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Unconquered A  Seminole  Boosters  Magazine

S E M I N O L E B O O S T E R S M AG A Z I N E

February 2011

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

➸ The No. 3 Overall

2011 Mercedes-Benz C300

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Sports Program In The Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup Standings

Victory In The Chick-Fil-A Bowl And The Definitive “State” Champions

➸ The Consensus

Top-Ranked College Football Recruiting Class

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SEMINOLE


SunTrust is proud to be the official bank of Seminole Athletics. For your team to win, everyone must work together toward a common goal. Same goes for your financial success. Whether it’s day-to-day banking, or helping you establish a solid game plan for your financial future, SunTrust representatives are teammates you can rely on. To learn more, stop by your local branch, call 800.SUNTRUST or visit suntrust.com.

SunTrust Bank, Member FDIC. Š 2010 SunTrust Banks, Inc. SunTrust and Live Solid. Bank Solid. are federally registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc.


PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE FSU ROAD WARRIORS 31300 US Hwy 90 West, I-10 Exit 192, 1.5 miles West on Hwy 90 Tallahassee, FL 32343 888-696-5513 | S EMINO www.tallahasseeRVs.com LE-BO OST ERS .CO M UNCO NQUERED MAGAZ I NE

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T

he University Center Club is the premier private club serving Florida State University, Tallahassee and friends of the community. Since its establishment in 1996, the Club has offered Members and guests outstanding cuisine while enjoying spectacular views of downtown Tallahassee and Doak Campbell Stadium. The Club features à la carte dining in the Osceola Grill and six exquisitely appointed private meeting/dining rooms along with an 8,000 square foot ballroom. When you combine this magnificent facility with our expert staff you have Tallahassee’s Premier Private Club!

To learn more about membership, game day benefits, or hosting an event, please contact our Membership team today! Melinda Baker can be reached at (850) 644-6522 or melinda.baker@ourclub.com Cherrie Barbree can be reached at (850) 644-9089 or cherrie.barbree@ourclub.com University Center | Doak Campbell Stadium | Tallahassee, FL 32306 | (850) 644-8528 | www.UniversityCenterClub.com 4

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Unconquered magazine (USPS 18182) is published quarterly by Seminole Boosters, Inc., 225 University Center, Suite 5100, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. (850) 644-3484, Fax: (850) 222-5929. POSTMASTER: send change of address to, Unconquered magazine, care of Seminole Boosters, Florida State University Center, Suite C-5100, 5th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. Periodicals Postage Paid at Tallahassee, FL, Volume 28, Issue 1. All advertising revenues directly support programs of the Seminole Boosters, Inc. For advertising rates, please contact the sales representatives listed below. © 2010, Seminole Boosters, Inc. All rights reserved. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Florida State University faculty, staff or administration. Overview Unconquered magazine celebrates Seminole athletics and the indomitable spirit of its student-athletes who overcome adversity, the passion of its coaches and educators who help students reach beyond their limits, and the devotion of donors who redefine the boundaries of generosity by giving scholarships that change lives and who make donations that build first-class athletic facilities. By sharing their stories of transformational experiences — on the athletic playing field, in the classroom and in life — Unconquered magazine encourages the growth of responsible world citizenship and cross-cultural understanding. Each issue carries stories on what makes student-athletes great and how they were shaped by their experience at FSU, features on Seminole community sports legends and profiles of donors who make contributions.

2011 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Brian Swain

Ken Willis

Mike Harrell

Gene Ready

Steve Brown

Bob Caton

Morris Miller

TOM JENNINGS

RANDY SPETMAN

ANDY MILLER

Bruce Harrell

Lori Mattice

Dr. Pamela Perrewe

Chairman

Past Chairman

Chairman-Elect

Booster Attorney

Secretary

VP for University Advancement

Treasurer

Immediate Past Chair

Athletic Director

Seminole Boosters President

Contact Send correspondence to Derril Beech, at the address shown above, or by e-mail to dbleakley@fsu.edu. Telephone: (850) 645-7330. Magazine Staff Publishers: Andy Miller, Jerry Kutz

Philip Griffitts

Managing editor: Derril Beech

At-Large Member

At-Large Member

At-Large Member

Faculty Representative

Design, layout, production, pre-press: Rowland Publishing, Inc. Photo editors: Derril Beech, Rowland Publishing, Inc. Featured photographers: Mike Olivella, Ross Obley, Russell Grace Contributing photographers: FSU Photo Lab, FSU Sports Info Columnists: Charlie Barnes, Jim Crosby, Jerry Kutz Contributing writers: Rob Wilson, Daniel Mitchell, FSU Sports Information Copy editors: Jerry Kutz, Rowland Publishing, Inc. Photo purchasing information: Mike Olivella photos: www.seminoles.com

2010–2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Ross Obley photos: www.seminoles.com Russell Grace photos: www.russellgraceimages.com

Seminole Boosters, Inc. EXECUTIVE STAFF Andy Miller President and CEO Charlie Barnes Executive Director Senior Vice President Joel Padgett Senior Vice President Gift Planning Director Tom Carlson Senior Vice President Jerry Kutz Vice President of Marketing and Communications Cindee Lundeen, PhD Director Billy Sexton Director

Rachel Catalano Special Events, Executive Assistant to Andy Miller Sarah Reed Executive Assistant, Coaches Clubs Director Mary Bailey Executive Assistant to Jerry Kutz, Stewardship Kari Terezakis Executive Assistant to Tom Carlson, Charlie Barnes Matthew Zagaeski Assistant Information Technology Director

FSU VARSITY CLUB Betsy Hosey Director DONOR RECORDS Jennifer Terrell Director Matt Lanahan Office Assistant Jeff Chamlis Gift Entry Jason Liskooka Data Entry Abbie King Data Entry Dominique Gordon Data Entry Brandon Mand Gift Entry

Eric Carr Director

Patti Barber Receptionist, Office Assistant

Sanford Lovingood Controller

Barbara Mason Financial Assistant

Matt Behnke, CPA Chief Financial Officer

PROGRAM DIRECTORS

Derril Beech Managing Editor, Advertising, Student Boosters Director

Maria Fuller Skybox and Parking Director

FSU TRADEMARK LICENSING

Max Zahn Northeast FL Representative Kristin Tubeck Tampa Representative ASSISTANTS TO EXECUTIVE STAFF AND DIRECTORS Mary Pat Desloge Senior Executive Assistant to Andy Miller

Farrah Miller Information Technology Director, Webmaster, Internship Coordinator Michael Espada Ticket Sales Manager

Seminole Boosters, Inc.

UNCONQUERED MAGAZINE

Sherri Dye Director of Licensing Garrett O’Connor Assistant Licensing Director

Rick Astor Kathy Atkins-Gunter, PC Jorge Azor Byron Bailey Doug Bailey Tom Barron, PC Mark Bates Joe Beckham Flecia Braswell Steve Brown Jim Byrd Bob Camp, PC Joe Camps, PC Bob Carnes Bill Carraway, PC Jimmy Carter, PC Ken Cashin, PC Bob Caton Raymond Cottrell, PC Dave Cowens, PC Clif Curry Craig Dewhurst Carl Domino, PC

Wade Durham Frank Fain, PC Ron Farrell Michael Feiler Lon Fellenz Mike Fields, PC Philip Griffitts Todd Haag Andy Haggard, PC Kim Hammond, PC Bill Harkins Bruce Harrell Michael Harrell Ed Hart Ed Haskell, PC Arielle Haynes Sherm Henderson, PC Charlie Hill, PC Jeff Hill Lee Hinkle Roger Hobbs Ron Hobbs, PC Cassandra Jenkins

Bill Kalfas Jim Kirk, PC Chris Kraft, PC Lawton Langford, PC George Langford, PC Greg Lawrence Brett Lindquist Douglas Mannheimer, PC Lori Mattice Linda McGee Andy Miller Morris Miller Michael Miller David Mobley DeVoe Moore Russ Morcom Julie Moss John Olson, PC Bill Parker, PC Sean Pittman Frank Pope, PC Theo Proctor, PC Gene Ready

John Rice Christian Scherf Jon Shebel Barry Smith Bob Smith Lomax Smith, PC Randall Spetman Kathy Stahl Brian Swain Donn Szaro Nylah Thompson Glenda Thornton Gary Thurston Nada Usina Oscar Vicente Cumi Walsingham Gary Walsingham, PC Derek Whitis Ash Williams Ken Willis PC denotes Past Chairman

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Derrick Brooks

Mark Hillis

Dustin R. Daniels

James E. Kinsey, Jr.

Emily Fleming Duda

Leslie Pantín, Jr.

David B. Ford

Margaret A. “Peggy” Rolando

Manny Garcia

Brent W. Sembler

William “Andy” Haggard,

Susie Busch-Transou

Chair

Eric C. Walker

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“We are proud of our scholar athletes who excel in the classroom and on the playing field.”

Eric J. Barron

President of The Florida State University

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get your officially licensed nike college product at: BILL’S BOOKSTORE • FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE • GARNET AND GOLD 6

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CO N T E N T S

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Booster Life 5 Board of Directors 26 Booster Life 68 Planned Giving 70 Welcome New Members/ NCAA Compliance Columnists 8 Spring Coaches Tour 22 The Value in Being Here

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Report 18 Community Outreach: Making a Difference Off the Field 30 Student Athletes Q & A 34 Survey Results 36 2011 Football Preview 42 Annual Membership, Season Tickets & Volunteer Campaign 50 Boosters History & Mission 64 Baseball Preview 72 Group Ticket Sales 74 Website Redesign 76 Quarterly Report Features 12 FOOTBALL RECRUITING ’Noles finish as ESPN #1

32 DONOR PROFILE Carl Domino

52 DONOR PROFILE Mike Harrell

54 SEMINOLE Basketball Winning, Outreach

60 SEMINOLE Basketball Iraq to Florida State

photos by fsu sports info & mike olivella

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On the cover: Seminole Pride — Osceola Photo by MIKE OLIVELLA

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Jimbo Tour

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Jimbo Tour

Jimbo Fisher Travels to See Fans and Boosters Following a 10-Win Season The Spring Coaches Tour is Coming to a Town Near You By Charlie Barnes, vice president Photos by ross obley, mike olivella & IPI photography

I

n order to be successful, a newly-minted Head Football Coach needs good advice and the ability to learn quickly from mistakes. Jimbo Fisher quoted the advice that Coach Bowden gave him about how a rebuilding program progresses along a predictable timeline: “First you lose big; then you lose close. Then you win close; and then you win big.”

Coach Jimbo Fisher celebrates the 31–7 victory over UF. He received congratulations from ESPN reporters and FSU fans alike.

In 2010 we seemed to be blowing through the lose close/win close phase with thumping victories over our two principal rivals and the dismissal of an old ghost in the bowl game. With superior recruiting in 2009 and 2010, along with this newest 2011 class, we could be returning soon to dynasty levels of talent-in-depth. “We’re finally learning to win again,” was Jimbo’s assessment after the Maryland game, the eighth Seminole victory of his 2010 campaign. More important to Fisher than the win-loss record in his rookie season, was his focus on the process of developing a winning mentality. Just like our players, our fans also have to learn how to win again. Everybody wants to win, but only a few programs expect to win every week, every game.

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Jimbo Tour

Jimbo Fisher will take his Seminole Boosters travelling show on the road again this April and May. His consistent message to Seminole fans sounds a little like an old time tent revival, but it’s a message Fisher embraces with evangelistic passion. “Winning is a culture and it’s a habit. And it’s not only winning on the field. It’s the way you walk, you talk, you eat, you breathe, you believe. And everybody in your organization, not just the players and coaches, but everybody who affects those kids has to have that mentality. That’s what we’re starting to bring back.” The Spring 2011 Seminole Boosters/ Jimbo Fisher Tour will be a series of celebrations from Atlanta to Miami, from Pensacola to Jacksonville and all points in between. Last year — Coach Fisher’s first as a touring pro — Jimbo conveyed a specific message to rapt Boosters and fans at each stop. He talked, not about how many games we were going to win, but about his

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specific methodology for building a winning program. “Take care of the process,” he said, “and the wins will come.” Those big wins were surely welcome in the hearts of Seminole fans in 2010. By the time you see Jimbo this spring, we will have concluded an inspiring regular season with wins over Miami and Florida, a visit to the ACC Championship game followed by a victory in the Chickfil-A Bowl. Add to all that the triumph of a fabulous recruiting class just signed in February. Few among the legions of Seminole fans expected a turnaround of this magnitude this fast. Come to Tallahassee for the Spring Game this April 16. Then, be in the stands this fall to support your Seminoles. It’s time for greatness again. Here is the itinerary for our Spring 2011 Tour. Please see the Seminole Boosters website (Seminole-Boosters.com) for more specific details. This spring you’ll be able

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to sign up online for many of the events and tournaments. SB Monday, April 18: Sarasota/Bradenton Thursday, April 21: Pensacola Friday, April 22: Panama City Monday, April 25: Jacksonville Friday, April 29: Wakulla Saturday, April 30: Orlando Monday, May 2: Atlanta Wednesday, May 4: Ocala Friday, May 6: Tampa Saturday, May 7: Miami Friday, May 13: Ft Myers/Naples Saturday, May 14: Pinellas County Friday, May 20: Polk County Saturday, May 21: Palm Beach County Monday, May 23: Ft. Lauderdale


Jimbo Tour

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The New By Rob Wilson, Photos courtesy Rivals.com ’Noles

James Wilder, Jr.

Nick O’Leary

ESPN Ranks FSU’s Recruiting Class No. 1

J

imbo Fisher couldn’t stop smiling on his second signing day as Florida State’s head coach. And who could blame him?

Media and recruiting experts marveled at the Seminoles during the recruiting process and poured into Tallahassee to do live reports from campus. If there were any doubts left about FSU’s return to the college football mainstream, they certainly have evaporated. Among Fisher’s characteristic rapid-fire answers to questions about his signing class came one very telling and refreshingly-frank admission: “Size does matter.” If it didn’t, Fisher added, “boxers wouldn’t be separated into weight classes.”

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It was a great line on a day of signing on the line for FSU’s class, which is ranked among the nation’s best by all the services. And Fisher’s evaluation of the class is worth a deeper look. As many FSU fans know by now, Fisher has been a Florida State fan virtually his whole life. He was in the stands at the Sugar Bowl when Deion finished his career with an interception against Auburn. And he can recite from memory most of the lineups of the Seminole’s best teams. But his first chance to walk into an FSU huddle came in 2006 when Bobby Bowden tapped him to run the offense and coach the quarterbacks. There were elements of that 2006 team Fisher would have liked to change. But what coach wouldn’t find elements of any team, even the Pittsburgh Steel(Left to Right) Cornerbacks Keelin Smith and Nick Waisom with safety ers, to change? Karlos Williams at the Under Armour All-America game.

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The New ’Noles

Meet the 2011 Recruits So let’s take a look at the starters on that 2006 FSU team. Not when they lined-up on opening day, but back when they signed with the Seminoles. In other words, an apples-to-apples look at those starters as recruits and the class just landed by FSU. Looking at offense first and skipping the quarterbacks altogether, the composite running back on the 2006 team stood 5 feet 11 inches and weighed 178 pounds. Mesh the three running backs just signed by FSU and the average is 5 feet 10 inches but a much heftier 210 pounds. Rick Trickett is in hog heaven having added nine offensive linemen in this recruiting class alone but some might be surprised that they are actually a touch smaller — let’s say more fit — than the ’06 line was when they signed. Those starters averaged 6 feet 4 inches and 297 pounds, which was definitely skewed by junior college transfer Shannon Boatman and his 6-foot-6, 312-pound frame. The summary of the O Line in this year’s class stands 6 feet 3 inches and 291 pounds. Interestingly, two players on the 2006 line signed at more than 330 pounds and were “down” to lower weight by the time they worked into playing time, whereas the new signees are all projected to be pulling up to the training table rather than having to push back. The composite linebacker who started in ’06 was just under 6 feet 1 inch and weighed 229 pounds when he signed. This new group is just shy of 6 feet 3 inches and weighs an average of 220. The biggest disparity in the comparison comes along the defensive line and in the secondary. The ’06 starters on the defensive front averaged 6 feet 2 inches, 247-pounds on their individual signing days, while this year’s group of six frontline stoppers averages 6 feet 3½ inches and 275 pounds as high school seniors — hence, the pep in Mark Stoop’s step. The “new” freshman defensive back at FSU averages an inch taller and nearly 10 pounds heavier than the starters did five years ago. Florida State’s five signees in the secondary average 6 feet 1 inch and 189 pounds compared to 6 feet, 180 pounds for 82>> the ’06 starters.

AUSTIN BARRON (6’3”, 280 lbs.) Guard, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., St. Thomas Aquinas HS Helped St. Thomas Aquinas to a Class 5A state title in 2010, which included 5,612 yards of total offense... Named to Elite Scouting Services Class 5A All-Tournament Team... Ranked No. 40 on the Sun-Sentinel Broward County Top 50 List... Joins fellow teammates Bobby Hart and Rashad Greene in the 2011 FSU signing class... Another one of veteran offensive line coach Jay Connolly’s products, which include current FSU senior tackle Andrew Datko and Buffalo Bills deep snapper Garrison Sanborn... Underrated athlete who also plays third base... Member of the 2010 Sun State Football All State Finals First Team Offense. TERRY BELL (6’5”, 270 lbs.) DT, Lakeland, Fla., Tenoroc HS Three-star lineman who is ranked No. 51 as a defensive tackle by Rivals. com… Full time offensive guard and part time defensive lineman for his Tenoroc team… Listed No. 86 in the Sun State Football Top 100… No. 101 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Selected All-County First Team by The Lakeland Ledger… No. 83 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel. Kelvin Benjamin (6’6”, 210 lbs.) WR, Belle Glade, Fla., Glades Terry Bell Central HS Big target, whose sheer size — an 80-plus-inch wingspan and 9 1/8inch hands — makes him difficult to defend… Has played only three years of football at Glades Central, a perennial power… Four-star recruit who is rated No. 8 wide receiver and the No. 60 overall player nationally by Rivals.com and the No. 12 receiver by Scout.com… No. 23 wide receiver nationally by ESPN… No. 13 wide receiver and the No. 89 player nationally according to 247Sports… 30 catches for 551 yards and six touchdowns in eight games this season… No. 2 on the Sun Sentinel’s Top 32 Broward County Seniors… Named First Team All-Palm Beach County by Sun Sentinel… No. 25 on Bill Buchalter’s Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No. 36 on the Mobile Press-Register Super Southeast 120… Member of the The Florida Times-Union’s Florida Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 1 wide receiver… The Palm Beach Post All-Area First Team … No. 72 on Tom Lemming’s MaxPreps.com Top 100… No. 42 on the SuperPrep Florida 110. Eric Beverly (5’9”, 216 lbs.) RB, Jacksonville, Fla., First Coast HS One of the leading rushers in the greater Jacksonville area for two seasons before suffering a knee injury in spring football, sidelining him for his senior season… A powerful back who is a tough, inside runner… Three-star running back by Rivals.com and Scout.com who ranks as the No. 11 all-purpose back by Rivals. com and No. 65 running back by Scout.com… Rated the No. 29 running back by ESPN… Rated a threestar prospect by 247Sports… SunStateFootball ranks Beverly as the No. 82 player in the state, even after missing his senior season… No. 90 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Helped lead team to the second round of the state playoffs as a junior in 2009 when he ran for 1,800 yards and scored 19 touchdowns…Rated No. 91 in the 2010 Post Season Top 100 by Scout.com’s Mike Bakas… Chose Florida State over Illinois. Lamarcus Brutus (5’11”, 185 lbs.) Safety, Port St. Lucie, Fla., Treasure Coast HS Touted safety equally adept at playing physical against the run or making plays in pass defense… Three-star prospect by both Rivals.com and Scout.com and is ranked as the No. 47 safety by Rivals.com and No. 33 by Scout.com… Rated a three-star prospect by 247Sports… No. 14 safety by ESPN… First Team All-Area defensive back honors by TCPalm… Recorded 104 tackles, two fumble recoveries, two forced fumbles, six interceptions and blocked two field goals as a senior... No. 62 on Bill Buchalter’s Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 9 safety… Chosen by ESPN760 as the No. 7 player to watch in Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast… No. 24 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Teammate of fellow FSU signee Keelin Smith and 2010 Seminole signee Jeff Luc. CornelliuS “Tank” Carradine (6’5”, 249 lbs.) DE, Cincinnati, Ohio, Butler C.C. Taft HS Outstanding all-around athlete with size, strength and speed… Effective in run support, as well as pressuring the quarterback… Four-star recruit according to Rivals.com and five-star recruit according to Scout.com… One of the nation’s top prospects out of junior college (No. 1 by Rivals.com; No. 5 by Scout. com) and the No. 1 JUCO defensive end prospect… Five-star recruit by 247Sports … No. 1 on the SuperPrep JUCO 100… Racked up 26 sacks in his two years at Butler Community College, including 16 in 2010, which led the NJCAA… 2010 First Team NJCAA All-American… Led team to No. 2 ranking in the NJCAA and an appearance in the NJCAA National title game as Butler finished its season 11-1 while also winning the Jayhawk Conference and Region VI championships… All-Jayhawk Conference First Team selection… Region VI Defensive Player of the Year… As a sophomore, led his team with 119 tackles including 29 for a loss and 16 sacks, also forced three fumbles, recovered five others, 15 quarterback hurries and a pass breakup… His 29 tackles for loss rank fourth in a single season… Started every game at weakside defensive end as a freshman in 2009 and led the Grizzlies with 90 tackles… Finished second on the team with 20

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The New ’Noles tackles-for-loss and 10 sacks… Prepped at Cincinnati’s Taft High School where he was coached by Mike Martin… Regarded as one of the top prospects in the Midwest prior to signing a letter of intent with Illinois… Picked Florida State over Alabama, Ohio State and Georgia. Ruben Carter (6’4”, 285 lbs.) OL, Miami, Fla., Jackson HS Three-star offensive lineman who split time between guard and center as a senior at Miami Jackson High School and also logged time on the defensive line… Helped pave the way for Jackson’s appearance in the first round of the 3A state playoffs… Rated the No. 29 offensive guard by Rivals.com and No. 42 offensive tackle by Scout.com… Rated a three-star prospect by 247Sports… No. 78 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… Selected Second Team All-Dade County by The Miami Herald as a senior and earned honorable mention standing as a junior… Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Florida Super 75 where he was rated as the No. 2 offensive guard… No. 92 offensive tackle by ESPN… No. 80 on the SuperPrep Florida 110. Jacob Coker (6’5”, 210 lbs.) QB, Mobile, Ala., St. Paul’s Episcopal Competitive and driven quarterback who is an exceptional athlete… Switched from running a Wing-T offense in his junior season to a pro-style offense as a senior and completed 94-of-153 passes for 1,508 yards and 16 touchdowns while also carrying 61 times for 355 yards and five TDs… Led St. Paul’s to the semifinals of the Alabama State playoffs and a 10-2 record in his final season… A threestar prospect by Rivals.com and Scout.com who is ranked the No. 18 pro-style quarterback by Rivals.com and No. 44 QB by Scout.com… Rated a three-star prospect by 247Sports… No. 17 on the SuperPrep Alabama 43… Selected to play in the Alabama-Mississippi All-Star game… Rated the No. 70 pro-style quarterback by ESPN… Also an exceptional basketball player who led St. Paul’s to 17 wins as a junior while averaging 17.4 points per game… Named the Class 5A basketball player of the year in Mobile County as a junior and was invited to the state of Alabama’s North-South All Star basketball game… Now averaging 21.9 points and nine rebounds per game as a senior for a team that hopes to make a deep run in the Class 5A state playoffs. JACOB “JAKE” FAHRENKRUG (6’4”, 321 lbs.) Guard, North Dakota State College of Science, Robbinsdale, Minn., Cooper HS Widely considered the top offensive lineman in the JUCO ranks… Four-star recruit according to Rivals.com, who lined up at left guard for his North Dakota State College of Science team… An explosive and athletic interior line prospect who has no trouble leading as a pulling blocker, or getting on linebacker at the second level… Played in the Minneapolis suburban high school of Robbinsdale Cooper for three years… Once weighed 400 pounds and used athletics as a way to improve his health… No. 11 on the SuperPrep JUCO 100… The No. 4-rated overall JUCO prospect and the top-rated offensive lineman in the nation by Rivals.com… Rates a four-star recruit by 247Sports… Named 2010 First Team NJCAA All-American… Also named Academic All-Conference, First Team AllRegion 11 and First Team All Midwest Football Conference… Earned honorable mention All-Region as a freshman at North Dakota State. DEVONTA FREEMAN (5’8”, 195 lbs.) RB, Miami, Fla., Miami Central HS Considered one of the most versatile runners in the country, effectively running between the tackles and capable of using his 4.5 40-yard dash speed to turn the corner… A four-star prospect by both Rivals.com and Scout.com… No. 10 running back and No. 108 overall player in the nation by Rivals.com and the No. 9 running back by Scout.com… No. 15 running back by ESPN… No. 5 running back and the No. 52 overall player in the nation by 247Sports… Helped lead Miami Central to the 2010 Class 6A state title and was named the MVP after gaining 308 yards on 36 carries — falling just 20 yards shy of a state championship game record… As a senior ran for Miami-Dade County, leading 2,208 yards and 26 touchdowns… Recorded 663 rushing yards and six touchdowns in the final two games of the state playoffs… Rushed for 545 yards and two touchdowns as junior back-up to Kentucky signee Brandon Gainer … First Team All-Dade by The Miami Herald… Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Florida Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 4 running back… No. 24 on the SuperPrep Elite Top 50 and No. 4 on the SuperPrep Florida 110. Rashad Greene (6’0”, 175 lbs.) WR, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., St. Thomas Aquinas HS A deep threat and a solid route runner, the speedy four-star receiver has been clocked around 4.42 in the 40-yard dash while starring for perennial state and national power St. Thomas Aquinas… No. 10 wide receiver nationally by Scout. com, No. 20 by 247Sports and No. 29 by Rivals.com and No. 10 wide receiver by Scout.com… No. 125 on the ESPNU 150 and No. 20 wide receiver nationally by ESPN… Had 43 receptions for 943 yards (21.9 yards per catch) with 13 touchdowns as a senior… Came up big in the 2010 Class 5A state title game with six receptions

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Bobby Hart

Rashad Greene

for 148 yards and two touchdowns — including a title-clinching 74-yard pass in the fourth quarter… St. Thomas Aquinas defeated Tampa Plant 29-7 and finished with a No. 3 national ranking… Tallied 31 catches for 510 yards and 10 touchdowns as a junior, helping St. Thomas Aquinas to a state title… First Team Sun-Sentinel All-Broward County as a senior… No. 30 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… All-Broward County First Team by The Miami Herald as a senior and All-Broward County Second Team as a junior… No. 94 on Mobile PressRegister Super Southeast 120… No. 17 on the SuperPrep Florida 110 … Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 5 wide receiver … Also a standout track & field athlete in sprints and jumps… Coached in football by South Florida icon George Smith at St. Thomas Aquinas. Bobby Hart (6’5”, 298 lbs.) OL, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., St.. Thomas Aquinas Anchored a St. Thomas Aquinas offensive line that helped the Raiders compile 5,612 yards of total offense on their way to the 2010 Class 5A state championship and a No. 3 national ranking… Five-star offensive tackle by Scout.com and four-star lineman by Rivals.com… Relentless drive blocker with good feet in pass protection… No. 8 offensive tackle by Rivals.com, No. 77 nationally at any position and No. 19 in the state… Scout.com ranks him No. 4 offensive tackle in the country… Rated a four-star prospect and the No. 16 offensive tackle by 247Sports… No. 25 on the ESPNU 150 and No. 4 overall offensive tackle… Selected to Under Armour All-American team… First Team All-Broward County by Sun Sentinel as a senior… No. 14 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… All-Broward County First Team by The Miami Herald as a senior… No. 43 on Mobile Press-Register Super Southeast 120… Member of The Florida TimesUnion’s Florida Super 75 where he was rated as the No. 1 offensive tackle… No. 32 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Second Team 2A All-State offensive lineman as a junior at Fort Lauderdale’s Cardinal Gibbons… Won’t celebrate his 17th birthday until August 21, after he has arrived on the FSU campus… Coached by legendary South Florida high school coach George Smith… Also played forward on a highly ranked travel AAU basketball team until last summer, playing against the likes of Ohio State freshman phenom Jared Sullinger and Winter Park High senior Austin Rivers… Qualified for state in wrestling as a sophomore. Tyler Hunter (6’0”, 197 lbs.) Safety, Valdosta, Ga., Lowndes County HS Hunter is the fourth member of the Lowndes County High School football team to commit to Florida State in the last two years, joining Greg Reid, Gerald Demps and Telvin Smith… No. 116 in the ESPNU 150 and the No. 10 safety… Rated the No. 33 safety by Rivals.com and the No. 43 safety by Scout.com… Earned a threestar rating from 247Sports… No. 39 on the SuperPrep Georgia 83… No. 34 on the Atlanta Journal Constitution’s Top 50 Recruits… His father, Brice Hunter, was a receiver and a University of Georgia legend before his untimely death in 2004. The elder Hunter, who was slain during an argument with a neighbor, was the Bulldogs’ top receiver in the early 1990s and still ranks among the school’s career leaders in several offensive categories… Played for highly-respected Lowndes County coach Randy McPherson … Hunter has run a 4.50 40 and boasts a 4.33 shuttle time… Chose the Seminoles over Florida, Louisville, Mississippi State and Tennessee. Tre jackson (6’4”, 300 lbs.) OL, Jessup, Ga., Wayne County HS Versatile big man recruited as both a defensive tackle and an offensive lineman… Has the frame and skill set that excites coaching staff… Holds a three-star ranking from Rivals.com as a defensive tackle and carries a No. 60 national position rank. Also ranked as the No. 78 overall player in football-rich Georgia… Scout.com has Jackson rated as a three-star prospect at offensive guard... Played at Wayne County for coach Jody Grooms… Late bloomer in the recruiting world because he sat out his junior season with an injury… Hails from same school that produced former Seminole Tony Yeomans, who was part of FSU’s heralded 1985 signing class… Originally committed to Georgia Tech back in October… Selected Florida State over Georgia, Alabama, Miami and NC State, though he also had offers from Florida, Rutgers, Middle Tennessee and Georgia Southern. Arrington Jenkins (6’2”, 225 lbs.) LB, Miami, Fla., Coral Park HS A three-star linebacker who plays physically and with outstanding instincts, Jenkins has been clocked at 4.5 in the 40-yard dash… Second Team All-Dade

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The New ’Noles County by The Miami Herald as a senior… No. 8 overall prospect in Miami-Dade County by The Miami Herald and No. 2 among linebackers…Ranked No. 43 among outside linebackers nationally by Rivals.com… Rated a three-star prospect by 247Sports… No. 87 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Rated the No. 9 outside linebacker by ESPN… No. 2 on The Miami Herald’s Top 25 Miami-Dade recruits for 2011… Started at Miami Killian High School and earned First Team All-Dade as a sophomore before missing much of his junior year and finishing his senior season at Coral Park. TIM JERNIGAN (6’2”, 297 lbs.) DT, Lake City, Fla., Columbia HS Powerful and extremely quick off the ball, he has been a disruptive force in opposing backfields as evidenced by his 14 sacks as a senior… Five-star defensive lineman, who is ranked No. 4 at defensive tackle in the nation by Scout.com… Four-star prospect ranked No. 2 by Rivals.com… Ranked No. 29 in the Final Rivals 100… Recorded 77 tackles, 32 tackles for loss, 14 sacks and one interception and also ran for four touchdowns on offense as a senior in 2010… 2011 U.S. Army All-American… All-USA First-Team defense by USA Today… Rated a four-star prospect, No. 2 defensive lineman and No. 17 overall player on the ESPNU 150… No. 6 on The Gainesville Sun’s Florida Top 50 Seniors… Named to the 2010 AllFirst Coast First Team Defense by The Florida Times-Union… Member of the Times-Union’s Super 75 where he was rated as the No. 1 defensive tackle… No. 8 on the SuperPrep Florida 110 and No.35 on the SuperPrep Elite 50… No. 5 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No. 9 on Mobile PressRegister Super Southeast 120… No. 41 on Tom Lemming’s MaxPreps.com 2011 Top 100 … Registered 131 tackles, 27 tackles for loss, 12 sacks, three forced fumbles and three fumble recoveries and was a 3A All-State selection as a junior and a sophomore… Selected the Seminoles over LSU, Alabama, Tennessee and Florida. Nile Lawrence- Stample (6’1”, 297 lbs.) DT, Davie, Fla., Nova HS A four-year starter who played middle linebacker as a junior before moving to defensive tackle as a senior… Despite playing defensive tackle for the first time in his life as a senior, became a dominating presence on the Nova defensive line, regularly drawing double- and occasionally triple-team attention… Finished the 2010 campaign with 47 tackles, six sacks and a forced fumble… Four-star prospect ranked No. 29 defensive tackle by Rivals.com… Rated a four-star prospect and the No. 14 defensive tackle by 247Sports… Three-star prospect by Scout.com and No. 37 defensive tackle… Named First Team All-Broward County by the Sun Sentinel as a senior… No. 80 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No. 71 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Was a big hit at a Miami combine with 4.9 in the 40-yard dash… All-Broward County First Team by The Miami Herald as a senior… Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Florida Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 3 defensive tackle… No. 146 on the ESPNU 150 and rated the No. 13 overall defensive tackle… Coached by Bill Hobbs… As a junior middle linebacker at Nova, registered more than 100 tackles. STERLING LOVELADY (6’2”, 273 lbs.) OL, Navarre, Fla., Navarre HS A three-year starter at offensive tackle for Navarre High School, coached by Chad Lashley… Projected as a center or interior lineman in college… Helped lead team to the Region 1 4A title game and a school-record 11 wins as a senior … Navarre finished 11-2 overall and ranked No. 10 in 4A… ThreeTrey star recruit and No. 7 center prospect by Rivals.com… Pettis Rated the No. 13 center by Scout.com and a three-star prospect by 247Sports… No. 15 center according to ESPN… The first Navarre football player to sign with a Bowl Championship Series member school and one of the few prep football players from the Pensacola area to ever complete his high school requirements in December and join a major college football program before his senior class graduates… Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Florida Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 1 center.

Florida Times-Union as a senior… Posted stunning numbers with 17.5 sacks and 89 tackles, including 42 for loss, while forcing four fumbles… Second Team 5A All-State as a junior when he helped his team reach the state playoffs… No. 97 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 4 defensive tackle in the state… Rated the No. 18 overall defensive tackle by ESPN… No. 45 in the The Gainesville Sun’s top 50 seniors list for the state of Florida... No. 26 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Played at the same high school that produced current Seminoles Jermaine Thomas and Avis Commack… Mitchell’s father, also named Derrick Mitchell, lettered in basketball for the Seminoles in 1988 and 1989. Giorgio Newberry (6’6”, 255 lbs.) DE, Fort Pierce, Fla., Fort Pierce Central HS A four-star defensive end with a good motor and explosiveness off the ball, he enjoyed a stellar senior season recording 83 tackles, 14 tackles for loss and eight sacks… No. 10 strongside defensive end by Rivals.com and No. 18 defensive end by Scout.com… Four-star prospect by 247Sports… First Team All-Area defensive end by TCPalm… Finished his junior season with 40 tackles and three sacks while also garnering First Team All-Area honors… No. 17 on Bill Buchalter’s Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 3 defensive end… No.54 on the Sporting News Top 100… No. 27 on the ESPNU 150 and No. 3 overall athlete… selected to Under Armour All-American team… Played right tackle, left tackle and even some center in high school and did the same in the Under Armour All-American game despite being projected to play defense in college… No. 67 on Tom Lemming’s MaxPreps.com Top 100… Rated No. 25 in the The Gainesville Sun’s top 50 seniors list for the state of Florida… No. 19 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Chosen by ESPN760 as the No. 3 player in the 10 players to watch in Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast… Coached by Chris Hutchings. Nick O’Leary (6’4”, 235 lbs.) TE, Palm Beach, Fla., Dwyer HS The top-rated tight end prospect in the country presents matchup problems with his athleticism… As a senior, caught 51 passes for 875 yards and 12 touchdowns in helping lead Dwyer to 2010 Class 4A state football semifinals. O’Leary helped Dwyer win the 4A title in 2009… U.S. Army All-American… Rivals ranks him as the No. 1 tight end and No. 33 player overall while Scout.com has him the No. 3 tight end and the 62nd best player in the nation… Rated a five-star prospect, the No. 1 tight end and the No. 16 overall player in the nation by 247Sports… All-USA Second Team offense by USA Today… No. 20 on the ESPNU 150 and rated the No. 2 tight end prospect… No. 74 on Tom Lemming’s MaxPreps.com 2011 Top 100… Sun Sentinel Super 11 selection… No. 1 on the Sun Sentinel’s Top 32 Broward County Senior… No. 3 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No. 39 on Mobile Press-Register Super Southeast 120… First Team All-Palm Beach County by Sun Sentinel… Excelled as a punter and special teams player… Member of The Florida Times-Union’s Florida Super 75 where he is rated as the No. 1 tight end… Palm Beach Post All-Area First Team… No. 10 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Grandson of legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus.

Bobby Hart

Giorgio Newberry

Derrick Mitchell (6’4”, 285 lbs.) DT, Jacksonville, Fla., First Coast HS A quick defensive tackle prospect listed as a four-star prospect by Scout.com and a three-star prospect by Rivals.com… Considered to have great hips and an outstanding first step… Ranked as the No. 20 defensive tackle and the No. 233 player nationally by Rivals.com and the No. 28 defensive tackle by Scout.com… Rated a four-star prospect and the No. 7 defensive tackle and the No. 98 player nationally by 247Sports… Has been a standout at First Coast High School where he is a teammate of fellow FSU signee Eric Beverly… First Team All-First Coast defensive lineman by The

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The New ’Noles Josue Matias (6’5”, 290 lbs.) OL, Union City, N.J., Union City HS One of New Jersey’s finest prospects as a lineman because of his size and agility… A four-star prospect by Rivals.com and Scout.com… missed his entire senior season as he recuperated from a leg injury… Ranked the No. 25 offensive tackle nationally and No. 9 best player in the state of New Jersey… No. 13 offensive tackle by ESPN, No. 27 offensive tackle by Scout.com and No. 18 offensive tackle by 247Sports… First Team All-Hudson Area by the Star-Ledger as a junior in 2009… No. 12 on the SuperPrep New Jersey 35… 350 pounds in the bench press… Marks the second consecutive year the Seminoles have landed a touted offensive lineman from New Jersey, which produced current redshirt freshman Daniel Foose… Matias selected Florida State over Rutgers from a lengthy list of options. TREY PETTIS (6’5”, 327 lbs.) OL, Deland, Fla., Deland HS Standout offensive lineman who split time between tackle and center as a senior for DeLand High School, where he was coached by his father, Kevin Pettis... Played prominent role in DeLand’s resurgence as the program compiled a 22-5 record over the past two seasons… Under Armour All-American and took part in the All-American Game on Jan. 5… Three-star recruit who is rated the No. 8 center by ESPN, No. 10 by Scout.com and No. 13 by Rivals.com… Three-star prospect by 247Sports… First Team All-County by Daytona Beach News-Journal in 2009 and 2010… Started 43 varsity games — 38 at DeLand … Selected for the FACA North-South All-Star Game… No. 43 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No. 105 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… No. 6 on Orlando Sentinel’s 2011 Central Florida Super60… First Team All-Central Florida and First Team All-Volusia County by Orlando Sentinel… Member of The Florida TimesUnion’s Florida Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 2 center. Jordan Prestwood (6’5”, 287 lbs.) OL, Plant City, Fla., Plant City HS Big, athletic lineman who is considered an outstanding run-blocker with the agility to protect the passer… three-star offensive lineman according to Rivals.com… No. 130 overall prospect in the ESPNU 150 and the No. 10 offensive tackle… Ranked the No. 5 offensive tackle and the No. 70 player in the nation by 247Sports… No. 10 offensive tackle nationally by Scout.com and No. 28 by Rivals.com at that position… has a good size and considered a good run-blocker… No. 23 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… The Tampa Tribune All-Hillsborough County First Team as a senior … No. 95 on Mobile Press-Register Super Southeast 120… The Florida Times-Union’s Florida Super 75 where he was rated as the No. 4 offensive tackle… No. 66 on Tom Lemming’s MaxPreps.com 2011 Top 100… No. 30 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Played tight end as a junior and finished with 28 catches for 319 yards… Had four touchdown receptions and one rushing touchdown, earning Third Team 5A All-State honors.

Lamarcus Brutus

Keelin Smith

Keelin Smith (6’3”, 185 lbs.) DB, Port St. Lucie, Fla., Treasure Coast HS Three-star cornerback with great size and athleticism, who also could play safety… No. 34 best cornerback by Rivals.com and No. 28 safety by Scout.com… Four-star prospect and the No. 14 safety by 247Sports… As a senior posted 64 tackles, one interception and blocked three field goals… Selected to the Under Armour AllAmerican team… No. 60 on the ESPNU 150 and No. 5 overall safety… No. 58 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No.40 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… The Florida Times-Union’s Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 5 cornerback… First Team All-Area defensive back by TCPalm… Scout.com’s Mike Bakas rates Smith as the No. 55 player in Florida in the Post-Season Top 100… Rated No. 16 in the The Gainesville Sun’s top 50 seniors list for the state of Florida… Chosen by ESPN760 as the No. 6 player in the 10 players to watch in Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast… At age 14 won a national and international title at the prestigious Hershey’s National Track and Field Championship in Hershey,

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Pa., winning the boys age 13-14 standing long jump competition with jumps of 9 feet, 5 1/4 inches (national) and 9-4 1/4 (international) to be the first national champ in the 17-year history of Fort Pierce’s Sheraton Plaza Track Club. Terrance Smith (6’3”, 215 lbs.) OL, Decatur, Ga., Southwest Dekalb HS Three-year starter at Southwest Dekalb where he developed his reputation as an outstanding pass rusher… Enrolled at Florida State in January… Three-star prospect by Rivals.com rated the No. 18 outside linebacker… Has a four-star rating and ranked the No. 21 defensive end by Scout.com… Three-star prospect by 247Sports… No. 26 outside linebacker by ESPN… As a senior amassed 60 tackles and 10 sacks in nine games… As a junior, had more than 120 tackles, 15 sacks and 15 tackles for loss… No. 27 on the SuperPrep Georgia 83… No. 34 on the Atlanta Journal Constitution’s Top 50 Recruits… Also enjoyed a standout career in track & field as a sprinter/jumper… Chose the Seminoles over the likes of Alabama, Auburn, Clemson, Georgia, Georgia Tech and Ohio State… Smith’s father, the late Terry Smith, starred as a wide receiver for Clemson in the 1990s. Nick Waisome (5’10”, 171 lbs.) CB, Groveland, Fla., South Lake HS One of the top cover-corners in the country… Four-star recruit who is rated the No. 8 cornerback by both Rivals.com and Scout.com… ESPN ranks him the No. 67 overall prospect and No. 2 cornerback nationally… No. 2 cornerback and No. 44 overall player in the nation by 247Sports… Selected to Under Armour All-American team… Had 47 tackles, six interceptions and scored five touchdowns as a senior… First Team All-Central Florida defensive back by Orlando Sentinel and Defensive Player of the Year in Lake/Sumter County by Orlando Sentinel as a senior… No. 18 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No. 5 on Orlando Sentinel’s 2011 Central Florida Super60… No. 49 on Mobile Press-Register Super Southeast 120…The Florida Times-Union’s Florida Super 75, where he was rated as the No. 3 cornerback… No. 57 on the SuperPrep Florida 110… Finished his junior season with 67 tackles, 18 pass break-ups and four interceptions and also had 17 receptions for 495 yards and six touchdowns on offense… First Team All-State defensive back for 6A classification as a junior. James Wilder, Jr. (6’2”, 219 lbs.) RB, Tampa, Fla., Plant HS A dynamic, five-star athlete, who is considered the best overall athlete in the country after playing both running back and linebacker at Tampa Plant High School… Led Plant to the 5A state title game… Selected to U.S. Army All-American team as a senior and participated in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl, where he scored the winning touchdown for the East… Rushed for 1,597 yards and 22 touchdowns, and had 75 tackles and eight sacks as a senior… All-USA First Team defense by USA Today… No. 2 running back and No. 11 player nationally by Rivals.com… No. 3 outside linebacker and the No. 29 overall player by Scout.com… No. 29 player on the ESPN 150 and the No. 4 overall athlete in the nation… No. 7 on the Sporting News Top 100 for 2011… Five-star prospect by both Rivals.com and Scout.com … The Tampa Tribune’s All-Hillsborough County First Team as a senior… No. 1 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No. 7 on Mobile Press-Register Super Southeast 120… The Florida Times-Union’s Super 75, where he is rated as the No. 1 overall athlete… 2010 U.S. Air Force All-American Second Team Defense by MaxPreps… No. 2 on Tom Lemming’s MaxPreps.com Top 100… As a junior helped Plant to a 5A state title after rushing for 1,004 yards (7.49 per carry) and 15 touchdowns, while registering 136 tackles (66 solo) and 19 sacks on defense… First Team All-State honors for 5A classification as a junior… As a sophomore, registered 145 total tackles with 62 solo and 15 sacks and was selected All-Hillsborough County First Team, FSWA Second Team 5A All-State and All-Suncoast Second Team… Son of former Buccaneers running back James Wilder. Karlos Williams (6’2”, 210 lbs.) Safety, Davenport, Fla., Ridge Community HS A hard-hitting, consensus five-star safety with good size, who is ranked the No. 2 safety, No. 8 player nationally and No. 2 player in the state of Florida by Rivals. com… No. 22 overall player and the No. 2 safety in the nation by Scout.com… No. 1 safety and the No. 7 player nationally by 247 Sports… Hits like a linebacker but reportedly has the hands of a receiver and skills of a top-notch safety… Selected to Under Armour All-American game… All-USA Second Team defense by USA Today… No. 17 on the Sporting News Top 100 for 2011… No. 5 on the ESPNU 150 and rated the No. 1 safety prospect… No. 9 on Tom Lemming’s MaxPreps.com 2011 Top 100… No. 12 on Bill Buchalter’s 2011 Florida Top 100 for the Orlando Sentinel… No. 10 on Mobile Press-Register Super Southeast 120… Member of The Florida TimesUnion’s Super 75 where he was rated as the No. 1 safety… No. 8 on the SuperPrep Elite Top 50, No. 3 on the SuperPrep Florida 110 and the SuperPrep Dixie Defensive Player of the Year… First Team All-Polk County by The Lakeland Ledger… Also played running back and ran 69 times for 564 yards (8.2 yards per carry) and scored seven touchdowns as a senior… As junior, had 102 tackles and three interceptions and was listed in Associated Press South Region 25 list of top recruits… brother is Vince Williams, who is a rising junior linebacker at Florida State.

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Jimbo Fisher (center) and his coaching staff pose at the Recruiting Warparty at the Tallahassee Antique Car Museum where more than 800 attended.

Photo by Mike Olivella

From page 12

So down the road, and it depends on who you talk to about how far down the road, FSU will surely be fielding a bigger, stronger, faster team. But the question always floats around about whether that translates into championships? To answer that, let’s look at the top recruiting classes of 2002-2006 according to Rivals and see who won the national title four years after that. Top class in 2002 was Texas and the national champion four years later was Florida — wish I hadn’t picked that year. No. 1 recruiting class in 2003 went to LSU and the national champion was LSU (a Fisher-coached team). USC’s class was rated tops in 2004 and UF won the championship. In 2005 and 2006, top class honors went to USC again, but in 2005 the national title went to Alabama and Auburn won the most recent championship. Statisticians would tell you that one national champion in five is statistically significant compared to lower ranked classes. Football coaches will tell you that a whole lot more goes into the process of producing championships than just recruiting — and that statisticians make poor tacklers. Fisher told the packed room on signing day that recruiting the right players was just one third of a three-legged process. He believes FSU has signed good players, but emphasizes the importance of player development, which is the second leg. The final leg of the stool is coaching them once you get them on the field. Of one thing there can be no doubt, FSU’s man in charge believes this class can complete that triangle. SB S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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Community Outreach

Baseball team volunteers for the Soap Box Derby benefitting breast cancer.

Student-Athlete Advisory Council members and other students from a variety of sports, led by Christian Ponder, participated in Super CPR Day.

(L to R) Ashley Staget, Trevor Andrews, Amy Sargeant and Margo Zwerling participated in Super CPR Day. Seminole Track & Field teams participated in Cupcakes for Diabetes fundraiser.

Seminole Track & Field teams adopt-a-family produced gifts for the holidays. 18

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Community Outreach

HelpingHands Student-Athletes and Coaches Make a Difference Off the Field By John Lata, Ph.D., Office of Student Services

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ith the holiday season behind us and the New Year full steam ahead, it’s time to reflect back on some of our student-athletes’ efforts and honors off the field. We’re just four months into the academic calendar and your Florida State University student-athletes have completed more than 3,600 hours of community service in a variety of locations. And the academic year is still young. Over winter break alone, student-athletes and coaches took time to make a difference in a variety of ways: The Track & Field team helped raise money for the Sixth Annual Salvation Army Adopt-a-Family. Each event group (men’s sprints, women’s sprints, throwers, jumpers, striders, men’s distance and women’s distance) “adopted” a child. The goal was to raise $100 for each group/child, which was no hurdle for FSU. The men and women raised $815 in total and purchased eight bikes and helmets. “This is a terrific charity and one that we have now worked with for six years,” said FSU Head Coach Bob Braman. “I am proud of the team’s effort to help raise money for such a worthy cause.” While training in Naples, Fla., over winter break both the Men’s and Women’s Swimming and Diving squads donated their time to the Fleischmann After-School Club and to the Harbor Chase Assisted Living Facility. The Fleischmann AfterSchool Club was developed for children of working parents, and Harbor Chase is the home of senior citizens who enjoy the company of others and/or need assistance. On Dec. 16, student-athletes from a variety of sports participated in the Bethany

Apartments Christmas Party. Sponsored by the Capital City Kiwanis Club, ECHO and Moose Lodge, the party helps bring holiday joy to children of “displaced families” living in temporary housing. Studentathletes spent time meeting and eating with the children as well as interacting with them in fun activities like “who can make the fastest snowman out of tissue paper.” When Santa Claus appeared, your student-athletes served as Santa’s Helpers, distributing presents to each child. It was a memorable and heart-felt night as parents were thankful their children received gifts this holiday season.

Your studentathletes accomplished all that — and the academic year is still young. Quarterback Christian Ponder was recognized at the Allstate Sugar Bowl for his selection to the Allstate AFCA Goodworks Team, which honors college football players who made a difference with their community service. Though Ponder was unable to attend, he was highlighted during halftime of ESPN’s television broadcast. One of Ponder’s initiatives took place in November, when as president of the American Red Cross ’Noles, he led a Super CPR Day event that certified more than 300 individuals.

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Additionally, Ponder received the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ Bobby Bowden Award from the award’s namesake and the man Ponder called coach for four seasons in Tallahassee. Ponder is the ninth recipient of the award, which is presented to the one college football player who best combines achievements on the field and in the classroom with serving as a “faith model” in the community. “It’s definitely an honor,” Ponder said after accepting the award. An outstanding student, Ponder earned his undergraduate degree in finance in two-and-a-half years and in December received the National Football Foundation’s Scholar-Athlete Award, which includes an $18,000 postgraduate scholarship. Additionally, he was a two-time finalist for the Danny Wuerffel Trophy, which recognizes those who serve as exemplary role models for their academics, community service and faith. Ponder was one of more than 100 of your student-athletes who last year earned Academic All ACC honors, second only to Duke. Your FSU student-athletes have demonstrated off-the-field generosity and classroom commitment while excelling on the field of competition. The Seminoles men’s and women’s teams finished No. 5 last year in the Lierfield Sports Directors Cup — a national measure of comprehensive athletic excellence — and earned a final ranking of No. 4 last fall, behind Stanford, North Carolina and Ohio State. Your student-athletes accomplished all that — and the academic year is still young. SB

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Charlie Barnes

Being Here It’s Not Just About the Show; It’s About the Experience By Charlie barnes, vice president Photos by Mike Olivella, Ross Obley & Russell Grace

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ovember and December are magical in Manhattan. New York calls itself the greatest city in the world and late fall lends power support to the claim.

Cascading showers of lights color the long stretch of Broadway. Hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions of tourists choke the broad streets, eyes cast upward at the towering buildings or arms crossed and heads bowed against the biting cold. Manhattan throbs with joy this time of year. Every restaurant table is reserved, every hotel is booked, every show is sold out. The Broadway theaters are bursting with energy despite their old age. All the seats are filled and that’s not a minor point because those old seats, like the seats in Doak Campbell Stadium, were measured long ago to conform to average rear ends of considerably less width than most Americans sport today.

The shows are wonderful. The Christmas Spectacular at Radio City Music Hall is a constant favorite, and other current Broadway winners include “Wicked,” “Mama Mia,” Charlie Barnes, Executive Director, Seminole Boosters, Inc. “Jersey Boys” and “Rain.” “Rain” is a tribute to The Beatles. Nostalgia is a cold word; this show isn’t about flickering video and old album covers. For those of us who grew up with this music, the entire production is a brief, poignant evening’s passage to our younger selves. The actors/musicians are spot-on. They look the part and they play all the music live. The actor playing Paul McCartney stepped forward and told the audience that he was now going to play “the most recorded popular tune in history” and invited the packed house to sing along. He didn’t say the name of the piece; he didn’t have to. The audience instantly began singing “Yesterday” as he began to play. »

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Charlie Barnes

It was that moment that I realized something about our Seminoles and Doak Campbell Stadium. There is considerable value in being there. It’s not just about the show; it’s about the experience. I imagine “Rain” is available on a disk. You could settle back at home and watch it on your big-screen television with an adult beverage and a snack. But you’ll never reproduce being in that theater, sharing the electric experience with a thousand kindred hearts who feel as you do as you embrace the magic. Yes, the magic. The magic of being there — of being right here, in Doak Campbell Stadium — used to draw so many Seminole fans that throughout the 1990s the house routinely averaged 102% of capacity. Now we look to a new generation of Seminole fans to embrace the magic and recreate the energy of the full house. Coach Jimbo Fisher has made a spectacular beginning, with wins over our two major rivals as well as an old ghost in the bowl game. Being here is better than staying home. Winning on the field is always the most important key, but for our fans who spend the entire weekend in Tallahassee, the Seminole Boosters, the City of Tallahassee and the university are all working together to make our fan experience the best in the country. College Town is a transformative vision, and one example of these new initiatives. College Town is a new entertainment and residential district extending generally between Doak Campbell Stadium and the Civic Center. “College Town is designed to feature sophisticated three-to-five-story, urban-designed buildings surrounded by tree-lined, cobblestone pedestrian streets. The planned community will offer sophisticated restaurants, entertainment, shopping and living options that are clean, safe and vibrant. As envisioned, College Town would be a center where education, business and people come together in a lively and imaginative environment.” Your Florida State campus and most especially College Town will be a wonderful place for you and your friends to spend

EJ Manuel will lead a veteran offense in 2011.

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Charlie Barnes

It was that moment I realized something about our Seminoles and Doak Campbell Stadium. There is considerable value in being there. It’s not just about the show; it’s about the experience. the weekend. Imagine families dressed in garnet and gold, strolling and shopping along quaint streets. Visualize an entire weekend of shaded tailgates, the delicious smell of smoke and the familiar faces of college pals from long ago. There used to be a special sense of anticipation in the air on big game weekends, and now it’s coming back. Everyone can feel heightened energy and enthusiasm among Seminole fans who smile and chop their arms at each other as they pass. Game Weekend brings the brassy sound of the Marching Chiefs in the distance, giving their pre-game concert in Dick Howser Stadium. Wisps of smoke curl skyward from knots of fans clustered around their cookers and chairs. You’ll enjoy another new feature this fall: the Seminole Walk. When our 2011 football team strolls toward Doak Campbell Stadium, thousands of Seminoles will be straining to line the pathway and cheer them on. The old confidence is returning and we’re not that far away. Too often during the final minutes of the Chick-fil-A Bowl

the stadium announcer pleaded with fans not to rush the field after the game. FSU fans were laughing. No one had any intention of rushing the field. “We’ve been here before,” Seminoles were thinking. The contest against South Carolina was a tossup and we’re happy to win; but we’re getting used to winning again, and we expect it. Your goal posts are safe. We’re moving on. The reviews of today’s best Broadway shows are sensational, and the reviews of Jimbo Fisher’s program are just as promising. College Town is coming very soon, and the Seminole fires that blazed across college football in the 1990s still burn bright in the eyes of America’s football fans. Florida State is still one of the most recognized and respected brands in college football. There’s strong evidence that Florida State endures as an icon; the 2010 Chickfil-A Bowl (Peach Bowl) was the mostviewed game in the bowl’s 43-year history. And, it was the fifth most-viewed game in all of ESPN’s bowl broadcast

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history. In fact, a 2010 Wall Street Journal study showed that both FSU and Miami are still among the Top Five most popular TV draws during bowl season. The study charted national viewership for every bowl game since 1998. Our Seminoles rank No. 2 nationally, behind only Southern California and ahead of Notre Dame, Miami and Michigan. On the field after the bowl game, Coach Jimbo Fisher addressed the milling crowd. He spoke directly to his team, but the message was embraced by Seminole fans. “There’s much more out there for us to accomplish…This is not where we want to be…We’re not waiting for the future. The future is now!” There’s magic in that promise, a magic that is definitely worth the trip to Tallahassee. Yes, the journey can be expensive, and yes, the stadium can be cramped. But like Broadway, there’s nothing better than being here in person for a fantastic show. And, as impressive as the Seminoles were this season, their performance is not yet as terrific as it’s going to be. And soon. You’ll want to be here. SB

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Booster Life

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Booster Life

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Player Profile

by Caryn Savitz, FSU Sports Info

If you could play any other sport other than softball, which would it be? SH: I’d play volleyball. I played it in high school. It’s really fast paced and just a really fun sport. Describe what it means to you to be a part of Florida State Athletics. SH: It’s the tradition, all the pride you get when you put on that Florida State jersey. I’m from Tallahassee, so I know all about the legends that have been here, everyone from Bobby Bowden to Joanne Graff and Mike Martin. There’s a lot of pride and tradition here, and to me being from Tallahassee I feel like I get to show others from here that you can get here, your dreams aren’t that far out of reach.

Sarah hamilton Hometown: Tallahassee, Florida Year: Senior Major: Accounting Birthday: October 7, 1988 Number: 25 Position: Pitcher

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s the only Tallahassee native on the women’s softball team, Sarah Hamilton always knew she wanted to be a Seminole. Now living her dream as a right handed pitching ace for the ’Noles, Hamilton is entering her senior year. A 2010 ACC pitcher of the week, Hamilton is a leader on the field and off. Even on her off days she can be found in the weight room, constantly trying to find ways to improve her game. Whether she is studying for an accounting test or talking with fans after a game, Sarah Hamilton is continually demonstrating what it means to be a Seminole student athlete. Who is your favorite former Florida State Athlete, and why? SH: I have to say Leslie Malerich because since I’m from here, I’ve been coming to games since I was eight and she was my favorite pitcher when I was young. I just remember always being the one sitting up in the stands thinking,“One day I want to be down there.” And now, I’m actually the one who gets to be down there. She’s always been my favorite, she was really good with the kids and so now I always try to be the one who goes and talks to the kids after the games.

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How do the facilities at FSU compare to others you’ve seen around the country? SH: Honestly, pretty much everything we have is better than most places I’ve been. Actually right now they’re in the process of building us a two-story batting cage that is going to be amazing. I’m still shocked every time I walk by it. Everything from the weight room, the turf room, our field, everything is just above and beyond. They’ve done such a good job making sure we have everything that we need. What have you learned about yourself in the last four years? SH: The last four years here have made me realize what I can push myself through, which I’ll need once I graduate. I’ve learned that I have more in me than I thought, that I can push farther than I ever thought I could. I’ve learned that I can be a leader and that I can be a team player, all those things you need in life after college. Just being here for the last four years, you really do grow up; being an athlete here for four years has really taught me how to be independent and be my own person. What are your plans for after graduation? SH: I’m an accounting major so I have to go through one more year of grad school to sit for the CPA exam and get my license, so I’m probably going to be here for grad school. I’ve been given the opportunity to play [softball] overseas this summer, in Holland and Italy, but I may be taking summer school, so that depends on school. How has your scholarship helped you to achieve your goals? SH: My scholarship definitely helps in every way. There are so many kids out there who put in the same work we do and just struggle through, so it really helps out and makes life easier. Our sport isn’t one where it’s a full ride

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or nothing; you can have a partial scholarship. So for us it’s good, a lot of people get at least something. All of the scholarships that Boosters give us, it goes to almost all of our team, not to just a few players. What does a softball free day consist of for you? SH: Traveling most of the time. I have class and then I’ll go in and do weights on my own. It’s not “mandatory” but we go in and work out on our own. A lot of time it’s just catching up on schoolwork. Accounting is hard and it’s a lot of work. Also, we’re always traveling, 64 games is a lot. What was the coaching transition like when Coach Alemeda took over as head coach? SH: It was a pretty smooth transition for us. I think a lot of people expected us to not have that great of a year because we had a new coach and we were starting over. It was a rebuilding year. But we ended up having a great year. I think Coach Alemeda and the entire staff did a really great job of coming in and teaching us through coaching. I think we got into a rut of just playing my freshmen year, and then my sophomore year with the transition I feel like we did more learning. I learned a lot and I think they worked really hard with making us feel comfortable. I love both of them. Coach Graff recruited me, she was the legend and she did great things for the program. Overall, it was a smooth transition. Who do you look up to the most on your team? SH: Probably Robyn Arbook, a fifth year senior. She tore something in her shoulder and had to redshirt a year. She puts in so much work. She had to sit out a whole year, putting in just as much work as everybody else. Not getting to play is probably one of the hardest things. She’s just a great leader and a great person. She’s put in a lot of work and a lot of hours for this team. Being from Tallahassee, did you always know you wanted to be a Seminole? SH: I always did. Like I said, when I was 8 years old I was the one in the stands watching all the games. I was the one that really just wanted to be the one down there on the field. When I was getting recruited though, I didn’t really hear much from Florida State at first. They don’t really recruit much from Tallahassee. I was the first softball player from Tallahassee to get a scholarship. So they weren’t really recruiting out of Tallahassee, and I thought they weren’t going to recruit me. I had gotten better offers and earlier offers from other schools, but as soon as Florida State was interested I was ready to be a Seminole. It’s always been a dream of mine to come here.


by Caryn Savitz, FSU Sports Info

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ike McGee wanted one more year to play baseball for Florida State, so he turned down an offer from the Arizona Diamondbacks after his junior year. McGee is an essential utility player and has been dynamic for the Seminoles in various positions throughout his career. Having had the opportunity to play with superstars such as Buster Posey, McGee will be perfectly prepared for a future in the MLB. Decorated with awards from the last three seasons, McGee is a leader to all of his teammates, including his brother Stephen, who is a sophomore catcher. An exceptional talent, Mike McGee is a proud Seminole and a beneficial aspect of Florida State Baseball. What made you decide to return to Florida State for your senior season? MM: It’s hard to pass up the whole experience here; I’d stay forever if I could. It doesn’t get any better. I get to go to school and learn what I want to learn during the day and then get to play baseball every night. If you have another year of it, it was just hard for me to pass it up. I can play pro ball next year, but I won’t be able to be at Florida State next year. What is it like having your little brother as a teammate? MM: It’s nice, but it’s just kind of normal by now. We’ve been playing together for as long as we’ve been playing baseball. So it’s normal, it feels just like another day having him out there. It’s nice though, I’m glad he is able to enjoy the Florida State experience like I’ve been able to. How has Coach Martin helped to make you a better baseball player? MM: He’s been doing it forever, so he knows what he’s talking about. With the emotional side of the game, he knows how to handle certain situations. There’s nothing that can happen during a season that he hasn’t already been through. So anytime any of the guys get down about an at bat, or they’re in a slump, he knows how to talk you out of it. He can really help you control your emotions throughout stressful situations during the season. What has been the most memorable game thus far in your career? MM: There’s been a lot of games, there’s so many that stand out. The win my freshmen year to go to the College World Series was awesome. That whole series was awesome. My first hit in the College World Series was something that I’ll never forget. Another great one was this past season at Boston College, me, [Tyler] Holt, [Stephen] Cardullo went back to back to back homeruns. If I had to pick my MOST memorable though,

Player Profile

my favorite game would definitely be hitting a walk-off homerun against Miami. What was it like playing with Buster Posey and then watching him help his team to the World Series? MM: That was wild. Playing with Buster was real nice; he was a real quiet guy who kind of just went about his business. I’m friends with his brother [Jack Posey] so I got to hang out with Buster a lot. He’s a real nice guy and obviously a great player. In college, once you get here everyone is pretty much the same level of talent. We’re all the best from our high school going to a D1 college. But Buster stood out. I don’t know how he did it. He would never not get a hit, and a lot of the time he’d be hitting home runs. Who is your favorite former Florida State athlete? MM: That’s a really tough one — there’s so many to choose from. I really liked watching Ernie Simms play; I also like Sam Cassel, who played basketball. As far as baseball though, J.D. Drew played here and that’s cool and playing with Buster, who is rookie of the year, of course. This is a hard question; my favorite though is probably Warrick Dunn. If you could play any other sport other than baseball, which would it be? MM: I would love to play golf, it’s just so relaxing. It would be nice. I would like to play more golf. I think it would definitely be my second choice. Describe what it means to you to be a part of Florida State Athletics? MM: It’s great because I love the respect that we get. Wherever you go in the country, like if you go to play a tournament somewhere, people find out you’re an athlete at Florida State, it’s a big deal. You can be really proud of being here and competing for Florida State. We have the history of being great, and I really just enjoy being a part of this program. How do the facilities at FSU compare to others across the country? MM: We have the best there is. Overall our whole situation here is better than any other place that I’ve ever been. I don’t think anybody’s facilities are near what we have. What are your plans for after graduation? MM: I’m going to play wherever I can get drafted. I want to play as long as I can. I’m graduating with an economics and political science degree, so in the off-season I’m going to try and get a job. I’d like to build up some experience for when I’m done playing baseball, which will hopefully be awhile from now. I’ll at least have a little experience.

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Mike McGee

Hometown: Port St. Lucie, Florida Year: Senior Major: Political Science/Economics Birthday: March 7, 1989 Number: 25 Position: RHP/OF

How has your scholarship helped you to achieve your goals? MM: Well, without it I wouldn’t be able to be here. There’s no way I could afford to go to a big school like this without having a scholarship. It has helped immensely; it takes a lot of worry off of my mind. I’m able to focus on school and baseball. It’s been a major help. I wouldn’t be here without it, that’s for sure. How will playing the Philadelphia Phillies help to prepare you and the team for the 2011 season? MM: It’s really more of a fun thing. Last year we did really well and it was great to get out on the field with them. I remember I was in left field and the announcer goes “now up to the plate Jimmy Rollins” and I just couldn’t believe I was playing with guys like Jimmy Rollins, Chase Utley and Ryan Howard. It’s just a really neat experience. It definitely prepares the freshmen to play with a large crowd. We’re playing with guys we see on TV, who we idolize. It’s really great getting to go out and play with them.

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d o n o r f e atu r e

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By Daniel Mitchell Photos courtesy CARL DOMINO

t may sound like a stretch to say that Carl Domino’s list of contributions to Florida State could reach from Tallahassee to Turnberry. But it’s not far from the truth when you consider Domino has: • Endowed scholarships for baseball and men’s basketball. • Served as chairman of Seminole Boosters (1995) and as a board member ever since. • Helped fund a bi-annual trip to Scotland for the FSU men’s and women’s golf teams. • Held memberships on the FSU Foundation Board of Trustees and the University’s Commission on the Future.

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That’s just a partial rundown of what Domino has given to his alma mater. In 2010, his largess earned Domino the Circle of Gold Award, which recognizes FSU alumni and friends who have worked publicly or behind the scenes on behalf of the school. Yet Domino’s donations of time, money and energy provide only a surface view of the Jupiter resident’s contributions to Florida State since 1987. That’s when he returned to Florida from Philadelphia, where he worked as a financial analyst and portfolio manager, to found Carl Domino Associates. He sold the business in 2000, then started Carl Domino, Inc., in 2004. Having established a reputation as one of America’s top money managers, Domino entered politics in 2002. He served eight years in the Florida House of Representatives, including a stint as Majority Whip (2004-06) for the Republican Party. Now out of politics, he’s free to spend more time with wife Sharon and twins Reagan, a girl, and Mason, a boy. And, naturally, to devote as much time as possible to FSU.


(Four men standing L to R): Henry Ostaszewski, Les Akers, Joel Padgett and Carl Domino at FSU vs. LSU in Death Valley, 1991.

“Carl is a tremendous asset to our athletic department and the university as a whole,” says Joel Padgett, senior vice president of Planned Giving for Seminole Boosters and a longtime friend. “He’s been a great advocate for Florida State in so many ways, from supporting our student-athletes to representing the school’s interests in the Florida Legislature. “We’re very lucky to have him on our side.” For Domino, involvement with Florida State isn’t about praise or accolades. It’s about giving back to a university he credits with “everything I have accomplished in life,” making sure those who follow him enjoy the same benefits and setting an example for other alums. “One of my goals is to allow the kids to fully experience college, which is so important,” says Domino, who earned his accounting degree from FSU in 1966 and an MBA from Harvard in 1972. “Secondly, it certainly helps the school because having a successful athletic program does encourage donors to give, maybe not to the athletic program, but to the National High Magnetic Lab or the School of Engineering or Business. “Then, I think everyone likes to remember their youth. For most everyone, their four years in college are among the best, and collegiate athletics is a good way to get people focusing back on those days. I’m sure when we all talk about the good old days we talk

about our favorite professor, but we all know who the quarterback was at the time. It’s a rallying point, and I think it’s really been a positive thing for Florida State.”

“I think everyone likes to remember their youth. For most everyone, their four years in college are among the best, and collegiate athletics is a good way to get people focusing back on those days.” carl domino

Likewise, Domino cherishes the relationships he’s established within the Seminole family. “We’ve had a lot of grand coaches over the years,” he notes. Domino mentions stalwart Booster patrons including Bill Parker and Les Akers among compatriots he admires.

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Few have been as generous as Domino. He’s been passionate about all things FSU since selling Cokes — for a nickel — at football games in the 1960s. Vivid memories abound, including a 1991 trip to Baton Rouge and “Death Valley,” where the Seminoles outlasted LSU in a legendary downpour. He’s far from a football-only fan, though. Domino is known as one of Seminole basketball’s most ardent supporters. He also shows up often at Dick Howser Stadium and numerous other venues. An avid golfer with admittedly modest skills, Domino has been instrumental in that program’s recent rise. He was a key driver in the building of FSU’s Dave Middleton Golf Complex and provides financing for the men’s and women’s teams to visit Scotland, alternating every other summer to tackle fabled links like St. Andrews and Turnberry. In fact, Domino is extremely proud of FSU’s across-the-board athletic improvement. The Seminoles’ 5th-place finish in the 2009-10 Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup standings — a measure of a university’s overall athletic prowess — marked an alltime high. “We’re developing consistency in these sports that suggests you should be up there for a long time,” says Domino, who’s played a crucial role in making it happen. SB

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BOOSTER INSIDER // BY JERRY KUTZ

RECLAIMING

DOAK

Is it a Matter of ‘Win, Baby, Win’ or Ask, Listen and Act?

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eminole fans and students wedged into Doak Campbell Stadium on the afternoon of Nov. 25, 2010, transforming a brick-and-mortar structure into a living, snarling den of inequity. On that day, Doak roared as it devoured the Florida Gators and then belched victory fireworks. To appreciate the experience, you had to be there to feel it. Television, even HD-TV, could not touch the passion and emotion generated by the frenzied home crowd. While the Florida State Athletic Department and Seminole Boosters know they cannot duplicate the ecstasy of throttling the arch-rival at every home game, they are determined to generate enduring Seminole memories each week that television simply can’t provide. Let’s be candid. Florida State, like every college and pro team, is competing with home theatre television for fans, and technology is only getting better. So FSU Athletics and Boosters know they must offer experiences that will give fans a

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compelling reason to turn off the television and participate at the stadium. They are listening to sports marketing experts who are advising them to make magnificent Doak Campbell Stadium as comfortable as possible and to emphasize the traditions that resonate with Seminole fans and make Florida State unique. The athletic department and Boosters have embarked on a three step plan: 1. Ask customers what they want. 2. Listen to their answers. 3. Act on what they say. Dr. Jay Rayburn, a professor in the School of Communication and research director at Beacon Research, was retained to help ask the right questions. Focus groups were formed to help determine the key issues. And surveys were developed for current and past ticket holders, asking them what works for them, what doesn’t work and what could be done to improve the home game experience. “There were things that we expected to

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find. And then, as researchers, there were some surprises,” said Rayburn, who led the project team. It is important to note that more than 1,800 of the 7,500 people surveyed responded to the lengthy battery of questions on a wide variety of topics. The fact that nearly 25 percent responded clearly shows that FSU’s fans are truly engaged in wanting to make the experience better. “What’s great about this project is that, because the response rates were so high, we can look at the information from several perspectives and say with confidence, at least from a statistical perspective, that these are the specific things that fans want and those that they don’t want or you’d better get fixed,” Rayburn said. While the volume of data will take time to digest, here’s a quick overview of what was learned and what FSU can begin to act upon. The response validated the need to look at stadium improvements and the notion


that game day traditions are what draw Seminole fans to home games. Osceola and Renegade — the absolute coolest tradition in college sports — was important to 100 percent of the respondents. Fans also said the activities and traditions are important, validating the emphasis FSU places on them: priority parking (96 percent), military flyovers (96 percent), highlights on scoreboard (96 percent), player introductions (92 percent), tailgating (92 percent), Marching Chief activities in stadium (87 percent), cheerleaders (86 percent) and energetic soundtracks on the sound system (76 percent). Fans were clear about how to improve their experience: better use of the scoreboard for scores and highlights of other games (98 percent); wider, more comfortable seats (93 percent); cleaner infrastructure and bathrooms (92 percent); more concession options (78 percent); a player walk from the buses to the stadium two-and-a-half hours before the game (78 percent); opening the parking lots for tailgating earlier (72 percent); and providing cool zones under the stadium (70 percent).

Some of those improvements are easy to address, others not so easy. Making better use of the scoreboard for scores and highlights is on the agenda with the caveat that the ACC limits schools to showing only one replay of calls that are

It was obvious from reading comments that season ticket holders place a very high value on creating the atmosphere that comes with a packed stadium. “under review” on the stadium video screen. FSU Athletics and the Boosters are hoping this coming season to introduce a player walk, which is wildly popular among fans

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at Auburn, Tennessee and other schools. Opening the parking lots a little earlier and offering more concession options are also relatively inexpensive challenges that can be quickly addressed. Seminole Boosters has asked stadium design architects to look into the cost and timeframe for making Doak Campbell Stadium a more comfortable and fun place to attend games. The architects will consider the survey when addressing renovation projects. In the survey, 93 percent said they want a wider, more comfortable seat and 55 percent would like a club seat, even if it is in the end zone. Forty percent of those that want a wider, more comfortable seat don’t want their seat location to change, which will be a challenge when adding inches to every seat. Obviously, these capital projects will take time to study and a significant investment to achieve and will be the subject of future Unconquered magazine articles. Some of the pleasantly surprising findings include learning that communications channels are open: 98 percent of respondents know that a Booster con82>> tribution is required to sit in the

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The Seminoles return eight starters on offense, eight on defense, and their kicker, punter and return specialist. (Top) Chris Thompson was offensive MVP of Chick-fil-A Bowl. (Center) EJ Manuel on long run. (Left) Lonnie Pryor adding more yards.

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2 0 1 1 f o o tball P RE V I E W By ROB WILSON Photos by MIKE OLIVELLA

Amped &READY! The 10-Win Season Included Poundings of In-State Rivals Miami and Florida and Steve Spurrier in the Chick-fil-A Bowl

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lorida State football fans are likely to find themselves begging for August to arrive this year.

Why? Because college football experts have already thrown a lot of Garnet and Gold chum in the water. Tony Barnhart, who is known as “Mr. College Football” at the Atlanta Journal Constitution and has the ear of every coach in the South, has picked FSU as No. 4 in his first informal 2011 poll. ESPN.com’s Mark Schlabach runs with a younger crowd but sees it the same way, slotting the Seminoles at No. 7. And ESPN analyst Robert Smith, who was an Academic All-America running back at Ohio State, is all in with FSU, picking the Seminoles as his No. 2 team entering next season. »

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(Clockwise from Top Left) Sean Powell, Nick Moody, Chris Thompson, Dustin Hopkins and Terrence Brooks.

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Maybe the excitement has held over from the huge wins against Florida and South Carolina, victories that reminded the FSU faithful just how great it is to be at a Seminole game. It had to be fun to pass Gator–stickered cars on I-10 Sunday morning after the game. I can speak from experience that the walk back to downtown Atlanta hotels through shell-shocked SEC fans was pure pleasure. Of course it could be that you have reread the roster from a game program this year and realized Jimbo Fisher will have eight starters back on both offense and defense, making it one of the most “veteran” FSU teams on paper in a long time. It will certainly be difficult to replace the leadership and talent of Christian Ponder, Rodney Hudson and Ryan McMahon on offense — or Markus White, Kendall Smith and Mister Alexander on defense. But consider this: On Florida State’s drive to take the lead in the Chick-fil-A bowl, every single player who touched the ball (once snapped of course) on the 13-play drive will be on the practice field this spring. Not enough to get your pulse racing? Well, every FSU defender who made a tackle on USC’s last ditch offensive drive will also return. And we’ve got both kicker Dustin Hopkins and punter Shawn Powell back as well. Now we’re talking. Florida State finished the recruiting season with the No. 1 ranked recruiting class according to ESPN.. Somewhere in all these facts, just about any Seminole fan can find a tipping point. And even the most cynical fan will have a hard time not breaking into a smile thinking about the future. But let’s get greedy and add even more. There is no doubt that FSU’s strength and conditioning staff has done wonders for the team in only one year. Seminole players will have their second “off-season” with Vic Viloria and his “Hatch System,” insuring bigger, stronger athletes. The benefits are magnified by Coach Fisher’s directive to monitor the diet of each player — as


well as each one’s “buy-in” to the system. It is grilled chicken and vegetables on the training tables and an emphasis on lower body strength, not “mirror muscles,” in the weight room. FSU even has a bona fide red HOT ticket early in the schedule with the Oklahoma Sooners likely a preseason No. 1 pick in many polls. Chat rooms have already “booked” ESPN Gameday out on Langford Green and Tallahassee hotels report that rooms are filling up quickly for what may be the early season must-see game. Raw statistics justify the warm fuzzy feelings. Jer-Ty-Chris (Jermaine Thomas, Chris Thompson and Ty Jones) return at tailback where the trio gained 1,774 yards. FSU’s top 11 receivers return, along with both tackles and a guard returning on the offensive front. And who would have thought that the hangover of Ponder’s graduation might be handled with nothing stronger than aspirin with the development of EJ Manuel. Defensively, the entire secondary returns to frustrate opposing quarterbacks. The linebackers will be young save stalwart Nigel Bradham, but they will have talent to develop. FSU’s defensive front will be a year older after finishing third nationally in quarterback sacks, while finding the next great defensive end will be a priority. And if you are looking at why FSU coaches may look a little calmer going into spring, look no further than the return of special teams units that performed extremely well. “This is just the beginning,” said Fisher as he hoisted the Chick-fil-A bowl trophy on New Year’s Eve, doing his part to send FSU fans scrambling for a calendar. August figures to be a long time coming this year, but it should be an awful fun wait. Follow FSU during spring practice on Seminoles.com and then join the team and Coach Fisher on Saturday, April 16, at Doak Campbell Stadium for the annual Garnet and Gold game. SB

Athletic Director Randy Spetman presents Jimbo Fisher with ACC Atlantic Division championship trophy.

You Are Part of Our

Game Plan Don & Aggie Steiner Atlanta, Ga. Custodes Lampadis Members, 2000

To succeed you must have a plan. Seminole Boosters has a short and long term game plan, and plans for unforeseen calamity. You, through your Booster membership, help us achieve our short term plan of annually funding our athletics department. Our long term plan is to fully fund our Athletic Scholarship Endowment. Essential to that success are donors’ gifts through wills or trusts for a specific amount or percentage, or through lifetime income gifts. JOIN THE CUSTODES LAMPADIS SOCIETY Joel Padgett, Director of Gift Planning (850)644-3378 jpadgett@admin.fsu.edu S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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This is …

Doak Campbell

Doak Campb S tad i um

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bell Stadium 2011 Football Schedule DATE

OPPONENT

September 3 Louisiana-Monroe Varsity Weekend/Hall Of Fame September 10 Charleston Southern September 17 Oklahoma September 24 @ Clemson October 1 Open October 8 @ Wake Forest October 15 @ Duke October 22 Maryland Military Appreciation October 29 NC State Parent’s Weekend November 3 @ Boston College (Thursday) ESPN, 8 Pm November 12 Miami November 19 Virginia Homecoming November 26 @ Florida home games are in white S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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More than 100 Boosters toured FSU’s football facilities each home game.

Super volunteer Jamie Warren (center) helped organize tours in 2010.

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Donors enjoy seeing how their membership contributions build facilities and fund scholarships.

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A N N U A L M E M B E R S H I P / v olun t eer c ampai g n

Get In the Game: Volunteer … It’s Rewarding Recruit a New Member to “Team Behind the Team” By Jerry kutz, Vice president marketing & Communications

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pportunity is knocking on Florida State’s door, Seminole fans, and it’s time for each of us to welcome in the future. While in-state rivals Florida and Miami are just replacing their football coaching staffs, Florida State Head Coach Jimbo Fisher has accomplished most of what anyone could ask of a first-year head coach: • Assembled a highly-respected coaching staff • Signed a top-10 recruiting class in 2010 • Defeated in-state rivals Florida and Miami • Claimed the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference • Won his first bowl game, defeating Steve Spurrier • Won 10 games • Finished in the top 25 • Signed what ESPN ranks as the No. 1 recruiting class in 2011

Fisher’s early success on the field has caught the attention of the nation’s very best 2011 football prospects, who have pledged their commitment to play for Florida State. The future looks very bright for Seminole football under Fisher’s leadership, and now it’s time for Seminole fans to help Fisher capitalize on the opportunity presented to us.

»

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A N N U A L M E M B E R S H I P / v olun t eer c ampai g n How can you help? If you are a member of Seminole Boosters already, now’s the time to help FSU recruit new team members — new Seminole Boosters — so that we can provide Fisher’s players and coaches with the resources they need to compete for even greater glory. If you are not yet a member of Seminole Boosters — the team behind Fisher’s team — now’s the time to pledge your commitment. It’s in everyone’s best interest to recruit a large and powerful team, and it’s really easy and fun to get involved.

Booster members greet coach Dameyue Craig (Top), Jimbo Fisher (Center) and each of the players after tours.

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Why the team needs your help Florida State currently has some 15,000 Seminole Booster members who provide a little over $13 million in contributions to supplement the athletic budget. That money is used to fund scholarships (more than $9 million), building projects, coaches’ salaries, etc. But while $13 million is a great deal of money, it is only about half of what Southeastern Conference schools like Georgia, Alabama, Auburn and Florida generate for their programs, so we need to grow our base of membership to compete. You can help us grow our ranks by encouraging friends to join, even at the $60 per year level, as there is strength in numbers. You can also help us recruit new season ticket holders as we have thousands of seats available, many of which are in the priority sections of the stadium. We have a very good story to tell, a very bright future, so now is a perfect time for each of us to spread the good word. While Seminole Boosters will continue to devote all of our resources to recruiting new members and new season ticket holders, we need your volunteer help to fully capitalize on the opportunity that presents itself to us this year. We need to ask you to call your friends who love FSU sports and ask them to commit their support to the program they enjoy watching on television and bragging about. Your phone call is far more powerful than anything we can do because people give to


(Top) Booster members gather to watch 3D highlight film in team meeting room. (Above) Members and children pose in the indoor practice room.

others for causes they believe in. You believe in Seminole Athletics and you know friends who believe in FSU sports too. Just ask Jimbo Fisher or his staff of recruiters how effective a phone call from one recruit to another can be. Fisher’s top-rated recruiting class was due in large

part to the referral phone calls committed recruits made to uncommitted prospects, sharing ideas, sharing the good news and offering encouragement to commit to become a part of the team. There has never been a better time for you to ask. Our fans are hungry for

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success and optimistic that we are on the verge of something great. Exciting things are happening in Tallahassee, and your friends will surely want to be a part of it by coming to games or feeling a part of it by funding the program as a Seminole Booster member. SB

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Regional representatives Max Zahn (Left, Center), Eric Carr and Rachel Catalano meet donors at Booster events.

Volunteer for Seminole Boosters: Ask a friend to Join Volunteer Rewards In addition to the satisfaction of knowing you are helping your team be successful, volunteers can earn recognition and unique experiential rewards for their efforts. The rewards include: Recognition in the Unconquered magazine Seminole Booster merchandise Tickets to home games Skybox seats Upgraded parking benefits Tours of Athletic Facilities Opportunities to meet coaches and players Autographed photos, helmets, miscellaneous On field photo opportunities with Renegade and Osceola Trips to away games and bowl games Invitations to exclusive events And much more

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olunteering for Seminole Boosters isn’t demanding or time consuming. We ask our current members every year to help us recruit a new member by simply asking a Seminole friend or family member to join as an Iron Arrow ($60 per year) or higher. If they want ticket priority, we ask our volunteers to share their knowledge of our ticket priority system to guide their friend through the process of ordering season tickets and meeting the priority requirements for sitting in Doak Campbell. And you can always call the Booster office or a local volunteer leader to help.

Volunteer Grady Campbell simply sat down with his friend Drew Miller and a pitcher of beer and began calling friends. Before they knew it, they had enjoyed a great time and Seminole Boosters had 60plus new members. Brian and Courtney Williams took a similar tact. They sent emails to all their Seminole friends with a nicely crafted letter explaining how Seminole Booster members’ donations are used to fund athletics — and why their membership would make a difference. Some of their friends joined immediately and they called the others.

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A N N U A L M E M B E R S H I P / v olun t eer c ampai g n Meet the Regional Booster Team:

Jamie & Connie Warren jwarren@fsu.edu Tallahassee-Pensacola

rcatalano@fsu.edu West Palm Beach/Ft. Lauderdale

Eric Carr

Cindee Lundeen

Kristin Tubeck

Max Zahn

ericdcarr@gmail.com Bay Area/Southwest Florida

ktubeck@admin.fsu.edu Bay Area/Southwest Florida

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clundeen@admin.fsu.edu Ft. Lauderdale/Miami

fsumax@bellsouth.net Lake City/Jacksonville/St. Augustine

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By the time they were done, they had recruited nearly 40 new members. Jamie and Connie Warren recruited hundreds of new Boosters and season ticket holders by simply monitoring the Warchant message board and answering people’s questions about Seminole Boosters and season tickets. There are dozens of message boards active with FSU fans who really don’t understand why membership in Seminole Boosters is important. While some volunteers prefer to work on their own, others prefer to get involved in our annual fund campaign, which offers direction and rewards for various levels of achievement. Volunteer: Get into the game If you would like more information about becoming a volunteer, please contact James Warren ( jamnolfin@hotmail. com) or Jerry Kutz ( jkutz@admin.fsu. edu) at (850) 644-3484 or any of our area Volunteer leaders. Assistance at the local level is available through our network of area representatives, inner council members and Board of Directors. These are the people who can answer your questions regarding membership and local events. Seminole Clubs are active across the state of Florida and U.S. Seminole Clubs are organized groups whose members love and support Florida State University’s athletic and academic missions. Seminole Boosters helps more than 60 clubs across the nation keep people connected by delivering fan-friendly events to their local areas. Seminole Boosters funds the Jimbo Fisher Spring Tour, the Football Signing Day Recruiting Party and a Preseason Football War Party, as well as many other events throughout the year. In return, the clubs help promote Seminole Booster membership, which funds the cost of athletics and the cost of delivering the fan-friendly events to their area. SB


Events surrounding FSU Athletics: Gainesville Golf (Women’s) at Mark Bostic GC, March 6–7 Baseball vs UF, March 15 Softball vs UF, May 4 Track & Field at Fla Relays, April 1–2 Jacksonville/St. Augustine Golf (Men’s) at Sawgrass CC, Feb. 27–March 1 Track &Field vs North Fla, March 3 Baseball vs UF, March 15 Softball vs Jacksonville, April 5 Baseball vs Jacksonville, May 3 Track & Field vs North Fla, May 14 Miami Baseball vs Miami, April 29–May 1 Orlando Tennis (Women’s) vs UCF, March 9 Softball vs UCF, April 6 Tampa/St.Pete Baseball vs Philadelphia Phillies , Feb. 24 Tennis (Women’s) vs USF, March 6 Tennis (Men’s) vs USF, March 8 Track & Field vs USF, March 19

Events hosted locally include: Regional Signing Day War Parties Regional Jimbo Fisher Spring Tour Stops Regional Plant the Spear Gatherings Regional Mixers with Coaches and Players Regional Receptions with Coaches and Players Sport Specific Coaches Clubs Events Monday Luncheons with Jimbo Fisher Weekly Coaches Call-In Shows Golf Tournaments Travel Opportunities to Away Games, Bowls, Tournaments and Cruises Tailgate and Skybox Deck Parties at Home and Away Games Tours of the Athletic Facilities Exclusive VIP Events and Much More Game-Day Events in Tallahassee

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HISTORY/ MISSION

Seminole Boosters, Inc. More Than Raising Money

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s a member of Seminole Boosters, you should know where your money goes: to balance the Florida State annual athletics budget. The $12 million that Seminole Boosters provides Seminole Athletics funds athletic scholarships for student-athletes, supplements coaches’ salaries and covers additional costs in the $48 million budget. As a contributor to Seminole Boosters, you should know that your money is also used to pay for the cost of building and renovating athletic facilities. From the DeVoe L. Moore University Center and Doak Campbell Stadium to the Morcom Aquatics Center, fans like you make donations to Seminole Boosters so the organization can provide the very best resources for Florida State University Athletics and its student-athletes. As an investor in the Florida State Seminoles, you should also know that Seminole Boosters, Inc., has a seasoned history with the university, and over the past 50 years

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has grown into more than just a leading collegiate fundraising operation. From 1951 to 1974, a group of Tallahassee businessmen provided for the financial needs of the athletics department as the National Seminole Club. Re-organized in 1975, current President Andy Miller was hired to re-establish the organization on a national scale and increase fundraising goals. Today, Seminole Boosters, Inc., is not only a fundraising group. It also serves as a fan base for the Seminoles, plans events and is your connection to the University. We’re on Facebook, assist in ticket promotion, publish this magazine, provide fan experiences such as facility tours and tailgates, build buildings and meet your needs. Seminole Boosters is here for two reasons: provide the best resources for Florida State student-athletes and serve you as best we can. Our ask to you: help us help them. SB

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Here are some ideas and ways to give: Fund a scholarship or partial scholarship. Renew as an annual member. Ask a friend to join as an annual member. Give to a facility project. Purchase a legacy walk brick. Join a sport specific Coaches Club. Sign up your student for Seminole Student Boosters. Leave Seminole Boosters, Inc. in your will. Shop for officially licensed products at your favorite FSU retail store. Use our travel partner for all your travel needs (gametimetravel.com/FSU). “Like” us on Facebook at Seminoles.com/facebook. Buy a Nike TRUE Seminole shirt. Buy tickets to a sporting event. Bring a friend to a game or event. Do you have more ways to support Seminole Boosters and Seminole Athletics? Share your ideas, let us know what you’re doing or if you want to be more involved. E-mail Seminoleboosters@admin.fsu.edu.


GetJoin In… Renew the …GVolunteer! ame:

Call: (850) 644-3484 Visit: Seminole-Boosters.com

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D onor fea t ure By JIM CROSBY Photos By Ross Obley

Mike coaches two of his three daughters’ basketball teams. Terra (L) and Rachel (R) both play for Grace Academy in Bainbridge, Ga.

Mike Harrell: Born to Be a Seminole “I didn’t have any choice. It was in my DNA.”

Mike Harrell was explaining how he became a Seminole. His dad, Jimmy, attended Florida State where he met a pretty freshman named Jane from Douglas, Ga. They later married and put son Mike ( ’80-84), his sister Vicki (76-79) and brother Mark (82-86) through FSU. Even a brief conversation with Mike, now secretary of the Seminole Boosters executive committee, reveals the passion he has for his university. Talk about stories — Mike’s got them and he can regale you with one after another. “My dad told us the first person he met when he went to class at Florida State was Buddy (Burt) Reynolds,” says Harrell. He struck up a conversation with the Seminole football player, who would gain fame as a movie star.

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The Harrell’s are also supporters of Florida State Women’s Basketball. Recently, he took his middle school teams on a special visit to watch the Lady ’Noles practice at the FSU basketball training center.

Harrell recalls, “Dad said he and Reynolds somehow ended up in an arm wrestling match.” What his dad didn’t reveal was who won. Living in Bainbridge, Ga., Harrell says, “We were Seminoles when it wasn’t sporty to be a Seminole fan. Just about everybody around was a Georgia Bulldog fan.” Despite being chided for their allegiance, however, Harrell’s family became one of the early contributors to the Seminole Booster program, which really gained momentum during the Bill Peterson era (l960-70). In fact, Harrell still has every one of the old Seminole Booster tags given to contributors, going back to the early ’70s. Faithful supporters of Seminole football, Harrell says they followed Bobby Bowden as he took FSU from a 0-11 team all the way up to his final victory over West Virginia in the 2009 Gator Bowl. Their support continues unabated in the Jimbo Fisher era as they always renew their skybox for the games. “The bottom line is, it’s great to be a Seminole,” says Harrell. Recently the Harrells celebrated their 50th year in business as Southwest Georgia Oil Company, doing business under the trade name of Inland. They started out as a petroleum jobber, mainly selling diesel to farmers. Now, Inland has developed into a network of convenience stores. They also wholesale gas and diesel fuel, do trucking and produce bio-diesel fuels. “We are real committed to bio-fuels and to making the transition from fossil fuels,”

says Harrell. He recalls with pride how his company was the first to grow a farm crop (corn), harvest it and then take it to a refinery in Camilla, Ga., where it was ground and turned it into ethanol. Some of the ethanol was put in the company truck’s fuel system and the rest was taken to a retail site in southern Alabama. The whole process took 72 hours. As his company has grown, so has Mike Harrell’s commitment to Florida State. He recently completed a Charitable Lead Trust with the Boosters organization and couldn’t be happier. “What it boils down to is a way to give money to the Boosters with an asset that produces income, but that asset ultimately converts over time to whatever estate planning mechanism you’ve got for your kids. So, it is a great way to move assets to the next generation while the assets benefit the university,” he explains. Harrell is also impressed with the way Seminole Boosters has worked with him over time, being patient in tough times and helpful in decision-making when business improved. “I tried to go broke in 2000, did my best but didn’t get it done,” he says with a smile. “Just kept growing the Inland truck stops. The Boosters understand you can’t always do everything right now. But Andy Miller (president and CEO) and Tom Carlson (senior vice president) have been great to work with. They realize it takes time in my world of pumping gas, selling beer and potato chips and coaching high school basketball.”

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Not only does Harrell like the Legacy Trust idea, his company auditor is especially pleased with it. “He told me ‘Listen, you are going to want to do more of these things because it is a great estate planning tool,’” says Harrell. Girls’ basketball is another passionate interest of Harrell’s. He’s the volunteer head coach of the Grace Christian Academy School team. All three of his daughters — Rachael (14), Terra (11) and Mikey (8) — are involved. He has also been a longtime supporter of women’s basketball at Florida State. Coach Sue Semrau understands the value of having such a solid supporter. “For the last several years, Mike Harrell has been a key contributor to our women’s basketball program, helping us take our program to new heights,” she says. “His support has been vital to the success of our team and his enthusiasm as a coach to learn more about the game of basketball inspires us all.” Having been around for the ups-anddowns of Florida State athletics for the past 40-plus years, Mike Harrell makes an astute observation. “If you had to freeze this moment in time, you’d see it is so great to be a Seminole now. Everywhere you look in Seminole Territory it is just bright.” A key reason for the bright looking Seminole future is the loyalty, contributions and leadership of folks like Mike Harrell. SB

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B A S K E T B A L L F eat u r e By FLORIDA STATE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL and FSU SPORTS INFORMATION Photos courtesy FSU WOMEN’S BASKETBALL & MIKE OLIVELLA

Samaritan’s Feet:

Bahamas F

(Above) Florida State won the Junkanoo Jam Tournament title in Freeport, Bahamas. (Opposite) While in the Bahamas the team served the local community through charitable work and found time to have some fun too.

lorida State women’s basketball players, coaches and staff members spent the Thanksgiving holiday giving back and winning a tournament.

In addition to playing championship caliber basketball while in the Bahamas, the ’Noles also turned their attention from the basketball court to the community. The team worked with Samaritan’s Feet, a nonprofit organization dedicated to changing lives through Shoes of Hope distributions around the world, by going to the Lewis Yard Primary School in Freeport, Bahamas, while they were in town for the Junkanoo Jam. While at the school, the team danced, sang and played with the students before measuring, washing and then ultimately putting brand new shoes on each one’s feet. Florida State won the Junkanoo Jam tournament, beating Alabama and Arizona State for the title.

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Players’ Diaries

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Olivia Bresnahan Freshman Guard

Olivia Bresnahan — Last Thursday wasn’t your average Thanksgiving. Looking back on it makes me realize just how blessed I am to play basketball at Florida State. It gives me so many neat opportunities, and Thanksgiving Day is a perfect picture of all the things I get to experience as a Seminole. Our trip to the Bahamas turned out to be much more than just fun and games. We

Players were asked to share their experiences in the Bahamas over Thanksgiving Weekend 2010

got the special opportunity to work with a program called Samaritan’s Feet. This organization is designed to give children less fortunate than us the chance to receive a brand new pair of shoes. It might not seem like a lot to us, but the shoes brought more happiness and smiles than anyone could imagine. The experience was very rewarding, and it made me appreciate everything I have. It was a great way to start off our Thanksgiving. After we served the little kids we had a team party on the beach. The whole area was just beautiful, and it was really exciting to see and experience a different culture. One of the best things about the trip was that my family came down to watch us play, so it was really cool to still eat Thanksgiving dinner with them. We went to a banquet for the tournament with all the other teams, and I still got my fill of turkey! Afterwards, some of the local people came and performed a traditional “Junkanoo” march with singing and dancing. It was very cool. It capped off a wonderful day. Although there were many distractions that could have changed our focus, we were able to stay together as a team and get the job done. We worked hard and played with a lot of energy in both of our wins. All in all it was a great trip! Go ’Noles!

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Alexa Deluzio — I wasn’t sure exactly what to expect when we boarded the plane. We were headed to the Bahamas for our Thanksgiving trip. I did know that it was certain to be just another incredible experience. I have come to expect that with our coaches and staff. They always seem to give us opportunities to experience so much more than basketball. Our trip to the Bahamas was no different. It was far more than just a basketball tournament. It was a time of giving, thankfulness and team bonding.

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Alexa Deluzio RS Sophmore Guard Family & Child Sciences Major

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Natasha Howard Freshman Forward Business Major

My favorite part of the trip was getting to serve and spend time with children at Lewis Yard Primary School. It was such a rewarding experience on so many levels. We humbled ourselves and washed the feet of children who are less fortunate than us, although you would never know that by their attitude towards life. They were so happy and thankful for the smallest things. Sometimes we forget how truly blessed we are. I will be forever grateful for that experience because it showed me there is far more to life than playing basketball, and I have so much to enjoy and be thankful for. While it was great that we toughed out two wins, we still have so much to work on as a basketball team. My teammates and I are more determined than ever to be selfless and grow together. It is so encouraging to know that even in the toughest of circumstances, I have 10 teammates who have my back. I am so blessed to experience the things we get to do as Seminoles. Sitting on the plane ride home, looking out the window and thinking back on the last few years, I was overwhelmed just thinking about how

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Players were asked to share their experiences in the Bahamas over Thanksgiving Weekend 2010

lucky I am. It was a great trip, and of course I am pumped that our football team beat the Gators! Go ‘Noles!

and experience new things. I had so much fun with them and I am looking forward to the rest of the season.

Natasha Howard — I had never been out of the country so I was really excited about going to the Bahamas. It was such a fun time. We got to do a lot of cool things, but my favorite part was spending time with the kids. They were so excited to see us and spend time with us. It reminded me of just how lucky we all are. We have so much, and it is easy to take it for granted sometimes. We get clothes, running shoes, basketball shoes, really, anything we need. These kids were smiling so big. I never really pictured myself doing something like that, washing kids’ feet and giving them a new pair of shoes. It was an experience I will never forget. It didn’t stop there though. We danced with them and laughed with them. They all wanted hugs or high fives. They had so much love to give. You don’t realize that you are going to get to do things like that going into college, but it was so much fun. I was so lucky to be able to go to the Bahamas with my teammates

Cierra Bravard — Thursday, Nov. 25, 2010 is when almost every American was celebrating a day of giving with feasts and family time. But the highlight of my Thanksgiving was the thanks I got for giving a pair of shoes to grateful and cheerful children in Freeport on Grand Bahama Island. The day started like any other, but when I set foot on the school property at Lewis Yard Primary School, I was immediately overwhelmed by the warmth and welcomes from the staff and children. Of course it was recess so they were already in a good mood, and they didn’t even know we were there to give them something, so the smiles and hugs really meant a lot. It hit home for me when I saw how deserving these kids are. I approached a few of the boys who were drawing on the chalkboard. I filled my hand with chalk and showed the kids how to make hand prints. Not only did they leave their handprints on the chalkboard, but also on my heart! After the meet and greet, the whole school walked out in an orderly manner, and they opened with a song that brought tears to my eyes. They kept repeating words similar to “thank you Lord for everything we have,” and it made me smile. From an outsider’s point of view they don’t have much, but to them they have everything they need! When the shoe distribution started, I was measuring feet and taking sizes. It was fun just to chill and chat with the kids! The excitement and anticipation they had for a pair of shoes was so amazing. They were sweet and grateful. My jaw was actually getting tired from smiling so much, as if I should be the one smiling! Some of the stories we heard were sad and hard to take, but we weren’t going to let it affect us any more than it did them.

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Cierra Bravard Junior Forward Sociology Major

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I learned how important it is to always take the positive out of every situation. That’s what I felt they did, and I do believe that will get them very far in life. The lasting impression their smiles left on me is unforgettable, and I know they will walk many miles and take many journeys in the one pair of shoes we gave them. After four days in Freeport, Bahamas, the No. 14 Florida State women’s basketball team returned to Tallahassee with a Junkanoo Jam tournament title and a whole lot more. The team expressed appreciation for the opportunity to travel to the Bahamas. SB

(Top) The team visited a school for children in Freeport to work with the charity Samaritan’s Feet. (Above) Cierra Bravard showing her wingspan.

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Florida State Women’s Basketball Mini-Poster

Courtney Ward Major: Criminology 5' 7" Senior Guard from Montgomery, Ala. • Jefferson Davis High School

Career Field Goal: 352-899 (39%) Career 3-Point Shots: 195-464 (42%) Career Free Throws: 192-264 (73%)


Florida State men’s Basketball Mini-Poster

Chris Singleton Major: Interdisciplinary Social Studies 6' 9" Junior Forward from Canton, Ga. • Dunwoody High School Career Field Goal: 313-758 (41%) Career 3-Point Shots: 98-302 (32%) Career Free Throws: 188-316 (59%)


B A S K E T B A L L F eat u r e By Anna Katherine Clemmons, ESPN.com Archive, Originally Published on ESPN.com on Veteran’s Day 2010 Photos courtesy BERNARD JAMES and by MIKE OLIVELLA & ROSS OBLEY

The Road Less Traveled W

hen preseason basketball practices began at Florida State this fall, assistant coach Stan Jones received a request he’d never heard before.

Junior transfer Bernard James, getting ready for his first season with the Seminoles, had arrived on the Tallahassee campus after two years in junior college and six years of service in the Air Force. Active duty on five different continents meant James had grown accustomed to following orders.

Coach Stan Jones: “In my 30 years of coaching, I’ve never had a guy ask, ‘Coach, can you yell at me more?’ ” “He said, ‘Coach, I need you to start yelling at me because that’s how I learned in the military,’ ” Jones says. “He wants people to challenge him. In my 30 years of coaching, I’ve never had a guy ask, ‘Coach, can you yell at me more?’ ” The unique request is indicative of James’ unusual path to Division I college basketball. The 25-year-old Savannah, Ga., native, who garnered a double-double (15 pts, 10 reb.) in his first regular-season game on Nov. 12 against North Florida, didn’t play competitive basketball until he was 17 years old. Bernard James used height to his advantage while playing basketball for the Air Force squad. The first time he picked up a basketball was at age 13 — and he hated it. “I was more of a ‘climb a tree and read a book’ kind of guy, and I was very into astrology,” James says. “I was much more a thinker than a doer.” He never watched sports unless his friends already had a game on TV. When, on a whim, he tried out for the basketball team as a high school freshman, he was cut nine days later. “I skipped the first week-and-a-half of practice because that’s when they did all the

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running, so when they picked up a ball, and I tried to come back, the coach wasn’t having it,” James chuckles. “That was the short-lived start of my hoops season.” Soon after, James dropped out of high school. “Bernard was really laid-back,” says his mother, Beverly Cook. “It’s not like he got in trouble, he just didn’t want to go to school.” His stepfather, Darryl Cook, an Army and Air Force veteran, encouraged James to enlist in the Air Force. He told James that particular specialty would allow him to travel the world and would offer a better quality of life. So James enlisted, and upon arriving at camp in California, he was immediately asked if he played basketball. “The first day on the job, my supervisor had a game that night,” James remembers. “He asked me if I played, and I said, ‘No.’ Then he said, ‘You do now.’ ” At 6-foot-4 and growing, the then-17-yearold looked the part on the court but lacked the fundamentals that many players had developed in their teen years. James tried to be a quick study in the basic tenets of rebounding, shot-blocking and scoring and began watching basketball, mainly on tape delay through the Armed Forces Network. He soon earned a spot on the 15-member Air Force squad, comprised of the best players chosen from the over 400,000 men enlisted in the Air Force worldwide. His Air Force teammate, Staff Sgt. Rob Grey, who is currently stationed at Travis Air Force Base in California, remembers the first time he played with James. “I put a move on him and thought I had him for a routine jump shot,” Grey says. “But he busted the ball out to about the third row of the stands. He’s a phenomenal athlete, but he was a really raw talent then. He’s grown by leaps and bounds.” James says the Air Force competition was vastly different from college basketball stateside. Many team members were older, and several had played collegiately or in high school. The game was slower, individualized, more cerebral — a “battle of the minds,” James says.

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“I just love basketball now; it’s hypercompetitive, and that’s what I love. I love going head-to-head and seeing who comes out the better man.” Bernard James

When the Air Force squad entered the World Games, they faced many European teams with former Olympians on the roster. During his six-year stint, James earned four gold medals, including in 2008, when he led the USA All-Star team to its first International Military Sports Council championship since 1998. In the title game, he had 12 points, 18 rebounds and six blocks and was named the tournament’s MVP. Finding time for basketball wasn’t always easy. He would often miss games after being called away on assignments or conduct solo practices in less-than-ideal conditions. One afternoon in Camp Bucca, Iraq, where his group was stationed to assist the Army in watching over 22,000 detainees, James practiced on the lone basketball court. The concrete court, he says, was slick as ice. Running was out of the question, so he could only stand and shoot. When he tried to pivot quickly, he twisted his kneecap, leading to a recurring injury. During his 2005 Air Force season, the team played in a tournament in Las Vegas. One of the referees was also an ACC referee and noticed James. He called FSU coach Leonard Hamilton, telling him there was an Air Force player he might want to keep an eye on, according to Jones. After that call, Hamilton says he reached out to Beverly Cook, who in turn asked her

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son to contact the head coach. “We started developing a relationship that way, but he was always back and forth on active duty, so it was difficult to keep in touch,” Hamilton says. “But during the communication that we did have, it was obvious he wanted to finish his education, go to college and get his degree, and that once he got out of the service, he’d be very interested in FSU.” James says other programs had reached out to him, including Clemson, but that he and his mother agreed Florida State would be the best fit. In the fall of 2008, after completing his six years, James enrolled at Tallahassee Community College, which boasted one of the top junior college basketball programs in the nation and where he’d remain in close proximity to FSU. During preseason conditioning, James reinjured the knee he’d aggravated in Iraq. He was diagnosed with a fractured patella and missed the entire preseason. By the time he joined his TCC teammates, “the players were so much more athletic, which was hard for me,” James says. “I was used to coasting by, so that was a huge change.” Still, as TCC coach Eddie Barnes pointed out, James didn’t get frustrated. He constantly asked for direction and again found himself learning through trial by fire. “He was a sponge,” Barnes

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says. “There were no questions about his athleticism; it just came down to the fact that he’d have to create a good feel for the game.” Barnes and his staff worked with James on softening his jump shot and learning how to post up as well as position himself on defense. In two seasons with the Eagles, James averaged 13.6 points and 9.8 rebounds. He recorded 24 double-doubles and left TCC second on the school’s all-time list for field goal percentage (.624), rebounds (512) and blocks (131). Former TCC teammate Hugh Robertson, now playing at South Florida, says James’ role exemplified the lessons he’d learned in the military. “He definitely was a leader, like a big brother for us all,” Robertson said. “He’s just a great individual,” Barnes adds. “His character and the discipline he got from the military has helped him grow to be a model citizen.” Now at FSU, the 6-foot-10, 240-pound junior joins a recruiting class ranked No. 16 in the nation by ESPN.com. The Seminoles have reformatted their offense this season, focusing on a quicker, more up-tempo style. They’re 5-1 and are averaging 78.2 points per game. While he’s still learning FSU’s plays, James has already been a positive influence on his teammates.


James’ teammates say that while he may still be learning offensive and defensive schemes, he is already a positive influence. “Our team has a lot of upperclassmen, but he brings a whole new level of maturity,” junior Luke Loucks says. “When he walks into a room, you can feel his presence.” James’ mom tells the story of earlier this year, when one of James’ teammates was reprimanded for his actions off the court. James took the player aside, quietly counseling him and reminding him to control his anger so that it wouldn’t become a hindrance. “He wants to help in any way that he can as far as the team goes, and also personally,” Cook says. Seminoles junior forward Chris Singleton, reigning ACC Defensive Player of the Year (and whom James cites as his paradigm for defensive play), says James has helped him “learn to be a more mature player.” In the first half of FSU’s 97-73 win over UNC Greensboro on Nov. 14, James entered the game at the 16-minute mark of the first half. He looked timid, waiting too long to jump for rebounds and hesitating before attempting a shot. Toward the end of the half, James set up Singleton for a monster block before garnering one of his own. During the second half, James appeared more comfortable, finishing the game with five points, four blocks and seven rebounds in 19 minutes of play. “I came out kind of flat and wasn’t as aggressive as I needed to be,” James said afterward. “I let the refs bother me —- I saw the things they were calling, and I was thinking too much about trying not to get fouls called instead of going after it. In the second half, I went out and played and tried not to think about things so much.” “There’s a learning curve, so we’re just teaching him, being patient and allowing him to develop at the rate that he can absorb,” Hamilton says of James. There’s also an element of ACC-inspired awe. “Getting in front of a big crowd in big arenas is still kind of a wow factor for him,” Jones says. “But I think in the next month

or so, you’ll start to see what kind of great player he is.” Grey predicts his good friend will be in the NBA next year. While James isn’t making forecasts, he says he’ll “definitely” earn his economics degree, even if the NBA becomes an option. On Veterans Day, James and teammate A.J. Yawn, who’s currently a lieutenant in the Army (but has yet to serve active duty), visited Tallahassee’s wall memorial for veterans. The two went to dinner beforehand, talking about their shared experiences and how the lessons they’ve learned in the military have carried over to being a part of the Seminoles squad. “I just love basketball now; it’s hypercompetitive, and that’s what I love,” James says. “I love going head-to-head and seeing who comes out the better man.” A love that started by following orders. When asked what he thinks now of his supervisor’s command to play basketball that

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first evening, James smiles: “The best thing that ever happened to me.” No wonder he’s asking for more. SB Anna Katherine Clemmons writes for ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com.

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s e m i n o l e B A S E B A LL By jim crosby Photos by mike olivella and fsu sports info

Wearing

Golden Spikes

I

t’s the Heisman Trophy of baseball and has been presented annually since 1978 to the outstanding amateur baseball player in America. To win the Golden Spikes award is to have your name permanently etched among the best who ever played college baseball.

Four Seminoles, the most at any university, have been honored with this highest award. To win in baseball you must be strong up-the-middle. FSU’s Golden Spikes winners prove that point. They include catcher Buster Posey (2008), pitcher Mike Loynd (1986), and two centerfielders, J. D. Drew (1997) and Mike Fuentes (1981). They run the gamut from walk-ons to future superstars looking for a place to play ball. All four have played under Mike Martin, who is writing his own chapter in the legends of college baseball story with 1,627 wins going into the 2011 season. Martin, now in his 32nd season as head Seminole, recalled that, “There weren’t any Player of the Year Awards except The Sporting News award when the Golden Spikes first came around.” Bob Horner of Arizona State won the first Golden Spikes and went on to star for the Atlanta Braves. Likewise, each of the Seminole award winners ended up in the big leagues. The Garnet and Gold route each of them took was diverse and compelling. »

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Buster Posey was honored at an FSU football game after winning a World Series Championship with San Francisco Giants and claiming rookie of the year honors.

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s e m i n o l e B A S E B A LL

F

Mike Fuentes Coral Gables, Florida BA .353, HR 27, RBI 83

uentes is a story of determination and perseverance. He had numerous scholarship offers but none from Florida State. Wanting to stay in Florida, he walked on at FSU. Fuentes was cut from the team. After playing summer ball under Mike Martin, the assistant coach recommended him to head coach Woody Woodward who asked him to come back out. He only played in eight games in 1978 and was expected to be a backup centerfielder in 1979 until the one they recruited signed a pro contract. Fuentes remembers his debut. “So, Florida State was stuck with me to open the season against Troy State in a double header. I hit two home runs in both games, four homers for the weekend.

I don’t think I missed a game after that,” Fuentes says with a smile. Martin agrees that power surge surprised a lot of folks. “I saw him as a guy who could bust the game open with a stolen base, a double, a great catch. Just glided when he ran — a beautiful baseball player.” Fuentes got stronger and improved to the extent he led the NCAA in career homers while putting up 26 in his Golden Spikes season. An inspiring, never-give-up story, Mike Fuentes went from walk-on, to being cut, to becoming centerfielder by default, to Golden Spikes winner. He played under three of the NCAA’s most celebrated coaches: Woody Woodward, Dick Howser and Mike Martin.

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Mike Loynd Short Hills, New Jersey 20 W 3L, 223 SO, 2.45 ERA

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artin remembers a conversation with Joe Dean, the raspy-voiced basketball TV analyst who later became the LSU athletic director. Dean told him, “Coach, I’ve got a guy you want to see, a six-foot-three pitcher from New Jersey, Mike Loynd.” When Loynd arrived on campus Martin saw it differently. “In practice I saw him throwing and thought he would be lucky to make the team. Wait ‘til I get my hands on Joe Dean,” said Martin. After redshirting him Martin recalls, “I’m watching Loynd throw batting practice to Jody Reed (future 10-year major leaguer). Reed flips his bat as he leaves the batting cage. I asked him what was wrong. He said ‘Everything that guy throws moves.’” Loynd kept the ball moving through three years of ”lights-out” pitching. He struck out 417 batters and compiled 45 wins. In his Golden Spikes season he compiled an amazing 20 wins with 223 strikeouts.

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Martin fondly remembers Loynd’s first start against the Hurricanes in Miami. He loaded the bases in the first inning and the home fans got on his case. They were calling him every name in the book with the kindest being “over-rated.” Then, Loynd struck out two batters, got a popup, stuck his fist in the air and walked off the mound. It was game over for the Hurricanes. The Loynd success story continues at Florida State thanks to the generosity of the Loynd family, especially his dad, Dick Loynd, former CEO of Converse shoes. Today press conferences are conducted in the Mike Loynd Tradition Room. Martin says, “Florida State owes a lot to the Loynd family.”


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f ever a player had star written all over him from Day One on campus it was J. D Drew from tiny Hahira, Ga. (pop. 1626). Jamey Shouppe, FSU’s chief recruiter, remembers the first time he saw Drew at Advanced Baseball Camp. “We weren’t really looking at him because we had a lot of outfielders returning,” said Shouppe. “Then he took batting practice and hit several over the right field screen. I knew with that swing he would be a great one.” In high school, Drew was equally gifted in football and baseball. Asked why he

I

n 2006 a player arrived at Florida State who Mike Martin called “the ultimate college baseball player.” Buster Posey from Leesburg, Ga., a hundred miles up the road from Tallahassee, possessed “leadership qualities second to none.” Then Martin added: “The way Buster Posey conducted himself in the classroom, the clubhouse and on the field made all those around him better.” In 2007 Posey agreed to switch from shortstop to catcher. Under Mike Martin Jr.’s instructions he learned the position well enough to win the Johnny Bench award as college baseball’s best catcher. Then, he won everything else, including the Dick Howser Trophy, Brooks Wallace Award, National Player of the Year award from Baseball America, Collegiate Baseball and Rivals.com and, finally, the Golden Spikes trophy. Posey was picked 5th by the San Francisco Giants, won the starting catching

chose baseball he said, “I was a wide receiver and they never would throw the ball to me.” Football’s loss was baseball’s gain. Before the kid from South Georgia was done he broke 17 Florida State and ACC offensive records. Seminole fans got used to watching Drew do the “unbelievable.” At Miami in consecutive at-bats, he hit a three-run homer over the left field wall, a solo shot to center, then capped it off with a grand-slam over the right field fence into a parking garage. One game! Three homers! Eight RBI. In his Golden Spikes season Drew had an amazing triple-triple with more than 100 hits, runs and RBI. He became college baseball’s first 30-30 member by hitting 30 homers and stealing 30 bases. He won the Dick Howser Award, Baseball America, Collegiate Baseball and The Sporting News Player of the Year awards. A first round draft pick, Drew’s feats continued in the Big Leagues as MVP of the 2008 All-Star game.

J. D. Drew Hahira, Georgia BA .455; HR 31; 100 RBI

position in 2010, was on the World Series Champion team and, to top it off, won Rookie of the Year. Time to retire? Not really. Buster was only 23 years old. With all the awards and personal recognition Buster got it should be hard for him to pick out a single high point at Florida State. But without hesitating he says, “That would have to be winning the Super Regional against Wichita State to make it to the College World Series.” Team goals supersede individual recognition for Buster Posey.

In addition to the four Golden Spikes winners, Florida State has had 11 National Players of the Year and 206 All American picks, with 88 receiving first team honors. With such a rich tradition it is little wonder that those Golden Spikes have a big splash of Garnet on them. SB

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Buster Posey Leesburg, Georgia BA .463; HR 26; RBI 93

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planned giving By JOEL PADGETT Photos courtesy THE BROOME FAMILY

You’re Going To Do What?!! H

e was annoying. It was 1968, the first year girls and boys could share a classroom at Bishop Kenny High School. The wool uniforms and classrooms without air conditioning should have stifled this sort of behavior. The 16-year-old girl took her seat, dreading his next move. Her dark eyes glared, reflecting a Spanish-Italian heritage that accounted for “the temper” he was to experience for the first time. Paul was 16 and sat right behind Mary

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Ann. Smitten by her fiery beauty, he did what boys do: vie for her attention with sophomoric jokes and unmerciful teasing. So when Paul made that next move, offering Mary Ann a lollipop, she naturally assumed it was another juvenile prank and slapped the sucker across the classroom. Mary Ann didn’t bite on the lollipop but did bite months later when he mustered the nerve to make his next move. Their first date, the Junior Prom, wasn’t lollipops and rainbows either. Nervous

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Paul looked at the apple of his eye and mustered this regrettable observation: “Your hair doesn’t move.” They never dated anyone else after that sweet but sticky start and have now enjoyed 38 years of marriage together. Paul Broome was a skinny, blue-eyed boy who bore an uncanny family resemblance to his great, great grandfather, James Broome, the third governor of Florida. The governor’s family was from Quincy, but when his grandson’s wife (Paul’s


grandmother) was unable to care for all of her children, Stockton Broome brought Paul’s father, Frank, and his brother Paul to Jacksonville. The great uncle put the boys through school, and they remained inseparable through long Jacksonville careers. Paul’s father Frank started his family while working for an optical company, then worked his way through a Chicago optometry school before returning home to raise his family. Paul’s older brother became an optometrist and Paul thought he should be one too, but science and math weren’t his interest. After a fun year at Jacksonville University, Paul’s dad sent him to junior college, where he and Mary Ann finished together. In 1971, Paul made the trip to the state capital and Florida State University with Mary Ann. When the couple decided to marry the next summer, their parents said they would have to support themselves. They got married, worked their way through school and managed to catch FSU football and baseball games. Paul graduated with a degree in Political Science in 1975 and applied to law school. Mary Ann looked forward to the prestige and stability a legal career would bring but knew it would require more years of hard work while Paul was in law school. While waiting acceptance, Paul’s uncle invited his namesake to lunch at the Brown Derby. “Youngster, you’ve spent enough time in school,” Uncle Paul proclaimed. “You need to go to work — with me.” Paul adored Uncle Paul but had never thought about following him into the insurance business, where his uncle had excelled with New York Life since 1936, except for the years he served in World War II. The persuasive salesman convinced Paul that an insurance career would be fun and rewarding. Paul rushed home to share the exciting news, but instead saw “the temper.” “You’re going to do what?!!” she exclaimed, heritage flaring. “Great, you went to college all this time to be an insurance man!” Mary Ann worked a number of jobs in the early years of Paul’s career, fretting over finances, while Paul loved his career

from the moment he met his first client. Uncle Paul taught him selling skills, but it was his uncle’s clients who turned Paul into a passionate believer in life insurance as he saw firsthand what a powerful difference it made in the lives of his clients. As they settled into life, the Broomes realized they missed FSU sports, and found a tiny group of fellow ’Noles who met at a Jacksonville restaurant. They became active with the club and started going to games again. Bobby Bowden had arrived, and the tiny club grew so large that meetings were moved to the Prudential building where hundreds showed up for weekly calls to the coaches. “The only way we could get information about FSU sports in those days was to come to the club meetings,” Broome said.

On the first day that Paul became a New York Life agent, he bought his first life insurance policy, which became the start of something grand for their family and for the Seminole family. Mary Ann worked her way up in the club leadership, becoming its first female president in 1988, and Paul continued to handle the merchandise sold at meetings. Studentathletes and coaches visited often, which made supporting them more personal and fun. The best reward the Broomes enjoyed was the opportunity to meet former defensive coordinator Mickey Andrews and his wife, Diane. The relationship almost never started. Mickey was scheduled to speak at the club shortly after his departure from coaching at the University of Florida, and the Broomes were asked to take them to dinner. Paul remembers Mary Ann’s reaction. “The temper” said, “I don’t want to take that Gator anywhere!” Mary Ann is glad she relented because

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it led to a long friendship with “two of the finest human beings in the world.” A Navy brat, Mary Ann is the oldest of three girls and three boys. While the couple has no children they made sure her nieces and nephew were raised Seminoles. They began taking her nephew, Trippe Bush, to games when he was five and were ecstatic when he enrolled. Trippe died in a car crash before he could graduate so Paul and Mary Ann honored his memory with a football locker gift. On the first day that Paul became a New York Life agent, he bought his first life insurance policy, which became the start of something grand for their family and for the Seminole family. Although it was tough early on to carry the premiums, the Broomes continued to buy insurance on themselves and on family members. These whole life policies paid dividends and built cash values, which they call the “Broome Bank.” They have used the flexibility of their private bank for everything from vacations to homes. In the last few years, with credit difficult to obtain, many of Paul’s policyholders have used the cash in their policies to keep their business or their home. Those clients, who bought insurance to protect their family by replacing income in case of death, found it the only thing that protected their family in the case of bad times. The Broome’s policies provide the added bonus of enabling philanthropy. Paul and Mary Ann are using life insurance to provide for family after they are gone. But they also want to take care of their Seminole family and are using their policies to make a substantial estate gift for scholarships. FSU athletics continues to be a huge part of their lives, and they want to insure that young people — like the ones they have come to know — have a chance to compete as a Seminole. Seminole Boosters, Inc. appreciates gifts of whole life insurance. Whether given during your lifetime, when a policy may no longer be needed, or upon your passing, they are a great way to support the ones you care about. SB

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Compliance

Donation Requests & Student-Athlete Appearances A

s Florida State Seminole Boosters, the Compliance Team realizes you may donate your time and money to many great causes. You are also undoubtedly connected to the Seminole athletics community and may ask for donation requests (e.g., FSU apparel, signed memorabilia) or student-athlete appearances to help support your charitable endeavors. Florida State Athletics would like to support as many charitable requests as possible. However, the Compliance Team has a few important reminders for you. Please note that prior to the Florida State Athletics Department allowing any item to be donated or having any student-athlete appear at a function, the Compliance Team must ensure that the request meets NCAA rules. For instance, the NCAA rule governing donation requests states that the donated item or money raised from that item cannot be given to a prospective student-athlete. In addition, an NCAA rule regarding student-athlete appearances states that in no way can a student-athlete be used to advertise any kind of commercial item or company. We monitor these requests with either a Donation Request Form or Promotional/Fundraising Form for student-athlete appearances. Both forms can be found on Seminoles.com under the Compliance page. There are many other rules that apply to donations and appearances but the two noted above are the most relevant. If you would like to have any Seminole items or student-athletes at your next event or fundraiser, please complete the applicable form listed above and send any other pertinent information to the Compliance Team via email to adominato@fsu.edu or via fax to (850) 644-7025. Finally, if you have ideas concerning possible educational initiatives, or functions you would like the Florida State Compliance Team to be involved with, our office welcomes your input. We can be contacted at (850) 644-4272. Help us to better educate you! We greatly appreciate your continued support and assistance in our compliance efforts. Thanks in advance for your ideas and Go Noles!

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS (from October 5, 2010–January 21, 2011)

C. Brandon Greer Fitzlane, Inc. Nicole McHenry Barton Ronald and Marisol Sylvester Shaun Painter The Brunetti Foundation

John L. Anderson Joseph B Hooten Joshua Madden Jumarr Farmer & Amarius Reed Ken Moler Kevin A. Forsthoefel Marvin and Marie Hayag Peter M. Fernandez Randall Merrill Ricky & Karen Potter Robert & Melanie Beare Ryan M. Roth Ryuji Takeda Susan Sapoznikoff Ted L. Smith Thomas E. Morris, III Wes Blalock William Ketchersid

TOMAHAWK

WARRIOR

GOLDEN CHIEF

Alex Montague Brown & Brown, Inc. Donald and Amelia Montano Jay Baker Matthew K. Foster and John Leace Robert S. Edwards Tyler Porter

SILVER CHIEF

Adria Ward Anna E. Owens Askia Jones Bill Hayes Brent & Sharon Willis Chris Caldwell Chritine Anne Minardi Clyde & Deborah Turner Dennis Holbrook Eric Van Dezilder Frank & Chris Hall Graham M. Lupton Ian Chomat and Jon Kosberg James and Elizabeth Haslett James Montague and Jimmy Grainger Jason D. Bonner John & Karen Churey

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Andrew D. Adams Andrew Neeves Brewster B. Bevis Brian Westrick Casey M. Roberts Charles and Janice Tews Charles Vickers Christopher Badger Christopher Smith Christopher W. Chambers Clayton M. Lehman and Kelly S. Lehman David C. Williams David Mahon David Stoms Dwight B. Richterkessing Erin Calloway

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Florida State University Seminole Club of NYC, Inc. Gillian L. Stewart and David T. Stewart, M.D. Gregory J. Youngberg Hugh W. Costa Jeffrey Allen Roltsch Jeffrey F. Aumick Jeffrey Tormeno Jeremy Hardin John M. Kovary John M. Rudd, Jr. Jonas Harbison Jonathan Juhl Keith & Molly Harris Kenneth Akodu Kevin Peranton Loren Savage Mark T. Flaherty, Esq. Matthew F. Skelly Michael A. Tadlock Michael and Donna Reese Mr. Francis Luisi Nevin M. Durden Nicole L. Payne Norma Shornak Lucas Spears Randy Clevenger Rodney T. Barnes Ronald Winn Sandra L. Walker Scott Clark Sheri Thomson Sherry S Kendrick Shirley C. Hays Timothy and Linda Moyer Trey Byrd Wiley Grady

RENEGADE

Aaron Allison Aaron Deslatte Al Morris Alixandre E. Deaux

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Andrew and Sara Howard Bobby W. Hardie Brian McAdams Bryan and Erin Rapp Chayson S. Shoemaker Christopher J. Fluehr Christopher T. Owen Christy A. Fowler Cory McFarlane Courtney Flack Craig T. Beese Crystal C. Jurado Dan Dolan Daniel R. Van Sickle Darrel Willis Dennis Cook Dennis Sauls Everett and Maria Bieber Grimm DePanicis James E. McFatter, III James Larson James R. York, Jr. James W. Cade Jason Waters Jeffrey Chambers Jeffrey Gulsby Jeremy Rogers Joe Gianotti John M. Colman John N. Redding John Weiland Joseph Costello Joshua R. Bean Kevin R. Clarke Lee J. Hart Leon O’Neal, II Mark A. Templeton Mark J. Gambill Mary A. Vance Matt Owens Matthew Hutton Melissa Belyeu Michael Blumen Michael Dolan Michael I. Felton Michael Lewis Michael Nairn Mike Cathcart Mitchell Niemann Mr. & Mrs. R. Todd Martin Nicholas Robinson Pablo J. Diaz Parker Alley Patrick C. Salinas Paul Steuart Randall W. Hanna Richard & Cindy Senderling Rodney and Mercedes Willis Ronald Tapper Ryan Adamson Samantha Lightfoot Sean Tacie Shawn Kirkpatrick Steve and Whitney Gibbs Teresa Gonzalez Thomas Herzog Tim Hall Timothy B. Hunt Todd Broyles Todd Engelhardt Todd Sontag Troy Baxto William B. Harnish William L. Haire, Jr. William Worden

BRAVE

Alfred Nelson Austin Taylor Blake A. Partridge Brett Birdsong Chris Alflen Christopher Miller Daryl R. Levine David and Blinda Stokes Deanna and Robert Ramsey Emily Stacker Geoff and Emily Brenner George S. Conley Glenn A. Bier Harlan Franklin Harvey Henry James Davis, Jr. James E. Rumker Jeff Rosenthal Jennifer A. Lester John D. Sisler, Jr. Johnny Fontan Jonathan Biard Joseph C. Contento Justin R. Sherry


Katie J. Allan Larry Johnson Levi G. Shadle Marcus J. Shipman Marino Rodriquez Matthew Pare Matthew Saunders Matthew Zaideman Michael A. Espada Michael P. Kelly Mike Sundquist Mr. & Mrs. H. Howard Hardaway, Jr. Ms. Dana Portnoy Paul Ryan Ricardo Charria Roger J. Staub Romy Alvarez Ronald and Kristina McGuire Ryan C. Holt Scott M. Harrell Stephen J. LaCerte Tremayne Pearson Trent Meewes William & Bonnie Pfost

Robert Bayard Robert Whitaker Ronald E. Dixon Ronald G. Burnstine Ronald L. Wilson Ryan West Scott Edmonson Scott J. Thompson Scott Morris Scott Poundstone Sean Wyckoff Shanda M. Lee

Shane Stitik Shawn Sutton Shirley Kinney Sonya and Carter Vaverek Stephen and Shannon Berg Stephen Moncrieffe Stephen T. Benson Steve Rhodes Steven D. Muscatello Suzanne C. Maestre Thomas B. Eckert Thomas Beers

Thomas Lippy Thomas W. Shaw Tiffany Wilkes Traci Norris Tracy Stitt Troy Rich Wendy Warras William B. Bracken Zachary D. Frank

IRON ARROW

A.J. Bacon, Sr. Greg Rosenthal Gregory C. Faulkner Harry J. Lennard Hope Everd Ingrid V. Jimenez Ivaylo D. Dinov, Ph.D. Jackie Lujo Jaime L. Bloomfield James and Lynnette Worrell James Hovey James Morris Janie and Al Radford Jason H. Laing Jeffrey Davis Jeffrey Johnson Jennifer Corrigan Jeremy M. Powers Jeremy Nagorka Jesse Carrasco Jessica L. Conrad Jillian Kaufman Jodi Ketchersid Joel Caddell Joey Delvalle, Jr. John A. Fallone John A. Salgado John M. Gibson Johnathan Davis Johnny T. Millender Jonathon Lane Joseph Bell Joseph P. Catanzariti, III Josh Creamer Justin Garza Karen McGinnity Kari Janzen Karl Bufe Katherine E. Lindsay Katherine Powell Katherine Vejano Katie Mills Keith D. Ruebeling Kenneth Lee Kerry J. Hinote Kevin E. Hosey Kevin J. Morello Kristin L. Scheel Kurtis R. Kendall Kyle J. Leist Lisa D. Keleher Maja Sokmensuer Manish Thaker Marc J. Harris Mark and Michelle Teta Mark and Terri Shealy Mark C. Elmore Marlon Alvarado Martha Bixler Matt Layne Matt Prescott Matthew A. Croft Matthew R. Maiorano Michael B. Khalil Michael Barrett Michael P. Lawlor Michelle H. Mullins Mike Doherty Natalie Kowal Neil D. Ragland Nina Rosenberg Paul “Alex� Quimby Paul and Erin Kurtz Reuben NesSmith Richard Cutrera

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group ticket sales By ROB WILSON Photos courtesy BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF TALLAHASSEE

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Creatively Filling Doak E

ver wonder how the Seminole Ticket Office fills seats in Doak on Saturdays? The answer to that question lies in the community. The ticket office has an outbound sales department and is striving to get everyone in the community involved, especially the youth. Not only does this get fans in the seats, but it also creates interest and familiarity with the university among local youth. “In this day and age in the sports industry, it’s important to think outside the box when attracting fans to get involved. With a program like FSU, it’s important to utilize community outreach to increase and maintain the fan base,” said Michael Espada, Ticket Sales and Booster Memberships manager. “Similarly, by being flexible and creative with the ticket packages that we offer, it constantly gives prospective fans the opportunity to sample the excellent experience that FSU athletics has to offer.” The Seminole Ticket Office starts by contacting local youth groups in the area. This includes, but is not limited to, youth organizations, youth sports leagues, church groups and nonprofits. For example, The Boys and Girls Club of Tallahassee brought 60 children to the Samford game. Dean Goozee, ‘Nole fan since ’77 and a Tomahawk Booster since the 80’s, said of the experience: “On the day of the game, I was overwhelmed by the appreciation shown by the Club. Clearly it

was a special day for all of the children and they were very thankful for the opportunity to see an FSU home game.” Goozee went on to say, “While assisting the group with their seating in the stadium on the day of the game, I noticed a number of other children’s groups and organizations in attendance. Clearly there are many like-minded FSU fans who wanted to help make the day a special one for kids throughout the Tallahassee area.” While the Seminole ticket office helps organizations have a special game day experience, they also help them with fundraising initiatives. Nonprofit and youth organizations are offered programs where they can utilize FSU athletic tickets for any of their organizations’ needs. They can receive a significant discount on tickets to sell to the community and family members and then use the difference between the face value and the discount price to help reach their fundraising goals. Another initiative is the “Jimbo’s Super Students” program. It is an honor roll program that rewards students in the community for getting good grades. The program enables many local elementary school students who earn a 3.0 GPA, have

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perfect attendance, or who show exemplary improvement, to receive a complimentary ticket to an FSU home game with the purchase of an adult ticket. The promotion

also offers tickets to teachers and faculty on Teacher/Faculty appreciation day. Said Espada: “As an educational institution we feel it’s important to promote academic excellence among our youth. Through programs like this we are encouraging youth to perform well in school and get rewarded with tickets to see the ‘Noles play on Saturdays.” Remember, groups get discounts of up to 50%, so reserve your group discount today and support your ‘Noles! For more information and to purchase tickets please contact Michael Espada in the Seminole ticket office at (850) 645-9588. SB

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Get Connected,  The new Seminole-Boosters.com launched in December New Look

New videos, photos and page design on display at Seminole-Boosters.com.

Navigation

Based on user statistics and feedback from members, the navigation menus have been updated to help users easily find information about membership, events and Booster benefits.

Events Calendar

In partnership with our social networking sites, the events calendar has become a great resource for fans. Booster and athletic event info is available.

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We want your feedback. Please take a few minutes to tell us about your online experience. E-mail your comments to seminoleboosters@admin.fsu.edu or call us at (850) 644-3484. U NCONQU E R E D M AGA ZINE

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Stay Connected! Optional Login Social Networking

Seminole Boosters and Florida State Seminole Athletics come together to bring you news, videos, special offers and event info on Facebook. Join the official Seminole fan Facebook community, “Like” seminoles.com/facebook.

You’re just three clicks away from completing your online pledge for 2011 or making a payment on a current pledge, securely, of course. Viewing giving history or updating profile info requires a login.

Facebook

www.seminoles.com/facebook

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Seminole Boosters: twitter.com/SeminoleBooster Seminole Student Boosters: twitter.com/SSB_Noles Seminoles.com: twitter.com/Seminoles_com FSU Tickets: twitter.com/FSUTickets Basketball (M): twitter.com/FSU_MBasketball Coach Leonard Hamilton: twitter.com/FSUCoachHam Basketball (W): twitter.com/FSU_WBasketball Coach Sue Semrau: twitter.com/CoachSueFSU Swimming and Diving: twitter.com/FSU_Swimming Cross Country: twitter.com/FSU_XCountry Track & Field: twitter.com/FSU_track Volleyball: twitter.com/FSU_Volleyball Tennis (W): twitter.com/FSU_WTennis Tennis (M): twitter.com/FSU_MTennis Soccer: twitter.com/FSU_Soccer Baseball: twitter.com/FSU_Baseball Golf (W): twitter.com/FSU_WGolf Football: twitter.com/FSU_Football Coach Dameyune Craig: twitter.com/CoachDCraig Coach James Coley: twitter.com/CoachColey Coach Eddie Gran: twitter.com/RBUniversity Coach DJ Eliot: twitter.com/CoachEliot

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Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T 2011

Seminole Athletics Earns Another Top 5 Ranking for Comprehensive Sports Excellence

Soccer

Toni Pressley, Kassey Kallman and Kelsey Wys have been named Soccer America All Americans. Florida State University junior defender Toni Pressley has been named to the 2010 Soccer America Division I Women’s Soccer All-America Team, also known as the Soccer America “MVP’s Team.” Two Seminole freshmen, defender Kassey Kallman and goalkeeper Kelsey Wys, have also been named to the Soccer America All-Freshman teams. Pressley, who kicked the game-winning goal against USF in the second round of the NCAA Tournament, was named as a MVP’s Team first team member. She was previously selected as a First Team All-ACC member, an NSCAA All American fourth team member and named to the TopDrawerSoccer. com national “Team of the Season.” Pressley finished the 2010 season with a team high three game-winning goals and helped lead the Seminoles to the top ranked defense in the ACC during the regular season.

Kallman was named to the Soccer America All-Freshman first team. She was a key component of the swarming Seminole defense that allowed only 14 goals during the regular season. Kallman played a team high 2,022 minutes and started every game during the regular season and NCAA Tournament. For her efforts she was named as an ACC Second Team member, ACC All-Freshman first team member, TopDrawerSoccer.com All Rookie Team and TDS “Team of the Week” for her tremendous efforts during the Sweet Sixteen. Wys was named as a Soccer America All-Freshman second team member. She led

the ACC in shutouts (12), save percentage (.843) and was second in goals against average (0.76). Overall Wys went 16-5-1 in her first year in the net. During the first week of the season Wys was named to the TopDrawerSoccer.com “Team of the Week,” and later was selected as a CollegeSoccer360 National Primetime Performer of the Week during first week of October. Wys finished the season as an All ACC second team member. Overall the Seminoles’ finished the 2010 campaign by making an 11th consecutive NCAA Tournament and advanced to the Elite Eight for the sixth straight year.

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2011 Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T

2011 Seminole Softball Schedule Big Ten/Mountain West/ACC Tourney — Tallahassee, Fla. March 5 1 p.m. FSU vs. Wisconsin March 5 3 p.m. FSU vs. Utah March 6 11 a.m. FSU vs. Utah March 6 1 p.m. FSU vs. Wisconsin

FSU returns seven starters plus four veterans on the mound.

WOMEN’S Softball Live on Seminoles.com

The Florida State University softball team will have six home series from the 2011 season streamed as part of the Seminoles.com All-Access schedule.

Easton SEC/ACC Challenge in Auburn, Ala. March 8 5 p.m. CT @ Auburn March 9 1 p.m. CT vs. Penn State March 11 3:30 p.m. CT vs. Mississippi State March 12 1:30 p.m. CT vs. Alabama March 12 6:30 p.m. CT vs. Mississippi State March 13 1:30 p.m. CT Alabama

March 5 Wisconsin (dbl-header) March 6 Utah (dbl-header) April 2 Virginia Tech (dbl-header) April 9 Virginia (dbl-header) April 13 North Florida (dbl-header) April 24 Maryland FSU looks to build on its strong history and make a record-breaking 12th NCAA Championship appearance. The Seminoles have two 11-year streaks, from 1986-96 and 2000-10, that are currently the school’s longest postseason stretches. Since the 1986 season, FSU has failed to make an NCAA Regional only twice. FSU has made consecutive Atlantic Coast Conference championship game appearances in head coach Lonni Alameda’s first two seasons. The 2011 edition includes seven returning position starters as well as four returnees on the mound. Junior outfielder Shayla Jackson is among the team’s top returning players after garnering a .338 batting average last season with one home run, 33 RBIs, 72 hits and 39 runs scored. Senior right-hander Sarah Hamilton, a Tallahassee native, anchors a strong pitching unit. Hamilton finished the 2010 year at 22–10 with a 1.50 ERA and 326 strikeouts in 214.1 innings pitched. All games at the FSU Softball Complex are free to attend.

March 16 6 p.m. University of South Alabama March 19 1 p.m. @ North Carolina State (DH) March 20 Noon @ North Carolina State March 23 6 p.m. @ Florida A&M University March 26 1 p.m. @University of North Carolina (DH) March 27 1 p.m. @ University of North Carolina April 2 1 p.m. Virginia Tech (DH) April 3 Noon Virginia Tech April 5 4 p.m. @ Jacksonville University (DH) April 6 6 p.m. @ University of Central Florida April 9 Noon Virginia (DH) April 10 Noon Virginia (possible 11am start due to travel) April 13 4 p.m. University of North Florida (DH) April 16 1 p.m. @ Boston College (DH) April 17 Noon @ Boston College April 23 1 p.m. Maryland (DH) April 24 Noon Maryland May 4 6 p.m. @ University of Florida May 7 1 p.m. @Georgia Tech (DH) May 8 1 p.m. @Georgia Tech May 13–15 TBA ACC Tournament @ Georgia Tech May 19–22 TBA NCAA Regional May 27–29 TBA NCAA Super Regional June 2–8 TBA WCWS

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Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T 2011

Men’s Tennis

Men’s Tennis In The Midst Of Toughest Schedule Yet The Florida State men’s tennis team, which began the season ranked No. 27, is in the midst of its toughest season in school history, with 20 of its 24 opponents ranked by the ITA. The Seminoles may have lost their No. 1 player from last year, but the team is returning every other player and blue-chip recruit Blake Davis is in the singles line-up. Individually, Florida State has two studentathletes ranked in singles, with senior Clint Bowles (Tampa, Fla.) leading the way at No. 37 and senior Vahid Mirzadeh (Wellington, Fla.) ranked No. 42 after going 5-3 in the fall. Bowles finished the 2009-10 season with a 2612 record and in the fall had a five-match win streak to reach the finals of the ITA Southeast Regional. Mirzadeh had his best season last year after going 20-6 in singles while posting a 2-0 record against top 10 opponents. Last season, singles positions 4-6 were played by freshmen. This year, those same talented players return with something they didn’t have last year — experience. Going from juniors to collegiate play can be daunting. Teammates depend on you to win your match and to get that point for your team. And the players find themselves in loud arenas with many in the crowd cheering for, and against, them. But with the rookies now being in their second year, this will bring a more experienced and confident team to the courts. Already Connor Smith (Tampa, Fla.), Anderson Reed (Daphne, Ala.), Jordan Kelly-Houston (Christchurch, New Zealand) and Andres Bucaro (Guatemala City, Guatemala) have shown their maturity and leadership. The ACC has a history of being one of the toughest conferences and this year is no different, with 11 of the 12 teams ranked in the top 75. Florida State’s conference schedule features five home matches against No. 1 Virginia, No. 24 Virginia Tech, No. 44 Miami, No. 75 Maryland and Boston College. FSU travels to No. 14 Duke, No. 20 North Carolina, No. 22 Wake Forest, No. 23 Georgia Tech, No. 53 Clemson and No. 57 NC State. The ‘Noles non-conference schedule features home

matches against No. 2 USC, No. 5 Texas, No. 9 Florida and the Seminole Quad featuring No. 41 Nebraska, Florida Atlantic and Furman. The team travels to face No. 2 USC and South Florida and will compete against No. 28 Fresno State at the ITA Kick-Off at UCLA to determine who will face the winner of the No. 6 UCLA vs. No. 33 Minnesota match.

Women’s Tennis

Earns Highest-Ever Preseason Rank Coming off a fantastic 2010 season, where they made it to their first ever NCAA Sweet 16, the Florida State women’s tennis team is set to kick-off 2011. They begin the season with the program’s highest ever preseason ranking, checking in at No. 14 in the ITA Division I Rankings. Leading the way for the Seminoles is senior Katie Rybakova, who is currently ranked No. 42 in the country by the ITA, and sophomore Noemie Scharle, who begins the year as the team’s highest ranked player (No. 18) despite missing last season due to injury. Senior Federica Suess and sophomore Francesca Segarelli form a tremendous doubles team, starting the year ranked as the nation’s No. 43 tandem. Rybakova is perhaps the team’s most accomplished player on and off the court, having twice won the Golden Torch Award for the highest GPA among Seminole athletes and making the ACC’s All Conference team for three consecutive years. In 2011, Rybakova will be shooting for a school record fourth time as an All-ACC player. Segarelli, the 2009-10 ACC Freshman of the Year, along with another talented sophomore, Amy Sargeant, will be among the top Seminoles competing this season. The Seminoles will be looking for new leadership with the 2010 departure of graduating players Lauren McCreless and Jessica Sucupira. They left Florida State tied as the all-time record holders in singles (102) and first and second in doubles’ victories (93 and 92). Upcoming seniors Rybakova and

Francesca Segarelli (Top) is ACC Freshman of the Year. Katie Rybakova (Bottom) has earned All-Conference honors every year and has maintained the highest GPA of all student-athletes.

Suess have been climbing the record books and the all-time record for singles is potentially within reach for both. Florida State will play a demanding schedule as the Atlantic Coast Conference will continue to be one the strongest conferences in the nation this season. The ACC has five of the top 15 nationally ranked schools, seven in the top 25 and nine schools in the top 52. Among the top 25 spots in the nation, No. 6 North Carolina leads the way for the ACC, with others being No. 7 Duke, No. 11 Clemson, No. 12 Miami, No. 16 Georgia Tech and No. 24 Virginia. With the experience gained in 2010 by the current players and the addition of talented freshmen Ruth Seaborne and Manon Veldman, head coach Jennifer Hyde and associate head coach Oliver Foreman look to lead the ‘Noles to even higher levels of excellence in the conference and beyond.

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2011 Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T

Women’s Golf

Former Player Leads ’Noles What’s new with the Florida State women’s golf team is former Seminole studentathlete Amy Bond, who is in her first season as head coach. What remains the same is the expectation that the Seminoles will once again compete for both the ACC and NCAA Championships. The Seminoles finished in 10th place in the NCAA Championship Tournament in 2010 and nothing less is expected this season. “I believe that I will need to lead by example and keep my game up, and that every one of us needs to keep improving,” said senior Macarena Silva. The Seminoles boast post-season veterans including Silva, Maria Salinas, Hannah Thompson and Jessica Negron. The tournament-tested Seminoles have the skill to compete against the top teams in the nation throughout the spring season. Silva, the only senior on the Seminoles’ roster, will look to lead the team to the ACC Championship and back to the NCAA Championship.

“The ACC championship is always a great tournament and we will always perform well in that event,” said Silva. “Everything is geared to playing well at the end of the season in the NCAA’s — we have been there, done well and are looking forward to going back and playing well again this year.”

Men’s Golf

No. 3 ’Noles Want Championship Following a program best third-place finish in the 2010 NCAA Championship Tournament, the Seminole men’s golf team has its sights set even higher: winning a national championship.

Brooks Koepka

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Senior Drew Kittleson, one of the top senior golfers in the nation agrees: “Everyone wants to get back to the national championship again this season. But this season we want to get to the finals and win the championship. “The expectations for the Florida State golf teams are very high and that is good because that is what we want and that’s who we feel like we are.” The Seminoles will be led by Kittleson, who has continued to develop his game throughout his career. Kittleson will be one of the top players in the nation after winning the NCAA Central Regional individual championship. Junior Brooks Koepka was the ACC player of the year in 2010 and is another great asset to the Seminole line-up. The Seminoles are a well rounded team with post season veterans Kyle Cobb, Wesley Graham and Doug Letson, who will all fight for a spot in the Seminole line-up throughout the season. The Women’s Golf Team (Top Left), Hannah Thomson (Top Right), Brooks Koepka (Below Left) and Kyle Cobb (Below Right).


Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T 2011

Track and Field

’Noles Will Host Three Meets The nationally-ranked Florida State men’s and women’s track teams will kick off the 2011 outdoor season on March 3 and the Seminoles will compete in 15 events before the NCAA Regionals take place May 26-28 in Bloomington, Ind. The outdoor NCAA Championships will be held in Des Moines, Iowa, starting June 8. “Once again we’ve put together one of the best competition schedules in the country,” said coach Bob Braman. “We’re able to get our best athletes to the best meets and we’re hosting three great meets at Mike Long Track.” Both teams will see All-Americans returning to competition, among them Teona Rodgers, Danielle Jeffery and Allyn Laughlin on the women’s team and Brandon Byram, Maurice Mitchell, Brian Chibudu, Michael Putman and Gonzalo Barriolhet playing for the men’s team. Those outdoor home meets will occur on March 24-25 for the FSU Relays, April 8-9 for the Seminole Invite and May 6-7 for Twilight. In addition to some great competition in Tallahassee, including an event on March 1112 at Florida A&M University, Florida State will compete from coast to coast this year. During the outdoor campaign, the ’Noles will travel from Philadelphia, Pa., to Palo Alto, Calif. The opener for the outdoor season takes place in Jacksonville at North Florida on March 3. “Our schedule sets us up well to compete nationally at the highest level and to pursue championships,” Braman said.

Swimming and Diving Men and Women Defeat Florida

The Seminole swimmers and divers wrapped up 2010 with a bang, upsetting fourth-ranked Florida at the Morcom Aquatic Center. In the first night meet in the pool’s history, FSU put on a show with the men winning 184-116 and the women winning 187-113. Senior Rob Holderness led the men with victories in the 100 and 200 breaststroke while freshman Tiffany Oliver paced the women with a school record in the 100 free. Both swimmers earned ACC Performer of the Week honors for their efforts. The divers also dominated the evening, winning all four events with senior Landon Marzullo sweeping the one- and three-meter boards for the men and junior Lisi Rowland and freshman Kelsey Goodman earning wins for the women. With such an exciting end to 2010, the Garnet and Gold held their annual training trip in Naples, Fla., where the team took to

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heavy training to prepare for the ACC and NCAA Championships. The ‘Noles also took time out of their training schedule to volunteer at either the Fleischmann Afterschool Club or the Harbor Chase Assisted Living Facility. The Fleischmann Afterschool Club was developed as an afterschool stop for children of working parents and Harbor Chase is the home to older adults who would like to enjoy the company of others, or have special needs that give them the inability to live on their own. With the season winding down and ACC Championship season upon us, you can follow all of the action at www.seminoles.com with live streaming and live results from the meet. SB

(Clockwise from top) Tiffany Oliver, Casey Sandlin with seniors at Harbor Chase, and Alex Fernandez.

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Jerry Kutz, from page 31

priority areas of the stadium and that their contribution funds scholarships and the athletic budget; 96 percent were aware of monthly payment options for tickets and Booster membership; and 84 percent felt they were well informed of their purchase options. Ticket holders and donors are also very aware of events surrounding the game day weekend. Eighty percent of ticket holders said they would like to work with a personal customer representative for their ticket and Booster business, a project FSU plans to implement. It was also good to learn that the vast majority (88 percent) of season ticket holders want to fill the stadium, even if that means offering a lower-priced ticket in certain sections of the end zone. It was obvious from reading comments that season ticket holders place a very high value on creating the atmosphere that comes with a packed stadium. If you are wondering who responded to the survey, 43 percent were between the

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age of 35 and 54, 28 percent were between 55 and 64. A little more than half (54 percent) live within three hours of the stadium. Another significant finding was that 62 percent regularly use social media sites, important to know for improving marketing and communications efficiency. There is a clear desire among fans to extend the game day experience to a weekend experience with activities like the Friday Night Torch Lighting (70 percent), concerts (69 percent), the Friday Night Block Party (64 percent), pregame concerts on Langford Green (68 percent) and the Marching Chiefs pregame show at Dick Howser stadium (66 percent). In order to do that, FSU must continue to work to reduce travel costs — hotel rates and airport options — for season ticket holders, nearly half of which travel three or more hours to attend games. FSU must continue to work with local hoteliers to offer one-night rates, or more affordable two-night packages in Tallahassee or the surrounding areas, and promote the best

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flight options from Tallahassee, Panama City, Valdosta and Jacksonville. While Jimbo Fisher recruits the pieces he needs to put an exciting team on the field to electrify the scoreboard and the audience, FSU Athletics and Seminole Boosters are equally determined to create an atmosphere for enduring Seminole memories at every home game weekend. “In my opinion, the timing for a research project like this is perfect because the program is on a dramatic upswing,” Rayburn said. “And while winning tends to ‘fix’ everything, it may cover up real or perceived issues that affect the quality of a fan’s experience. “The Boosters and Athletic Department are really focused on all of the variables that create experiences for everything associated with FSU home game weekends. Hopefully, this study provides the business intelligence needed to create the very best experiences for FSU fans — which is their goal.” SB


SunTrust is proud to be the official bank of Seminole Athletics. For your team to win, everyone must work together toward a common goal. Same goes for your financial success. Whether it’s day-to-day banking, or helping you establish a solid game plan for your financial future, SunTrust representatives are teammates you can rely on. To learn more, stop by your local branch, call 800.SUNTRUST or visit suntrust.com.

SunTrust Bank, Member FDIC. Š 2010 SunTrust Banks, Inc. SunTrust and Live Solid. Bank Solid. are federally registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc.


Unconquered A  Seminole  Boosters  Magazine

S E M I N O L E B O O S T E R S M AG A Z I N E

February 2011

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Spring 2011 Unconquered Magazine  

Seminole Boosters Unconquered Magazine featuring Florida State University Athletics and Fundraising

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