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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

T H E

I N - F L I G H T

M A G A Z I N E

O F

E T H I O P I A N

A I R L I N E S

Roots & Ritual

Coffee

and culture in

Ethiopia.


Contents |

selamta

Features On the Cover

AM I VI TAL E

Coffee beans are roasted prior to a traditional coffee ceremony in the Ethiopian village of Choche.

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Sketching Saigon Discovering Ho Chi Minh City, stroke by stroke.

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Roots and Ritual

Coffee and culture in Ethiopia.

From the air, Kaya Mawa Lodge is no more than a small Malawian oasis just a stone’s throw from the Mozambique border.

An Oasis of Tomorrows

G L E N NA G O R D O N

Ecotourism and unexpected beauty on Lake Malawi.

SELAMTAMAGAZINE.COM

Selamta brings Africa to the world and the world to Africa. Join us online for more of the adventure of travel, the vitality of business and the richness of culture found in Ethiopia, Africa and the world.

CONTACT editor@selamtamagazine.com, advertising@selamtamagazine.com facebook.com/selamtamagazine

twitter.com/selamtamagazine

november/december 2013

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selamta

| Contents

Departments

22 5 FROM THE CEO

6 NEWS Celebrating Ethiopian Airline’s award as “Best Regional Airline in Africa,” and announcing new service to Niamey, Niger.

Panorama 12 AROUND ADDIS Apps for exploring Ethiopia.

56 SNAPSHOT Introducing Enugu, Nigeria. 58 CUISINE Beirut’s Tawlet Ammiq restaurant.

D U T Y - F R E E C ATA L O G O C TO B E R - D E CE M B E R 2 0 1 3

D U T Y - F R E E C ATA L O G O C TO B E R - D E CE M B E R 2 0 1 3

60 24 HOURS Frankfurt am Main: City cred, village charm. 62 DESTINATION A hidden gem of old Beijing.

T H I S W I L L B E YO U R DAY

THE NEW FRAGRANCE FOR WOMEN. FEATURING GWYNETH PALTROW.

16 DIPLOMACY + DEVELOPMENT Celebrating 130 years of Korean and German diplomacy, plus a promising start for two new hybrid maize varieties. 18 EVENTS + EXCURSIONS Kite-flying in India and modern art masterpieces in Canada. 20 HOTELS + HOTSPOTS Four seaside gems for taking in Africa’s coastal beauty. 22 STYLE + SUBSTANCE A guide for discovering Singapore’s energetic spaces and quiet corners.

Spotlight 53 NATURE Scientifically monitoring volcanic unrest. 4

selamtamagazine.com

64 BUSINESS Creating sustainable change in Zanzibar.

Sheba_Oct13_PRESS.indd 1 648131-1_PGPL_260x195.indd 1

10:53 AM 08/08/2013 9/11/13 11:34

66 TAKE 5 Palaces around the globe.

Fly Ethiopian 69 TRAVEL TIPS In-flight exercises to keep you limber, helpful pointers for travel to Ethiopia, and a quick introduction to Amharic. 72 FLEET 74 ROUTE MAPS 78 SALES AND AGENTS OFFICES

Entertainment 83 MOVIES, TV, AUDIO 92 PUZZLES

L E E YI U T U N G / G E T T Y

14 COMMERCE + CAPITAL Digital Jobs Africa makes investments in young African job seekers, and a new computer model predicts global crop failures.


From the CEO |

selamta

Welcome Aboard ክቡራን ደንበኞቻችን

Esteemed Customers,

L

et me first wish all my compatriots a happy and prosperous 2006 Ethiopian year! The New Year got off to a rousing start thanks to you, who gave us a resounding vote of confidence in September by selecting us as Best Airline in Africa at the Passenger Choice Awards. During the past year, we were also recipients of the Best Staff Service in Africa award by SKYTRAX — a global leader in airline service ranking — and the Airline Strategy Awards for Regional Leadership by Airline Business magazine. The 2005 Ethiopian year saw us attain many great heights. In line with the growth strategy outlined in our Vision 2025, we are meeting all of our objectives and closed the year with exceptional financial and operational performance. We added 14 new aircraft, including four 787 Dreamliners, showing once again that Africa is a global technology leader. We have installed a new Bombardier Q-400 simulator, which will enable us to train not only our pilots but also many young African brothers and sisters aspiring to become pilots. The commencement of direct services to Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo in July was a historical milestone, extending our network to all inhabited continents except Australia. We pledge to continue enhancing our uniquely Africanflavored Ethiopian hospitality and continue introducing modern aircraft to our fleet including the 777-300 ER (the largest aircraft in our fleet). We will offer the best possible connectivity to and from Africa with the opening of new stations such as Niamey, Tokyo and Singapore. And when we launch our equity partnership with Malawian Airlines, Lilongwe will become our Southern Africa regional hub and our third hub in Africa. We will give special focus to improving our services across the value chain for our premium cabin customers, as well as Sheba miles and Star Alliance Gold members. We will further expand the Cloud Nine lounge in our main hub at Addis Ababa airport. Internally, we have re-structured our organization to become the leading airline group in Africa, with seven strategic business units. We aim to fully tap into the market potential of all aviation-related services, such as training, aircraft maintenance services, catering and ground services. In short, the months ahead will be exciting, and you will see us achieve yet more milestones and enhance our products and services — all with the intention to give you the best possible travel experience. Thank you for choosing to fly with us today, and have a pleasant flight!

ሁሉ አስቀድሜ ለመላው ኢትዮጵያዊያን 2006 የደስታና የብልፅግና አመት እንዲሆንላችሁ እመኛለሁ። መንገደኞቻችን በሰጣችሁን ላቅ ያለ ድምፅ አዲሱን አመት “በአፍሪካ ምርጥ አየር መንገድ” ሽልማት ከ Passenger Choice Award አሸንፈን ብሩህ በሆነ ሁኔታ ጀምረናል። እምነታችሁን እኛ ላይ በመጣል ድምፃችሁን ስለሰጣችሁን ከልብ እናመሰግናለን። ያለፈውን አመትም ከ SKYTRAX World Airline “ምርጥ የአፍሪካ አየር መንገድ የሠራተኞች አገልግሎት” እና ከ Airline Business መፅሄት በአፍሪካ “የአየር መንገድ ስትራቴጂ መሪ” የሚሉ ሽልማቶችን በመቀበል ጨርሰናል። የ2005 የአትዮጵያ አመት በርካታ ስኬቶችን ያስመዘገብንበት ነበር። በራዕይ 2025 ያስቀመጥናቸውን ትልሞች በማሳካት አመቱን ከፍተኛ እድገት በማስመዝገብ ጨርሰናል። አራት 787 ድሪም ላይነሮችን ጨምሮ 14 አዳዲስ አውሮፕላኖችን በማስገባት አፍሪካ በቴክኖሎጂ ረገድ ቀዳሚ እንደሆነች አሳይተናል። ለኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድ ብቻ ሳይሆን አውሮፕላን አብራሪ መሆን ለሚሹ አፍሪካውያን ወንድሞቻችን እና እህቶቻችን ስልጠና መስጠት የሚያስችለን አዲስ የቦምባርዲየር Q-400 ምስለ-በረራ ገጥመን ሥራ ጀምረናል። ባለፍነው ነሐሴ ወደ ሪዩ ዴ ጄኔሮ እና ሳኦ ፓውሎ በጀመርነው በረራ ከአውስትራሊያ በስተቀር ሰዎች በሚኖሩባቸው አህጉሮች በሙሉ በመብረር ታሪካዊ ምዕራፍ ጨብጠናል። የአፍሪካዊ ጣዕም ያለውን ልዩ የኢትዮጵያዊነት መስተንገዶአችንን ለመቀጠል ቃል እየገባን፣ በሚቀጥሉት ወራት እስካሁን ካሉን አውሮፕላኖች ግዙፍ የሆነውን የቦይንግ 777-300ER ጨምሮ ምቾታቸውን የጠበቁ አውሮፕላኖችን ማስገባት እንቀጥላለን። በቀጣዩም ወደ ኒያሚ፣ ቶኪዮ እና ሲንጋፖር አዳዲስ በረራዎችን በመጀመር በአፍሪካ እና በተቀረው አለም መካከል አመቺ እና ቀላል የሆነ የበረራ ግንኙነት አገልግሎት መስጠታችንን እንቀጥላለን። በጋራ ያቋቋምነው የማላዊ አየር መንገድ ሥራ በማስጀመርም በደቡባዊ አፍሪካ አካባቢ ላሉ አገሮች በአህጉሪቱ ሶስተኛው የበረራ ማዕከላችን ከሆነው ከሊሎንግዌ በጣም አስፈላጊ የሆነውን የአየር በረራ ግንኙነት አገልግሎት እንሰጣለን። እንዲሁም ለመጀመሪያ ማዕረግ፣ ለሼባ ማይልስ እና ስታር አሊያንስ መንገደኞቻችን የምንሰጠውን አገልግሎት የተሻለ ለማድረግ አትኩረን እንሰራለን። አዲስ አበባ አየር ማረፊያ ያለውን የክላውድ 9 ላውንጅም የማስፋፋት ሥራ እንቀጥላለን ። አየር መንገዳችንን በአፍሪካ ቀዳሚ የአቪዬሽን ግሩፕ ለማድረግም በ7 የትርፍ ማዕከላት አዋቅረናል። ይህም ከምንሰጠው የመንገደኛ እና ጭነት ማጓጓዝ አገልግሎት በተጨማሪ የስልጠና፣ የአውሮፕላን ጥገና፣ የኬትሪንግ እና የግራውንድ ሰርቪስ አግልግሎት በመስጠት በገበያው ላይ የበለጠ ተወዳዳሪ ያደርገናል። በአጠቃላይ መጪው ወራቶች ተጨማሪ ስኬቶችን በማስመዝገብ ለእናንተ መንገደኞቻችን የላቀ አገልግሎት የምንሰጥባቸው ጊዜያት ይሆናሉ። የኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድን የበረራ ምርጫችሁ ስላደረጋችሁ እናመሰግናለን። መልካም በረራ!

Tewolde GebreMariam

Chief Executive Officer, Ethiopian Airlines november/december 2013

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selamta

| News

“This is strong confirmation that Ethiopian has become an airline of choice by millions of customers.”

BEST AIRLINE IN AFRICA

Ethiopian Airlines recently won the Passenger Choice Award for “Best Regional Airline in Africa.” The Passenger Choice awards, created by APEX, the U.S.based Airline Passenger Experience Association, gives a voice to airline passengers. “This is strong confirmation that Ethiopian has become an airline of choice by millions of customers,” said Ethiopian CEO Tewolde GebreMariam. “In our belief of continual improvement, we will expand our strong network of connectivity and enhance our awardwinning customer services, flavored by Ethiopian hospitality both on the ground and in the air. “The award is also recognition of and encouragement for all Ethiopian employees, who are working hard every day. I thank them and call upon them to continue giving their best in the service of our passengers.” Selamta, the in-flight magazine of Ethiopian Airlines, was also a finalist among the five best worldwide airline magazines at the 2013 Passenger Choice Awards.

NOTEWORTHY

In line with its Vision 2025 multiple-hub strategy, Ethiopian Cargo is pleased to announce the opening of a second cargo hub based in Lomé, Togo. In partnership with ASKY Airlines, the new cargo hub commenced operations in September after the phase-in of a B737-400F. This new cargo hub will transport goods and commodities between West Africa and the rest of the world, playing a critical role in trade growth and economic development.

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ethiopianairlines.com

Ethiopian Cargo is the largest cargo operator in Africa, serving 25 cargo destinations globally. Ethiopian Cargo recently received the “Long Time Partnership” award from Asia Freight Terminal in Hong Kong, in recognition of its reliable cargo service.


News |

selamta

NEW ROUTE TO NIAMEY, NIGER

NEW Q-400 SIMULATOR In August 2013, Ethiopian Airlines installed a Q-400 simulator, which will be used to train pilots not only for Ethiopian but also for other African airlines. The Q-400 is an ideal aircraft for domestic and regional flights, with its speed closer to that of narrowbody jet airplanes and with reduced fuel consumption and emission. Ethiopian uses these 13 Q-400s for its extensive regional and domestic network. Ethiopian was also recently named an Authorized Service Facility to perform line and heavy maintenance on Q400 and Q400 NextGen turboprop aircraft.

As of November 2013, Ethiopian Airlines began service to Niamey, Niger, four times a week. Niamey, the largest city in the West African country, will be the airline’s 57th destination on the continent and 84th destination in the world. Ethiopian will also soon add Singapore as a destination.

AFRICA’S BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

OFFICIAL CARRIER

Ethiopian Airlines garnered global attention in September by being named African Business of the Year for 2013. The award commends Ethiopian’s business model for boosting the continent’s economy by creating new opportunities for its people. “We are honored to receive this award,” CEO Tewolde GebreMariam remarked. “Africa is on the rise, and we are growing together with the continent. With our extensive and fast-expanding network that now covers five continents, and our multiple-hub strategy in Africa that creates multiple gateways to the continent, we are serving as an essential vehicle for the flow of tourism and foreign investment.”

Ethiopian Airlines has been appointed official carrier of the 34th session of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States and also of the 26th joint parliamentarian summit for the ACP and the European Union, held in Addis Ababa in November 2013. Ethiopian is also the official carrier of the yearlong 50thanniversary celebrations of the OAU-AU. The ACP is composed of 79 African, Caribbean and Pacific states, of which 48 countries are from sub-Saharan Africa. ACP objectives include sustainable development of its member-states and their gradual integration into the global economy; consolidation of unity and solidarity among ACP states, as well as understanding among their peoples; and establishment and consolidation of peace and stability in a free and democratic society.

“Africa is on the rise, and we are growing together with the continent.”

november/december 2013

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selamta

| About

Contributors VOLUME 30 | NUMBER 6

NANA EKUA BREW-HAMMOND has appeared on MSNBC and

TheSartorialist, and in The Village Voice and The New York Times. Publishers Weekly called her novel, Powder Necklace, “winning.” Keep up with her on Twitter at @nanaekua, and check out her itinerary for 24 hours in Frankfurt on page 60. Rooted in: New York City Most fascinating local ritual from her travels: "On a trip to Zambia, I learned that it's customary for house help to kneel down when addressing the boss. I never got used to it." MAJKA BURHARDT is an author, filmmaker and professional climber, as well as the creator of “Additive Adventure” — when adventure goes beyond exploration to cultural and environmental connections. Her newest project, The Lost Mountain, combines cliffside ecology, conservation and adventure in Mozambique. Read about her exploration of coffee culture across Ethiopia on page 34. Rooted in: New Hampshire (USA) Most fascinating local ritual from her travels: "I love learning how to make a local dish and sharing this daily ritual with the people I meet."

Selamta — meaning “Greetings” in Amharic — is published bimonthly on behalf of Ethiopian Airlines by JourneyGroup+C62, LLC. JOURNEYGROUP+C62, LLC 418 Fourth Street, NE TK Building Charlottesville, VA 22902 Office #102 U.S.A. Bole Road +001 434 961 2500 (phone) Addis Ababa, Ethiopia +001 434 961 2507 (fax) +251 116 180365 (phone) EXECUTIVE GROUP MANAGING DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE EDITOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR EDITORIAL MANAGING EDITOR PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR SR. WRITER/PHOTOG. WRITER/RESEARCHER RESEARCHER EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

DESIGN DIRECTOR DESIGNER DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Rooted in: New York City and Ghana Most fascinating local ritual from her travels: "'Spraying' at Nigerian weddings — throwing money at the bride and the groom as everyone dances around. Though it's technically illegal in Nigeria (it's considered an abuse of currency), the practice remains a typical part of most weddings."

Diane J. McDougall Phil De Jong Jr. Jodi Macfarlan Ron Londen Caroline Eberly, Lisa Ryan Kalkidan Mulugeta Tsega Negussie

DESIGN

PRODUCTION DESIGNER

GLENNA GORDON is a documentary photographer who splits her time between West Africa and New York. In addition to her own photo projects, she also covers news and features, does work for NGOs and trains photographers in Africa. Read about her luxury island experience on Lake Malawi on page 42.

Philip De Jong Amanuel Mengistu Greg Breeding

Mike Ryan Ashley Walton Lindsay Gilmore Zack Bryant

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Russ Edwards Josh Bryant PRODUCTION/SALES Sara Sem PRINTING Emirates Printing Press, Dubai LEAD DEVELOPER

EDITORIAL BOARD Philip De Jong Amanuel Mengistu Diane J. McDougall Zemene Nega

Mengistu Adelahu Henok Teferra Tsedenia Tadesse

ADVERTISING JOURNEYGROUP+C62, LLC

photographer whose work has been exhibited at festivals and galleries the world over. His last major exhibition, titled “Amazon,” was a two-person show with photographer Sebastião Salgado. See his images of Ethiopia’s coffee culture on page 34. Rooted in: Cape Town, South Africa Most fascinating local ritual from his travels: “The Reed Dance in Swaziland, where tens of thousands of unmarried girls and women gather reeds in the forest and then dance and sing for the royal family. Historically, one of the main objectives of the ceremony is for the Swazi King to choose another wife.”

CANDACE ROSE RARDON is a travel writer and sketch artist from Virginia (USA), although she has also called the U.K., New Zealand and India home. She recently released her first book, Beneath the Lantern's Glow: Sketches and stories from Southeast Asia and Japan. Read her story about sketching her way through Saigon on page 24. Rooted in: Currently sketching her way through the Middle East Most fascinating local ritual from her travels: “Taking part in a local gamelan orchestra's practice session on the Indonesian island of Nusa Penida.”

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selamtamagazine.com

INTERNATIONAL SALES

Azariah Mengistu TK Building Office #102 Bole Road Addis Ababa, Ethiopia +251 116 180365 (phone) +251 116 180367 (fax) azariah@C62media.com

NORTH AMERICA SALES

Sam Voelkel 418 Fourth Street, NE Charlottesville, VA 22902 U.S.A. +001 434 961 2500 (phone) +001 434 961 2507 (fax) samv@journeygroup.com

As the continent’s premier carrier and a member of the prestigious Star Alliance, Ethiopian Airlines brings Africa to the world and the world to Africa. Selamta does the same, celebrating the adventure of travel, the vitality of Africa’s role in global business affairs, and the richness of culture across all of Ethiopian Airlines’ many, varied destinations. This complimentary copy is yours to keep. While every care is taken to ensure accuracy, the publisher and Ethiopian Airlines assume no liability for error or omissions in this publication. All advertisements are taken in good faith, and the opinions and views contained herein are not necessarily those of the publisher. All copyrights and trademarks are recognized. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without written permission by the publisher. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review. © 2013.

L I N DSAY G I L M O R E / J O U R N E YG RO U P

PER-ANDERS PETTERSSON is a Swedish-born, award-winning


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Ranger is available with a new 2.5-liter petrol engine or a choice of new 2.2- and 3.2-liter diesel engines. Each of these high-tech units combines

Ranger is available with a new 2.5-liter petrol engine or a choice of new power and efficiency with fantastic range. For example, the 2.2-litre,

2.2and 3.2-liter diesel oftorque theseat high-tech unitsfor combines 110 kW diesel engine puts engines. up to 375 Each N•m of your disposal power and efficiency fantastic excellent flexibility whenwith you are on therange. move. For example, the 2.2-litre, 110 kW diesel engine puts up to 375 N•m of torque at your disposal for Dependingflexibility on whichwhen modelyou andare engine youmove. prefer, Ranger’s new engines excellent on the come with either a 5- or 6-speed manual transmission, or a smooth 6-speed automatic which features manualyou sequential-shift capability. Depending on which model andaengine prefer, Ranger’s new engines

come with either a 5- or 6-speed manual transmission, or a smooth 6-speed automatic which features a manual sequential-shift capability.

Come and visit us for all your vehicle & after sales needs, Ries Engineering Share Company Debrezeit road or at our showroom in front of Nyala Motors, P.O. Box 1116, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Tel: +251-11-4403506/+251-11-8-400617, Fax: +251-11-4420667, E-mail: ries.psd@ethionet.et, Website: www.riesethiopia.com

Come and visit us for all your vehicle & after sales needs, Ries Engineering Share Company Debrezeit road or at our showroom in front of Nyala Motors, P.O. Box 1116, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Tel: +251-11-4403506/+251-11-8-400617, Fax: +251-11-4420667, E-mail: ries.psd@ethionet.et, Website: www.riesethiopia.com


THE BEER OF ETHIOPIA SINCE 1922 ከ18 ዓመት በታች ለሆኑ የተከለከለ


CO M P I L E D BY CARO L I N E E B E R LY AN D L ISA RYAN

PANORAMA AROUND ADDIS 12 | COMMERCE + CAPITAL 14 |

DIPLOMACY + DEVELOPMENT 16 | EVENTS + EXCURSIONS 18 | HOTELS + HOTSPOTS 20 | STYLE + SUBSTANCE 22

Hotels + Hotspots

COASTAL LUXURY

CO U RT E SY O F AL MANAR A R E SO RT

Relaxing in Africa, where water meets sand.

Take in the beauty of the African coastline at one of the following seaside gems, ranging from deckedout resorts to intimate chalets, like the villas at Kenya’s Almanara Resort (shown here).

TURN TO P. 20 TO LEARN MORE.

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Around Addis

APPS FOR EXPLORING ETHIOPIA Get around Addis (and beyond) with ease. Using these apps, you’ll have language lessons, news and needto-know travel information at your fingertips.

FOR i PHONE EthioTube Catch the latest news, shows, music videos and other clips from ETV and similar popular networks. Ethiopian Proverbs

EthioProverb

EthioTube

ET Airlines

Proverbs are a mainstay of Ethiopian culture. Search sayings — from witty to wise — by category. Ethiopian Flight Schedule Never miss a flight: This app churns out schedules and updates for both Ethiopian Airlines and partner carriers.

Amharic

Ethio Calender

X3 Radio

Amharic Feedel Learn Amharic on the go. Just click the character and the app will sound the correct pronunciation back to you.

Addis Map

Ethio Guide

Ethio News Ethiopian Calendar Translate dates to and from the Western calendar; get to know Ethiopian national holidays; and master the rhythm of Ethiopian Orthodox fasts and feasts. X3 Ethiopia Radio Groove to African tunes by streaming local Ethiopian radio.

FOR ANDROID

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Map of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Ethiopia Guide by Triposo

High-def maps let you search addresses, find routes and locate your spot through GPS positioning. Don’t worry about getting lost when your signal drops; the app works offline too.

A one-stop travel shop, this app allows users to book hotels directly; converts currency; advises activities based upon time, location and weather; and more.

Ethiopian News Scan the headlines with this news portal, which pulls from Ethiopian TV and radio and also gives access to the global scoop.


NOKIA 106 WITH TORCH

NOKIA 105 WITH COLOR SCREEN NOKIA 108 DUAL SIM WITH CAMERA

NOKIA 107 DUAL SIM WITH MP3 PLAYER


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Commerce + Capital

If knowledge is power, foreknowledge can mean a world of difference when it comes to yearly harvests in the global agriculture market. A newly developed computer model aiming to predict climate-induced global crop failures showed promise in a recent study: Crop failures were reliably predicted in up to one-third of the global crop area. Wheat and rice — two critical food sources throughout the world — yielded the most reliable predictions. Researchers suggest that the model could help import-reliant nations prepare and plan for market changes.

MAT T PAM E R / J O U R N E YG RO U P

CROP MARKERS


LET’S GET DIGITAL

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) H O N G Q I Z HAN / G E T T Y, CO U RT E SY O F Z E N K AYA , ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P

In a future-facing initiative, the Rockefeller Foundation is responding to Africa’s growing youth population — the continent’s future workforce — with a new initiative called Digital Jobs Africa. From its regional office in Nairobi, Kenya, the Foundation is making a US$100-million investment to provide young African job seekers with technical training for information technology jobs such as data entry, service-center support, online research and web design. In a rapidly growing digital market, the program aims to help 1 million people in Africa over the next seven years.

HOME SLEEK HOME APPLE IN THE EAST

In a step toward a future partnership, Apple CEO Tim Cook traveled to Beijing to meet with China Mobile Chairman Xi Guohua. Despite being the world’s largest mobile carrier by subscribers, China Mobile remains the only Chinese carrier yet to adopt iPhones and iPads. Cooperation between the two giants would be a huge move, as 13 percent of Apple’s quarterly sales come from the Greater China market.

Though its contemporary designs are easy on the eyes, South African building company Zenkaya cares about more than just aesthetics. The company’s modular housing kits maximize efficiency and materials while minimizing waste, environmental impact and energy usage. Designed with sleek, modern lines meant to harmonize with surrounding landscapes, Zenkaya homes can be fully installed by the company or purchased in kits, with pre-engineered parts for do-it-yourself construction.


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PLAY HARD, WORK HARD

The genius of Uncharted Play’s SOCCKET is simple: Store the kinetic energy from a soccer ball’s movement and convert it to usable power. After only 30 minutes of play, a small mechanism inside the durable, airless ball can capture three hours of power for a companion LED lamp, a valuable resource for those without access to electricity.

Three Cheers for Selamta, honored as a world-class publication by the 2013 APEX Passenger Choice Awards

Selamta is proud to be named one of the world's top-5 in-flight publications. APEX selected the magazine based on passenger feedback and judges' comments, recognizing excellence in graphic design, editorial content and overall communications effectiveness. Congratulations, Selamta and Ethiopian Airlines!

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CO U RT E SY O F U N CHART E D P L AY

Diplomacy + Development


HYBRID HYPE

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E Y G RO U P ( O R I G I NAL ART BY 2 21 A ) , NAT HAN AL L R E D / G E T T Y, ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E Y G RO U P ( O R I G I NAL ART BY S U B MAN / G E T T Y )

In West Africa, the Malian government has released two promising new hybrid maize varieties: sanu (big man) and mata (mama). Both are resistant to Striga, a parasitic weed, and are fortified with genes to survive drought. Sanu and mata yield almost twice as much as local maize varieties and are good for cooking.

RELATION CELEBRATIONS This year, Korea and Germany commemorate their 130th anniversary of diplomatic relations with eight months of lively celebrations. Festivities continue from Nov. 29 to Dec. 8, when the public is invited to performances by Korean and German jazz musicians in eight German cities, including Frankfurt, Munich and Hamburg.

www.yolyhotel.com tel (011.25111) 663.2828 p.o.box 5668 Addis AbAbA

REPORTING REWARDS

Earlier this year, the Pan-African Climate Justice Alliance launched a competition to further stimulate scientific reporting on climate change. Eighteen African countries submitted entries for the African Climate Change and Environmental Reporting Awards. Elias Ntungwe Ngalame of Cameroon was named the winning reporter for his research: using live radio to monitor daily weather changes and better adapt to climate and weather shifts. Ngalame received both a cash prize and a grant to attend the 19th Conference of Parties climate negotiations in Poland.


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Events + Excursions

NOV. 20, 2013 - MARCH 2, 2014

THE GREAT UPHEAVAL: MODERN MASTERPIECES AT THE ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO Toronto, Canada

Event Highlights | Featuring pieces from the Guggenheim Collection, this exhibition offers a glimpse into Europe’s innovative art scene between 1910 and 1918 — years of social and technological changes surrounding the First World War. Follow the chronology of expressionism, futurism and cubism featured in the work of groundbreaking 20th-century artists such as Cezanne, Gauguin, Picasso, Kandinsky, Matisse and Duchamp. While You’re There | Head over to Kensington Market and Spadina Avenue, described as the bohemian heart of Canada. With a wide variety of unique standalone shops (like Global Cheese), eateries and bars, there’s something for everyone. Take public transit, as the area’s popularity means minimal parking.

FRI

Great Eats | Close to the market, Kultura is an upscale global-fusion restaurant serving both regular and tapas portions. Come for dinner and stay for dessert — doughnut holes with Bailey’s Crème Anglaise, anyone? Locals’ Tip | On Friday nights (the typical “locals night out”), be sure to make restaurant reservations and consider taking a taxi or hopping on a Red Rocket, as Toronto’s streetcars are called.

JAN. 14, 2014

25TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL KITE FESTIVAL Event Highlights | This lively Indian kite festival is held each year on the same day, to coincide with the Hindu festival of Uttarayan (celebrating the start of the sun’s movement in the Northern Hemisphere). Locals and kite masters alike flood the Indian sky with thousands of brightly colored kites. For the competitive fliers, goodnatured kite-fighting (cutting the strings of others’ kites with your own) is always fair game. The displays continue after dark with illuminated box kites, called tukkals — their long lines strung with brightly lit lanterns reaching into the night sky. While You’re There | The Patang Bazaar, located in the center of Ahmedabad, is the kite market to visit. It’s open 24 hours a day during the week of Uttarayan. Great Eats | For a lunch break, head out to Swati Snacks. Don’t let the name fool you: This vegetarian spot will fully satisfy, offering a variety of authentic Gujarati cuisine such as panki chatni and dal bati. Make sure to wash it all down with some coconut punch or sugarcane juice. Locals’ Tip | If you plan to participate in a kite fight (pecha), make sure you purchase a kite with manjha (kite-string coated with glue and glass for a competitive edge). 18

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( TO P TO BOT TO M ) PAI N T I N G S CO U RT E SY O F G U G G E N H E I M CO L L E C T I O N , SR E E D HAR YE D L APAT I / G E T T Y, K I T E F E ST IVAL I MAG E S BY M E E NA K AD R I

Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India


HARD WON, BEST SHARED. Not for sale to persons under the age of 18. Drink Responsibly. The JOHNNIE WALKER, BLACK LABEL and KEEP WALKING words, the Striding Man device and associated logos are trademarks. ŠJohn Walker & sons 2011.


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Hotels + Hotspots

Take in the beauty of the African coast from one of these seaside gems.

ALMANARA DIANI BEACH RESORT, KENYA

THE RESIDENCE ZANZIBAR

At The Residence Zanzibar, nothing stands between you and the sea — other than your own private pool and a couple of swaying palm trees. Situated on the dream-like island of Zanzibar, the resort comprises a series of luxurious-yet-understated villas. The best part? These retreats have expansive sliding-glass doors that roll to the side, opening the space to the coast.

THE RHINO RESORT, SENEGAL

Check in at this contemporary hotspot and you won’t want to leave. With two swimming pools, a spa and beauty salon, fitness center, two restaurants and a bar, the resort is its own luxury haven within the seaside district of Saly. The critics also approve: The hotel swept five awards at the annual International Hotel Awards earlier this year. 20

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MACHANGULO BEACH LODGE, MOZAMBIQUE This intimate spot — tucked inside a coastal wildlife sanctuary — appeals to both the adventurous and those seeking solace. Resort activities range from windsurfing to ocean safaris and snorkeling, and each of the 12 two-bedroom, seafacing chalets is its own private oasis, complete with a plunge pool and deck.

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) CO U RT E SY O F AL MANAR A R E SO RT, CO U RT E SY O F T H E R E SI D E N CE Z AN Z I BAR , CO U RT E SY O F MACHAN G U LO B E ACH LO D G E , CO U RT E SY O F T H E R H I N O R E SO RT

Almanara combines the best of water and land: The resort is flanked on one side by the pristine Diani Beach coastline and on the other by the Shimba Hills National Reserve, a patchwork of rainforest and grassland. The getaway is fit for foodies too: Each of the six villas comes with personalchef service, and the open-air “Sails” Beach Bar & Restaurant invites guests to linger.


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Style + Substance

THE STYLE OF SINGAPORE

In one of the latest cosmopolitan destinations for Ethiopian Airlines, energetic spaces and quiet corners beg to be explored.

FOR A DOSE OF NATURE

Located in the flashy Marina Bay area, Gardens by the Bay is a series of conservatories, gardens and towering structures called “Supertrees.” These man-made “trees” are both natural and glitzy: Each is the framework for a vertical garden and a source of light at night. See the gardens and the bay from a different perspective by taking a stroll along the OCBC Skyway, a suspended walkway that connects two of the trees (and leads to a treetop bistro).

FOR STRESSFREE SHOPPING

FOR AN UNORTHODOX MEAL

FOR A DESIGN-CENTRIC DAY

Red Dot Design Museum is a smorgasbord for design lovers, with hundreds of works of communication and object design from more than 500 countries. Don’t let the inspiration stop when you leave; pick up a copy of the museum’s The Design Journey guide and follow its recommended full- or half-day route to discovering well-designed places of interest. 22

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FOR AN OFFBEAT READ

A treasure trove of books and curiosities, Books Actually celebrates the beauty and craft of print. On the shop’s shelves are works of fiction and poetry, as well as literary journals and rare editions. The store even has its own line of printed pieces, called Birds & Co., that offers notebooks cut, stitched and printed by hand.

Though the food and wine served at Lolla’s Secret Supper are tops, perhaps the best thing about the roving dining event is that it is, well, secret. Guests sign up via Facebook (or by way of co-founder Pang Hian Tee’s wine shop, Lollapalooza), learn the location a few days beforehand and then only discover the menu upon tasting. Can’t get on the reservation list? Treat yourself to tapas at the not-so-secret Lolla, the brick-and-mortar installment of the concept.

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) K I R K SIAN G , K E VI N T R U O N G / G E T T Y, CO U RT E SY O F LO L L A’ S SE CR E T S U P P E R , CO U RT E SY O F BO O KS AC T UAL LY, CO U RT E SY O F R E D D OT M U S U E M

Resist the crowds of the city’s frenetic Mustafa Centre and slow your pace to a stroll in the artsy and offbeat Ann Siang Road neighborhood. Colorful storefronts flank the street, and bohochic boutiques rival indie bookstores for shoppers’ attention.


The Power of Friendship


Discovering Ho Chi Minh City, stroke by stroke. STO RY A N D IL LU ST RAT IO NS BY CA N DAC E R OS E RA R DO N

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“W

hat you doing, honey?” a woman named Chan asks me on a rainy Monday evening in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. I am sitting on a low, plastic stool at the sidewalk restaurant run by her mother, with a bowl of steaming bún mám pork noodles tempting me away from the task at hand. I look up from my sketchbook to answer Chan, and my answer is this: I have come to sketch her city. Ho Chi Minh City — or Saigon (Sài Gòn), as the city was called before 1975 and is still popularly known — is my last stop on a three-week journey around Southeast Asia. The city was something of a mystery to me before I arrived. And that’s exactly why I decided to discover Saigon through the brushstrokes of my sketchbook. Ever since taking my first sketching trip to Porto, Portugal, some 2½ years ago, sketching has changed the way I travel. On one level, it has slowed me down. The images I want to capture with my camera often send me running in a million directions at once; but when my sketchbook is out, I spend at least two hours in the same place. I move less but pay more attention to a single scene. On a deeper level, and this proved to be true throughout Southeast Asia, sketching has become my way of engaging with a new city, the key I use to unlock my connection — a connection not only with the place itself but also, more importantly, with the people who call it home. I can’t imagine experiencing Saigon any other way.


Sketch #1 ON M Y F I R ST M O R NI NG, I’m on my way to sketch Notre Dame Cathedral when I pass through Tao Đàn Park,

a 10-hectare (25-acre) haven of green space in downtown Saigon. The first person I cross paths with is Lensu, a ponytailed guitarist who says he plays in the park every morning at 9 a.m. Much of his guitar is covered in jeweled pins and his fingers dance across the strings, spinning a beautiful classical melody. Within minutes, I’m putting off this morning’s intended destination. While sketching at the park’s Cafe Giai Khát instead, I look around. We all seem to have time to linger this morning: guitar students from nearby Ho Chi Minh City Conservatory of Music, businessmen with their newspapers, even young school kids coming in to purchase a yogurt. Saigon might be all motion and movement, but Tao Đàn Park is a place of stillness at its center. november/december 2013

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Sketch #2 WH EN I FI N A LLY M A KE I T TO TH E CATHE D RA L , I’m just in time for that afternoon’s rain showers. The city hardly

seems to halt, however; motorcycle drivers pause only to pull out brightly colored ponchos, and I, too, find shelter for my next sketching session beneath the umbrellas of an outdoor café. From this vantage point, I take in the panorama of wide boulevards, leafy palm and dipterocarp trees, and colonial architecture. The twin bell towers of the red-brick basilica are striking, but the pink façade of the Central Post Office also catches my eye. Both were constructed in the late 19th century, when Vietnam was part of French Indochina. Although the French are long gone, the buildings they left behind make for an intriguing background against which modern Saigon is now juxtaposed. 26

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Sketch #3 TO L EA RN W H AT I CA N of the city’s role in the Vietnam War, I head next to the Rex Hotel, which at the time served as a base for foreign journalists. In fact, the hotel’s rooftop garden played host to the American military’s daily press conference — or what infamously became known as the “Five O’Clock Follies.” While the view from the roof is impressive, I realize I want to sketch the building itself, so I settle into another rooftop restaurant opposite the hotel. My server, Phat, looks on as I begin. “You draw crossroads,” he says, noting the intersection in front of the Rex. Indeed, Phat couldn’t have chosen a more fitting word for Saigon as a whole, as it seeks to hold onto its vibrant traditions in the face of fast-paced modern development. The ground floor of the hotel is now home to luxury shops such as Chanel, Rolex and Salvatore Ferragamo; like so much else in the city, it has been transformed. 28

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Sketch #4 several times before stopping to sketch it. What draws me to this after-hours version of the city’s largest market, dating to the 17th century, are two women vendors: one selling mangoes from a wire basket on the back of her bicycle, another grilling fried bananas on her mobile shoulder-pole stall. Each wears an iconic, conical leaf hat, or nón lá. As I’m working on my sketch from the sidewalk, two local college students walk up and introduce themselves as Hà and Nhan. Nhan tells me that Hà also uses watercolors, and soon I am invited to paint with him the next day. Although I’m hesitant at first — my time in the city is soon coming to an end — we ultimately agree to meet at the Saigon Zoo in the morning.

I H A D PAS S E D TH E BE N TH À NH NI GHT MA RKE T

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Sketch #5 AFT ER S KE TC H I N G TO G E T HE R the next morning, Hà and Nhan invite me to a coffee shop. At first, I envision one of the city’s many chain cafés, until they point their motorbike away from the heart of downtown Saigon. Once we reach our destination, I know I would never have found it on my own, and I can’t imagine my loss if I’d missed such a creative, funky space. Billowed fabric runs the length of the high ceilings, record players and old typewriters are standard décor, and a singer and her accompanist are practicing for their live piano performance that night. After we’ve ordered our iced coffees (cà phê đá), Nhan explains that the café’s name means “Open the door,” or literally “Open Sesame,” after the classic Arabian Nights story. I can only smile at the coincidence — and at how my two new friends have opened another door to Saigon for me today. 30

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Sketch #6 with Hà and Nhan, what I’ll remember most is our morning sketching session in the Saigon Zoo — one of the oldest zoos in the world, first opened in 1869. Hà leads us past the elephants to a two-story yellow building. “We sketch here,” he says, and with that, we each get out our paints and set up shop. I watch the building come to life beneath Hà’s skilled hand and marvel at how differently we interpret the very same subject. “Yesterday, we consider not talking to you, because we have to go home,” Nhan tells me as we finish our sketches. “But if we not talk to you, we not have today.” It’s yet another reason I will leave here incredibly grateful — grateful for every person I met and every corner of Saigon I experienced, and grateful that my sketchbook could bring us all together.

ALT H OU G H I S P E N D M Y E NTI RE L AST DAY

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yeshi

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Roots & Ritual Coffee

and culture in

Ethiopia.

Wild coffee berries are the main source of income in the Kaffa region, said to be the birthplace of coffee. Children and cattle also drink the brew here. 34

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Entrenched in the forested flanks of Ethiopia’s Amaro Mountains, I sat down for a cup of coffee with a seventh-generation leader of the Messa tribe, Marsha Aday. We convened outside his regal earthen home, with a dizzying vista of wild coffee trees toppling over each other as they stretched to the summit of Mount Yero Wallo. § I was visiting Marsha Aday to hear his coffee story and the coffee stories of his ancestors. He wove a tale for me of cursed and burning red beans, of Muslim traders on camelback, and of the best coffee in Ethiopia. He told me there was more to tell, but in order for him to share his coffee story — and for me to truly understand — I would have to drink his coffee. & By Majka Burhardt • photos by Per-Anders Pettersson


We ducked inside the carved wooden doorframe of his home, where his wife, Gete, roasted, ground and began to brew two handfuls of beans from trees that you could almost reach from their doorstep. A sweet and spicy scent filled their home as the sky outside filled with clouds. My stomach rumbled in anticipation. But then, thunder and lightning crashed across Yero Wallo, and a flash flood turned me out of their house before I could ever sip a drop of the brew. Ethiopia is the birthplace of Coffea arabica — the species that represents 70 percent of the planet’s current coffee consumption.¹ Indeed, coffee appears in Ethiopian legend as far back as the 10th century B.C. Stories of its uses, symbolism and power overlap across this 1.1-million-square-kilometer (426,000-square-mile) country, providing a fabric of commonality and diversity. Across 90 languages, 200 dialects and 10,000 different coffee types, these coffee stories form a tantalizing roadmap for a lifetime of exploration. Step inside the journey. K AF F A : THE CO F F E E NAME, T H E C O F F E E L E GE ND Coffee’s biological home is understood to lie in Kaffa, 36

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deep in the south-central highlands of Ethiopia, near the border with Sudan. Around the world, the story of coffee’s discovery is tied to a young man named Khaldi (also known as Kaldi, or even Khaled). Depending on the teller, Khaldi was a goat-herder or a shepherd, a Muslim or a Christian, a scholar or a prankster, a delinquent or a monk. But he is always from Kaffa. And in every tale, Khaldi sees goats/sheep frolicking near a mysterious red fruit and is consumed by a desire to have as much fun as the animals. He investigates the fruit himself and, voilà, coffee is discovered. While it’s an easy semantic leap from Kaffa to coffee, the academically accepted root of coffee is actually an adaptation of the Arabic word qahwa, a wine made from the brew in the 17th century in Yemen. Coffea arabica was the name given in 1753, based on this association. But Khaldi is far from Ethiopia’s only coffee legend. In another, a particularly sweet-smelling ox was spotted eating similarly sweet-smelling, ripe coffee beans, or cherry, which inspired people to consume the same. And in yet another tale, dating to the 7th century, Prophet Muhammad’s grandsons were being bathed by their mother; once they were clean, coffee beans

Everyone in a coffee-farming family plays a role in the annual harvest, lasting from September through December. ¹ Coffea robusta (or Coffea canephora) accounts for the majority of the other 30 percent of coffee consumed worldwide. It’s generally grown at lower altitudes than Coffea arabica and is considered more bitter and a lower grade of coffee. Historically, robusta has been typically used as filler coffee, though the specialty coffee world has started to experiment with how to better use and cultivate robusta at a finer level.


Farmers harvest ripe coffee beans — called cherry — and dry them under the sun before dehulling and sorting.

² After coffee, Ethiopia’s primary exports are oil seeds, chat and floriculture.

sprouted from their bathwater. Those beans were used for prayers and began the Muslim tradition of using coffee beans in religious ceremonies. Individual children have even told me that their great-great-great-grandmothers discovered coffee. In Kaffa, the heartland of Ethiopian coffee diversity, all of these stories might well be true. Coffee trees and forests consume the landscape, and the scientists at Ethiopia’s primary Coffee Research Station in Kaffa’s capital, Jimma, will tell you that only half of Ethiopia’s 10,000 types have thus far been discovered. Each coffee type is morphologically different based on leaf color, productivity and other genetic signifiers. And each type — called an accession — has its own taste profile. Up to 5,000 accessions have been catalogued thus far. Ethiopians take coffee seriously — not surprising, considering that it accounts for more than 50 percent of the country’s gross domestic product.² But coffee is more than a commodity. It is a life currency. In Kaffa, people brew coffee in the traditional Ethiopian three-cup ceremony (see “The Coffee Ceremony” on page 38), serve the coffee cherry roasted whole and soaked in melted butter with honey, and use coffee grounds mixed with honey to

relieve an upset stomach. Here, and throughout Ethiopia, coffee trees can make or break a marital agreement, and they can soothe asthma, problem children or a distressed heart. In Kaffa, a stranger becomes a friend when you pause and ask her to tell you more about coffee. H ARAR: C O F F EE T O T H E W O RL D Kaffa might have coffee’s lineage and suppositional linguistic connection, but coffee moved into the rest of the world through Ethiopia’s eastern province of Hararge. There, the ancient city of Harar served as the trade hub between the Red Sea, Indian Ocean and the extensive Ethiopian heartland. This Muslim city propelled coffee along its historic course and into the greater world at the end of the 15th century. In Harar, as in Kaffa, coffee is called buna. In fact, throughout Ethiopia and the majority of Ethiopian languages, buna, bunn and bun are all used for coffee. This consistency has become the strongest piece of evidence for coffee’s origin in Ethiopia. When you travel today in Ethiopia, you are offered buna from every home and storefront, whether you be foreigner or friend. In Harar, you will easily find buna at restaurants and cafés, but in homes, buna is most often saved for november/december 2013

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religious occasions, births and marriages. For daily consumption, it’s the leaves that are used. They are picked green, sun-dried and then flash-roasted before being stored. Later, they are brewed slowly with milk to make a tea called kuti kela (also known simply as kuti). This practice supports a ceremonial importance of the coffee bean as well as the economic practicality of devoting the majority of coffee to export. Historically, Harari homes devoted entire rooms to the storing of leaves for kuti kela. If you are lucky, you will find someone who still reserves space for this purpose, and you will definitely find kuti kela to drink. While trying the tea, go ahead and sample a traditional coffee with salt as well. The chocolaty flavors of coffees typical to Harar work surprisingly well with a salty tang.

cup until they are 22 years old, of marrying age. In the Marsha region, infants get squirts of awol in between suckling on their mother’s breasts. My personal rule is to never pass up a coffee ceremony in the Rift — let alone anywhere else in Ethiopia — and to in turn ask my host to indulge me with stories of what each cup means and creates in their family and community. COFFEE’S LANDSCAPE

The Rift Valley has been a mainstay for high-value Ethiopian coffee since the 1970s. The lemony essence of a Sidama and the sweet earth of a Yirgacheffe are found in coffee shops around the world, and the Rift has even more to offer in today’s new symphony of celebrated flavors: from jasmine to rose, lingonberry to strawberry, cashew to walnut, black pepper to ginger, and countless other cup attributes that awaken the senses. Abo Awajo, a distinguished elder in Kele, explains to me how the people of Kele believe that timing with a coffee ceremony can dictate fate: If an unexpected visitor arrives during the first cup, called awol, it is good luck; but second-cup arrivals are treated with suspicion. A third-cup arrival signifies peace. North of Kele, in the province of Sidama, children are gradually eased into drinking coffee, starting with the third cup. They do not progress to the first

The majority of Ethiopia is mountainous terrain above 600 meters (2,000 feet). And 50 percent of the country is moist evergreen forest situated between 1,000 and 2,300 meters in altitude, with dark, rich volcanic soil — making it the perfect place for coffee. Even where you don’t see coffee trees, the beverage is highly prized. In the Gheralta region of the northern province of Tigray, coffee is no longer grown, but it is ever consumed and treasured. If people are low on coffee beans, they will add barley pearls to make a brew. It’s coffee, I’ve been told again and again in Tigray, even if there is only one bean in the batch. In the Lower Omo Valley, the Dassanech people import trucks filled with coffee husks for a tea they brew. This beverage has been a Dassanech staple for generations, though by most accounts, coffee as an endemic crop has not been present in the Lower Omo Valley for centuries. You can travel throughout the entire country by way of coffee. Be prepared for everyone you meet to offer you “the best coffee in Ethiopia.” No matter if you are a visitor or a local, it’s an honor to try so many superlative brews and a further honor to hear the story behind each one. I’m going back to Marsha Aday. There is coffee still to drink and stories yet to hear.

THE COFFEE CEREMONY:

SLOWING DOWN TO ENJOY RELATIONSHIPS.

R I F T V A L L E Y: ET HI O PIA ’S COF F E E HEARTBEAT

In Ethiopia, people often drink their coffee in three stages, bringing the same portion of coffee grounds to a boil for each stage. They first enjoy a strong cup, known as abol or awol, followed by progressively weaker brews called tona (or tala or thani) and a final round, baraka. Enjoying coffee in this manner takes time (one to two hours) and creates a space for community and conviviality. The term coffee ceremony arose in the 19th century and is now used to distinguish the practice from just a fast cup at a café or restaurant. Coffee ceremonies can be performed on a packed dirt floor or in a formal dining room. Guests gather around for the whole process of hand roasting and grinding the beans and then setting them to boil in a thick-bellied/thin-necked clay pot called a jebena. The coffee is poured through the jebena’s thin spout high above handless ceramic cups arranged on a squat tray and doled out to those in attendance. Spices, butter, milk and/or tennadum (a sprig of rue) are added, depending on regional, tribal and personal preference. No matter where you are in Ethiopia, each successive cup creates a deepening of conversation and sharing.

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A boy picks wild coffee on his family’s farm outside Bonga, Ethiopia.


Os dolupic iducium fuga. Et untur mi, corro berit, endicil laboreperi doluptatis ad


Haile Michael Gaano shares a coffee ceremony with guests in his home.

BEYOND ETHIOPIA: THE WORLD’S LOVE AFFAIR WITH C OFFEE. Coffee is the world’s most shared connection with Ethiopia, with more than 1.2 billion cups of coffee consumed daily. Ironically, though all arabica coffee originally came from Ethiopia, the country’s annual coffee production in 2012 was only 6.5 million 60-kilogram bags — representing 4 percent of the world’s coffee production. The global leader, Brazil, produces 50.1 million bags a year, 70 percent of which is arabica coffee. Ethiopia will likely never compete with Brazil in volume, yet she holds realms of untapped quality within her borders. This is because, like wine and grapes, coffee has a flavor profile that can differ dramatically between bean varieties. And Ethiopia has more than 10,000 different types of coffee sprouting from her soil. (Brazil, by contrast, has just under two dozen primary arabica varieties.) Appreciation for the nuanced tastes of coffee is growing worldwide, and Ethiopia stands to gain from that appreciation. Furthermore, it’s estimated that only 50 percent of Ethiopian coffee leaves the country; thus, Ethiopia has potential to dramatically increase its export quantity and revenue. It’s unlikely, however, that Ethiopia would ever export 100 percent of its coffee, as chances are low that the 85 million people living within Ethiopia’s borders would ever give up their 35-century-old relationship with the bean.

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Portions of this text are taken from Majka Burhardt’s book Coffee Story Ethiopia.


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Designed to fit seamlessly with the surrounding environment, Kaya Mawa’s rooms are tucked into nooks and crannies along Likoma Island’s edges.

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An Oasis of Tomorrows { Ecotourism and unexpected beauty on Lake Malawi. } S T ORY A N D PHO T OS BY GL EN NA G OR D ON


Kaya Mawa is a natural extension of the island’s rocky landscape.

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he turquoise and dark-blue fresh water of Lake Malawi is literally clean enough to drink. Tucked into a calm lagoon close to the lake’s eastern shore lies Likoma Island, a small Malawian oasis just a stone’s throw from the Mozambique border.

Some 9,000 people live on Likoma and make their living fishing and farming. Life is slow here, the fish are plentiful and the sun is always shining. There are no paved roads, and the only cars are a hospital ambulance and an open-top Land Rover belonging to Kaya Mawa lodge. It’s the perfect spot for a peaceful resort. Built over six years beginning in 1994, Kaya Mawa is both luxurious and simple, decorated with goods handmade by local women and designed to fit seamlessly into the environment. The 11 guest rooms feel like natural extensions of the rocky landscape, as if they are private caves waiting for guests to explore. But, unlike caves, they

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are light and airy — making the inside feel almost as if it’s connected to the beauty outside, ensuring that guests never stop soaking up the island’s ecosystem. In the main dining area at Kaya Mawa, a dozen white linen seating options beckon visitors: couches that are almost like beds, hammocks swaying in the breeze, armchairs just asking for an afternoon nap — all with views of the lake. From here, village women can be seen walking about quietly in groups of two or three, occasionally gathering buckets of drinking water from the lake and carrying them away on their heads, children in tow. A family


vacationing at Kaya Mawa is visible suiting up in snorkel gear and heading out, their little ones mingling with village children. In the guest rooms, gauzy raw-silk curtains blow in the breeze, limestone floors feel cool beneath the feet, and weathered wood furniture — often made from the hulls of fishing canoes no longer fit for the sea — looks rustically chic. In the rooms built for families, kid’s beds swing on hammocks. Every room also has a deck with lounge chairs and thick cushions, while private lake entryways invite guests to swim and explore. Many rooms have bathtubs for two built by local stonemasons, plus private outdoor swimming pools with panoramic views. One of the premium rooms, Makengulu, is even perched on its own private atoll. Guests cross a wooden bridge over pristine aqua water to find nothing but rocks, trees, birds and overflowing bougainvillea to welcome them.

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Guests cross a wooden bridge over pristine aqua water to find nothing but rocks, trees, birds and overflowing bougainvillea to welcome them.

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Kaya Mawa tries to hire at least one person from each local family, so that everyone on the island of 9,000 benefits from the lodge.

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Helen Chinjoka, 25, serves coffee to guests at Kaya Mawa.


Everything at Kaya Mawa is sourced locally, from the fresh food served at lunch to the seashell lamps shimmering at night. In fact, almost all of the lodge’s décor is made by local women in a craft workshop run by Kaya Mawa.

A country not to be overlooked While the Seychelles Islands and the Maldives have long been thought of as prime African tourist destinations, Malawi is still off the tourist map. Only 5 percent of people who travel internationally make it to Africa, and the majority of those travelers go to Egypt or South Africa. “People don’t get that you can come and lie on a sandy beach right in the middle of Africa,” says James Lightfoot, owner of Kaya Mawa. For him, part of the challenge is getting people to realize how extraordinarily beautiful this spot is. For most travelers, Malawi is just another poor country, not all that different from its neighbors and with not much to offer tourists. But for those willing to make the journey, Kaya Mawa doesn’t disappoint. Lake Malawi is one of Africa’s biggest lakes, at nearly 30,000 square kilometers (11,580 square miles). The best way to reach the lodge is via an hour-long Cessna flight from Malawi’s capital, Lilongwe, piloted by Ulendo Airlink. Malawi is often called the Warm Heart of Africa, and Likoma Island ups the ante on that promise: Everything at the lodge is sourced from the village, but the ethos of the operation means that all is offered and given, rather than taken or procured. For example, many of the lodge’s planters and individual bed headboards are crafted from old fishing boats that are purchased from villagers when the vessels are no longer sea-worthy. The wood is weather-worn and beautiful — skillfully hand-carved, its holes carefully repaired with small iron patches. They are a chic

and symbolic addition to the rooms — connecting the guests to the island economy and traditional ways of fishing. And almost all of the lodge’s décor is made by local women in a craft workshop run by Lightfoot’s wife, Suzie. Twenty-seven women work there, weaving baskets, sewing linen pillowcases and bedspreads, painting clay beads and stringing seashells for lampshades. Each of the women generates much-needed income from items purchased by the lodge and its guests. After the local government, Kaya Mawa is the biggest employer on Likoma, with more than 90 staff members. The goal is to hire at least one person from each family so that everyone on the island benefits from the lodge. (See “Peter’s Story” on page 49.) If a staff member passes away or is no longer able to work, the lodge makes an effort to hire someone else from the same family. In turn, the community’s support of the lodge means that guests are welcome throughout the island, local farms offer affordable produce, and fishermen sell their catch of the day to provide fresh seafood dishes on the lodge menu each evening. To understand the relationship between Kaya Mawa and the people of Likoma, it helps to know that Malawi is one of the world’s least-developed countries. Despite huge influxes of money from nongovernmental organizations and donors, development remains elusive. The average annual income per person in Malawi is less than US$900, and most people make their living off the land. november/december 2013

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Kaya Mawa staff set up for a “Swahili dinner,” a luxurious picnic on the lake shore.

For an outsider to come in and build on this beautiful spot, the people of the island must first accept and welcome their presence, and a partnership must be built. “If you go to a really beautiful lodge elsewhere in Africa, the staff often rotate in and out and aren’t necessarily from the area,” Lightfoot explains, “whereas all of our staff live with their families within walking distance of Kaya Mawa.” While other lodges might call themselves ecologically “green” because of their environmental practices, they are a far cry from what Kaya Mawa is attempting to achieve. “Ecotourism isn’t about how many solar panels you have or whether you compost,” Lightfoot adds. “It’s about the community.”

Far more than responsible tourism The term ecotourism was popularized in the early 1980s by a Mexican conservationist who defined it as “environmentally responsible travel” — meaning that such travel promotes conservation, actively benefits the local population and encourages low negative impact on the community. Kaya Mawa uses a combination of power sources, including solar panels for electricity and a diesel-powered generator when necessary. The lodge recycles everything — from old fishing boats to lake water, which is pumped into the swimming pools. Nothing is used in excess or 48

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brought onto the island when it can be sourced locally. At Kaya Mawa, being “eco” is really just being logical. It makes sense for the partnership between the lodge and the island to extend to the environment. The island offers many resources, the lodge uses them respectfully and everyone benefits. In addition to stewarding the local environment, Kaya Mawa engages in numerous other projects. When Lightfoot starts naming some of them, the list sounds like a mishmash of disorganized activities, such as fixing the church bell and buying goats to launch a profitable goat farm. But there’s purpose in this chaos: Almost all of the small projects are community-driven, in that they are things the community has directly requested. When the community needed the church bell to be fixed, the lodge helped provide the funds. The goats didn’t work out so well, but that’s another story. Sometimes, being a good neighbor comes down to basic communication. Like when the lodge bought a couple of quad bikes for guests to take around the island. The first few takers were thrilled and soon started pedaling down the island’s dirt roads — through villages of mud-brick houses with zinc and thatch roofs, through cactus and baobab trees, and past fields of cassava and maize. The villager


who had his cassava plant run over, however, was less excited. “The first thing we did was apologize,” says Becky Harris, the lodge’s general manager. Since it was harvest season, Harris calculated the value of the staple crop, and then the lodge reimbursed the farmer. From then on, guests were more clearly instructed about the importance of staying on the main path and not off-roading. A small lodge like Kaya Mawa — compared to a charity with a mandate, donors, overhead and so on — can nimbly respond to community needs and take on a more individualized approach. On Likoma, most of the projects have grown organically over time. For example, Kaya Mawa never planned to help finance two schools. But over the past several years, the lodge contributed the funding to create two elementary schools that now educate more than 100 children. The lodge also established the charity Island Child, which allows visitors to continue their relationship with Likoma by sponsoring a child through his or her secondary education. More than 60 children are now sponsored. In the local Tonga dialect, Kaya Mawa means “maybe

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tomorrow.” Building the lodge using only local goods and local labor took so long that, during the construction process, Kaya Mawa’s previous owners often repeated the phrase to answer questions about when the project would be finished or when the ferry would arrive. But it’s come to mean so much more. Maybe tomorrow, the government in Malawi will invest in small village outposts like those on Likoma Island. Maybe tomorrow, social entrepreneurship will take hold and economic growth will begin to raise the standard of living for everyday Malawians. Moving slowly to build the lodge ensured that everyone’s tomorrows would be better than their yesterdays. Kaya Mawa is committed to a partnership with the people of Likoma Island that will ensure many more tomorrows on this oasis.

To learn more about Kaya Mawa, visit KayaMawa.com, FlyUlendo.com  and MalawiTourism.com (and search for “Island Child”). To enquire about other tailor-made travel experiences in Africa, check out travel sites such as SafariGuideAfrica.com.

“Ecotourism isn’t about how many solar panels you have or whether you compost. It’s about the community.” — James Lightfoot

}

Peter’s Story

Peter Kawando

For 12 years, Peter Kawando, 38, has worked at Kaya Mawa — first as a builder, then as a bartender and shopper, and now as Becky Harris’ managing counterpart. Peter’s father was a fisherman on Likoma, and his mother never attended school. Still, they managed to send their son to secondary school on the mainland. Now, he supports both of them — along with his three children, and his sister and her six children, and his other sister and her five children. All together, that’s 18 people who regularly depend on him. Peter’s house has a tin roof, and in the future he hopes to have electricity and a television. These goals, however, are modest; the real goal is for his three children to go to university on the mainland. A few years ago, when he first became a manager, Peter feared people’s responses. “If I tell someone to do something, maybe they’d say ‘No, you’re just a bar man!’” he admits. “But now they listen to me.” As the lodge has grown, so have Peter’s responsibilities, skills and the income he can provide his family. november/december 2013

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Nature

VOLCANIC UNREST IN ETHIOPIA Scientific monitoring provides advanced warning.

AZ68 / GETTY

BY N I CO L A T E M P L E

The active Erta Ale volcano in northeastern Ethiopia.

t’s mid-morning and smoke is rising through the thatched roof of the mud hut far below; coffee beans are being roasted. Matt stands perilously on the edge of a cliff, balancing as he drills into an outcropping of black, volcanic rock. He pauses to check whether the hole is big enough to fit the metal cylinder he has tucked into his back pocket. It’s not. He adjusts his hat against the Ethiopian sun, leaving prints of sweat and rock dust, and starts the roar of the hammer drill again. CO N T I N U E D O N P . 54.

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The cliff is 250 kilometers (roughly 155 miles) south of Addis Ababa on the northern shore of Lake Awasa, on the rim of the Corbetti volcano crater. While Matt continues to drill, Juliet sits nearby, preparing equipment that she and the rest of the scientific team will set up here. Curious villagers have gathered around, and the audience grows as farmers below weave their way up to the activity, leaving their livestock and loaded donkeys to graze the dry vegetation. Tulu — the only member of this four-person research team who speaks the local Oromo language — listens intently as the villagers tell him about the area’s troop of inquisitive baboons, who present a new challenge to the team and possibly their equipment. This team of scientists from the U.K. and Ethiopia has just spent a week exploring every accessible outcropping of obsidian — a glass-like, volcanic rock — on two volcanoes located within the East African Rift: Alutu and Corbetti. The team is looking for sites to place ground-based GPS monitoring equipment that will measure movements in the Earth’s crust. For the last few years, Dr. Juliet Biggs, lecturer at the University of Bristol in England, has used satellites to study the

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to increase the number of monitored volcanoes by improving global satellite monitoring. By comparing two images taken at different times, Juliet measures changes in distance between the Earth’s surface and the satellite over a grid of data points. She can then calculate and visualize how the land is deforming over time. Data collected from the equipment being installed on Alutu and Corbetti will help the scientists understand what’s causing the land to lift and subside. This information can then help the Ethiopian government to recognize the potential hazards associated with these volcanoes and plan accordingly. It will also inform industrial activity in the area, as deep drilling for geothermal energy production is expected to soon occur on both volcanoes. The data collected may not only help to target areas of high geothermal production but also provide insights into the potential effects of the drilling itself. Satellites are used to remotely monitor erupting volcanoes, but apart from work by researchers like Juliet, they are not being used to look for pre-eruptive activity. Radar satellites typically have a life span of only a few years, so relying on them for a global monitoring system is impractical. The European Space Agency, however, is set to launch Sentinel-1 later this year — a satellite that will collect data from around the globe every few days for the next 20 years. This long-term commitment could allow Juliet and others in her field to develop the use of satellite imagery as a global monitoring tool. In the meantime, the team has set up another GPS monitoring station. Nure, the local farmer who lives in the hut below, has agreed to watch the equipment for a fair fee. He and the other spectators have helped the team pile rocks over the equipment and surround it with a fence of thorny acacia branches. Whether this defense will prove stronger than the curiosity of the baboons, though, remains to be seen. —Nicola Temple is a freelance science writer based in Bristol, U.K. She joined Juliet and the other scientists on the volcanoes in Ethiopia in March, where she discovered a new enthusiasm for rocks (though the baboons were pretty cool too).

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Members of the research team reposition GPS monitoring equipment along the rim of the Corbetti volcano crater.

chain of nearly 100 volcanoes (including the famous Mount Kilimanjaro) that lies within the East African Rift Zone. She’s found that in both 2004 and 2008, the ground around Alutu and Corbetti lifted by as much as 15 centimeters (almost 6 inches) in a single year. “These deformations — inflating and deflating of the surface — are typically attributed to the movement of magma below the surface,” she says, “and can be interpreted as a sign of unrest.” Though there are no records of these two volcanoes erupting, large craters and thick deposits of ash are indicative of an explosive past. Thousands of people live right on these volcanoes, farming the flat, fertile land within the craters. Yet there is no permanent monitoring equipment in place on either to provide advanced warning of an eruption (Juliet and her team only have resources to keep their equipment here for a year or two at most). This is not uncommon. There are approximately 1,300 volcanoes worldwide that are known to have erupted over the last 10,000 years, but only 100 volcano observatories to engage in monitoring. Some of these use advanced technology to monitor multiple volcanoes, while others are manned by no more than a lone individual stationed in a remote hut. This leaves a large portion of the world’s volcanoes unwatched. Although a number of them may well be dormant, others like Alutu and Corbetti may be showing signs of activity. Without monitoring, the risks for many vulnerable and often remote communities are unknown. And an eruption affects more than those living on the volcano itself. For example, the 2010 eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull resulted in the evacuation of hundreds of nearby residents, but the ash cloud it produced also left millions of travelers stranded in Europe and cost airlines an estimated US$1.7 billion in revenue. The Icelandic Meteorological Office monitors Eyjafjallajökull and so was able to relay phone messages to the local residents, advising evacuation. However, in the case of unmonitored volcanoes worldwide, lack of advance warning might mean widespread devastation. Juliet and her colleagues are keen


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Snapshot

Enugu, Nigeria CO M P I L E D BY HAN NAH J O R DAN

FAST FACTS

ENUGU NIGERIA

CAPITAL of Enugu State

DID YOU KNOW?

Nigerian footballer John Utaka (who plays for Turkey’s team Sivasspor) was born in Enugu, and he now pours back into his community through the John Utaka Foundation: offering scholarships to help educate and empower its poorest children.

POPULATION

722,664 (approximately 1/11 the size of London) AREA

113 sq. km. (about 1/5 that of Mumbai, India) NAME MEANS

“hill top” in Igbo, the local language NICKNAME

The Enugu Festival of Arts, founded in 1986, has garnered worldwide acclaim, including the audience of Princess Diana of Wales in 1990.

Nollywood Narratives

NOLLYWOOD 56

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Africa’s rich narrative voice entered mass media for the first time through this Nigerian cinema in 1992. Now, Nollywood produces as many as 1,000 movies for the homevideo market — the majority of which are shot on location in Enugu — and is estimated to generate US$250-500 million annually.

In Nigeria, Ethiopian Airlines now flies to Enugu, in addition to Lagos and Abuja, Nigeria’s capital.

AL L BY ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E Y G RO U P, O R I G I NAL ART ( TO P TO BOT TO M ) J O H N U TAK A BY CL IVE ROSE / G E T T Y, L AN DSCAP E BY MART I N K U D R

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“Coal City” (the booming coal industry transformed this village into a city circa 1909)


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Cuisine

Bringing Lebanon’s Breadbasket to Table Tawlet Ammiq restaurant connects Beirut’s rural farmers and urban diners. |

BY T I M F I T Z SI M O NS

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estaurants across the globe try to bring the farm to the table, but there aren’t many places where you can gaze across your plate upon the farms themselves. Tawlet Ammiq — a restaurant in Lebanon’s fertile Bekaa Valley — is just a 90-minute drive from the bustle of Beirut, but it feels a world away. There, on a hill overlooking “Lebanon’s breadbasket,” a visitor can sip wine pressed from grapes grown one town over, munch on salads tossed with greens from the farms sprawling out below, and savor freekeh (an ancient grain) stewed with livestock that once grazed on the hills that cocoon the restaurant. At Tawlet Ammiq, the people, the food and the land that gave birth to them both are all within sight. On warm Saturdays and Sundays especially, Tawlet Ammiq is packed with Lebanese and foreign diners nibbling on such fine fare as roast trout, grilled cauliflower marinated in tahini sauce, artichoke hearts stuffed with lamb and pine nuts, eggplant drizzled with cilantro and lemon, and 58

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kibbeh nayeh — a Lebanese delicacy of raw lamb ground with bulgur, wrapped in pita bread and eaten with mint and raw onion. After eating, guests are invited to lounge under umbrellas, on pillows and in lawn chairs, and gaze at the snowcapped Mount Hermon looming above Bekaa’s rolling fields. The story of Tawlet Ammiq is the story of founder Kamal Mouzawak’s efforts to bring together Beirut’s moneyed, urban consumers and the country’s patchwork of small farms. In 2003, Mouzawak founded Souk elTayeb (“delicious market”), the country’s

( AL L ) SÉ BAST IAN DAH L

Tawlet Ammiq is housed in Lebanon’s most environmentally conscious building, surrounded by protected wilderness areas.


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hood, Tawlet reintroduced the tabkha to the Lebanese dining scene and pulled back the curtain on traditional family cooking for its foreign visitors. But Tawlet’s next step — opening a branch in Lebanon’s poor and agricultural Bekaa Valley — was as much a product of serendipity as of planning. While Mouzawak contemplated an expansion, another organization was about to provide him with just the space needed. In early 2007, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation embarked on a project to build Lebanon’s most ecologically friendly model building in Ammiq, a small town in West Bekaa. When the building — a restaurant space — was completed, SADC sponsored a contest. Tawlet won, and so Mouzawak was handed the keys — free of charge — to Lebanon’s greenest building. In May 2012, Tawlet Ammiq opened its doors to its first customers. Blending the themes of ecological stewardship with the restaurant’s characteristic banquet-style dining, Tawlet Ammiq invites diners to contemplate where their food comes from and the ways in which de-

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first farmer’s market. “It’s always been about connecting rural to urban,” he explains. Souk el-Tayeb’s quick rise to popularity led to the market’s expansion from simply selling organic vegetables, honey and spices to also hosting a series of regional food festivals. Mouzawak and his staff enticed food tourists to different corners of the country, to appreciate the grapevines of the north as well as the cherries and figs of Hammana and Kfour. The food festivals seemed to help Lebanese people reconnect with their food’s geographic heritage. Soon Mouzawak was asking himself, “Why can’t we benefit from it in a more regular way, and more easily?” So in 2009, Souk el-Tayeb launched a restaurant in Beirut called Tawlet, which means “kitchen table” in Arabic. At Tawlet, rotating cooks from surrounding villages and the countryside prepare regional home-cooked meals and serve them buffet-style, with diners sitting at both communal and smaller tables. Small-batch production Lebanese wines, preserves, olive oils, paper crafts and other products found in the weekly farmer’s market can all be purchased from the restaurant’s own boutiques. Though Lebanese food is revered worldwide, most diners will only ever taste “mezze” — the small, shared dishes such as hummus, baba ghannoush, tabbouleh and labneh that are shared and eaten with bread. These dishes dominate the menus of Lebanese restaurants in Beirut and around the world. But the cooking most Lebanese eat on the average weekday is a more informal and varied experience that centers around a tabkha, meaning a one-pot meal. Housed in a converted garage in Beirut’s trendy Mar Mikhael neighbor-

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Kamal Mouzawak (above) founded the farm-to-table restaurant with the aim of celebrating foods sourced from the surrounding Bekaa Valley.

velopment can partner with environmental preservation. Atop its insulating green roof, solar panels generate electricity and heat water, and a breeze-powered ventilation system utilizes lower temperatures underground to cool the building without the use of air conditioners. Sandwiched between the Shouf Biosphere Reserve and the Ammiq Wetlands Reserve, Tawlet Ammiq also has the rare honor of being surrounded by protected wilderness. Migrating birds traveling between Africa and Asia stop in the area’s swamps and ponds to relax and rehydrate, and the country’s famed cedars dot the hills above the compound. Diners can even arrange, through Tawlet Ammiq, a pre-meal mountain hike or an evening’s guided bird-watching expedition. And with the restaurant’s recent addition of a three-bedroom guesthouse, adventure foodies will find a trip to Tawlet Ammiq not only delicious but also convenient and comfortable — perfect for exploring the tastes of the Levant. —Tim Fitzsimons is a Beirut-based radio and print journalist. An avid consumer of tahini and whatever fruit is in season, Tim eats grapefruit in the winter, strawberries in spring, cherries in summer and apples in autumn. november/december 2013

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24 Hours

Frankfurt am Main City cred, village charm. |

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nce the seat of medieval German kings and Roman emperors, Frankfurt is now home to Europe’s Central Bank — the continent’s largest financial center. Yet, in spite of its gilded past and present prominence, the city is refreshingly free of the painfully hip superiority complex associated with Western Europe’s more celebrated metropolises. Rather, Frankfurt am Main (translation: Frankfurt on the Main, referring to the Main River that runs through the city) takes greatest pride in its agrarian leanings, brewing culture and hometown hero: 18th-century writer and philosopher Johann Wolfgang Goethe. In your 24 hours navigating this imperial city’s straßen (streets), you’ll undoubtedly come across some homage to Goethe, an open-air market of fresh food and — if you so choose — a refreshing glass of bubbly beer or wine. 9:15 a.m. Plot your day at 01 Café Karin while enjoying the brotkorb (“breadbasket”) with a choice of Camembert, Gouda, or jam and butter (€7,50, or about US$10). Situated in the center of Frankfurt, the café is a short stride from the luxe designer boutiques on Goethestraße as well as Museumsufer — the city’s row of a dozen

NAT E LU E T K E HANS

How to get there » Ethiopian Airlines flies daily from Addis Ababa to Frankfurt.

BY NANA E K UA B R E W - HAM M O N D


( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) SE RG E Y BO R ISOV / G E T T Y, B L A Z K U R E / G E T T Y / H E M E R A , SE RG E Y BO R ISOV / G E T T Y

Frankfurt am Main, named for the Main River that runs through the city, is generally characterized by its timber-framed buildings and hearty German cuisine.

museums — and just opposite the houseturned-museum where Goethe was born. 10:00 a.m. After breakfast, choose from Museumsufer’s lineup of galleries, including ones devoted to fine art, ethnology, furniture and film. Most notable is the nearly 200-year-old 02 Städel Museum, home to centuries’–old works by Gaugin, Rembrandt and the anonymous 15th-century “Master of Frankfurt,” as well as contemporary pieces by Pollock and Warhol. Admission is €12 (€14 on weekends/holidays). Antique hounds shouldn’t miss 03 Goethe Haus. The building’s parlorsized rooms feature stunning period pieces, including the puppet theater Goethe used as a child, a pyramid-shaped piano and furnaces hand-painted like fine china. Admission is €7. 12:00 p.m. From the museum, walk 15 minutes to 04 Römerplatz, where a group of gingerbread-house-like buildings forms a tourist square. (Make sure to take the route that passes through Mainkai Street, so you can cross the famous Eisner Steg pedestrian bridge. An infinite number of padlocks hang upon its trusses, engraved with the names of lovers.) The surrounding buildings, which were restored after World War II, provide the perfect backdrop for the requisite photo-op. 12:30 p.m. Next, sample some of the city’s best street food at one of the popular outdoor food markets, where you’ll find wursts (sausages) smoking on massive grills, sandwiches and more. Depending on the day of the week — the markets have a rotating schedule — you can walk 10-15 minutes to 05 Konstablerwache (open Thursdays and Saturdays) or 06 Schillerstraße (Fridays). If you’re in town on an off day, stay in the square and enjoy a traditional German lunch at 07 Zum Schwarzer Stern. Chef Jürgen Laschewski serves a seasonal menu

that includes prime boiled beef served with cold herb sauce. Lunch here runs anywhere from €10 to €50. 2:00 p.m. After lunch, catch the U-Bahn (subway) to 08 Leipziger Straße in Bockenheim. You’ll find an eclectic mix of shops in this humming student center near Goethe University, including emerging designer boutiques, independent bookstores and pubs. Make sure to check out Hinterhaus 37, a chic little shop in a backyard setting that stocks upstart designer labels and refreshes customers with steaming shots of Espresso. 4:00 p.m. Head to the pub-lined cobblestone streets of 09 Old Sachsenhausen to take your place among lovers of apfelwein (a popular apple wine). In September, the rare federweißer wine (translated “feather white” for its cloudy color) is often enjoyed with the German onion cake Zwiebelkuchen. 6:00 p.m. Return to the city center for dinner (and perhaps an overnight stay) at the 10 Gerbermühle Hotel. This 4-star hotel right on the Main River famously occupies the site of a 14th–century

tannery and mill and is allegedly where Goethe met his married lover for trysts. A three-course meal in the hotel’s restaurant starts at €25. Try one of the traditional favorites on the menu, such as Himmel und Erde (“Heaven and Earth”): a plate of mashed potatoes and fried blood sausage with stewed apples and frankfurters. 8:30 p.m. Before retiring at the Gerbermühle (room rates range from €101 to €160), stop for a drink in the hotel’s Tower Bar. The bar, decorated with horn chandeliers and dark leather armchairs, retains remnants of the original mill upon which it was built. Reserve in advance — the Gerbermühle has only 13 rooms and six suites. If it’s booked, try the 4-star Mercure Hotel Kaiserhof, a 10-minute taxi ride away, where rooms start at €62. After a full day surveying the city’s coolest quarters, and now full from a satisfying meal and perhaps a little apfelwein, there’s no doubt you’ll have a gute nacht’s sleep. november/december 2013

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Destination

Nanluoguxiang

The narrow alley of Nanluoguxiang — Beijing’s oldest hutong — is one of the city’s few pedestrian-only streets.

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BY RO N G LU CK MAN

isitors to Beijing can soak up one historic splendor after another in this, one of the world’s oldest capital cities. Though 80-90 percent of the original city and its walls have been razed in a frenzy of modernization over the years, hundreds of years of history are still available. Perhaps the best way to appreciate them is via a rickshaw tour through the hutongs — the ancient lanes inside the original city walls. Roll through ancient neighborhoods on the back of a bikepedaled rickshaw, moving slowly enough to see locals gathering at tables for a game of mahjong. Hear the clack of the tiles amid the gossip, often enlivened by the chirping of crickets or songs from birds in hanging cages. Smell the rich aromas of history, along with noodles and dumplings steaming in open kitchens behind courtyard walls. Sadly, these atmospheric neighborhoods are disappearing. Back in 1949, Beijing still had 7,000 hutongs to explore. But by 2005, only 1,300 existed*, notes Michael Myer, author of

The Last Days of Old Beijing. Myer spent a year immersed in the old city, detailing the charms of the distinctive stone blocks and traditional life that flourished in the hutongs. “These neighborhoods are the heart of Beijing,” he says. Rickshaw tours regularly roll around Houhai Lake, a top tourist area that claims many of the remaining hutongs slated for protection. Yet close by, and overlooked by many guidebooks, is Nanluoguxiang — Beijing’s oldest hutong and also its hippest. Rickshaws aren’t allowed here. As one of the rare pedestrian-only streets in Beijing, it’s a perfect place to stroll on your own, among a cornucopia of boutiques, bistros, teahouses and pubs, all housed in a diverse collection of stone

( AL L ) G O TAK AYAMA

Hidden gem of Old Beijing. |


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“The magic of Nanluoguxiang is that it grew organically in this lovely old neighborhood, with this wonderful artistic spirit.” — DOMINIC JOHNSON-HILL

colorful nicknames like Centipede Lane and Fishbone Street, and you’ll spy an array of old theaters intermixed with quaint new hotels. Other open doorways reveal courtyards shared by multiple families, where adults chop wood and cook meals while children do homework, skip rope or practice calligraphy. In recent years, Nanluoguxiang has become crowded, and many complain about its commercialization. Yet this charming street remains true to its historic role, counters Eric Abrahamsen, author of Beijing by Foot. “During the Yuan dynasty,” Abrahamsen says, “Nanluoguxiang became the site of teahouses, in particular, as well as shops selling luxury goods from southern China. So, amusingly, it probably had a fairly similar character during the Yuan dynasty as it does today.” Indeed, Nanluoguxiang is one of China’s preservation success stories. In 2009, Time magazine listed a visit to the area on its top “25 Authentic Asian Experiences.” Kicking off Nanluoguxiang’s transformation 13 years ago was Pass By Bar. Owners Xiao Bin and Hai Yan had met in Inner Mongolia and discovered a mutual love of travel in the most remote regions of China. Initially they opened a tiny pub to share pictures with friends and other travelers, Yan explains, “so they could have a place to pass by and have a drink.” That bar with just six tables has since spawned a restaurant, souvenir shop and food stand, offering snacks like sausage skewers with peach jalapeno salsa and

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storefronts. Nanluoguxiang is also one of the best places in Beijing to discover unique locally designed goods: clothing, crafts and ceramics. Local artists revived this area over the last decade when they began renovating some of the old, run-down shops, opening small boutiques to display their own goods. As the street scene blossomed, more restaurants and pubs sprang up, and the buzz spread about this chic new district in the center of the old city. The pedestrian neighborhood claims eight centuries of spirited history, dating to the Yuan dynasty of the late 13th century, when a grandson of Genghis Khan made Beijing the capital of China. Back then, this hutong was home to minstrels, artists, poets and puppeteers who entertained the local gentry. Detour down any of the symmetrical side alleys that provide the street with

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Inside the hutong’s traditional courtyard residences lie boutiques, bistros and more, including handmade-ceramics store The Pottery Workshop (left).

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lamb kebabs sprinkled with aromatic cumin. Tangy treats are found up and down this colorful street. Locals swarm here just for the fried bread and famous homemade yogurt. While the layout hasn’t changed that much in centuries, the look and feel of the lane have received a much-needed sprucing up in recent years. “The magic of Nanluoguxiang is that it grew organically in this lovely old neighborhood, with this wonderful artistic spirit,” says Dominic Johnson-Hill, a local shop owner who often serves as spokesman for the district. “But what is truly special is that it’s still full of living history,” he adds. “If you visit early, before the shops open, you still see the local people out, exercising, sitting on stools and gossiping. This is like a cultural museum of Old Beijing, with some added creativity.” So when you visit Beijing, be creative. Abandon the rickshaw and explore on your own. One of the joys of Nanluoguxiang is to get lost in the alleys and discover a delightful potpourri of Old Beijing. *The Beijing Cultural Heritage Protection Center, which fights to preserve old Beijing, projects that about 20 percent of the ancient hutongs will be protected.

—Ron Gluckman has been covering China for more than two decades, writing for various publications including Time, The Wall Street Journal, New York Times and Travel & Leisure. He first visited Nanluoguxiang 13 years ago while living in Beijing, where he shopped for hand-pulled noodles, tofu and fresh yogurt. november/december 2013

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Business

Sustainable Zanzibar BY R ACH E L MACN E I L L

Zanzibar, the infamous archipelago off the Tanzanian coast, is a picture of luxury for international travelers who come to bask under the African sun. Yet not all of Zanzibar’s own residents are benefiting from the past decade’s explosive development in tourism. Sometimes just a stone’s throw from posh resorts are people living in poverty, with few opportunities to capitalize on the economic benefits. 64

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This is a common refrain in tourism destinations around the world. Businesses move in, encouraged by governments that crave foreign investment, and those businesses use local resources to sustain themselves. Too often, the economic benefits don’t trickle down to the local community. But in Zanzibar, one school for disadvantaged youth is bucking the system, using entrepreneurship to get involved in the tourism industry. Just outside urban Zanzibar Town stands a small concrete school with a sprawling garden. This is the Prospective Learning and Charitable Institution, and its garden is the jewel of the school’s environmental club and a symbol of empowerment. Club members sell their vegetables at the local market and, more recently, to select resorts and hotels. Proceeds help the charity school educate disadvantaged students from rural Zanzibar, making them more employable. PLCI’s visionary founder, 25-year-old Shafii “Gasica” Haji, hatched his idea for the school when he was only 17. PLCI offers the usual classes in English, science and math, as well as German and Spanish. Haji plans to add other language courses in the future, to better help his students get jobs in the tourism industry. Of the school’s 237 students, those who are able will pay tuition, which helps provide subsidies for others. Homeless students are even permitted to sleep at the school. Haji’s overall goal is that PLCI becomes a self-financing institution, and he’s making headway on that goal with the help of an organization called Sustainable East Africa — a locally supported initiative dedicated to finding solutions to Zanzibar’s social and ecological challenges. All of SEA’s programs are grassroots and locally driven, with little reliance on donor support.

( AL L ) ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P

Creating change from the ground up. |


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In the case of PLCI, students proudly sell the work of their hands, the school is able to educate more students toward future careers, and local establishments are able to serve fresh organic herbs and vegetables and attract more tourists. Getting the product to the table is the hard part, according to Nell Hamilton, the one-woman force behind SEA. Once the product is there, the tourism industry and tourist response is largely positive. Haji says that creating personal connections has made the difference. PLCI invited hotels to a graduation ceremony and sent them home with a gift of basil and an explanation of what the school was trying to do. After seeing the school’s work and trying the product, several hotels contacted PLCI directly. According to Hamilton, the more the Zanzibari tourism industry supports local initiatives like PLCI, the closer it gets to ensuring that the local community shares its success. “There’s a huge demand from tourists,” she says. “As clients, they’re the ones that drive [the industry].” “At the basic level, sustainable tourism is about creating better places for local people,” says Heidi van der Watt, board member for the Global Sustainable Tourism Council. While the terms ecotourism, responsible tourism and sustainable tourism are often used interchangeably, the latter is the preferred term — holistically including benefits to local communities, economies and environments. Interest in sustainable tourism is growing, and all aspects of the industry are in the nascent stages, including legislation and even product labeling. GSTC is working to create consistent standards of sustainability on a global scale. In Tanzania, the group Responsible Tourism Tanzania is creating guidelines for sustainable tourism practices, establishing a legal framework and compiling a list of best practices, along with a voluntary accreditation program

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— all of which will allow hotels to be evaluated for sustainability. As is common in tourist destinations, most local communities rarely see more than a fraction of tourist dollars spent in their backyards, according to Hamilton. By buying from the environmental club, Zanzibari hotels are proving that tourism can have a positive impact on their surrounding communities, both environmentally and socially. “It’s transforming the outlook of the students,” Hamilton adds. “Not only is it the first time they’ve earned money from their hard work, but it enables them to envision a future in which their ability to improve their lives is in their own hands.”

Spotting Sustainability

South Africa, Tanzania and Kenya are each

Where do the staff members come from? How many local staff are in management positions?

making strides toward regulating tourism sustainability. For more information, visit: EcoTourism Society of Kenya (www.ecotourismkenya.

Questions to ask as you travel. Unfortunately, some hotels take part in “greenwashing,” which means using the eco- and sustainable terminology without walking the talk. According to Nell Hamilton, founder of Sustainable East Africa, the key to discovering if your hotel is actually sustainable is to simply ask questions. Consider asking:

org), South Africa National Department of Tourism (www.tourism.gov.za) and Responsible Tourism Tanzania (www.rttz.org).

What percentage of the food comes from local suppliers or the local market? How is the fish caught? How do you reduce or recycle the hotel’s waste? For more information, visit the Global Sustainable Tourism Council’s consumer tips for responsible travel at selamta.co/gstc.

—Rachel MacNeill is a freelance writer based in Zanzibar and Canada, writing about travel, tourism and international development. She is interested in exploring the links between communities, industry and the initiatives that are making our world a better place. november/december 2013

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Take 5

Palaces Around the Globe BY CAN DACE ROSE R AR D O N

Every journey deserves to include a bit of regal flair. Live like a king (or queen) on your next trip with a visit to one of these royal residences around the world, each renowned for its history and splendor.

GRAND PALACE BANGKOK, THAILAND

THE FORBIDDEN CITY — BEIJING, CHINA Don’t let its name deter you — Beijing’s Forbidden City is anything but off-limits to those wanting to step a few centuries back in time in China. Completed in 1420, this extraordinary complex of 980 wooden buildings served as the Chinese imperial palace from the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) to the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911).

DROTTNINGHOLM PALACE STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

Although the Swedish royal family has called this elegant 17thcentury palace home since 1981, visitors can still enjoy much of its lush grounds and ornate buildings — located just a short drive from central Stockholm. Stroll along the Versailles-inspired avenues of the Baroque garden or take a guided tour of the Chinese Pavilion (included in your entry fee). 66

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FASILADAS PALACE | GONDAR, ETHIOPIA

Venture 450 miles north of Addis Ababa to the commanding stone castle of 17th-century emperor Fasiladas, restored by UNESCO and declared a World Heritage site in 1979. It’s little wonder the city of Gondar has been called “The Camelot of Africa” — and you, too, could soon be holding court on top of the palace’s parapet and 32-meter-high (105-foot-high) watchtower.

ABDEEN PALACE | CAIRO, EGYPT

See beyond the pyramids and bustling bazaars to a different side of Cairo inside this quiet, elegant residence, on which construction began in 1863. While not all of its 500 gilded rooms are open to the public, a ground-floor museum houses silver (including the royal family’s silverware), key historical documents, and a vast collection of both ancient and modern weaponry.

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) I M P E R F E C T L A Z YBO N E S / G E T T Y, B I G N D IAN / G E T T Y, T H U T M OSE L L L , RO B E RT B R E M E C / G E T T Y, J O HAN MĀL L E R B E RG / G E T T Y

It’s hard to miss the glimmering golden spires of Bangkok’s iconic Grand Palace. Arrive by water taxi (the palace isn’t located along the city’s Skytrain or MRT systems but is situated just steps from the Chao Phraya River) and explore the official residence of the Thai king since 1782. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha, considered the most sacred temple in Thailand, is especially worth a visit.


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Advertorial

Flying High

Passengers arriving Peking Airport on November 7, 1973 on the maiden flight

Ethiopian Airlines 40 years service to China 共庆我们一起走过的40年, 我们的未来在中国 ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES , the fastest growing airline in Africa, is pleased to be celebrating 40 years of uninterrupted service to China. When Ethiopian made its maiden China was opening its doors. Ethiopian by then has been marking milestone including Africa. It was that jet – Boeing 720 – that carried the high level delegation on the

momentous occasion and was recognized by Air Transport World which awarded Ethiopian "Route Pioneering Award" for its Ethiopian continued its operations to China without interruption changing its operations from Shanghai to Beijing on November 7, 1973. Since then China has been a key market and continues to be one of the most important destinations for Ethiopian. As trade, investment and tourism ties between China and Africa increased, so did Ethiopian operation. Throughout the years, Ethiopian added Guangzhou, Hangzhou

and Hong Kong to serve the increased demands of its passengers.

through its third hub in Lilongwe. Ethiopian Airlines currently has the

a week to these four destinations in China,

including the ultra-modern Boeing 787, Boeing 777-200LR and Boeing 777-300ER, which are serving destinations in China. All these are serving passengers between Africa and China with Ethiopian infused African hospitality on board all

Africa relations at an all-time high and forecast to continue on upward trajectory, Ethiopian is continuing to enhance its products and services to cater to the needs of the traveling public by availing the best possible connections between Africa and China. Ethiopian Airlines' main goal is to connect Africa with its major trading centers such as those in China. In addition to its 46 destinations in Africa, the largest passenger network in the continent, Ethiopian is following a multiple hub strategy to make connections between China and destinations in Africa as smooth and hassle free as possible. On top of its main hub in Addis Ababa, Ethiopian is enhancing the much needed connectivity between China and Africa through its second hub in Lome, Togo with its partner airline ASKY, which caters to 22 destinations in West Africa. deal to form a new airline, Malawi Airlines, which will offer enhanced connectivity to destinations in Southern Africa region

the SKYTRAX World Airline Award for the Best Airline Staff Service in Africa through online votes from millions of passengers. On top of connecting passengers traveling for business between Africa and China, Ethiopian has also enhanced its in house tour offerings which provide various tourism packages to Ethiopia and the rest of Africa. Ethiopian is now offering passengers packages to introduce the many cultural, historical and natural wonders of Ethiopia, nine of which are registered as UNESCO Heritage Sites. In addition, Ethiopian is also offering packages for sites in East Africa and leisure destinations such as Seychelles. Ethiopian wishes to thank all its Chinese passengers for their 40 years of loyalty and looks forward to serving you for 40 more years.


FLY ETHIOPIAN T R AVE L T I PS 69 | F L E E T 72 | ROU T E MAPS 74 | SAL E S AG E N TS AN D OF F ICE S 78

Travel Tips

SEATED EXERCISES These gentle exercises, which you can carry out easily during your flight, will help blood circulation and reduce any tiredness or stiffness that may result from sitting in one place for several hours. Check with your doctor first if you have any health conditions that might be adversely affected by exercise. SHOULDER ROLL

ANKLE CIRCLES

Hunch shoulders forward, then upward, then backward, then downward, using a gentle, circular motion.

Lift feet off the floor and draw a circle with the toes, simultaneously moving one foot clockwise and the other foot counterclockwise. Reverse circles. Do each direction for 15 seconds. Repeat if desired.

ARM CURL

FOOT PUMPS

Start with arms held at a 90-degree angle: elbows down, hands out in front. Raise hands up to chest and back down, alternating hands. Do this exercise in 30-second intervals.

Start with both heels on the floor and point feet upward as high as you can. Then put both feet flat on the floor. Then lift heels high, keeping the balls of your feet on the floor. Continue cycle in 30-second intervals.

FORWARD FLEX

KNEE TO CHEST

With both feet on the floor and stomach held in, slowly bend forward and walk your hands down the front of your legs toward your ankles. Hold the stretch for 15 seconds and slowly sit back up.

Bend forward slightly. Clasp hands around the right knee and hug it to your chest. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Keeping hands around knee, slowly let it down. Alternate legs. Repeat 10 times.

OVERHEAD STRETCH

KNEE LIFTS

Raise both hands straight up over your head. With one hand, grasp the elbow of the opposite hand and gently pull to one side. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

Lift leg with knees bent while contracting your thigh muscles. Alternate legs. Repeat 20 to 30 times for each leg.

I L LU ST R AT I O NS BY TO D D D E T WI L E R

SHOULDER STRETCH

OTHER TIPS FOR A COMFORTABLE FLIGHT

Reach right hand over left shoulder. Place left hand behind right elbow and gently press elbow toward shoulder. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

> For your own comfort, try to travel light.

> Avoid heavy meals during the flight.

> Wear loose clothing and elasticated stockings made of natural fiber.

> Take short walks once every two hours to improve circulation.

> Increase your normal intake of water and only drink alcohol in moderation.

> Try to touch your toes when waiting in the aisle, to stretch your hamstrings.

NECK ROLL

> Use moisturizing cream to keep your skin from drying out.

> Upon arrival at your destination, take a quick jog, brisk walk or a vigorous scrub to help stimulate circulation. Then, take a hot shower or a relaxing bath.

With shoulders relaxed, drop ear to shoulder and gently roll neck forward and to the other side, holding each position for about five seconds. Repeat five times.

> Take off shoes while on the plane to prevent your feet from swelling up, or wear shoes that will cope with expanding ankles.

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fly ethiopian

| Travel Tips

TRAVELING IN ETHIOPIA LAND » Ethiopia covers an area of 1.14 million square kilometers (944,000 square miles). CLIMATE » There are two seasons: The dry season, October–May, and the wet season, June–September. TOPOGRAPHY » Ethiopia has an elevated central plateau varying in height between 2,000 and 3,000 meters. In the north and center of the country, there are some 25 mountains whose peaks rise above 4,000 meters. The most famous Ethiopian river is the Blue Nile (or Abbay), which flows north a distance of 1,450 kilometers from its source in Lake Tana to join the White Nile at Khartoum, Sudan.

PEOPLE » The population is estimated at 78 million.

ECONOMY » About 90 percent of the population earns a living from the land, mainly as subsistence farmers. Agriculture is the backbone of the national economy, and the principal exports from this sector are coffee, oil seeds, pulses, flowers, vegetables, sugar and foodstuffs for animals. There is also a thriving livestock sector, exporting cattle, hides and skins. LANGUAGE » Ethiopia is a multiethnic state with 83 languages and 200 dialects. Amharic is the working language of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, while Oromiffa, Tigrigna and Guragina are widely spoken.

ELECTRIC SUPPLY » Ethiopia uses 220 volts 50 cycles AC. Plugs are European two-pin. TIME » Ethiopia is in the GMT +3 time zone. It follows the Julian calendar, which consists of 12 months of 30 days each and a 13th month of five or six days (on a leap year).

CURRENCY » The units of currency are the birr and cents. Notes are 100, 50, 10, 5 and 1 birr. The 1 birr coin is also in circulation. ATMs (Automatic Teller Machines) are found in major Addis Ababa hotels, shopping malls and at the Bole International Airport. It is important to retain currency exchange receipts. BANKING HOURS » Banking hours are usually 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Friday and 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturdays. Most banks work through lunchtime; however, foreign 70

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exchange services are closed during lunch hours (noon–1 p.m.).

a) 200 cigarettes, 100 cigars or 250 grams of tobacco

COURIER & MONEY TRANSFERS » Money transfers can be made through

c) half a liter of perfume

Western Union and MoneyGram. Both have representative branches in Addis Ababa and also make their services available from private and national banks. For courier services, DHL, Fedex, UPS, TNT and EMS have offices in Addis Ababa.

COMMUNICATIONS » Telephones, fax machines and Internet access are available in Addis Ababa in most hotels and at private Internet service centers around the city. WORKING HOURS » Government office hours are 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and 1:30–5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Working hours on Friday are 8:30–11:30 a.m. and 1:30– 5:30 p.m. Private and public businesses are often open on Saturdays.

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS » Public holidays are celebrated according to the Ethiopian (Julian) Calendar (see “Time”). The calendar is seven years behind the Western or Gregorian Calendar, with the New Year falling in the month of September. January 7: Ethiopian Christmas (Genna)

b) 2 liters of alcoholic beverages

d) souvenirs (by visitors) with a value not exceeding 500 birr

When it comes to currency: a) It is illegal to carry more than 200 birr when entering or departing Ethiopia. b) You must declare to customs officials at point of entry any cash in excess of US$3,000 (or the equivalent). If you have more than US$3,000 on departing, you must present a receipt from the purchasing bank.

IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS » Visas are required for all foreign visitors to Ethiopia, with the exception of nationals of Kenya and Sudan. Visa applications may be obtained at Ethiopia’s diplomatic missions overseas. Nationals of 37 countries are now allowed to receive their tourist visas on arrival in Ethiopia. The list includes: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, North Korea, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Taiwan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States.

January 19: Ethiopian Epiphany (Timkat)

BOLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT »

January 24: Birth of Prophet Mohammed PBUH (Mauwlid)*

*These holidays are subject to moon sighting.

The airport is about 5 kilometers from Meskel Square and Addis Ababa’s central business district. Free luggage carts and paid porters are available in the baggage hall. All bags must go through X-ray check before you exit. When flying out of Bole International Airport, please note: Terminal 1 — all domestic flights and flights to Burundi, Djibouti, Rwanda, Somaliland, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen. Terminal 2 — all other international flights. Taxis are readily available and may be ordered inside the terminal. Privately owned taxis are not metered, nor do they have fixed rates. Agree upon the fare in advance.

HEALTH REQUIREMENTS » A yellow fever certificate is required for some African destinations. Vaccination against cholera is also required for any person who has visited or transited a cholera-infected area within six days prior to arrival in Ethiopia.

SECURITY » Security at the airport is tight, and travelers need to produce their air ticket and passport to enter the terminal. All other visitors are required to pay a fee of 10 birr in the car park and may be required to show identification.

March 2: Victory of Adwa (1896) May 1: International Labor Day May 3: Ethiopian Orthodox Good Friday May 5: Ethiopian Orthodox Easter Sunday May 5: Ethiopian Patriots (1941) Victory Day May 28: Fall of the Dergue (1991) Day September 11: Ethiopian New Year September 27: The Finding of the True Cross (Meskal) October 15: Id ul Ahda (Sacrifice)*

CUSTOMS » Duty-free permitted for up to:

imports

are


Travel Tips |

LEARN AMHARIC ENGLISH-AMHARIC (PHONETIC) Learn some basic Amharic so that you can interact with the locals and enjoy your stay in Ethiopia by experiencing the rich culture of the Ethiopian people.

U SE F U L WO R DS Today Tomorrow Yesterday Now Quickly Slowly Mr Mrs Miss I

P RO N U N CIAT I O N G U I D E

You He, She We

a as the a in father e as the e in set i as the i in ship o as the o in go u as the oo in boot gn as the gn in compagne (French) (M) Masculine; (F) Feminine; (P) Plural

They What? Who? When? How? Why? Which? Yes (all right) No Excuse me I am sorry Good Bad

fly ethiopian

N U M B E RS Zare Nege Tilant Ahun Tolo Kes Ato Weyzero Weyzerit Ene Ersewo Essu, Essoa Egna Ennessu Min? Man? Metche? Endet? Lemin? Yetignaw? Eshi Aydelem /Ayhonem Yikirta Aznallehu Tiru / melkam Metfo

One

And

Two

Hulet

Three

Sost

Four

Arat

Five

Amist

Six

Sidist

Seven

Sebat

Eight

Semmint

Nine

Zetegn

Ten

Asser

Eleven

Asra-and

Twelve

Asra-hulet

Thirteen, etc.

Asra-sost, etc.

Twenty

Haya

Twenty-one, etc.

Haya-and, etc.

Thirty

Selasa

Thirty-one, etc.

Selasa-and, etc.

Forty

Arba

Fifty

Amsa

One hundred

And meto

One thousand

And shi  

D I R E C T I O NS / E M E RG E N CI E S

M E E T I N G AN D G R E E T I N G Hello

Halo

Good morning

Endemn adderu/ k(M)/sh(F)

Good afternoon Good evening

Endemn walu/k(M)/ sh(F)

CO M M E RCE

Where? (Place)

Yet?

Where is it?

Yet no?

Where? (Direction)

Wodet?

Street/road

Menged

Airport

Awiroplan marefeya

Where is the hotel?

Hotelu yet no?

Where are you going?

Yet iyehedu no? eh (M)/esh(F)

I am going to . . .

Wede... iyehedku no

Turn right

Wede kegn yitatefu/ tatef(M)/tatefi(F)

Turn left

Wede gra yitatefu tatef(M)/tatefi(F)

Go straight

Ketita yihidu/hid(M)/ higi(F)

Please stop here

Ezih Yikumu/kum(M)/ kumi(F)

Endemn ameshu/ eh(M)/esh(F)

Hotel

Hotel

Dehna hunu/ hun(M)/ hugne(F)

Room

Kifil

Bed

Alga

How are you?

Tenayistillign / endemen not? eh(M)/ esh(F)

To sleep

Metegnat

To bathe

Galan metateb

I am well, thank you (very much)

Dehna negn (Betam) amesegenallehu

Where is the toilet?

Metatebiya betu yet new?

You’re welcome

Minim aydel

Please come in

Yigbu/giba(M)/ gibi(F)

Where may I get something to drink?

Yemiteta neger yet agengalehu?

Coffee

Buna

Please sit down

Yikemetu/ tekemet(M)/ tekemechi(F)

One (cup of) coffee

And (sini) buna

Come

Na(M)/Ney(F)/Nu(P)

Beer

Birra

Go

Hid(M)/Higi(F)/Hidu(P)

Cold

Kezkaza

Stop

Kum(M)/Kumi(F)/ Irdugn(P)

Help

Irdagn(M)/irgegn(F)/ Irdugn(P)

Hospital

Hakem bet

Police

Polis

Goodbye

What is your name?

Simewo man no?h(M)/sh(F)

Hot

Muk

Tea

Shay

My name is . . .

Sime . . . no

Food

Migib

Where do you come from?

Keyet Metu? ah(M)/ ash(F) Hagero yet no?eh(M)/esh(F)

Meat

Siga

Fish

Assa

I come from . . .

Ke . . . metahu

Bread

Dabo

My country is . . .

Hagere . . . no

Butter

Kebe

Can you speak Amharic?

Amaregna yenageralu? tenageraleh(M)/ tenageriyalesh(F)

Sugar

Sikuar

Salt

Chow

Pepper

Berbere

Shop

Suk

To buy

Megzat

Sunday

Ihud

To sell

Meshet

Monday

Segno

Money

Genzeb

Tuesday

Maksegno

Cent

Santime

Wednesday

Erob

How much does this cost?

Wagaw sint no?

Thursday

Hamus

Friday

Arb

That is quite expensive

Betam wood no

Saturday

Kedame

Only a little

Tinish

I want to learn more

Yebelete memar ifelegalehu

How do you find Ethiopia?

Itiyopiyan endet agegnuat? hat(M)/ shat(F)

I like it here

Itiyopiya Tesmamtognal

DAYS O F T H E WE E K

november/december 2013

71


fly ethiopian Length 0

| Fleet

10 m

20m

30m

40m

50m

60m

70m

Bombardier Q400 Data (ET-ANI, ET-ANJ, ET-ANK, ET-ANL, ET-ANV, ET-ANW, ET-ANX, ET-ANY, ET-AQB, ET-AQC, ET-AQD, ET-ADE, ET-AQF) Seat Capacity: 78 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 29,574 kg; Landing, 28,123 kgs; Zero Fuel, 26,308 kg Operating Empty Weight:17.684 kg Total Cargo Volume: 502 cu.ft

Boeing 737-700 (ET-ALK, ET-ALM, ET-ALN, ET-ALQ, ET-ALU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 102. Total: 118 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 70,080 kg; Landing, 58,604 kgs; Zero Fuel, 55,202 kg Operating Empty Weight: 41,015 kg Total Cargo Volume: 966 cu.ft

Boeing 737-800 (ET-APK, ET-ANZ, ET-AOA, ET-AOB, ET-APF, ET-APL, ET-APM, ET-APO, ET-AQM) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 138. Total: 154 Max Gross Weight: Take Off, 79,010 kg Landing, 66,330kgs; Zero Fuel, 62,730 kg Operating Empty Weight: 43,545 kg Total Cargo Volume: 1,555 cu.ft

Boeing 757-200 ER (ET-ALZ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 154. Total: 170 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,699 kg, Landing, 89,812 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,485 kg Operating Empty Weight: 60,942 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 cu.ft

(ET-AMK) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 159. Total: 175. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,852 kgs. Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 61,072 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 Cu.ft.

Boeing 757-200 ER Cargo (ET-AJS) Cargo Capacity: 15 (88” x 125“) pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,892 kg; Landing, 95,254 kg; Zero Fuel, 90,718 kg Operating Weight: 53,010 kg Cargo Volume Main: 6,600 cu.ft Lower: 1,829 cu.ft

(ET-AJX) Cargo Capacity: 15 (88” x 125“) pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 109,316 kg; Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kg Operating Weight: 54,176 kg Cargo Volume Main: 6,600 cu.ft Lower: 1,762 cu.ft

Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner (ET-AOQ, ET-AOR, ET-AOS, ET-AOP, ET-AOT) A super-efficient airplane with new passenger-pleasing features. It will bring the economics of large jet transports to the middle of the market, using 20 percent less fuel than any other airplane of its size. Length: 186 ft Seat Capacity: Could Nine 24, Economy Class 246. Total 270. Height: 56 ft Range: 8,000 to 8,500 nautical miles Cruise Speed: Mach 0.85 Configuration: Twin aisle Cargo Capacity: 5 pallets + 5 LD3s Cross Section: 226 in Maximum Take Off Weight: 476,000 lb Wing Span: 197 ft

MD-11CF Cargo (ET-AML, ET-AND) Cargo Capacity: Upper deck: 26 Pallets (96”x125”); Lower FWD Bay: 6 Pallets (96”x125”); Lower AFT Bay: 14 LD3 Containers Max Take Off. WT.: 630, 500 lb

Max Landing: 491,500 lb Zero fuel wt.: 461,500 lb Engine: GE CF6-80C201F Pallet: 26 pallets – Upper Volume – 86 ton

Boeing 767-300 ER (ET-ALL) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 213. Total: 237 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,879 kg; Landing, 145, 149 kg; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kg Operating Empty Weight: 91,367 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 cu.ft

(ET-ALC) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine, 24; Economy Class, 210. Total: 234 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 185,065 kg; Landing, 145,149 kg; Zero Fuel, 130,634 kg Operating Empty Weight: 90,416 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 cu.ft

Boeing 777-200LR (ET-ANN, ET-ANO, ET-ANP, ET-ANQ, ET-ANR, ET-AQL) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 34, Economy Class 287. Total: 321 Max Gross Weight: Take Off, 347,450 kg; Landing, 223,160 kg; Zero Fuel, 209,100 kg Operating Empty Weight: 160,856 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,330 cu.ft Engines: GE90

Boeing 777-200LRF Cargo (ET-APU, ET-APS) Cargo Capacity: 27 (96" x 125") pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 766,800 lbs; Landing, 575,000 lbs; Zero Fuel, 547,000 lbs Cargo Volume: Main, 18,630 cu.ft.; Lower, 4,700 cu.ft.

Boeing 777-300 (ET-APX) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 34, Economy Class 365. Total: 399. Max. Gross Weight: Takeoff, 775,000 lbs; Landing, 554,000 lbs.; Zero Fuel, 524,000 lbs. Cargo Vol: 201.6 cu.m./7,120 cu.ft. Engine: GE90-115BL2

Length 0 72

10 m

20m

ethiopianairlines.com

30m

40m

50m

60m

70m


Fleet |

fly ethiopian

CURRENT COMMERCIAL FLEET Long Range Passenger Services 5 Boeing 787-8 (ET-AOQ, ET-AOR,

AOA, ET-AOB, ET-APF, ET-APL , ET-APM, ET-APO, ET-AQM)

ET-AOS, ET-AOP, ET-AOT) 6 Boeing 777-200LR (ET-ANN, ET-ANO, ET-ANP, ET-ANQ, ET-ANR , ETAQL)

5 Boeing 737-700 (ET-ALK, ET-ALM, ETALN, ET-ALQ, ET-ALU)

12 Boeing 767-300 ER (ET-ALC,

13 Bombardier Q400 (ET-ANI, ET-ANJ, ETANK, ET-ANL, ET-ANV, ET-ANW, ET-ANX, ET-ANY, ET-AQB, ET-AQC)

ET-ALH, ET-ALJ, ET-ALL, ET-ALO, ET-ALP, ET-AME, ET-AMF, ET-AMG, ET-AMQ, ET ANU, ET-AQG), Boeing 777-300 (ET-APX) 1 Boeing 777-300 (ET-APX) Medium Range Passenger Services

Domestic and Regional Passenger Services

Cargo and Non-Scheduled Services 2 Boeing 777-200LRF (ET-APU,

4 Boeing 757-200 ER (ET-ALZ,

ET-APS) 1 Boeing 757-260 Freighter (ET-AJS)

ET-AMK, ET-AMT, ET-AMU) 9 Boeing 737-800 (ET-APK, ET-ANZ, ET-

1 Boeing 757-200 PCF (ET-AJX) 2 MD-11CF (ET-AML, ET-AND)

Boeing 757-200 ER continued (ET-AMT, ET-AMU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 155. Total: 171. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,892 kgs; Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 60,023 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 Cu.ft.

Boeing 767-300 ER continued (ET-ALH) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 213. Total: 237. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 90,058 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-ALJ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 211. Total: 235. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,277 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AMQ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 30, Economy Class 195. Total: 225. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 90,426 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-ALO) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 211. Total: 235. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,499 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

(ET-ALP) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 208. Total: 232. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 148,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,277 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AME) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 30, Economy Class 190. Total: 220. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 181,436 kgs; Landing, 137,892 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 92,087 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AMF, ET-AMG, ET-ANU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine: 24, Economy Class: 213, Total: 237. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 87,419 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AQG) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 190. Total: 214. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 181,436 kgs; Landing, 137,892 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 92,087 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

november/december 2013

73


fly ethiopian

| International Route Map

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES INTERNATIONAL SERVICE Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire) Abuja (Nigeria) Accra (Ghana) Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) Bahir Dar (Ethiopia) Bamako (Mali) Bangkok (Thailand) Beijing (China) Beirut (Lebanon) Berbera (Somalia) Blantyre (Malawi) Brazzaville (Congo) Brussels (Belgium) Bujumbura (Burundi) Cairo (Egypt) Cotonou (Benin) Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) Dakar (Senegal) Dammam (Saudi Arabia) Dire Dawa (Ethiopia) Djibouti (Rep. of Djibouti) Douala (Cameroon) Dubai (UAE) Entebbe (Uganda) Enugu (Nigeria) Frankfurt (Germany) Guangzhou (China) Harare (Zimbabwe) Hangzhou (China) Hong Kong (China) Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) Johannesburg (South Africa) Juba (Southern Sudan) Khartoum (Sudan) Kigali (Rwanda) Kilimanjaro (Tanzania) Kinshasa (D. R. of Congo)

Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) Kuwait City(Kuwait) Lagos (Nigeria) Libreville (Gabon) Lilongwe (Malawi) Lomé (Togo) London (United Kingdom) Luanda (Angola) Lubumbashi (Congo) Lusaka (Zambia) Malabo (Equitorial Guinea) Maputo (Mozambique) Mekelle (Ethiopia) Mombasa (Kenya) Mumbai (India) Muscat (Oman) Nairobi (Kenya) N’Djamena (Chad) Ndola (Zambia) New Delhi (India) Niamey (Niger) Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) Pointe Noire (Congo) Paris (France) Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) Rome (Italy) Sao Paulo (Brazil) Seoul (South Korea) Singapore (Singapore) Stockholm (Sweden) Tel Aviv (Israel) Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Victoria (Seychelles) Washington, D.C. (U.S.) Zanzibar (Tanzania)

Vancouver Seattle Portland

Minneapolis Omaha

Salt Lake City San Francisco San Jose Los Angeles Santa Ana San Diego

Denver

Chicago

Montréal Ottawa

Syracuse Portland Toronto Rochester Boston Dayton Cleveland New York Philadelphia Cincinnati

Detroit

Kansas City Indianapolis Colorado Springs Washington, D.C. St. Louis

Memphis Nashville Oklahoma City Little Rock Columbia Atlanta Dallas Tucson Columbus Houston New Orleans Jacksonville San Antonio Orlando Tampa Fort Lauderdale Miami

Las Vegas Ontario Phoenix

Albuquerqe

N O RTH ATLANTIC O CEAN

DESTINATIONS WITH SPECIAL AGREEMENTS Cape Town (South Africa) Montréal, Quebec (Canada) Gaborone (Botswana) Helsinki (Finland) Jakarta (Indonesia) Kolkata (India) Manila (Philippines) Oslo (Norway) Ottawa, Ontario (Canada) Palermo (Italy) Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) Windhoek (Namibia) United States of America: Albuquerque, New Mexico Atlanta, Georgia Boston, Massachusetts Chicago, Illinois Cincinnati, Ohio Cleveland, Ohio Colorado Springs, Colorado Columbia, South Carolina Columbus, Georgia Dallas, Texas Dayton, Ohio Denver, Colorado Detroit, Michigan Fort Lauderdale, Florida Houston, Texas Indianapolis, Indiana Jacksonville, Florida Kansas City, Missouri

74

ethiopianairlines.com

Las Vegas, Nevada Little Rock, Arkansas Los Angeles, California Memphis, Tennessee Miami, Florida Minneapolis, Minnesota Nashville, Tennessee New Orleans, Louisiana Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Omaha, Nebraska Ontario, California Orlando, Florida Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Phoenix, Arizona Portland, Oregon Portland, Maine Rochester, New York Saint Louis, Missouri Salt Lake City, Utah San Antonio, Texas San Diego, California San Francisco, California San Jose, California Santa Ana, California Seattle, Washington Syracuse, New York Tampa, Florida Tucson, Arizona

S OUTH PACIF IC O CE AN

I N T E R NAT I O NA L ROU T E M A P K E Y

Ethiopian destinations Destinations with special agreements Code share flights Future destinations One-way nonstop ASKY routes

Rio de Janeiro São Paulo


International Route Map |

fly ethiopian

Helsinki Stockholm

Oslo

Moscow

Gothenburg

Aberdeen

Copenhagen

Belfast

Edinburgh Manchester

Dublin

London Brussels Paris

Warsaw Amsterdam

Dusseldorf

Frankfurt

Zurich Geneva Lyon

Toulouse

Prague Vienna Budapest

Munich

Marselle

Madrid

Berlin

Bucharest

Milan Sofia

Rome

Barcelona

Istanbul

Beijing

Lisbon

Palermo

Seoul Korea

Larnaca

Beirut Tel Aviv

Damascus

Kuwait City

Cairo

Dammam Riyadh

Hangzhou

Dubai

New Delhi Guangzhou (Canton) Kolkata (Calcutta)

Muscat

Jeddah

Hong Kong

Mumbai Dakar

Khartoum Bamako

Conakry

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Freetown Monrovia

Abidjan

Djibouti Berbera

Abuja Cotonou

Lagos

Accra LoméMalabo

Douala

Brazzaville Pointe Noire Kinshasa Luanda

ADDIS ABABA

Yaounde

Libreville

Ho Chi Minh City

Dire Dawa

Juba

Enugu

Kuala Lumpur Singapore

Entebbe Nairobi Kigali Mombasa Bujumbura Kilimanjaro Zanzibar Dar es Salaam

Lubumbashi Ndola Lusaka Harare

Manila

Bangkok

Mekelle

Bahir Dar

N’Djamena

Jakarta Victoria

Lilongwe Blantyre

IN DIAN O CE AN

ASKY N E T WO R K

S OUT H AT LAN TI C O CEAN Windhoeck

Dakar

Gaborone

Maputo

Johannesburg

Banjul Durban

Cape Town

Bamako

Niamey

Bissau Abuja Conakry Ouagadougou Freetown Cotonou Monrovia Lagos Abidjan Lomé Accra

N’Djamena

Yaounde Bangui Douala Libreville

Pointe Noire

Brazzaville Kinshasa

november/december 2013

75


fly ethiopian

| Domestic Route Map

RED SEA

Shire

Axum

Mekelle

Humera

DANAKIL DEPRESSION

RAS DASHAN (4,620M) SIMIEN MOUNTAINS

Gondar GULF OF ADEN

Lalibela

TANA

Bahir Dar

CHOKE MOUNTAINS

Asosa Dire Dawa Jijiga AHMAR MOUNTAINS

ADDIS ABABA

DEMBIDOLLO GORE

KOKA

Gambella

ZWAI ABIATA

LANGANO

Jimma

OGADEN REGION SHALA

MIZAN TEFERI

Arba Minch JINKA

ADDIS ABABA Main City Ticket Office Churchill Road PO Box 1755 Tel: 251-11-5517000 Fax: 251-11-5513047/5513593

ARBA MINCH Tel: 251-46-8810649 (CTO)

ASOSA Tel: 251-057-7750574/75 (CTO) 251-091-1255674 (CELL)

AXUM Tel: 251-34-7752300 (CTO) 251-34-7753544 (APT) 251-91-1255682 (CELL) Email: AXUTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM 76

ethiopianairlines.com

MENDEBO MOUNTAINS

Kabri Dar

ABAYA

SHAMO

BAHIR DAR

Gode

GONDAR

Tel: 251-58-2200020 (CTO) 251-58-2260036 (APT) 251-91-1255675 (CELL) Email: BJRTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

Tel: 251-58-1117688 (CTO) 251-58-1140735 (APT) 251-91-1255676 (CELL) Email: GDQTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

DIRE DAWA

HUMERA

Tel: 251-25-1111147 (CTO) 251-25-1114425 (APT) 251-91-5320405 (CELL) Email: DIRAM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

GAMBELLA Tel: 251-47-5510099 (CTO) 251-91-1255677 (CELL)

GODE Tel: 251-25-7760015 (CTO) 251-25-7760030 (APT)

Tel: 251 - 34 4480556 251 - 911 255437

JIJIGA Tel: 251-25-7752030 (CTO) 251-25-7754300 (APT)

JIMMA Tel: 251-47-1110030 (CTO) 251-47-1110207 (APT) 251-91-1255678 (CELL) Email: JIMTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

LALIBELA Tel: 251-33-3360046 (CTO) 251-91-1255679 (CELL) Email: LLITAM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

MEKELLE

Tel: 251-400055 (CTO) 251-34-4420437 (APT) 251-91-1255680 (CELL) Email: MQXTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

SHIRE Tel: 251-34-4442224 (CTO) 251-91-1255681 (CELL) CTO – City Ticket Office APT – Airport Office CGO – Cargo Office CELL – Cell phone


Addis Ababa Map |

fly ethiopian

KENNEDY LIBRARY

The main library at Addis Ababa University.

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ETHIOPIA

Highlighting the history of Ethiopia from prehistoric times to the modern day. KENNEDY LIBRARY

ST.GEORGE’S CATHEDRAL

A small octagonal Ethiopian Orthodox church built in 1896 as a token to St. George. RU

SS

PIAZZA DISTRICT

IAN

Another name for the historic district.

ST

MEGABIT 28 SQUARE/ARAT KILO

AD

Inside this square stands a monument erected in memory of those patriots who defeated the Italian invading forces.

S WA T

ST. GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL

NATIONAL MUSEUM

PIAZZA DISTRICT

RI NG RD

ANWAR MOSQUE

The main religious center for Muslims in and around the capital.

MEGABIT 28 SQUARE/ARAT KILO ANWAR MOSQUE TAITU HOTEL

TAITU HOTEL

PARLIAMENT BUILDING ST

LO RE NZ

Opened in 1898 as Addis Ababa’s first hotel, established by Empress Taitu Betul.

O TI EZ AZ

ST

ON CO L S

E

NIG

ER

PARLIAMENT BUILDING

L IK AV

D

SA

HA

RA

ST

ZEWDITU HOSPITAL

The hospital in central Addis Ababa.

ETHIOPIAN NATIONAL THEATRE

MENE

ZEWDITU HOSPITAL

Founded in the 1940s when the government recruited a band to play Ethiopian songs accompanied by a modern orchestra.

AFRICAN HALL & ECA CONFERENCE CENTER

ETHIOPIAN NATIONAL THEATRE YDNEKACHEW TESEMA STADIUM

AFRICA HALL AND ECA CONF. CENTER

A fully integrated and secured complex with state-ofthe-art facilities.

JO MO KE NY AT TA ST

MESKEL SQUARE

YDNEKACHEW TESEMA STADIUM

CA ME

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

R. .A.

Built during the reign of Emperor Haile Selassie I and still serving as the seat of Parliament today.

RO ON

A multi-use stadium in Addis Ababa used mostly for football matches as well as housing athletic facilities.

ST

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

AF

Established in 1947, providing technical and advocacy services to help businesses.

RIC

SIER RA LEO NE ST

MESKEL SQUARE

A site for public gathering or demonstrations and festivals — notably the Meskel Festival.

VE AA (B OL

MILLENNIUM EXHIBITION HALL

ER D)

A modern building holding various-sized events including concerts, sport matches, exhibitions and trade shows.

Millennium Exhibition Hall

Bole International Airport

RIN

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november/december 2013

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fly ethiopian

| Sales Offices

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES

SALES OFFICES ANGOLA Largo 4 De Fevereiro Hotel Meridien Presidente Luanda, Angola Tel: 2442 310328/310615 Fax: 2442 310328 APT Mobile: 914 526675 BELGIUM Park Hill J. E. Mommaertslaan 16B 1831 Diegem Tel: 0032 2 712 05 86 Fax: 0032 2 725 83 92 Email: bruadmn@ethiopianairlines.com BURKINA FASO Avenue Kwame N`krumah mmb. Bati 01 BP 4883 Ouaga 01 Tel Office: 22650301024/25 Email: OUAAPT@ethiopianairlines.com DanielW@ethiopianairlines.com BURUNDI Avenue De La Victorie No. 09 PO Box 573, Bujumbura Tel : 257 226820/226038 APT: 257 229842 Mobile: 257 78841844 Email: henokm@ethiopianairlines.com CAMEROON Rue Tobie Kuoh Bonanjo, B.P 1326 Douala Telephone – reservation desk: 00237 33 43 02 46; Area Manager direct line: 00237 33 43 02 64; Fax line: 00237 33 43 01 67; Mobile Area Manager for Cameroon: 00237 77 93 79 29; AIRPORT OFFICE Tel: 00237 33 43 37 30; Cell: 00237 77 11 77 29 CANADA City Ticket Office Suite 1912 - 365 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4W 3L4 Tel: +1416 962 0005, Toll-free: 1 855 269 0362, Mobile: +416 996 3384, Fax: 1 416 962 0095 Airport Office T1 Level 2, Room No. EB 2035/36, Lester B. Pearson International Airport, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Tel: +1 905 405 0040, Toll-free:1 800 445 2733, Fax:+1 1 905 405 0005 CHAD Avenue Charles De Gaule PO Box 989, N’djamena CTO Tel: 235 2523143/2523027 Tel: 235 523143/523027 ATO Tel: 235 2522599 APT: 235 522599 Mobile: 235 6 6896226 CHINA Beijing Room 704, SK Tower, A6 Jianguomenwai Avenue, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100022, China Office Tel: 0086 010 65050315, Fax: 0086 010 65054120 Email: bjsadm@ethiopianairlines.com, Reservation Tel: +86 010-65050315 (Call Center: 4001589689), Email: bjssup@ ethiopianairlines.com, etbjscto1@megacap. com.cn Beijing Capital International Airport –Terminal 3 Email: bjsapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo Tel: +86 10-64556409/ +86 10-64558536, Email: etpek@megacap.com.cn Guangzhou Room 502, 5th Floor, Podium Building of Guangdong Int’l Hotel, 339 East Huanshi Zhong Road, Guangzhou, 510098, China Email: cancto@ethiopianairlines.com Reservation Tel: 0086 020 87621101 / Office Fax: 0086 020 87620837 Call Center: 4001589689, Email: etcancto1@ megacap.com.cn, canres@ethiopianairlines.com Baiyun Int’l Airport Tel: 0086 2036067405 Email: canapt@ethiopianairlines.com

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Cargo Tel: 0086 20-36066253, Fax: 0086 20 36050345, Email: Tim.shen@sino-eth.com Hangzhou Room 1809 Building 2, Qiangjiang International Times Plaza, No. 111 Chengxing Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310020, China Email: GirumTb@ethiopianairlines.com Office Tel: 0086 0571 87960600, Fax: 0086 0571 87960677, Call Center: 4001589689, Email: ethghcto1@megacap.com.cn Hangzhou Xiaoshan International Airport Email: allhghetAirportStaff@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo Office Tel: 0086 0571-86691731, Fax: 0086 057186691730, Email: jeff.jiang@megacap.com.cn CONGO, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC Boulevard du 30 Juin No. 1525 Aforia Building-1st Floor Gombe, Kinshasa CTO Tel: 243 817 006 585/810 884 000 APT Mobile: 243 817 006 589 Email: fihres@ethiopianairlines.com fihapt@ethiopianairlines.com YinnesuF@ethiopianairlines.com CONGO, REPUBLIC Avenue Foch, Brazzaville PO Box 14125 Tel: 242-22 281 0766 Email: Negaw@ethiopianairlines.com COTE D’IVOIRE Avenue Chardy Immeuble Le Paris PO Box 01 BP 5897 ABJ 01,Abidjan CTO Tel: 00 225 20219332 20215538/20219430 Fax: 00 225 20219025 CTO Mobile: 225 05061583 APT Tel: 225 21278819 APT Mobile: 225 05063294 CTO Email: GashawM@ethiopianairlines.com APT Email: abjapt@ethiopianairlines.com DJIBOUTI Bld Administrateur Bernard Djibouti, PO Box 90, Republique de Djibouti Tel: +253 354235, 253 351007, +253 77804783, +253 77815479 Email (GSA): globe_ethiopianair@intnet. dj, HenockT@ethiopianairlines.com, Email (airport): jibapt@ethiopianairlines.com, MulugetaAd@ethiopianairlines.com Rue De Marseilles PO Box 90, Djibouti Tel: (253) 341216 Mobile: 815479 Fax: (253)350599 Email: JIBAP@ethiopianairlines.com EGYPT Concorde El Salam Hotel, 69 Abdelhamid Badawy Street, Heliopolis, Cairo Tel: 0800 0000 411(Reservations 24 hours) Tel: 202-2621 4934 (Admin) Fax: 202 2621 4934 APT: 202 2696 6620 Cargo: 20 10 6698255 Email: caires@ethiopianairlines.com APT: caiapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: etcargo@aviatrans-eg.com EQUITORIAL GUINEA Equatorial Guinea, Malabo Independence Avenue Admin Tel: 00240222657390 Email: ssgadmin@Ethiopianairlines.com CTO Tel: 00240333090588 Fax: 00240333090593 Email: ssgcto@ethiopianairlines.com Area Manager Email: TeshomeGb@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Email: ssgapt@ethiopianairlines.com ETHIOPIA Main City Ticket Office Churchill Road PO Box 1755, Addis Ababa Tel: 251 11 5517000/511931 251 11 6656666 (Reservation) APT Tel: 251 11 5178320 Fax: 251 11 6611474 FRANCE Ethiopian Airlines area office 66 Avenue des champs-Elysées 75008 Paris - France

Phone: 33 1 53 892102 and 0 825 826 135 (ticketing) Fax: 33 1 53 771303 Email: Ethiopian-airlines.paris@wanadoo.fr Ethiopian Airlines CDG Airport office Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport – Terminal 2 Phone: +33 1 74 37 04 80 MAS: +33 6 70 81 90 24 Email: parapt@ethiopianairlines.com GABON Quartier London Rue Ogouarouwe Plaque No. 14 PO Box 12802, Libreville Tel: 241 760144/45 APT Tel: 05316666 Fax: 241 760146 CTO Tel: 741315 CTO Tel: 241 741315 GERMANY Ethiopian Airlines, Kaiserstraße 77, 60329 Frankfurt am Main, Germany Sales & Marketing: Tel: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 053 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 235 Email: salesET.germany@aviareps.com Reservations: Tel: (0180-5) 355 600 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 028 Email: reservationsET.germany@aviareps.com GHANA Kwame Nkrumah Avenue, Cocoa House, Ground Floor PO Box 3600, Accra CTO: Tel 233 302 664856/57/58 Fax: 233 302 673938 Mobile: 233 20 2011132 Email: MichaelY@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 233 302 775168/778993/ 233 302 776171 ext. 1322/1324 Mobile: 233 20 2013588 Email: accapt@ethiopianairlines.com HONG KONG Rm 1102 Lippo Sun Plaza 28 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong Tel: 852 2117 0233 Fax: 852 2117 1811 APT: 852 31508122 APT Fax: 852 31508125 SITA: HKGKKET, HKGAPET Email: DanielG@ethiopianairlines.com INDIA Shop no. 2 – 5 , Chintamani Plaza, Ground Floor, Andheri Kurla Road Andheri (East), Mumbai – 400 099 Toll Free : 1800 103 9933 / 0124- 4845900 Admin : 022-22163797 Sales : 022- 22162150 Accounts : 022- 22155667 Email : bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Ticket Office: bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Sales: bomsls@ethiopianairlines.com Accounts: bomfin@ethiopianairlines.com Admin: bomadm@ethiopianairlines.com New Delhi (APT) Toll Free No: 1800 103 9933 Tel: 91 11 2331202/0091 11 2331203 CTO: 91 11 2331204 ATO: 91 11 25654872 Fax: 91 11 25655710 Email: Delapt@ethiopianairlines.com www.ethiopianairlines.com ISRAEL 1 Ben Yehuda Street Room 2016, Tel Aviv CTO Tel: 972 3 797 1405 Fax: 972 3 516 0574 Email: TLVRES@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM APT Tel: 972 3 9754096 APT Fax: 972 3 9754097 Email: TLVAPT@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM Opensky-Cargo CGO Tel: 972-3-9724332 CGO Fax: 972-3-9731082 Email: david@opensky-cargo.co.il ITALY Piazza Barberini 52 00187 Rome, Italy CTO Tel: 39 06 42011199 Call center access Tel No: 06 45230459 Tel: 3906 4200 9220 Fax: 3906 481 9377 APT: 3906 6501 0621 APT Fax: 3906 6501 0621

CGO: 3906 65954113 Email: info.roma@ethiopianairlines.it romres@ethiopianairlines.it Milan Address Via Albricci, 9 20122 Milan Tel: +39 02 8056562 Fax: +39 02 72010638 Email: milres@ethiopianairlines.com KENYA Bruce House Muindi Mbingu Street PO Box 42901-00100, Nairobi Tel: Res: +254 20311507/544; +254 723786649/734 666066 APT: 254 20 822236/822311 Fax: 254 20 2219007 Email: nbores@ethiopianairlines.com nboadm@ethiopianairlines.com Airport: nboapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: Freight In Time JKIA Cargo village, 2nd Avenue Box 41852-00100 Nairobi, Kenya Tel: 254 20-827480/827044/827248 Email: etmanager@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com etoperations@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com TSS Tower, Nkrumah Road PO Box 94600-80115, Mombasa, Kenya Tel: Res: +254 41 2319977/78/79 APT: +254 41 2011199 Cel: +254 714 618989 Email: MBATSM@ethiopianairlines.com MBARES@ethiopianairlines.com MBAAPT@ethiopianairlines.com LEBANON Beirut Gefinor Center Bloc-B, Clemenceau St. Tel: 961 1 752846/7 Fax: 961 1 752846/7 Email: BruckA@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 961 1 629814 Email: beyapt@ethiopianairlines.com MALAWI Kenyatta Drive, Bisnowaty Centre Tel: 00265 1771002/1308/6003/6001/20 31/6004 Fax: 01 772 013 ATO Fax: 01 700 782 Email: LLWCTO@ethiopianairlines.com LLWAPT@ethiopianairlines.com GodfreyL@ethiopianairlines.com W.Gondwe@sdvmalawi.com MALI Square Patrice Lumumba PO Box 1841, Bamako Tel: 00 223 20 22 2088 Fax: 00 223 20 22 6036 APT Mobile: 00 223 66 799 208 Email: DagnewM@ethiopianairlines.com MOZAMBIQUE Avenida 25 De Setembro No. 270, Edificio Time Squre, Bloc 4, First floor No. 6 Tel: +258 21 314421 NIGERIA CVC Building 3, Idowu Taylor, Victoria Island, Lagos, Nigeria PO Box 1602 Tel: 234 1 7744711/2 Fax: 234 1 4616297 APT: 234 1 7744710/7751921/3 Email: SolomonY@ethaiopianairlines.com lossales@ethiopianairlines.com lossr@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office, Aviation House Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja Lagos Tel: 234 1 7744710 Fax: 234 1 2711655 Email: losapt@ethiopianairlines.com Sheraton Abuja Hotel No. 1 Ladi Kwali Way, Maitema, Abuja Federal Capital Territory Suite No 173 Tel: 234 92906844/234 92904941 Email: ABVRES@Ethiopianairlines.com; ABVCTO@ Ethiopianairlines.com; ABVADMN@ Ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office -ABV: Ethiopian Airlines, Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport, Abuja-Nigeria Tel: 234 92903852, 234 92902761 Email: abvapt@ethiopianairlines.com; abvagt@ethiopianairlines.com;


Sales Offices and General Sales Agents | abvbag@ethiopianairlines.com www.ethiopianairlines.com Enugu CTO Polopark Mall, Polo Ground, Abakaliki Road, Enugu North, Enugu State, Nigeria Tel: 234 7033745716, Mobile: 234 8141543740 Ethiopian Cargo LOS-office Nahco Cargo Complex MMIA Ikeja Lagos Tel Mobile: 234 7034065669 OMAN Muscat, Ruwi, MBD Area, PO BOX 962, Muscat, Postal code 100 Sultanate of Oman Cell: +968 93891448 Tel: +968 24816565 Fax: +968 24815815 Email: samim@ethiopianairlines.com RWANDA Union trade center (UTC) building First floor, office No. 25 CTO Tel: 250252570440/42, 2502525755045, Fax: 252570441 Mobile: 250788562469 (Area Manager) Email: BrukE@ethiopianairlines.com kglsm@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 2502525100000 Mobile: 250-788595536/788426164/ 788517905/788828865 Email: kglapt@ethiopianairlines.com kglagt@ethiopianairlines.com SAUDI ARABIA Medina Road, Adham Center PO Box 8913, Jeddah 21492 Tel: 9662 6512365/6614/9609 Fax: 9662 6516670 APT: 9662 6853064/196 APT Fax: 9662-685316 CGO Tel/Fax: 9662 6851041 Email: Jedcto@ethiopianairlines.com Jeddah Airport Fax: 966 2 6853196 Mobile: 966 504301358 Email: jedapt@ethiopianairlines.com Jeddah Cargo Office Tel: 966 2 6850756 / 6851041 Fax: 966 2 6851041 Email: jedcgo@ethiopianairlines.com Riyadh Ticket or Town Office Email: ruhcto@ethiopianairlines.com Mobile: 966 505217168 Dammam, Silver Tower Building, King Abdul Aziz Street, Al Khobar Tel: 966 (3) 8984696, Fax: 966 (3) 8991539 Cell: 966 0559540076 Email: YohannesB@ethiopianairlines.com SENEGAL Immeuble La Rotonde, Rue Dr. Theze PO Box 50800, CP 18524 DKR RP Tel: 221 33 823 5552/54 Fax: 221 33 823 5541 Apt Tel: 221 33 820 9396/5077 Email: Dkrres@ethiopianairlines.com SOMALI LAND CI Maarat al Khayr Building Tel: 252 2 520681/528445 Mobile: 252 2 4427575 Email: hgaet@hotmail.com SOUTH AFRICA 156 BRAM FISCHER DRIVE 2nd Floor Holiday House – Randburg CTO Tel: 27 11 7815950 CTO Fax: 27 11 7816040 APT Tel: 27 11 3903819 APT Fax: 27 11 3943438 CTO Email: YohannesTK@ethiopianairlines. com, ATO jnbapt@ethiopianairliness.com SWEDEN Kungsgatan 37, SE-11156 Stockholm Tel: 46 0 8 440 0060/ 46 0 8 440 2900 ATO: 46 8 59360170 CTO: 46 8 4402900/4400060 Fax: 46 0 8 206622 Cell: 0046 709556073 APT: 46 859360170 Email: res.ethiopian@telia.com info.ethiopian@telia.com

SUDAN 2 Square 2b Khartoum east Parlaman street, El Sheikh Mustefa El Amin Bldg Khartoum, Sudan Tel: 249 1 83762063/88 Fax: 2491 83788428 APT: 2491 8790991 Email: krtres@ethiopianairlines.com krtsm@ethiopianairlines.com Juba South Sudan AirportMinistry Road, Panorama Building Cel: +211 956212301/ +211 955060355 Fax: 249 811 823600 Email: JUBCTO@ethiopianairlines.com JUBTSM@ethiopianairlines.com Malakal Ethiopian Airlines South Sudan Hotel Room No 02 Malkal Tel: 00249(0)955722506 Vivacell Fax: 00249(0)920698951 MTN TANZANIA T.D.F.L Building Ohio Street PO Box 3187, Dar-es-Salaam Tel: 255 22 2117063 65/2125443 Fax: 255 22 2115875 Mobile: 255 754 285 899 786 110 066 Area Manager: 255 786 285 899 Email: Milatm@ethiopianairlines.com darres@ethiopianairlines.com Dar APT Tel: 255-22 2844243 Mobile: 255 786285898 Email: darapt@ethiopianairlines.com Boma Road, PO Box 93 Arusha, Tanzania CTO: 255 27 2506167 - 2504231, 2509904 TSM Mobile: 255-782-450224 Email: jrocto@ethiopianairlines.com arkres@ethiopianairlines.com Kilimanjaro Airport: 255 27 2554159 Email: jroapt@ethiopianairlines.com THAILAND 140 One Pacific Bldg, Unit 1807 18th Floor, Sukhumvit Road Klongtoey, Bangkok CTO Tel: 66 0 26534366/7 Fax: 66 0 26534370 Email: bkkcto@ethiopianairlines.com bkkres@ethiopianairlines.com bkksm@ethiopianairlines.com Suvarnabhumi Airport 2nd Flr, Unit Z2-016, Airlines Operation Bldg (Airport Office) APT Tel: 66 0 21343062/3/4 APT Fax: 66 0 21343060 Email: bkkapt@ethiopianairlines.com General Sales Agent (Cargo Only) Tel: 66 0 22379207/8/9 Fax: 66 0 22379200 Email: bkkgsa@csloxinfo.com TOGO Hotel Palm Beach, 1 Rue Komore PO Box 12923 CTO Tel: 228 22 21 70 74/ 22 21 87 38 CTO Fax: 228 22 22 18 32 APT Tel: 228 22 26 30 39/22822361240 Ext. 4313/4517 Email: SeblewA@ethiopianairlines.com lfwcto@ethiopianairlines.com lfwapt@ethiopianairlines.com UGANDA Kampala PLOT 1 Kimathi Avenue, UAP Insurance Building Tel : +256414254796/7, +256414345577/8, +256414345118, +256752745118, Email: klares@ethiopianairlines.com, klacto@ethiopianairlines.com, klaagt@ ethiopianarlines.com Entebbe Airport terminal, 1st floor Tel: +256414320570, +256752321130, Email: ebbapt@ethipianairlines.com, katusiimed@ethiopianairlines.com, solomonwr@ethiopianairlines.com UNITED ARAB EMIRATES Flat 202, Pearl Bldg, Beniyas Street PO Box 7140, Dubai Tel: 9714 2237963/87 Fax: 9714 2273306 APT: 9714 2166833/1833/2161833 APT Fax: 9714 2244841/2822655

CGO: 9714 2822880/2163813 CGO Fax: 9714 2822655 CTO Email: dxbcto@ethiopianairlines.com APT Email: dxbapt@ethiopianairlines.com CGO Email: dxbcgo@ethiopianair-lines.com UNITED KINGDOM City office: 1 Dukes Gate, Action Lane London, W4 5DX Tel: 44-208 987 9086 (admin) 44-0800 635 0644 (reservations) Fax: 44-208 747 9339 Email: loners@ethiopianairlines.com

fly ethiopian

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES

GENERAL SALES AGENTS ANGOLA Reino Comercio Geral, Rue Marques Das Minas No.4, Luanda Angola Tel: 00244 222 445 713, Fax: 00244 222 335 713, Email: tchukombe@yahoo.com

Airport Office: Room 238, East Wing Terminal 3 London Heathrow, Airport Middlesex, TW6 1JT Tel: 44-208 745 4234/35 Fax: 44-208 745 7936 Email: lonapt@ethiopianairlines.com

ARGENTINA

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Airport Office Dulles International Airport PO Box 16855 Washington, DC 20041 Toll Free No: 800 4452733 Tel: 703 572 6809, 703 572 8740 Fax: 703 572 8738 Email: wasapt@ethiopianairlines.com

Aviareps AG, Landsberg, Str. 155,80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73 , Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com

Reservation, Ticketing and Customer Relations 277 South Washington St. Suite 120 Alexandria, VA 22314 Toll Free No: 800 445 2733 Tel: 703 682 0569 Fax: 703 682 0573 Email: etusa@ethiopianairlines.com

Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 1001-1002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503-010, Sao Paulo, Brazil Tel: 551131063295/551186328697

AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND World Aviation System Mezannine Level, 403 George Street, Sydney NSW 2000 Australia Tel: (02) 9244 2096, Fax: (02) 9290 3441 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: MCH Holding Australia Pty Ltd. Unit 6, MIAC Building, 1international Drive, Tullamarine, Vic. 3040. Fax: 03 9093 1377, Tel: 03 9093 1355 Email: hiran@mchholding.com.au

ZAMBIA Lusaka CTO Address Indo Zambia Bank Building Off Cairo Road, Plot No. 6907, PO Box 38392, Lusaka Direct Tel: 260 211 236401/02/03 Fax: 260 211 235644 Mobile: 260 955 236401/260 979 821971 Email: SenaitN@ethiopianairlines.com LUNRES@ethiopianairlines.com LUNCTO@ethiopianairlines.com

AUSTRIA & HUNGARY Aviareps AG, Josephspitalstr, 15, 80331 Munchen, Germany

APT Address Lusaka International Airport PO Box 38392, Lusaka Zambia Tel: 260 211 271141 Email: LUNAPT@ethiopianairlines.com

Cargo: ATC Aviation ACC, Bldg. 262, Entr. 08, 3rd Fl, AT-1300 Vienna Tel: 43 1 7007 388 54, Fax: 43 1 7007 388 53 Email: vie@atc-aviation.com

ZANZIBAR Malindi opposite Ijimaa Mosque Tel: 255 774417070, 777667665 Email: znzapt@ethiopianairlines.com znzstation@ethiopianairlines.com ZIMBABWE Cabs Center, 4th Floor CNR Jason Moyo Avenue 2nd St. PO Box 1332, Harare Tel: 263 4790705/6/700735 Fax: 263 4795216, APT: 263 4575191 Email: FitsimtD@mweb.co.zw hreres@ethiopianairlines.com COUNTRY NAME CALL CENTER NUMBERS Bahrain 973-16199205 Belgium 32 28948303 Egypt 800 000 0411/202-21600-006 France 0800901031 Germany 8001818982 Hong Kong 800905629 India 000 800 100 7947 Israel 972 3763 1052 Italy 39-0645230459 Lebanon 00961 142 7627 code 6247 North China 108007141635/864001589689 Saudi Arabia 800 814 0018 South Africa 0800984023 South China 108001401619/86-4001589689 Sweden 46-850513549 Thailand 18001562069708 United Arab Emirates (UAE) 8 000 3570 2401 United Kingdom 0800 016 3449 0800 635 0644 United States of America 1800 445 2733

AVIAREPS Airline Management Ges. Mbh, Argentinier Strasse 2/4, a-1040,Vienna, Austria AVIAREPS Hungary Ltd., Borbely utca 5-7, 1/104, 1132, Budapest, Hungary Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42 Email: xcheffel@aviareps.com

BAHRAIN Bahrain International, Chamber of Commerce Building Tel: 00973-17-224917 / +973-17223315 Fax: 973 17210175, Email: bitgsa@bahraintravel. com.bh, SITA: BAHTOET BELGIUM, LUXEMBOURG & NETHERLANDS Brussels Kales Airline Services, Park Hill, J.E. Mommaertslaan 18A, B - 1831 Diegem Tel: +32 2 716.00.60, Fax: +32 2 716.0086, Email: et.be@kales.com The Netherlands Kales Airline Services, Triport 1 Building, 6th floor, Evert Van de beekstraat 46, NL - 1118 CL Schiphol Tel: +31 20 655.36.36, Fax: +31 20 655.36.51, Email: airlines.nl@kales.com BENIN Vitesse Voyage M/S ABD Vitesse Voyages, Avenue Maro Militaire, Immeuble Toxi Labo Carre 404, Cotonou, Benin Tel: 22921320167/22964054232, Fax: 229 21320170, Email: abdvitessevoyage@yahoo.fr BRAZIL Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil Tel: 551131063295/551186328697

Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str. 155, 80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73 , Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com Heavyweight Express LLC (Cargo GSA), Vinicius Curbi, Country Manager, Heavyweight Air Express Brazil Tel/Fax: +55 11 3192 3838 Email: henry.miller@heavy-weight.com

Continued on next page »

november/december 2013

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| General Sales Agents

BURKINA FASO EUROWORLD SARL, EURO WORLD (Burkina Faso), 01BP4883 OUAGADOUGOU, KWAME N’NKRUMAH, Ouagadougou-Burkina Faso Tel: 226 50 30 16 52/16 85, Fax: 226 50 30 18 86, Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com CANADA Cargo: Airlines Service International (ASI), 5160 Explorer Drive, Unit 4, Suite F, Mississauga, Ontario 4W 4T7 Tel: 905629 4522, Fax: 905 629 4651 Email: asi@airlineservices.com CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC Africa Discovery, Avenue B. Boganda, PO Box 1182, Bangui, Central African Republic Tel: 23675501260/70551136 Fax: 49-69-26952940 Email: dorothee@africa-discovery.net CHILE Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str. 155, 80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax:49 89 54 50 68 42 info@AVIAREPS.com CHINA Beijing Megacap Logistics International Co., Ltd., Room 704, SK Tower, A6 Jianguomenwai Avenue, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100022, China Tel: 0086 010 65050315, Fax: 0086 010 65054120, Reservation Tel: +86 01065050315, Email: bjssup@ethiopianairlines. com, etbjscto1@megacap.com.cn (airport: bjsapt@ethiopianairlines.com) Cargo Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., F225 Complex Business Office Building, No.566-16 Shunping Road, Shunyi District, Beijing, China Tel: +86 10-64556409, +86 10-64558536, Email: etpek@megacap.com.cn Guangzhou Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., Room 502, 5th Floor, Podium Building of Guangdong Int’l Hotel, 339 East Huanshi Zhong Road, Guangzhou, 510098, China Reservation Tel: 0086 020 87621101, Office Fax: 0086 020 87620837, Email: etcancto1@ megacap.com.cn (airport: canapt@ethiopianairlines.com) Cargo Sino-Eth Logistics International Co., Ltd., Room 1615, main tower, Guangdong Int’l Building, No. 339, Huan Shi Road East, Guangzhou Tel: 0086 20-36066253, Fax: 0086 20 36050345, Email: Tim.shen@sino-eth.com Hangzhou Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., Room 1809 Building 2, Qiangjiang International Times Plaza, No. 111 Chengxing Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310020, China Reservations Tel: 0086 0571 87960600, Office Fax: 0086 0571 87960677, Email: ethghcto1@ megacap.com.cn (airport: allhghetAirportStaff@ethiopianairlines.com) Cargo Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., Room 2015, Aviation Freight Station Area B, No.5 Airport Road, Xiaoshan Airport, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China Tel: 0086 0571-86691731, Fax: 0086 057186691730, Email: jeff.jiang@megacap.com.cn Shanghai Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., Unit 11G, Shanghai Zhaofeng Universal Bldg, No.1800 Zhong Shan Road West, Shanghai, 200235, China Tel: 0086 021 64401083, Fax: 0086 021 64400192, Email: etshacto1@megacap.com.cn Cargo Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., 325A, No. 168 Suhang Road, Pudong International Airport, Shanghai, China Tel: 0086-021-68354523, Fax: 86-02168356537, Email: Eric.Fei@megacap.com.cn COLOMBIA Aviareps AG, Landsberg

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ethiopianairlines.com

Str. 155,80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com COMOROS Matembezi Travel & Tourism, Itsambouni, Moroni Tel: 2697730422/330400, Fax: 2697730075 Email: agence.matembezi@comorestelecom.com CONGO REPUBLIC Euro World Sarl, Immeuble Arc-En face chambre de Commerce, 1st floor-Centre Ville, Brazzaville Tel: 242 6712020/6713037 Cel: 971505589504, Fax: 31 020 655 3686 Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com/ vinu.abraham@satgurutravel.com CONGO DRC Lubumbashi Alamdar Tour & Travels, PO Box: 2976 Lubumbashi Tel: 243 818113377, Fax : 243 1801751933 Email: vazir@jefferytravels.com Kinshasa Cargo: Bollore Africa Logistic, Kinshasa Mobile: (+) 243 995 901 899, (+) 243 991 004 890, (+) 243 995 901 859 Email: kevin.degraeve@bollore.com, richard. panzu@bollore.com, dede.mbevo@bollore.com CYPRUS Orthodoxou Aviation Ltd., Orthodoxou Aviation Ltd, United Nations Street 44, 6042, Larmaca, Cyprus Tel: 357 24 841 150, Fax: 357 24 841 005 Email: aorthodoxou@orthodoxou.com.cy CZECH & SLOVAK REPUBLICS, POLAND Tal Aviation Poland, UL Ujazdowskie, 20 Street, 00478 Warsaw Tel: 48-22-6250467, Fax: 48-22-6253146 Email: rgrabski&tal.pl Tal Aviation Poland Ltd. Tel: 48 22 627 2259, Fax: 48 22 625 3146 Email: ethiopian@tal.pl DENMARK, NORWAY, LITHUANIA & LATVIA Khyber International, Vester Farimagsagade 3, DK-1606 Copenhagen V Denmark Tel: 45 33121188, Fax: 4533933799 Email: sales@khyber.dk, SITA: CPHZZET Cargo: Kales Airline Services DK - 7190 Billund Denmark Tel: 45 75354511, Fax: 45 75354569 DJIBOUTI Globe Travel, Bld Administrateur Bernard Djibouti Bld, PO Box 1161, Republique de DJIBOUTI Tel: 00253 354235/00253 351007, Fax: 00253 350599, Email: globeethiopian@intnet.com EGYPT Aviatrans Egyptian Air Service Co. Ltd PO Box 24 Orman Cairo Egypt Tel: 202 37484473, Fax: 202 37608959 Email: Aviatrans@aviatrans.com.eg FINLAND & ESTONIA Tour Planner, Matkantekijat Oy-Tourplanners Ltd, Annankatu 16 B 29, 3 Krs 00120, Helsinki, Finland Tel: 358 9 687 78911, Fax: 358 9687 78910 Email: tuomas.mantysaari@matkantekijat.fi Cargo: Kales Airline Services oy Perintötie 2D, 01510 Vantaa, Finland Tel: 358 9 8700 350, Fax: 358 9 8700 3515 FRANCE Air promotion group (APG) 66 Avenue des Champs-Elysées75008 Paris - France Tel: 33 153 771316, Fax: 33 1 53 77 13 05 Email: ethiopianairlines@apg.fr Cargo: Paris Cargo World France SARL PO Box 69003, Roissy CDG Cedex France Tel: 33 1 49 38 90 57, Fax: 33 1 49.38 90 63 Email: cecile@cargoworld.fr, Jhon.sloot@etcargo.fr, paul@cargoworld.fr GERMANY Frankfurt Ethiopian Airlines, Kaiserstraße 77, 60329 Frankfurt am Main, Germany Sales & Marketing: Tel: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 053 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 235 Email: salesET.germany@aviareps.com Reservations: Tel: (0180-5) 355 600 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 028 Email: reservationsET.germany@aviareps.com

Cargo: ATC Aviation, Cargo City Süd, Geb.641, 60549 Frankfurt/Germany Tel: 49 0 69 698053 47, Fax: 49 0 69 698053 20 Email: fra@atc-aviation.com Munchen Aviareps AG, Josephspitalstr, 15, 80331 Munchen, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73/ 49 89 54 50 68 42 Email: info@aviareps.com GREECE Gold Star Ltd., 3 Nikodimou & 33 Nikis Str. 10557, Athens, Greece Tel: 30 211 1002030, Fax: 30 210 3246723 Email: sales@goldstar.gr GUINEA GUINEE-VOYAGES, EI CISSE Amacif Bldg Conakrey Guinea, P.O.Box 5842 Tel: 0022463260554/62650181/64260554 (Mobile: 00 224-60260554/ 60340144/60212320), Tel: 22460212320/340144, Fax: 22430478063/22430012611/ 00224-30477734 Email: guineevoyages@yahoo.fr EI CISSE Amacif Bldg Conakrey Guinea Tel: 22460212320/340144 Fax: 224-30478063/22430012611/ 0022430477734, Email: guineevoyages@yahoo.fr HONG KONG Cargo: Pacific Air (HK) Limited Tel: 852 2759 4578, Fax: 852 2759 4316 Email: cargoeth@pacificair.com.hk INDIA STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., Alps Building, 1st floor, 56 Janpath, New Delhi – 110001 Tel: (011) 23312304 / 23320845, Fax: (011) 23329235, Contact: Mr Tadesse Tilahun (TadesseT@ethiopianairlines.com), Mr Sandeep Kumar Meena (mobile: 9910061099, etsales.del@sticgroup.com), Ms Kalpana Ganju (etreservation.del@sticgroup.com), Mr Praful Khosla (mobile: 9910378441, praful.khosla@ sticgroup.com) STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., No 3-5-874/A, Ground floor, Vipanchi Estate, Hyderguda, Hyderabad – 500029, Andhra Pradesh Contact: Mr.Unni Ashok Kumar (ashok.kumar@sticgroup.com) Tel: (040) 66618755 / 23231451 / 23210131, Fax: (040) 66612966, Email: hyderabad@ sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., G-5, Imperial Court, 33/1 Cunningham Road, Bangalore – 560052, Karnataka Contact: Mr.Vinod / Mr.Shankar Tel: (080) 22267613/22202408/22256194, Fax: (080) 22202409, Email: bangalore@ sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., 2nd floor, Sriniket Building, Old Thevera Road, Cochin – 682016, Kerala Contact: Mrs. Meenakshi Sethuram Tel: (0484) 2367476/477/478, Fax: (0484) 2367472, Email: cochin@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., Room No 53, 5th floor, Chitrakoot Building, 230A, A.J.C. Bose Road, Kolkata – 700020, West Bengal Contact: Ms. Sudeshna Tel: (033) 22890440, 22890441, 22890442, Fax: (033) 22890443, Email: kolkata@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., SCO 42-43, Sector 17A,, Chandigarh 160017, Punjab Contact: Mr. Satinder Sharma Tel: (0172) 2706562/67/2721336/337, Fax: (0172) 2702770, Email: chandigarh@sticgroup. com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., Temple Tower, 672, Anna Salai Nandanam, Mount Road, Chennai – 600035 Contact: Mr. Rajesh Pandian (rajesh.pandian@ sticgroup.com, mobile: 9840105460), Tel: (044) 24330211/24351829/24330659/243 30098, Fax: (044) 24330170, Email: chennai@ sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., 2nd floor, 301 Alfa Estate Building – 39, G.T. Road, Jallandhar – 144001, Punjab Contact: Mr. Amit Sharma Tel: (0181) 2232056/58, Fax: (0181) 2230961,

Email: jallandhar@sticgroup.com BENZY HOLIDAYS PVT LTD, 101 Crystal Arcade, C. G. Road, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 006 Contact: Shoba Kokate (Tel: 9920213661, shobha@akbartravels.in), Rajesh Bhatia, Sales Manager (Tel: 7820003525), Iqbal Mody (Tel: 9923798441) Tel: (079) 26403525, 30013430/32, Fax: 26403414, Email: rajesh@benzyethiopian.com, accounts.amd@benzyethiopian.com LEONARD TRAVELS PVT LTD, Tej House, 5 Mahatma Gandhi Road, Pune 411 001 Tel: (020) 26056451 or 26131647, Fax: (020) 2613782, Manager: Vandana Hasabnis, 9960231082 or 9623346382, Director: Mrs Bhojwani, (020) 26347611 Mobile: 9325066588, Email: ethiopian@leonardtravels.com, bhojwanis@eth.net MAAS TRAVELS & TOURS LTD, 101 R. M. Center, 5th Floor, Gulshan Avenue , Gulshan 2, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh Tel: (8802) 8835802, 03, 8835460, 8837484, Fax: (8802) 8826678, Email: maas@agni.com, managersalesmaas@gmail.com, amin.maas@ gmail.com, 88028837474 Resi: Azad: 8821569, mobile: 0171524097 Azad Direct: (8802) 9887711 Resi: Amin: (8802) 9338548 (M) +8801819257221 Afzal Hossain +88 01711635146 88028835802 Qayyum: 8801819220198, Reservation: Nasreen + 88 01730062981 VMS AVIATION AIR SERVICES PVT LTD, 164 Galle Road, Colombo 4, Srilanka Tel: (9411) 2502149, 2502209, 4377815, Fax: (9411) 2502190, Email: vikky@eureka.lk (mobile: 0094777752328), Hussein@vmstravels. net (mobile: 0094777590100) SHARAF CARGO PVT LTD (Cargo), Acme Centre, 2nd Floor, Opp Vadilal House, Mithakali Six Roads, Navrangpura, , Ahmedabad 380 009 Tel: 079 65454080 or 65454081/82/83, Fax: 079 66133503 Branch Mgr Mr. Dharmesh Panchal (9898060627), Email: panchal.ETAMD@ in.sharafcargo.com Asst Sales Mgr Mr. Nikhil Ketkar (9825319740), Email: ketkar.ETAMD@ in.sharafcargo.com GM Mr. Subeer Bharadwaj (9821086836), Email: bharadwaj.ETAMD@in.sharafcargo.com INDONESIA (M/S PT. Ayuberga) Menara Imperium, JI.H.R.Rasima Saidn Kav.1, Jakarta 12980, Indonesia Tel: 62 021 8356214, Fax: 62 021 8363937 Email: Ayubjkt@ayaberga.co.id Cargo: PT global Sarana Angkasa Wisma Soewarna Suit 2k, Soewarna Business Park, Soekarno Hatta International Airport, Jakarta 19110 Indonesia Tel: 62 21 5591 1428, Fax: 62 21 5591 1427 Email: ade@gsa.indonesia.com IRELAND PremAir Marketing Services Ltd, 7 Herbert Street, Dublin 2, Dublin, Ireland Tel: 00353-1-663 3933, Fax: 353-1-661-0752 Email: info@premair.ie/eamon.flanagan@ premair.ie Cargo: Heavyweight Air Express Ltd Tel: 353 -1-811-8693, Fax: 353-1-811-8901 Email: hae.ie@heavy-weight.ie ISRAEL Opensky Cargo Ltd Tel: 972 3 972 4338, CTO Tel: 972 3 7971405 Central Reservation Office Tel: 972 3 7971400/1403/1404 Reservation Agent Tel: 972 3 7971407, ShebaMiles & Group desk Email: david@opensky-cargo.co.il ITALY Cargo: ATC Tel: 39 02 506791, Fax: 39 02 55400116 Email: INFO@ATCMIL.IT, SITA: MILGSET/ CRT/CMIZZET, Tel: 39 06 65010715, Fax: 39 06 65010242, Email: INFO@ATCFCO.IT, SITA: ROMGSET


General Sales Agents | JAPAN Air System Inc., Toranomon TBL Building 8F 1-19-9, Toranomon Minato-Ku, Tokyo 105-0001 Tel: 03-3593-6608, Fax: 03-3593-6534 Email: Asipaxtyo@airsystem.ip Cargo: U-Transport Global Inc Tel: 81 3 3522 2286, Fax: 81 3 3522 2280 Email: minako-aso@utijapan.co.jp JORDAN Passenger & Cargo: Al Karmel Travel & Tourism Trading, Jabal Ei Hussin Khaleed Bin Waleed St. PO Box 926497 Tel: 962 6 5688301, Fax: 962 6 5688302 Email: alkarmel@alkarmel.com.jo KENYA Cargo: Freight In Time PO Box 41852-00100, Nairobi, Kenya Email: etmanager@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com Tel: 254 020-827044/827248/9 /827480 Ext: 132, Fax: 254 020-822709, Cell: 254 721 217141, Wireless: 254 020-3560579 KUWAIT Al-Sawan Co. W.L.L., M/S Al-Sawan Company W.L.L, Al Ghazali St (Al Rai), Kuwait Tel: 00965-4745190; Fax: 00965-4765661, Email: ceo@alsawan.com MALAYSIA Abadi Aviation Services S/B, Suite 1603, Level 16 Central Plaza, Jalan Sultan Ismail, 50250 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Tel: (+603) 21412190/21420581/8, Fax : (+603) 21410429, Email: etkul@abadi.com.my Cargo: Abadi Aviation Services S/B, Lot GFM-5D Malaysia Airlines Advanced Cargo Centre, Free Commercial Zone, Kuala Lumpur International Airport, 64000 Sepang, Selangor, Malaysia. Tel: (+603) 87871198/1179, Fax: (+603) 87871108, Email: albertyeoh@abadi.com.my MALTA Discover Momentum, L.L.C, 14350 North 87th Street Suite 265, Scottsdale, Arizona, 85260 USA Tel: 480 707 5566, Fax: 480 707 5575 Email: Jenny-Adams@discovertheworld.com/ www.discovertheworld.com MAURITIUS & MADAGASCAR Agence Megrebine de Voyages, IRELAND BLYTH LTD, Aviation Pole, 5th floor, IBL House, Caudan, Port Louis Mauritius Tel: 230-203-2000/2082, Fax: 230-2124050, Email: Ivedwards@iblgroup.com

Karachi Tel: 9221 3566 1712-13-14 & 16 Fax: 9221 3566 1715 Lahore Tel: 9242-3630-5229, 9242-3636-5165 Fax: 9242-3631-4051, Tel: 2823040/2823350, Fax: 2824030 Tel: 6305229/6365165, Fax: 6314051 PERU Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Tel: 551131063295/551186328697

Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str.155, 80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73 Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com PHILIPPINES Travel Wide Assoc. Sales Phils., Inc 8/F, Unit 817 Peninsula Court Bldg, 8735 Paseo de Roxas Ave, Makati City 1226,Philippines Tel: 63-2-5198789, Fax: 63-2-5195014 Web: www.twasp.com QATAR Fahd Travels, Doha, Qatar Tel: 00974-4432233, Fax: 00974-4432266 Email: fahd-travels@qatar.net.qa Cargo: Fahd Cargo Dar Al kotob area, Diamond Hotel Building, Doha, Qatar Fax: 00974 4431 1010, Tel: 00974 4441 4928 Email: fahdtravels@gmail.com RUSSIA Aviareps, Olympic Plaza, 39, Prospect Mira Bldg. 2, 129110 Moscow, Russia Tel: 7 495 937 59 50, 07 812 740 3820 Fax: 7 495 937 59 51, 07 812 740 3821 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: GSA Russia Global Services Ltd. Amathuntos Avenue 8, Marina Complex Block A, No. 2, 4531 Limassol Cyprus Tel: 7 495 7953838, Mobile: 7 905 7801893 Email: Olga.Polyanskaya@aircargopro.com RWANDA Euro World Sarl, Kigali, Satguru International Tel: 250 570440/570442, Fax: 250 570441 Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com Cargo: S.A.R.L SDV PO Box 1338, avenue de la douane, Kigali, Rwanda Email: rodolphe.kembukuswa@bollore.com

MEXICO Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil

SAUDI ARABIA Al Zouman Aviation, Jeddah Tel: 966 2 6531222, Fax: 966 2 6517501 Email: aviation@alzouman.com.sa

Tel: 551131063295/551186328697

Alkhobar Tel: 966 3 8649000, Fax: 966 3 8941205

Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str.155,80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com MOZAMBIQUE Lusoglobo Tours, GSA Ethiopian Airlines, Av. 25 De Setembro nº 270 Edificio Time Square Bloc 4, first floor office no. 6 Tel: 21 314421, Mobile: 82 3144211 / 845072366, Email: Lusoglobotours@tvcabo.co.mz

SERBIA, SLOVENIA, CROATIA CAT Aviation, Knez Mihajlova 30 Tel: 381 641135735 Email: qat@yubc.net SEYCHELLES Mason’s Travel Pty. Ltd. Revolutgion Avenue PO Box 459 Victoria Mahe Seychelles Tel: 0024 4288888 Fax: 248 4225273/248 4288820 Email: amason@masonstravel.com

NETHERLANDS Cargo: Global Airlines Services BV Amsterdam Airport Columbus Gebouw 1 Folkstoneweg 34 NL-1118 LM Amsterdam Airport Tel: 0031 20 653 71 00, Fax: 0031 20 653 55 04 Email: info@globalairline.nl

SIERRA LEONE IPC Tours, 22 Siaka Stevens Street, P.O. Box 1434, Freetown, Sierra Leone Tel: 00 232-221481, Fax: 232 22 227 470 Email: info@ipctravel.com, Email: ipc@sierratel.si Email: ipctravelagency@yahoo.com

NIGERIA Cargo: Bollore Africa Logistics Ltd., 2nd Floor NAHCO Building, Muritala Mohammed Int’l. Airport, Ikeja, Lagos Tel: +2348099914944, Mobile: 234 809 555 7905, Email: imma.jemihe@bollore.com

SINGAPORE CitiAir & Holidays Pte. Ltd. 48 133 New Bridge Road #14-05 China Town Point, Singapore 059413 Tel: (65) 6538 6860/ 3787/ 2678, Fax: (65) 6538 3183, Email: maplesin@singnet.com.sg

OMAN National Travel & Tourism, Postal Code 100 Sultanate of Oman Tel: 00968-246 60300, Fax: 968 24566125 Email: nttoman@omantel.net.om

Orient Air Pte. Ltd, 05-22,Cargo Agt Bldg D 9 Airline road, Changi Airfreight Center Singapore 819827 Tel: 65 6214 2193/6 or 65 6214 2192, Fax: 65 6214 2199

PAKISTAN Trade Winds Associates Pvt. Ltd., 33-Hotel Metropole, MerewetherRoad, Islamabad Tel: 009221-5661712-14, Fax: 009221-5661715 Email: aviation@tradewind.com.pk

SOMALIA Safeway Travel, Tourism and Cargo Agency, Maka Al-Mukarama street, Area number 4, Mogadishu

fly ethiopian

Tel: 618304444 Email: safewayagency@hotmail.com

Fax: 216 71 904 110 Email: atlantis@atlantis.tn

SOMALILAND Nobel Travel Agency, 26 Jun Main Road, Emarat Alkhayrm Building, 1st floor office No. 14, Hargiessa, Somaliland Tel: 252 2 528445/4 427575 Email: ntahga@hotmail.com

TURKEY Panorama Havacilik Ve Turizm Ltd., Cumhuriyet Cad. Apt. 185/1, Harbiye 34373, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: 90 212 2315919, Fax: 90 212 2344999 Email: Ethiopian@arartur.com.tr, mdogan@ arartur.com.tr/info@panoramaglobal.net

SOUTH AFRICA Cargo: Aero-Link Consulting Warehouse 34, Cargo, Section, P.O Box 1307, O.R. Tambo International Airport, Gauteng, 1627 Tel: +27 11 390 3132/3366, Fax: +27 11 390 3139/3149 Email: jeremy@aero-link.co.za

Cargo: Airmark GSA Tas. Ltd. Sti.Omar Avni mah, Dumen Sok., No: 11/4 34437, Taksim, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: 90 212 444 1 472, Fax: 90 212 249 474 8 Email: management@air-mark.com

156 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg, 2194, South Africa Tel: 27112898264, Fax: 27112898164 Email: g.simpson@holidayholdings.co.2a SOUTH KOREA Sharp Aviation K Inc 8th floor, Injo Building, 111-1 Seorin-dong, Jongno-gu Seoul, 110-110, Korea Tel: 82-2-722-1567, Fax: 82 2 7342813 Email: sspaik@sharp.co.kr/www.co.kr Cargo: Sharp Inc Tel: 82 2 7221567, Fax: 82 2 7342813 Email: sspaik@sharp.co.kr SPAIN & PORTUGAL AirTravel Management Calle Diego de leone, 69 40A-28006, Madrid, Spain Tel: 34 91 4022718, Fax: 34 91 4015239 Email: airmat@airlinesairmat.com Cargo: CRS Airline’s Representatives Conchita Supervia, 15–Local 08028 BARCELONA (SPAIN) Tel: 34 931888690, Fax: 34 93409251 SRI LANKA VMS Aviation Air Services PVT LTD 07-3 81183 (HO) RG, Galadari Hotel 64 Lotus Road, Colombo 1, Sri Lanka Hussien: 0094 777590100, Tel: 94 1 447370 / Fax: 94 1 437249, Email: vmstrv@eureka.lk, hussein@vmstravels.net SWEDEN Cargo: Kales Airline Services Tel: 46 40 36 38 10 Fax 46 40 36 38 19

UGANDA Cargo: Freight In Time Ltd., PO Box 70942 Kampala, Uganda Tel: 256 0774 898075, Fax: 256 414 223996 Email: amit@freight-in-time.com UNITED KINGDOM Cargo: Air Liaison Ltd - Heavyweight Air Express Group Tel: 44-1753 210 008, Fax: 44-208 831 9309, Email: ethiopianops@air-liaison.net UNITED ARAB EMIRATES ABU DHABI Salem Travel Agency, bun Dhabi, UAE Tel: 97126273333/6218000, Fax: 009712-6211155, Email: info@salemtravelagency.com DUBAI Passenger & Cargo: Asian Air Travel & Tour Agency, N.R.L Group bldg.AlGharhoud, Dubai, UAE Tel: 009714 2826322, Fax: 009714 2825727, Email: hnrml@nrlgroup.ae UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Cargo: Heavy Weight Air Express (HW) Toll Free No: 800 445 2733, Tel: 630 595 2323/571 480 5200, Fax: 630 595 3232, Email: hea.us@heavy-uweight.com VENEZUELA Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Tel: 551131063295/551186328697

Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str.155,80687 Munich, Germany

Cargo: Kales Airline Services Tel: 46 8 594 411 90, Fax: 46 8 594 42244

Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com

SWITZERLAND Airline center/AVIAREPS, AIRLINECENTER, Badenerstresse, Zurich,Switzerland Tel: 4122 91 98999, Fax: 4122 91 98900 Email: twelti@aviareps.com

VIETNAM Hai Au Building (11th Floor) 39b Truong Son Str., Tan Banh Dist Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Tel: 84835472481-86, Fax: 84835472487 Email: quangdx@vector-aviation.com.vn

AIRNAUTIC AG, Peter Merian Str.2 CH-4002, Cargo: Basel Switzerland Basel Tel: 41 61 227 9797 Fax: 41 61 227 9780 Email: info@airnautic.ch

Vector Aviation Co. Ltd Hai Au Building (11th Floor), 39B Truong Son Str.,Tan Binh Dist,HO CHI MINH City,Veitnam Tel: 848 3547 2487, Fax: 848 3547 2481-86

SYRIA Passenger & Cargo: Al Tarek Travel & Tourism Fardous St, PO Box 30185 Tel: 963 11 2235225, Fax: 963 11 2211941 Email: moutaz2728@yahoo.com TAIWAN Apex Travel Services Ltd., 6F-3 No. 57, Fi Shin N. Rd Taipei, Taiwan Tel: 886 2 2740 7722, Fax: 886 2 2740 5570 Email: tpetorg@1b.hinet.net Cargo: Global Aviation Service (Taiwan) Inc. Tel: 886 2 2658 0255, Fax: 886 2 2659 7610 Email: cgo@gastwn.com gastwn@ms12.hinet.et

YEMEN Marib Travel & Tourism, Beirut Street (Next to Sudanese Embassy Sanaa, Yemen) Tel: 00971-426833, Fax: 009671-426836 Email: manager@marib-tours.com ZAMBIA Cargo: EAS Zambia Ltd Bid Air Cargo, Kenneth Kaunda International Airport, PO Box 37287 Lusaka Tel: 27 11230460021, Fax: 27865910066 ZANZIBAR Passenger & Cargo: Marhaba Hotels Travels & Tours Ltd Tel: 255 24 2231527-28, Fax: Fax: 255 24 2231526, Email: marhaba@zanzinet.com

TANZANIA Cargo: Bollore Africa Logistic PO Box 1683, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania Tel: +(255) 22 2842 850, Mobile: +(255) 784 784 144, Fax: +(255) 22 2 842 181 THAILAND Cargo: Oriole Travel & Tour Tel: 662 2379201 9, Fax: 662 2379200 Email: ealbkket@loxinfo.co.th TUNISIA Atlantis International LTD, S.A., 29, Ave Du Japon, Immueble Fatma, 1073 Montplaisir, Tunis, Tunisia Tel: 216 71 908 999/216 906 000

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+ + + + + + + +

Free High speed Internet 112 B e d r o o m s i n c l u d i n g s u i t e s Dif ferent Res taur ants and Bar s S PA , F i t n e s s C e n t e r a n d S w i m m i n g P o o l F u l l a c t i v i t i e s (m i n i g o l f , b o a t , t e n n i s , e t c) Conference hall for 50 0 pa x Board meeting rooms Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n f r o m A d d i s a v a i l a b l e Tel: +251-1-16-63-01-55 E-mail: mkt@haileresort.com.et Website: www.haileresorts.com

Shashemene, Newly Opened E - Light Hotel + + + + 82

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Free High Speed Internet 52 Bedrooms Swimming Pool and Fitness Center Tel: +251-9-30-10-84-85

M a n a ge d

by

E t f r i n


ENTERTAINMENT ON-DEMAND MOVIES / TV 84 | MAINSCREEN MOVIES / TV 85 | MOVIE SUMMARIES 86 | TV SUMMARIES 88 | AUDIO 90

MAN OF STEEL

A

young boy learns that he has extraordinary powers and is not of this planet. As a young man, he journeys to discover where he came from and what he was sent here to do. But the hero inside must emerge if he is to save the world from annihilation and become the symbol of hope for all mankind. PG-13 / 143 minutes / Henry Cavill, Michael Shannon, Kevin Costner

november/december 2013

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entertainment

Am I using Video On Demand? Is the screen in front of you a touch screen? Then, yes.

| VIDEO ON DEMAND

?

NOV-DEC MOVIES See descriptions on pages 86-87.

BLOCKBUSTERS NOW YOU SEE ME CRIME PG-13 / 115 minutes

MAN OF STEEL ACTION PG-13 / 143 minutes HOLLYWOOD CLASSICS

BLUE JASMINE COMEDY PG-13 / 104 minutes

CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF DRAMA PG-13 / 108 minutes

2 GUNS ACTION R / 109 minutes

BRAVEHEART ACTION R / 178 minutes

PLANES FAMILY PG / 92 minutes

THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION DRAMA R / 145 minutes

STUCK IN LOVE COMEDY R / 97 minutes WHAT MAISIE KNEW DRAMA R / 99 minutes WHITE HOUSE DOWN ACTION PG-13 / 132 minutes

BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID ADVENTURE PG / 110 minutes CHARIOTS OF FIRE DRAMA PG / 123 minutes

PACIFIC RIM ACTION PG-13 / 131 minutes

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM COMEDY PG-13 / 117 minutes

THE SMURFS 2 FAMILY PG / 105 minutes

CASABLANCA DRAMA PG / 102 minutes

THE LONE RANGER ADVENTURE PG-13 / TBC

TITANIC DRAMA PG-13 /194 minutes

WORLD WAR Z ACTION PG-13 / 116 minutes

CRAZY HEART DRAMA R / 112 minutes

MRS. DOUBTFIRE COMEDY PG-13 / 125 minutes GONE WITH THE WIND DRAMA G / 233 minutes PLANET OF THE APES ADVENTURE G / 112 minutes THE WIZARD OF OZ FAMILY G / 102 minutes DIRTY HARRY ADVENTURE R / 103 minutes THE BODYGUARD DRAMA R /129 minutes THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA COMEDY PG-13 / 110 minutes KIDS CLASSICS WE BOUGHT A ZOO FAMILY PG / 126 minutes MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS COMEDY PG / 95 minutes DOLPHIN TALE DRAMA PG / 113 minutes CITY OF EMBER FAMILY PG / 95 minutes

HAPPY FEET FAMILY PG / 108 minutes AFRICAN MOVIES

SHOOTOUT AT WADALA ACTION R / 155 minutes ASIAN MOVIES

A MOTHER’S FIGHT DRAMA PG / 104 minutes

THE BOUNTY DRAMA PG-13 / 104 minutes

MASQUERADES COMEDY PG / 98 minutes

THE ASSASSINS DRAMA R / 104 minutes

MOTHER’S LOVE FAMILY PG / 100 minutes

THE WEDDING INVITATION ROMANCE PG-13 / 108 minutes

MISPLACED DRAMA PG / 109 Minutes

IP MAN: THE FINAL FIGHT ACTION PG-13 / 102 minutes

THE PRICE DRAMA PG / 88 minutes BEHIND THE MELODY PART 1 DRAMA PG / 65 minutes HINDI MOVIES

EUROPEAN MOVIES AMITIES SINCERES COMEDY PG-13 / 104 minutes ALCESTE À BICYCLETTE COMEDY PG-13 / 104 minutes

RAANJHANNA DRAMA PG-13 / 140 minutes

LA GRANDE VADROUILLE COMEDY PG / 132 minutes

YEH JAWAANI HAI DEEWANI DRAMA PG / 139 minutes

LA NOM DE LA ROSE DRAMA R / 130 minutes

LOOTERA DRAMA PG-13 / 136 minutes

NOV-DEC TELEVISION See descriptions on pages 88-89. KIDS GOOD LUCK CHARLIE / Baby Come Back / 30 Mins THE A.N.T. FARM / ParticipANTs / 30 Mins SHAKE IT UP / Kick it Up / 30 Mins DOC MCSTUFFINS / Gulpy Gulpy Gators!/One Note Wonder / 30 Mins PHINEAS AND FERB / The Great Indoors/Canderemy / 30 Mins FISH HOOKS / Queen Bea/ Baldwin the Super Fish / 30 Mins COMEDY HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER / Who Wants to be a Godparent, Splitsville, The Autumn of Break-Ups / 30 Mins NEW GIRL / Models, Halloween, Menzies / 30 Mins TWO AND A HALF MEN / You Know What the Lollipops For / 30 Mins FUTURAMA / Where No Fan Has Gone Before / 30 Mins THE BIG BANG THEORY / The Alien Parasite Hypothesis / 30 Mins

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THE MIDDLE / The Hose / 30 Mins

VEGAS / Money Plays / 60 Mins

MIKE AND MOLLY / Vince Takes a Bath / 30 Mins

THE GOOD WIFE / Affairs of State / 60 Mins

THE NEW ADVENTURES OF OLD CHRISTINE / Beauty is Only Spanx Deep / 30 Mins FRIENDS / The One Where Joey Speaks French / 30 Mins DRAMA GREY’S ANATOMY / Drowning on Dry Land, Some Kind of Miracle / 60 Mins FRINGE / The Human Kind / 60 mins THE MENTALIST / Cherry Picked / 60 Mins DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES / Free / 60 Mins BONES / The Bump in the Road, The Don’t In the Do, The Warrior in the Wuss / 60 Mins TOUCH / Noosphere Rising, Zone of Exclusion, Music of the Spheres / 60 Mins

DOCUMENTARY

LIFESTYLE FABULOUS BAKER BROTHERS / Season 1, Episode 2 / 30 Mins

HESTON’S FANTASTICAL FOODS / Heston’s Giant Ice Cream / 60 Mins PAWN STARS / Wise Guys / 30 Mins

FIRST STEPS / Episode 1 / 30 Mins

JOURNEY INTO WINE AUSTRALIA / Melbourne’s Wine Regions / 30 Mins

AMERICAN RESTORATION / Tyler’s Promotion / 30 Mins

FISH LIFE / The Race for Space / 30 Mins

HOW THE COMPUTER BECAME PERSONAL / N/A / 30 Mins

DESTINATION GUIDES

HOMES OF BRAZIL / Rio De Janeiro / 30 Mins

CHEFS AROUND THE WORLD / Juan Amador, Germany / 30 Mins

IT’S CHRISTMAS IN THE SAVANNAH / Episode 1 & 2 / 30 Mins

VIDEOFASHION STYLE / Soulmates / 30 Mins

THE ABYSSINIAN SHE-WOLF / Episode 1 / 60 Mins MANKIND: THE STORY OF ALL OF US / Inventors, Iron Men / 60 Mins ENGINEERING CONNECTIONS / Super Tanker / 60 Mins BEYOND THE COSMOS / Time Warp / 60 Mins MEGAFACTORIES / Coca Cola / 60 Mins

PRETTY LITTLE LIARS / Blood is the New Black / 60 Mins

TEST YOUR BRAIN / Memory / 60 Mins

ELEMENTARY / While You Were Sleeping / 60 mins

NORDIC WILD / Reborn / 60 Mins

A DAY IN THE LIFE / Will.I.Am / 30 Mins JAMIE’S 30 MINUTE MEALS / Rogan Josh Curry / 30 Mins ROAD TO RIO / Episode 6 / 30 Mins PARIS CHIC / Haute Couture / 30 Mins WORLD OF TENNIS / Episode 3 / 30 Mins

GLOBE TREKKER / Indonesia: Bali & Sulawesi, Japan: Tokyo to Taiwan, South West China, Philippines / 30 Mins SHORTS TEETH / N/A / 5 Mins PET HATE / N/A / 5 Mins SPY FOX / N/A / 4:31 Mins REULF / N/A / 4:21 Mins MY STRANGE GRANDFATHER / N/A / 8:50 Mins ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES

WORLDWIDE SPORT / Episode 13 / 30 Mins

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES DOCUMENTARY / 10 minutes

TECH TOYS 360 / Episode 12 / 30 Mins

AFRICAN UNITY / 10 minutes

SHOW ME YOUR WARDROBE / Paloma Faith & Tali Lennox / 30 Mins


Am I using Mainscreen? Is there a shared screen mounted to the ceiling? Then, yes.

MAINSCREEN |

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entertainment

OUTBOUND FLIGHTS See descriptions on pages 86-89.

ADDIS to AFRICA/WEST ASIA

NOV/DEC MOVIES BLOCKBUSTERS THE SMURFS 2 FAMILY PG / 105 minutes AFRICAN MOVIES A MOTHER’S FIGHT* DRAMA PG / 104 minutes

ADDIS to EUROPE

NOV/DEC MOVIES BLOCKBUSTERS NOW YOU SEE ME (FRENCH) CRIME PG-13 / 115 minutes EUROPEAN MOVIES AMITIES SINCERES COMEDY PG-13 / 104 minutes

ADDIS to INDIA

NOV/DEC MOVIES BLOCKBUSTERS NOW YOU SEE ME CRIME PG-13 / 115 minutes HINDI MOVIES RAANJHANNA DRAMA PG-13 / 140 minutes

ADDIS to EAST ASIA

NOV/DEC MOVIES BLOCKBUSTERS

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

NOV/DEC MOVIES BLOCKBUSTERS

NOW YOU SEE ME CRIME PG-13 / 115 minutes

NOW YOU SEE ME CRIME PG-13 / 115 minutes

THE SMURFS 2 FAMILY PG / 105 minutes

THE SMURFS 2 FAMILY PG / 105 minutes

ASIAN MOVIES THE BOUNTY* DRAMA PG-13 /104 minutes

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

ADDIS to AMERICAS

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

CLASSIC MOVIES A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM* COMEDY PG-13 /117 minutes

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

NEW GIRL / 30 Mins

ELEMENTARY / 60 mins

ELEMENTARY / 60 mins

ELEMENTARY / 60 mins

ELEMENTARY / 60 mins

THE MENTALIST / 60 Mins

THE GOOD WIFE / 60 Mins

THE GOOD WIFE / 60 Mins

THE GOOD WIFE / 60 Mins

THE GOOD WIFE / 60 Mins

IT’S CHRISTMAS IN THE SAVANNAH / 30 Mins

HESTON’S FANTASTICAL FOODS / 60 Mins

HESTON’S FANTASTICAL FOODS / 60 Mins

HESTON’S FANTASTICAL FOODS / 60 Mins

HESTON’S FANTASTICAL FOODS / 60 Mins

*Not available on B737 aircrafts

INBOUND FLIGHTS See descriptions on pages 86-89.

AFRICA/WEST ASIA to ADDIS

NOV/DEC MOVIES BLOCKBUSTERS MAN OF STEEL ACTION PG-13 / 143 minutes AFRICAN MOVIES MASQUERADES* COMEDY PG/ 98 minutes

EUROPE to ADDIS

NOV/DEC MOVIES

INDIA to ADDIS

NOV/DEC MOVIES

EAST ASIA to ADDIS

NOV/DEC MOVIES

THE BIG BANG THEORY / 30 mins JAMIE’S 30 MINUTE MEALS / 30 mins MANKIND: THE STORY OF US ALL / 60 mins

NOV/DEC MOVIES

BLOCKBUSTERS

BLOCKBUSTERS

BLOCKBUSTERS

BLOCKBUSTERS

PLANES (FRENCH) FAMILY PG / 92 minutes

PLANES (FRENCH) FAMILY PG / 92 minutes

PLANES (FRENCH) FAMILY PG / 92 minutes

PLANES (FRENCH) FAMILY PG / 92 minutes

MAN OF STEEL ACTION PG-13 / 143 minutes

MAN OF STEEL ACTION PG-13 / 143 minutes

EUROPEAN MOVIES ALCESTE À BICYCLETTE* COMEDY PG-13 /104 minutes

HINDI MOVIES YEH JAWAANI HAI DEEWANI* DRAMA PG / 139 minutes

ASIAN MOVIES THE ASSASSINS* DRAMA R /104 minutes

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

AMERICAS to ADDIS

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

KIDS CLASSIC MOVIES MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS COMEDY PG / 95 minutes

NOV/DEC TELEVISION

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER / 30 mins

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER / 30 mins

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER / 30 mins

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER / 30 mins

PAWN STARS / 30 mins

PAWN STARS / 30 mins

PAWN STARS / 30 mins

PAWN STARS / 30 mins

MEGAFACTORIES / 60 mins

MEGAFACTORIES / 60 mins

MEGAFACTORIES / 60 mins

MEGAFACTORIES / 60 mins

*Not available on B737 aircrafts

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| MOVIE SUMMARIES

CLASSIC MOVIES A Midsummer Night’s Dream Now, until the break of day, through this house each fairy stray. Academy Award winners James Cagney and Olivia de Havilland join an allstar cast in Shakespeare’s classic romantic comedy of the one night each year when magic infuses the world of humans, fairies walk among men and love will change the order of all things in a A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Braveheart In the late 13th century, William Wallace returns to a Scotland ruled by the ruthless Edward the Longshanks and leads a ramshackle yet courageous army determined to vanquish the greater English forces.

WHITE HOUSE DOWN

lows is a bizarre investigation where nothing is what it seems.

transformed John Reid, a man of the law, into a legend of justice.

2 Guns This explosive action film tracks two operatives from competing bureaus who are forced on the run together, and neither knows that the other is an undercover federal agent. For the past 12 months, DEA agent Bobby Trench and U.S. Naval intelligence officer Michael Stigman have been reluctantly attached at the hip, and each man distrusts his partner as much as the criminals they have both been tasked to take down.

Pacific Rim When legions of monstrous creatures started rising from the sea, a war began that would take millions of lives and consume humanity’s resources for years on end. Massive robots are designed to combat the giant Kaiju and controlled by two pilots whose minds are locked in a neural bridge. On the verge of defeat, the forces defending mankind have no choice but to turn to two unlikely heroes.

The Smurfs 2 The Smurfs team up with their human friends to rescue Smurfette, who has been kidnapped by Gargamel since she knows a secret spell that can turn the evil sorcerer’s newest creation — creatures called the Naughties — into real Smurfs.

Blue Jasmine A once wealthy and glamorous New York socialite finds herself broke and living with her sister in an attempt to downsize her life. As she reflects on the thing she believes she has lost, she meets a man in the Bay Area that may be able to solve all of her problems. First, however, she must discover who she is, and more importantly, accept San Francisco as her home.

Planes This action-packed animated comedy-adventure focuses on Dusty, a big-hearted, fast-flying crop duster who dreams of competing in an epic air race, despite his fear of heights. With the encouragement of his mentor, Dusty overcomes his fear and qualifies for the competition, rattling the defending champ of the race circuit, who will stop at nothing to see him fail.

Man of Steel A young boy learns that he has extraordinary powers and is not of this planet. As a young man, he journeys to discover where he came from and what he was sent here to do. But the hero inside must emerge if he is to save the world from annihilation and become the symbol of hope for all mankind.

Stuck in Love Three years past his divorce, novelist Bill Borgens can’t stop obsessing over ex-wife Erica, even despite a neighbor-with-benefits. Meanwhile, daughter Samantha is publishing her first novel and teen son Rusty is trying to find his voice. A tangled trio of romantic crises, the Borgens gain surprising revelations about how endings become beginnings.

BLOCKBUSTERS

Now You See Me Four magicians each answer a mysterious summons to an obscure address with secrets inside. A year later, they are big-time stage illusionists who climax their sold out Las Vegas show with a bank apparently robbed for real. This puts agents Dylan Rhodes of the FBI and Alma Vargas of Interpol on the case to find out how they did it. What fol-

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The Lone Ranger From producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Gore Verbinski comes Disney/Jerry Bruckheimer Films’ The Lone Ranger, a thrilling adventure infused with action and humor, in which the famed masked hero is brought to life through new eyes. Native American spirit warrior Tonto recounts the untold tales that

What Maisie Knew This powerfully acted modern adaptation of Henry James’ novel tells the story of a captivating little girl’s struggle for grace during her parents’ bitter custody battle. Maisie navigates the turmoil with a 6-year-old’s innocence, charm and sweet spirit. Her mom, an aging rock star, and her dad, a contemporary art dealer, are too self-involved to notice their own inadequacy as parents, but their new partners help anchor Maisie’s life. White House Down Capitol Policeman John Cale (Channing Tatum) has just been denied his dream job with the Secret Service of protecting the president (Jamie Foxx). Not wanting to let down his little girl, he takes her on a tour of the White House, when the complex is overtaken by a paramilitary group. Now, with the nation’s government in chaos and time running out, it’s up to Cale to save the president, his daughter and the country. World War Z When the city of Philadelphia is attacked by hoards of zombies — while United Nations employee Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) and his family sit in traffic — the chaos is widespread. It is then up to Lane to traverse the world in a race against time, and the odds, to stop the zombie pandemic, which is toppling armies and threatening to destroy humanity itself.

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid During the closing years of the 19th century, cowboy outlaws and best friends Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid try in vain to maintain their robbing ways while the modern world creeps in on their livelihood and fading way of life. Casablanca Rick Blaine owns a nightclub in Vichy-controlled Casablanca, frequented by refugees desperate to escape German domination. Despite the ever-present human misery, Rick manages to remain uninvolved in World War II, now raging across Europe and Northern Africa. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof As the family of a wealthy Southern patriach informs his children that he is dying of cancer, lies and secrets surface that threaten to rip the family apart. The doctors say the growing cancer is in remission. One self-seeking son claims to love his father.

TITANIC

Chariots of Fire 1924. The Paris Olympics. Eric Liddell is a devout Christian who believes that his athletic abilities are a gift from God, and that using that gift to its fullest extent – to win the gold medal – will be his way of glorifying God. Harold Abrahams is an English Jew, a student at Cambridge, who dreams of fame and of proving to his anti-Semitic fellow students, and to the world, that Jews are not inferior. Crazy Heart Bad Blake is a broken-down country music singer who’s had way too many marriages, far too many years on the road and one too many drinks way too many times. And yet, Bad can’t help but reach for salvation with the help of Jean, a journalist who discovers the real man behind the musician. As he struggles down the road of redemption, Bad learns the hard way just how tough life can be on one man’s crazy heart. Dirty Harry The first screen adventure for Clint Eastwood’s maverick San Francisco dectective, “Dirty” Harry Callahan, follows the maverick cop as he tracks a serial killer. Gone with the Wind On the eve of the American Civil War, rich, beautiful and self-centered Scarlett has everything she could want – except Ashley. But as the war devastates the South, Scarlett discovers the strength within herself to protect her family and rebuild her life. Through everything, she longs for Ashley, unaware that she is already married to the man she really loves – and who truly loves her – until she finally drives him away. Mrs. Doubtfire Daniel Hillard is a struggling father who loses his job as a voice actor for cartoons. When he throws a disastrous surprise birthday party for his son, Chris, everything takes a turn


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Am I on a Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is not a touch screen, please see p. 86-87.

Boeing 777/787 Flights | MOVIE SUMMARIES

LOOTERA

MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS

for the worse. Daniel’s wife, Miranda, has had it with Daniel and wants a divorce. When the divorce hearings arrive, Daniel is denied custody of the children but allowed visitations… but seeing his children once a week isn’t enough. Planet of the Apes A U.S. spacecraft lands on a desolate-looking planet, where the astronauts discover a world dominated by apes and humans are considered savage animals. The Bodyguard A former Secret Service agent takes on the job of bodyguard for a pop singer, whose lifestyle is most unlike a president’s. The Devil Wears Prada A young woman from the Midwest and freshly out of college gets more than she bargained for when she moves to New York City to become a writer and ends up as the new assistant to the tyrannical, largerthan-life editor-in-chief of a major fashion magazine. The Shawshank Redemption From a novella by best-selling author Stephen King comes a poignant tale of the human spirit. Red, serving a life sentence, and Andy Dufresne, a mild-mannered banker wrongly convicted of murder, forge an unlikely bond that will span more than 20 years. Together they discover hope as the ultimate means of survival. The Wizard of Oz A young farm girl and her little dog are magically transported into the enchanted land of Oz via a Kansas tornado. As they travel down Oz’s Yellow Brick Road to find the Wizard and ask him to send them home, they encounter a wonderful, funny, terrifying and, ultimately, enlightening group of characters, humans and otherwise. Titanic A 17-year-old aristocrat expecting to be married to a rich claimant falls in love with a kind but poor artist aboard the luxurious, ill-fated R.M.S. Titanic. KIDS CLASSIC MOVIES City of Ember For generations, the people of the City of Ember have flourished in an amazing world of glittering lights. But Ember’s once powerful genera-

entertainment

tor is failing… and the great lamps that illuminate the city are starting to flicker. Now, two teenagers in a race against time must search Ember for clues that will unlock the ancient mystery of the city’s existence, and help the citizens escape before the lights go out forever. Dolphin Tale Based on true events, Dolphin Tale is a family film about Winter, a young dolphin who loses her tail in a crab trap, and Sawyer, the introverted, 11-year-old boy who befriends her. Sawyer rallies friends and family alike to save Winter by convincing a pioneering doctor to create a unique prosthetic attachment to restore the dolphin’s ability to swim. Winter the dolphin will play herself in the movie. Happy Feet Happy Feet is set deep in Antartica. Into the land of Emperor Penguins, where each needs a heart song to attract a soul mate, a penguin is born who cannot sing. Our hero Mumble, son of Memphis and Norma Jean, is the worst singer in the world… however, as it happens, he is a brilliant tap dancer! Mr. Popper’s Penguins Mr. Popper is a driven businessman who is clueless when it comes to the important things in life – until he inherits six penguins. Popper’s penguins turn his swank New York apartment into a snowy winter wonderland – and the rest of his life upside-down. Filmed on a refrigerated soundstage with real Emperor Penguins, Mr. Popper’s Penguins is a contemporary adaptation of the classic book. We Bought a Zoo Benjamin is a newspaper columnist and adventure writer who, as a single father, faces the challenges of raising his two young kids. Hoping that a fresh start and a new life will restore their family spirit, Mee quits his job and buys an old rural house outside the city that comes with a unique bonus feature: a zoo, where dozens of animals reside under the care of head zookeeper Kelly Foster and her dedicated team. AFRICAN A Mother’s Fight A young widow’s world is turned upside down when her husband’s relatives take everything that she

owns and leave her homeless. She faces a battle against archaic traditions and for the survival of her daughters. Behind The Melody Part 1 Africa’s biggest singing superstar is being blackmailed by an anonymous voice at the end of a phone line. She finds comfort in a man and is shocked to discover that he is a link to the past that she tried so hard to erase. Masquerades After several years apart, a family is finally drawn home to Christmas by a tragedy; their uncle is recently deceased and they are charged with the responsibility of burying him. However, underneath all that is left unsaid is a dysfunctional family struggling to keep up appearances. Misplaced A convict is bailed out of jail by a supposed good samaritan, to help carry out an assignment to steal an iPad belonging to his boss. In a twist of fate, the wrong iPad is stolen. Mother’s Love The product of a broken home is shocked and upset when her father’s girlfriend moves into the family home, but even more so when she discovers exactly why… The Price A humble man languishes in prison for 30 years because of the impenetrable love he has for the daughter of a power-thirsty politician. HINDI Lootera Its 1953 and Varun Shrivastav comes to Manikpur to excavate the temple grounds of the local Zaminder. With knowledge and experience beyond his young demeanour, Varun greatly impresses the Zamindar and his family. Especially Pakhi, the Zamindar’s feisty and only daughter, who finds herself irrevocably drawn toward him. But Varun isn’t all he seems on the surface. Raanjhanna A small-town boy needs to break through the class divide to gain acceptance from his childhood sweetheart who is in love with big city ideals. Shootout at Wadala Based on the first-ever registered encounter by the Mumbai Police,

Shootout at Wadala tells the story of a shootout between the Mumbai encounter squad and a gangster named Manya Surve, led by Inspector Issaq Bagwan. Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani This is the story of Bunny and Naina, just finished college and on the threshold of the decisions that will shape their lives. They meet again in their twenties, unfulfilled in certain areas of their lives, and find themselves at a different kind of crossroads. ASIAN Ip Man: The Final Fight The legendary Wing Chun grandmaster Ip Man is called into action once again; however, what starts as a simple challenge from rival kung fu styles, soon draws him into the underworld of The Triads. Reluctantly, he must defend life and honor and fight one last time. The Assassins Set in the late 210s in China in the years leading up to the end of the Han Dynasty, The Assassins tells the story of Cao Cao, the “King of Wei,” and the major attempts on his life. Lingju is the orphaned daughter of Lu Bu, Cao Cao’s defeated rival, and has been recruited since childhood to kill Cao. The Bounty Neurotic bounty hunter Cho Sai Fung takes on a commission to hunt down a fugitive robber in a small island hotel, with a huge reward on his head. However, he finds himself being watched by the nosy father and daughter who run the inn. The Wedding Invitation Li Xing surprises QiaoQiao with a

marriage proposal. When she turns down the proposal, they decide that if they are both single in five years, they will get married. When Li next hears from her, however, it is with an invite to her wedding. EUROPEAN Alceste à bicyclette Once one of the greatest actors, Serge Tanneur now spends his time living in solitude on the Île de Ré. When fellow actor Gauthier Valence decides he wants to offer Serge the title role in a production of Molière’s play The Misanthrope, he finds that the retired man is playing hard to get. Amities Sinceres Paul, Walter and Jacques are three friends in their fifties, with very different personalities. When the overprotective Walter’s daugther, Clemence, falls for Paul, however, their 30-year friendship is put to the test. La Grande Vadrouille Set during the Second World War, La Grande Vadrouille tells the story of a British Bomber Crew and two French civilians as they set out from Paris to cross the demarcation line between Nazi-occupied Northern France and the South. La Nom de la Rose After a mysterious death in a Benedictine Abbey, the monks are convinced that the apocalypse is coming. William of Baskerville, a respected Franciscan monk, is asked to assist in determining the cause of the death. However, as more deaths occur, the secret the Abbey wants to remain hidden is unearthed.

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| TELEVISION SUMMARIES

KIDS

COMEDY

Doc McStuffins Episode: Gulpy Gulpy Gators!/One Note Wonder Doc fixes Gustave, the green gator, on Donny’s Gulpy Gulpy Gators game after he eats too many marbles. Alma’s xylophone toy, Xyla, loses a key by accident.

Friends Episode: The One Where Joey Speaks French When Rachel’s father has a heart attack, she goes to Long Island with Ross to visit him. Meanwhile, Phoebe attempts to teach Joey to speak French for a play he’s been cast in.

Fish Hooks Episode: Queen Bea/Baldwin the Super Fish Mr. Baldwin begins to think that Milo is a superhero in disguise. Meanwhile, Bea throws a fake dance for the gang to distract them while she goes to the real dance, intending to be crowned queen.

Futurama Episode: Where No Fan Has Gone Before The Planet Express crew finds itself pitted against the cast of the original Star Trek when an energy creature seeks to determine who is more worthy of his fanatical devotion.

Good Luck Charlie Episode: Baby Come Back The kids offer to look after 9-month-old Charlie while their parents go out on a date. P.J. takes Charlie to the park, where he meets a cute girl walking her baby brother with a stroller identical to the stroller he is pushing Charlie in. Phineas and Ferb Episode: The Great Indoors/Canderemy To help the Fireside Girls, the guys get together to build a biodome. Meanwhile, things get complicated for Candace during her day with Stacy as Dr. Doofenshmirtz fuses her with Jeremy. Shake it Up Episode: Kick it Up Cece and Rocky decide to spend some time apart, when she begins to suspect that they are spending too much of their time together. However, when Rocky meets a new group of friends, she soon regrets her decision. The A.N.T. Farm Episode: ParticipANTs Chyna and Olive decide to be more proactive at school, and together they try out for the cheerleading team. However, when only Chyna makes the squad, she begins to think that she’s getting more than she bargained for.

How I Met Your Mother Episode: Splitsville When Robin is hesitant to break up with Nick, Barney takes matters into his own hands. Meanwhile, Lily and Marshall are desperate for some private time. How I Met Your Mother Episode: The Autumn of Break-Ups As the season of break-ups continues, Ted and Victoria must choose the next step in their long and complicated relationship. Meanwhile, Robin worries about Barney when he chooses a dog to be his wingman. How I Met Your Mother Episode: Who Wants to be a Godparent When Lily and Marshall can’t decide on who they want to be godparents for Marvin, they put the gang to the test to see who would make the best fit. Mike and Molly Episode: Vince Takes a Bath As Mike and Molly get started on their post-wedding thank-you notes, Vince throws out his back. Joyce conveniently disappears, leaving Mike and Molly (mostly Molly) to attend to Vince’s needs. New Girl Episode: Halloween Jess gets a job as a zombie at a haunted house, but is more frightened of her feelings toward Sam.

Schmidt and Cece are perfectly matched in the costumes they’re wearing, while Winston and Shelby are worlds apart in theirs. Nick gets a visit from a former college crush. New Girl: Episode: Menzies As Jess’ job search kicks into high gear, the guys fear her time of the month is also affecting their physical and psychological well-being. Meanwhile, Schmidt begins a “50 Shades of Grey” type of relationship with his corporate boss. New Girl Episode: Models After spending a wild night out with Cece and her model friends, Jess jumps in the driver’s seat when she must fill in for Cece at a car show. Meanwhile, the guys question what defines male friendship after Schmidt buys Nick a cookie. The Big Bang Theory Episode: The Alien Parasite Hypothesis Amy finds she has sexual feelings for Penny’s ex-boyfriend, while Koothrappali and Wolowitz try to prove who would be the better superhero. The Middle Episode: The Hose Trashy neighbor Rita Glossner returns and accuses Frankie of stealing her hose. Sue finds Mike’s paycheck and is so shocked at how little he makes that she decides to call off her road trip to Cincinnati for her school mascot duties to save money. The New Adventures of Old Christine Episode: Beauty Is Only Spanx Deep Christine’s confidence is knocked when a pretty young waitress flirts with Mr. Harris and she begins to consider plastic surgery. Richard accidentally proposes to New Christine over the phone. Two and a Half Men Episode: You Know What the Lollipops For Walden begins to feel his age when a family friend of his, Missi, comes to visit. He mistakes her advances for

THE MIDDLE

TOUCH

flirtation, only to find that she really wants to set up Walden with her mother. DRAMA Bones Episode: The Bump in the Road With the help of Special Agent Genny Shaw, the Jeffersonian team identifies the remains of a discount shopper who was dragged along the road by an 18-wheeler. Meanwhile, Brennan is adjusting to her first day back at work after giving birth. Bones Episode: The Don’t In the Do When a corpse is found at a landfill, dyed in a blue substance, intern Arastoo Vaziri discovers a method that helps eliminate post-mortem damages to the corpse, which leads the team back to a hair salon where the victim worked. Bones The corpse of a truck company employee is found in the middle of the woods. After the victim’s son is questioned, Booth and Brennan visit his karate class in search of a motive. Desperate Housewives Episode: Free While Susan struggles to let go of Julie, Wayne brutally injures Adam and goes after Katherine. Gabrielle and Carlos come across Ellie’s money in a teddy bear and decide to hide it from her. Elementary Episode: While You Were Sleeping Holmes and Watson investigate the murders of two illegitimate children of a wealthy businessman, but matters are complicated when a witness identifies a woman in a coma — and the man’s legitimate daughter — as the murderer. Fringe Episode: The Human Kind Olivia is still worried about the effects of the Observer implant on Peter, and succeeds in getting another one from their ally Anil for Walter to study. Meanwhile, Peter is still trying to track down Captain Windmark for revenge.

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Grey’s Anatomy Episode: Drowning on Dry Land Meredith is still underwater and her condition is worsening. Izzy performs brain surgery on a man stuck between vehicles and Alex continues to search for the pregnant Jane Doe’s family as she undergoes surgery. Grey’s Anatomy Episode: Some Kind of Miracle As Richard and Derek struggle to keep Meredith alive, she finds herself caught in limbo interacting with deceased acquaintances. Alex continues to bond with the Jane Doe and Derek begins to suspect that Meredith was depressed. Pretty Little Liars Episode: Blood is the New Black Emily struggles to pass a test for English, but Ella completes it for her and gives her a good grade. Garrett tells Spencer that someone has them all fooled and that medical records don’t lie. Hanna continues to visit Mona, who is still catatonic. The Good Wife Episode: Affairs of State Alicia finds herself defending a young Taiwanese man, who may or may not have diplomatic immunity, when a young woman is found dead on a party boat. New first-year associate Caitlin proves instrumental in finding evidence. The Mentalist Episode: Cherry Picked While on the scene of a murder, the CBI uncovers a kidnapping and realize that there is a case of mistaken identity and the wrong couple has been kidnapped. Meanwhile, Jane investigates the disappearance of the last-known confederate of Red John. Touch Episode: Noosphere Rising Martin attempts to find Teller’s mysterious workshop and winds up aiding another professor, Logan, to win big at poker. Meanwhile, a young Italian man creates a viral video to track down the love of his life, whom he only met in passing.


?

Am I on a Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is not a touch screen, please see p. 86-87.

TELEVISION SUMMARIES |

entertainment

Touch Episode: Zone of Exclusion Following numbers from Jake, Martin helps reunite a French woman with her biological mother and twin sister, and then attempts to find the person responsible for their estrangement. Touch Episode: Music of the Spheres Martin exposes a corrupt parole officer, and a Brazilian street musician uses his guitar to win the heart of a beautiful woman. In addition, Jake bonds with another mute boy. Vegas Episode: Money Plays Ralph investigates the murder of a craps dealer. Mia Rizzo, a member of Savino’s mob family back in Chicago, is hired as the new count room manager. DISCOVERY Beyond the Cosmos Episode: Time Warp Do we actually know what ‘time’ really is? Travel back to the Big Bang, where physicists believe the secrets of time may be hidden. Engineering Connections Episode: Super Tanker Richard Hammond reveals the ingenious engineering required to transport hazardous cargo in some of the biggest vessels afloat. First Steps Episode: Episode 1 The world is an exciting place for any youngster. But there are pitfalls as well as thrills as they take their first steps. Whether on land or under water, these first steps in a young animal’s life will inform its understanding of the world. Fish Life Episode: The Race for Space Reefs are magnificent edifices, yet they still remain largely unknown. Even though it covers less than 1% of the sea floor, this ecosystem hosts about 25% of marine species. What is the origin of this natural structure? How is life organized there? Homes of Brazil Episode: Rio de Janeiro Though no longer the capital of Brazil, Rio de Janeiro is still the most emblematic city of the country. The thirst for modernity overrides the old buildings and the city of Rio now combines styles from different periods. It’s Christmas in the Savannah Episode: Episode 1 & 2 Christmas balls, tinsel in the trees and some improbable snow on the ground: This is the unexpected setting for this wildlife film shot in southern Africa during the Christmas period. Mankind: The Story of all of Us Episode: Inventors On a unique planet, a unique species takes its first steps: Mankind begins. We innovate to survive — discovering fire and farming; building cities and pyramids; and mastering the art of war.

MANKIND: THE STORY OF ALL OF US

Mankind: The Story of all of Us Episode: Iron Men A mysterious band of pirates plunders the Mediterranean coast — leaving destruction in its wake. Empires fall, but out of the chaos we discover iron. People power reshapes mankind. Megafactories Episode: Coca Cola Megafactories lifts the lid on how millions of your everyday products and iconic designs begin life on the assembly line. Nordic Wild Episode: Reborn As the bitter Arctic winter loosens its grip, Scandinavia’s animals emerge and the young explore their new home. Test Your Brain Episode: Memory An intricate series of interactive experiments to see how easily the brain can be fooled. In New York, a veteran NYPD detective challenges viewers to test their memories. The Abyssinian She-Wolf Episode: Episode 1 Despite their shrill howls, their fur like a fox’s and their resemblance to jackals, Abyssinian wolves are close cousins to European, Asian and American grey wolves. Discover the struggle of these endangered wolves. LIFESTYLE A Day in the Life Episode: Will.I.Am Go behind the scenes and into the life of producer, songwriter and superstar Will.I.Am. American Restoration Episode: Tyler’s Promotion Rick’s son Tyler gets promoted to shop foreman, however not everyone is quite as happy about this as he is…

Chefs Around the World Episode: Juan Amador, Germany A thrilling tour de cuisine – 14 countries, 14 chefs, 14 celebrities, hosted by Eckart Witzigmann. Fabulous Baker Brothers Episode: Season 1, Episode 2 The brothers are in London, making a beefeater burger, a pea soup with smoked eel and some gluten-free chestnut biscuits called ‘Queenies.’

Show Me Your Wardrobe Episode: Paloma Faith & Tali Lennox Fashion Moguls Jackie Dixon and Zara Martin meet songstress Paloma Faith and delve into her wardrobe of kooky fashion. Tech Toys 360 Episode: Episode 12 Travel to Top Marques in Monaco to discover the ultimate tech toy: the supercar, the Noble Automotive M600.

Heston’s Fantastical Foods Episode: Heston’s Giant Ice Cream Creative chef Heston Blumenthal creates the world’s largest ‘99’ cone, complete with chocolate flakes!

Videofashion Style Episode: Soulmates Intriguing creations – by Christian Louboutin, Nicholas Kirkwood and Sergio Rossi – for well-heeled fans.

How the Computer Became Personal Episode: N/A This documentary travels back to 1984, tracing stages of the computer up to the present day.

World of Tennis Episode: Episode 3 Matches from the ATP and WTA tours, interviews, features, news and updates on the sport.

Jamie’s 30 Minute Meals Episode: Rogan Josh Curry Jamie Oliver makes rogan josh curry with fluffy rice, carrot salad, poppadoms and flatbread.

Worldwide Sport Episode: Episode 13 A colorful spectrum of sports from around the globe. Meet the headlining sportspeople.

Journey into Wine Australia Episode: Melbourne’s Wine Regions Isabelle touches down in Melbourne and takes to the road to explore the state’s offering of pinot noirs. Paris Chic Episode: Haute Couture A close look at fashion over the past 15 years and what’s behind the glamougr of the fashion industry. Pawn Stars Episode: Wise Guys Sellers get some rude surprises, but a rare gold coin and a World War II armoured scout car look promising. Road to Rio Episode: Episode 6 Highlights the athletes that will play a part in the lead up to the 2016 Olympic Games.

DESTINATION GUIDES Globe Trekker Episode: Indonesia: Bali & Sulawesi Our traveler, Shilpa Mehta, explores two contrasting islands of Indonesia – Bali and Sulawes.

Globe Trekker Episode: South West China Traveler Justine Shapiro visits four of the 21 provinces in China – Guangxi, Guizhou, Yunnan and Sichuan. SHORTS My Strange Grandfather An adorable story of a child trying to understand the quirks and idiosyncrasies of her strange grandfather. Pet Hate A frustrated old pet-shop owner is constantly confounded by his pets who have decided that they don’t want to be sold… Reulf In black-and-white Paris, little creatures with a paintbrush decide to brighten up the city… Spy Fox When the world is threatened by an evil hammerhead shark bent on flooding the world, it’s up to SpyFox to stop him. Teeth A tale of two old friends, their teeth and a series of events that leaves them lost for words.

Globe Trekker Episode: Japan: Tokyo to Taiwan Using a combination of flights and ferries, Ian Wright takes us on an island-hop through the Southern Islands of Japan. Globe Trekker Episode: Philippines Traveler Shilpa Mehta visits the Philippines, beginning her journey at the giant statue of Marcos and finding out what life was like in the Philippines during his rule. november/december 2013

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| AUDIO

NOV-DEC BROADCAST CHANNELS MUSIC FROM ETHIOPIA Enjoy a channel alive with only the best songs from Ethiopia. Artists such as Haile Roots, Nati Haile and Reshad Kedir perform a collection of satisfying sounds epitomizing the harmonious talents of Ethiopia today.

NOV-DEC ALBUM COMPILATIONS ETHIOPIAN AFRICAN Enjoy a selection of albums brimming with sounds from the heart of Africa. Listen to collections from Yabba Funk, Victor Deme, Angelique Kidjo and many more.

ETHIOPIAN TRADITIONAL MUSIC (MUSIC FROM ETHIOPIA)

ETHIOPIAN INSTRUMENTAL Ethiopian Instrumental is an elaborate and expressive collection of instrumental pieces. Theodros Mitiku, Tilaye Gebre and The Express Band, among others, will soothe you completely through a mixture of their delicate and energetic sounds.

ALL THAT JAZZ All That Jazz is a concoction of every character within jazz. A handful of artists, such as Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole and Donald Byrd, give warming performances in this mix. From old classics to smooth contemporary, All That Jazz is sure to cover all corners of this nonchalant musical style. EASY LISTENING Easy Listening allows you to switch off and recline, as a very laid-back medley of tunes sing you into total serenity. Coldplay, Ed Sheeran and Lisa Hannigan perform their most soothing songs to help you completely repose.

Enjoy collections from some of the greatest artists in Ethiopia today. Artist like Jamboo Joote, Tikue Weldu and Mohammed Tawil. Sit back and appreciate.

ETHIOPIAN CLASSIC Here, enjoy albums full of world-renowned performers, orchestras and soloists, performing major works from some of history’s greatest composers: Bach, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven and many more.

ETHIOPIAN COUNTRY Here, a fusion of Country albums for you to enjoy. A range of artists, from Buddy Miller to Sara Evans, are here to share a collection of their hits with you.

ETHIOPIAN HIP HOP/R&B A melodic mix of Hip-Hop tunes and R&B hits, with a large selection of albums for you to listen to. This includes artists such as Snoop Dogg, Tinie Tempah and Jennifer Hudson.

CHART HITS Chart Hits is a channel solely dedicated to the latest chart-toppers in pop and rock. If you want to be up-to-speed with the most current hits in music today, then tune into Chart Hits, where Gotye, Lana Del Rey and Beyoncé will definitely activate your musical taste buds. COUNTRY This channel offers a blend of cooling Country sounds. With hits from both classic and modern artists, you are sure to experience the refreshing flavors of authentic country music. Jeff Bridges, Emmylou Harris and Lady Antebellum perform some of their best works for you today.

ETHIOPIAN INSTRUMENTAL Here, we offer an expressive and inspiring collection of Instrumental albums for you to enjoy.

ETHIOPIAN JAZZ From old classics to smooth contemporary, here you will find an excellent collection of Jazz albums. You’ll find every great Jazz musician, from Miles Davis to Billie Holiday to Louis Armstrong.

ETHIOPIAN KIDS WORLD HITS World Hits is an eclectic collection of music from all over the globe. This channel allows you to experience all ranges of talent in all ranges of music. Artists such as Salah Al Zadjali, Destra and Axelle Red take this opportunity to introduce you to their own personal worlds, through the medium of music. CLASSICAL COLLECTION Classical Collection showcases world-renowned performers, orchestras and soloists, performing major works from some of the best composers in history. The London Symphony Orchestra with Josef Krips, Walter Klien and the Württemberg Chamber Orchestra provide a classical assortment. CLASSIC ROCK Rife with roaring riffs and smooth bass lines, Classic Rock is a channel wholly dedicated to true rock n’ roll. Here, Pink Floyd, T. Rex and Jimi Hendrix play a handful of the greatest rock songs in history.

Here, a cheerful compilation of albums, full of upbeat songs for all your little ones to enjoy.

ETHIOPIAN OLDIES Enjoy taking a trip down memory lane through this extensive collection of nostalgic albums. This includes some of the greats, such as Al Green, Elvis Presley and Fleetwood Mac.

ETHIOPIAN POP If you’re looking for the latest hits, then enjoy this medley of the most current Pop albums out now. This includes albums from Beyonce, Lady Gaga and David Guetta.

ETHIOPIAN ROCK Relish in a sea of Rock, with albums from legendary rock n’ rollers to the latest stars of 2012 — Bob Dylan, The Strokes and The Black Keys.

GOLDEN OLDIES Take a walk down memory lane with a compilation of nostalgic hits. Golden Oldies presents R.E.M., Tina Turner and Duran Duran, who lead the way with a string of classics, taking you right back to when they were No. 1.

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ETHIOPIAN WORLD Here, enjoy a diverse collection of hit albums from all over the globe! Amplify your cultural consciousness through sounds from Ely Guerra, Ocean Hai and Oliver Haidt.


| Crossword

ACROSS hetypes 1 Quarrel

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| Sudoku

Selamta Magazine 11/13 Easythe Sudoku ToVery solve Sudoku puzzle, each row, PuzzleJunction.com

column and box must contain the numbers 1 to 9. Solutions on page 96. To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box

Selamta Magazine

9 2 3 1 7 5 2 6 1 7 8 9 4 3 2 7 4 2 8 5 11/13 Medium Sudoku 4 9 5 6

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Selamta Magazine 11/13 Hard Sudoku 9 6 8 5 3 1 2 4 7

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PuzzleJunction.com

| Puzzle Answers

Very EasySelamta Sudoku Magazine 11/13Solution PuzzleJunction.com Medium Sudoku

PuzzleJunction.com

Answers to puzzle from page 92.

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Copyright ©2013 PuzzleJunction.com

4 9 3 5 8 7 2 1 6

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Sudoku Solution 9 7 1 3 2 5 8 4 6

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6 1

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A C I T



Selamta November–December 2013