activity (including room and meals) paid by August 27 using any of the payment methods listed below. Failure to pay account balances by August 27 may result in cancellation of classes and housing assignment, if applicable.

Graduation Applications for Current Semester Due in Registrar’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tue. Aug. 24

Note: You will not receive a billing statement for this registration activity.

LABOR DAY--NO CLASSES (University Offices will be closed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mon. Sept. 06

PAYMENT METHODS

LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW WITH PARTIAL REFUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sat. Sept. 18

1. Fees and charges paid in full

Last Day to Drop a First Eight-Week Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Sept. 24

2. Fees and charges deferred by confirmed financial aid 3. Fees and charges paid by enrollment in the Installment Payment Plan

Last Day to Add First Eight-Week Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wed. Aug. 25 Last Day to Add a Full Semester Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Aug. 27 Last Day to Audit or Take as Pass/Fail a First Eight-Week Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Sept. 03

Last Day to Audit or Take as Pass/Fail a Full Semester Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Sept. 24 Textbook Services Sale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mon. - Fri. Oct. 04-08 Last Day to Return Graduation Papers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Oct. 08 Midterm Grade Reporting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 09 - 18 Fall Break. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thu. - Fri. Oct. 14-15 Second Half of Semester Begins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mon. Oct.18 Last Day to Add Second Eight-Week Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wed. Oct. 20 Last Day to Drop a Full Semester Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Oct. 29 Last Day to Audit or Take as Pass/Fail a Second Eight-Week Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri. Oct. 29 Homecoming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sat. Oct. 30 Last Day to Drop a Second Eight-Week Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Nov. 19 LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW FROM THE UNIVERSITY WITHOUT FAILING GRADES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri. Nov. 19 Thanksgiving Recess. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tue. Nov. 23 at close of classes to Mon. Nov. 29 8:00 am Final Exams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mon. - Fri. Dec. 13-17 Honors Ceremony (10:30 a.m.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sat. Dec. 18 Commencement (2:00 p.m.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sat. Dec. 18 Last Day to Return Textbooks (By 4:00 p.m.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mon. Dec. 20

Regional Campus Orientation Handbook 2010  

Orientation handbook for students of Southeast Missouri State University's regional campuses.

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