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M arc h /A pri l 2 0 13

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Lifting cover to come

the Veil Tracing the rich history of Ethiopia's Orthodox icons.

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“ My mobile saves my wife  and son’s life… ” ----- by Tefaye, a farmer from Eastern Africa

“If it was not for this mobile, I couldn’t have found the doctor who was far from my house when my wife started giving birth in a hurry and had labour difficulties. Now, you see, I can talk with anybody at anytime from anywhere. Even if I stay in my house, my coffee can be sold at a good price. I’m really grateful to my mobile, it not only brings me a little wealth but it has also saved my wife’s and my son’s lives.” ZTE is employing mobile and internet technologies to enhance access to, and the quality of, public services in Africa. More than 60  million african people are now enjoying the freedom and benefits of modern communications with ZTE mobile devices. As a global leader  in  telecom  solutions,  we  design  everything  specifically  to  meet  the  exact  needs  of  individual  operators  and  their  customers.  Begin  building the mobile devices your customers really need at www.zte.com.cn.


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selamta

Features On the Cover

A caretaker of Axum’s Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion reveals panels featuring the archangels Gabriel and Michael, believed to be several hundred years old.

Spirits in Paint

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Ethiopian icons from ancient times to today.

Joy Ride by Rickshaw

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2,000 miles through India on a tuk tuk.

Bases Loaded

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Uganda holds its own against the world — in Little League Baseball.

Marcus Samuelsson dons his chef coat for Red Rooster Harlem, the 2-year-old restaurant he opened in New York City.

Marcus Samuelsson

Meet the Ethiopian-Swedish-American chef and his latest restaurant venture, Red Rooster Harlem.

G E D IYO N K I F L E

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Selamta brings Africa to the world and the world to Africa. Join us online for more of the adventure of travel, the vitality of business and the richness of culture found in Ethiopia, Africa and the world.

contact editor@selamtamagazine.com, advertising@selamtamagazine.com facebook.com/selamtamagazine

twitter.com/selamtamagazine

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| Contents

Departments

5 from the ceo

6 news Awards, an anniversary and other announcements.

Panorama 11 Around Addis Discovering the capital’s thriving contemporary art scene. 14 commerce + capital Renewable energy and the continent's first city edition of Monopoly. 16 diplomacy + development Improving trade for local farmers, plus a deal to protect South Africa’s rhinos. 18 events + excursions Upcoming festivals in Hong Kong, Toronto and Washington, D.C. 20 Hotels + Hotspots Art Deco–style luxury in London, plus a recently restored hotel in Kuala Lumpur. 21 style + substance Amping up the iPhone and revamping São Paulo’s storm drains.

Spotlight 55 arts Kenyan quartet Sauti Sol dreams of greatness. 58 Wordsmith A review of AfroSF: Science fiction by African writers. 4

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59 TRAVEL TOOLS Essential cosmetic tips.

Sheba

60 24 Hours Maputo: Experiencing the rhythms and flavors of Mozambique. 62 Cuisine A vegetarian’s guide to Paris. 64 1,000 Words Return of the Walias. 66 Destination The wild, preserved beauty of Gabon. 68 Take 5 São Paulo’s downtown gems.

Fly Ethiopian

duty-free catalog Arguably the best African shopping in the sky — a selection of must-have items at duty-free prices.

71 travel tips In-flight exercises to keep you limber, helpful pointers for travel to Ethiopia, and a quick introduction to Amharic. 74 fleet 76 route maps 80 Sales and agents offices

Entertainment 85 movies, tv, audio 93 puzzles 96 Vintage A glimpse into the past.

M I CHAE L P O L I Z A / NAT I O NAL G E O G R AP H I C

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From the CEO |

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Welcome Aboard Dear Esteemed Customers,

ክቡራን ደንበኞቻች

nity is strength, division is weakness,” says a Swahili proverb. This is especially true in today’s globalized world and in the capital-intensive, skill-driven and hyper-competitive airline industry. The African Union kicked off the yearlong celebration of its 50th anniversary on 27 January 2013 under the theme PanAfricanism and African Renaissance. I would like to share with you a few thoughts on the concrete meaning of Pan-Africanism for Ethiopian Airlines, and why it is critical for the renaissance of the African airline industry. We were the first airline to start East-West Africa air connection with our flight to Lagos in 1960, at a time when foreign airlines did not even have Africa on their maps. We have served the continent in both good and bad times for more than 67 years and continued our operation even in the most difficult environments, often at great financial loss. We have always made Africa proud in aviation technology leadership by introducing the first jet services to the continent in December 1962, and by being first to operate the thenultramodern B767 in June 1984 and the B787 in August 2012. We have always opened the doors of our aviation schools to our fellow African brothers and sisters. In fact, one third of the graduates from our academy are from other African countries. We also avail critical aircraft maintenance services to African carriers at preferential rates. In short, Pan-Africanism and African integration are part of our corporate DNA, and this common objective cements our partnership with the African Union. Today, Africa is on the rise. Foreign investments and foreign airlines are flocking to the continent. Unfortunately, this African renaissance is not benefiting the African airline industry, which has a meager 18-percent market share of travel to and from the continent, and even this is declining. African economies are thriving, but foreign airlines are reaping the benefits. Africa not only must be a consumer base for the global economy, but it also can and must grow its own indigenous industries that are able to compete on the global stage. We will only be strong if we are united with clear policy direction and with strong partnerships among African airlines. Thank you for flying with us today. As always, we are eager to get your feedback on how we are doing. Have a pleasant flight!

ኢትዮዽያ አየር መንገድ ለመብረር እንኳን ደህና መጣችሁ አለም እንደ አንድ መንደር በሆነችበት እና በተለይም ግዙፍ የገንዘብ ፍሰት ፣ ሙያዊ ክህሎትና ውድድር የሚጠይቀውን የዘመናችንን የአየር ትራንስፖርት ኢንዱስትሪ ሁኔታ “ሕብረት ጉልበት ነው መከፋፈል ውድቀት ነው ” የሚለውን የኪስዋሂሊዎች አባባል እውነት አድርጎታል። የአፍሪካ ሕብረት ለአንድ አመት የሚቆየውን የድርጅቱን 50ኛ አመት የወርቅ እዮቤልዩ በአል አከባበር መርሀ ግብር “ፓን አፍሪካኒዝምና የአፍሪካ ህዳሴ” በሚል መሪ ቃል እ.ኤ.አ ጃንዋሪ 27 ቀን 2013 ዓ.ም በይፋ ጀምሯል። ፖን አፍሪካኒዝም የሚለው ጥልቅ ፅንሰ ሃሳብ ለኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድ ያለውን ልዩ ትርጉም እንዲሁም ለጠቅላላው የአፍሪካ አየር ትራንስፖርት ኢንዱስትሪ ህዳሴ ያለውን ፋይዳ በጥቂቱ ለመቃኘት እወዳለሁ። እ.ኤ.አ በ1960 ዓ.ም ወደ ሌጎስ በመብረር ሌሎች አየር መንገዶች ስለአፍሪካ በማያውቁበት ወቅት አህጉሪቱን ከምስራቅ ወደ ምዕራብ በማገናኘት የፈር ቀዳጅነት ሚና ተጫውተናል። በመልካምም ይሁን በአስቸጋሪ ሁኔታ ውስጥ አህጉራችንን እያገለገልን 67 አመታትን ያስቆጠርን ሲሆን አሁንም የገንዘብ ኪሳራና ሌሎች ተግዳሮቶችን ተቋቁመን አገልግሎት እየሰጠን እንገኛለን። በእነዚህ የአገልግሎት ግዜያት ውስጥ የአፍሪካ ኩራት በመሆን በመጀመሪያ እ.ኤ.አ በ1962 ዓ.ም በአህጉሪቱ ለመጀመሪያ ጊዜ የጀት በረራ አገልግሎት የጀመርን ሲሆን ቀጥሎም በ1984 ዓ.ም በግዜው እጅግ ዘመናዊና ትልቅ የነበረውን ቦይንግ 767 አውሮኘላን በማስመጣትና እንዲሁም እ.ኤ.አ በኦገስት 2012 ዓ.ም ዘመናዊውን ቦይንግ 787 ድሪምላይነር አውሮኘላን በመግዛትና አገልግሎት ላይ በማዋል መሪነታችንን አጠናክረናል። የአቪዬሽን ማሰልጠኛ ተቋማችን ለአፍሪካውያን ወንድሞቻችንና እህቶቻችን ሁልጊዜ ክፍት ነው። ከተቋማችን ተመርቀው ከሚወጡት ተማሪዎች ውስጥ 1/3ኛ የሚሆኑት ከሌሎች የአፍሪካ ሀገሮች የሚመጡ ናቸው። ለአህጉሪቱ አየር መንገዶችም ጥራቱን የጠበቀ የአውሮኘላን ጥገና አገልግሎት በተመጣጣኝ ዋጋ እንሰጣለን። በአጭሩ ፖን አፍሪካኒዝም እና የአፍሪካ ጥምረት የኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድ ዋነኛ አካል በመሆናቸው ይህ የጋራ ግብ ከአፍሪካ ህብረት ጋር ያለንን ግንኙነት ይበልጥ ያጎለብተዋል። አፍሪካ ዛሬ በማደግ ላይ ናት። የውጭ ኢንቨስትመንት እንዲሁም ከአፍሪካ ውጭ ያሉ አየር መንገዶች ወደ አህጉሪቷ እየጎረፉ ነው። እንደ አለመታደል ሆኖ ይህ የአፍሪካ ህዳሴ የአህጉሪቱን 18በመቶ የገበያ ድርሻ ብቻ የሚሸፍነውን የአፍሪካን የአየር ትራንስፖርት ኢንዱስትሪ እየጠቀመ አይደለም። የአፍሪካ ኢኮኖሚ እያደገ ቢሆንም በአብላጫው እየተጠቀሙ የሚገኙት ግን የውጭ አየር መንገዶች ናቸው። አፍሪካ የበለፀጉ ሀገሮች ምርቶች ተቀባይ ብቻ ሳትሆን በራሷ ብቁና ተወዳዳሪ የሆኑ ኢንዱስትሪዎችንም ማስፋፋት ይኖርባታል። የአፍሪካ አየር መንገዶች ጠንካራና ተወዳዳሪ ሆነን መቀጠል የምንችለው ግልፅ የሆነ የእድገት አቅጣጫ በመያዝና እርስ በርሳችን ተቀራርበን ህብረት መፍጠር ስንችል ነው። ዛሬም የበረራ ምርጫችሁ ስላደረጋችሁን እናመሰግናለን። እንደተለመደው ስለአገልግሎታችን የምትሰጡንን አስተያየት በጉጉት እንጠብቃለን። መልካም በረራ!

“U

Tewolde GebreMariam

Chief Executive Officer, Ethiopian Airlines march/april 2013

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| News

Tewolde GebreMariam, Ethiopian Airlines CEO (center), brings honor to the airline with yet another award.

African Business Leader of the Year Last December, Ethiopian Airlines’ CEO, Tewolde GebreMariam, won the “African Business Leader of the Year” award from the Corporate Council on Africa. The award was presented at a gala dinner in Washington, D.C., in the presence of more than 300 U.S. and African business leaders, ambassadors and U.S. government officials. CCA is the premier American organization devoted to U.S.-Africa business relations. Its members number 180 companies, which represent nearly 85 percent of total U.S. private sector investments in Africa. CEO Tewolde was recognized for making Ethiopian the best-run airline in Africa, while turning it into a true international carrier. He was also recognized for his

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support of U.S.-Africa trade, evidenced not only by the nature of Ethiopian Airlines’ business, but also by being the first carrier on the continent to buy the most advanced airliner, the Boeing 787-Dreamliner. “This award is, first and foremost, a tribute to the competence and hard work of all Ethiopian employees,” Tewolde said. “It encourages us to work even harder to achieve the objectives in our Vision 2025 and to serve our beloved continent with greater commitment and dedication.” Ethiopian is in the third year of implementation of its 15-year strategic roadmap, Vision 2025, which will see it become the leading aviation group in Africa, with seven profit centers grossing total revenue of US$10 billion, by 2025.


News |

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International Diamond Prize for Excellence Happy Anniversary!

In December 2012, Ethiopian Airlines received its sixth international award of the year: the International Diamond Prize for Excellence in Quality, from the European Society for Quality Research. Ethiopian won the award for its commitment to quality, excellence and continuous improvement. Esayas Woldemariam, senior vice president of global sales, received the award on behalf of Ethiopian during the ceremony held in Brussels.

Ethiopian Airlines celebrated its firstyear anniversary as a Star Alliance member on December 13, 2012. And airline officials shared the celebration with passengers — awarding round-trip tickets and other prizes. “Through the Star Alliance network, the largest in the world,” announced CEO Tewolde GebreMariam, “our customers are enjoying a seamless travel experience to over 193 countries, earning and redeeming miles on frequent-flier programs of member airlines, getting access to more than 990 lounges, and benefiting from more coordinated schedules.” Ethiopian’s membership in Star Alliance has enabled its customers to benefit from connections to 1,358 airports on one of 21,956 daily flights offered by member airlines.

New Destinations Ethiopian Airlines will commence three weekly flights each to two new destinations, starting March 31, 2013: Blantyre, Malawi — commercial and industrial capital of Malawi. Blantyre will be Ethiopian’s 44th destination in Africa and the second destination in Malawi, after Lilongwe. Ndola, Zambia — third-largest city in Zambia and industrial and commercial capital center. Ndola will be Ethiopian’s 45th African destination. It will also be the second destination in Zambia, after Lusaka. These new destinations mark one more step toward accomplishing the airline’s goal of connecting Africa to the world as the flagship carrier of Africa.

noteworthy

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45 Ce l e b r at i n g 50 Years

› Did you know that Ethiopian Airlines is the fastest-growing airline in Africa, with a 16-percent average growth in passengers over the past five years, and a 25-percent growth in the 2011–2012 fiscal year?

› Did you know that Ethiopian Airlines serves 72 international and 17 domestic destinations? Our international destinations include 45 in Africa (outside Ethiopia), 18 in the Middle East and Asia, and nine in Europe and North America.

› Did you know that, in addition to the major hub in Addis Ababa, Ethiopian Airlines also has a secondary hub, in Lomé, Togo? Ethiopian partners with ASKY, a multinational private airline based in Lomé, to better connect West Africa with Ethiopian’s worldwide network.

African Union

At the Heads of State and Government of the African Union summit in January, AU leadership called upon Africans to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the continental organization in 2013, which was designated as the Year of PanAfricanism and African Renaissance. Ethiopian Airlines will be joining others across the continent in commemorating this momentous occasion with various events and activities throughout the year. march/april 2013

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| About

Contributors Volume 30 | Number 2

Tim Bascom is the author of Chameleon Days, a memoir about his childhood in Ethiopia, as well as a number of travel pieces — including about his honeymoon going awry in London, finding unexpected peace at an Indonesian temple, and understanding his father better through a shared trip to the ancient churches of Lalibela. He teaches creative writing at the University of Missouri. See “Spirits in Paint” on p. 22. Rooted in: Iowa (USA) Can’t travel without: “A 20-year-old green travel holster that has been everywhere with me — from Nepal to Swaziland. It hangs from my belt and gives me quick access to my passport, extra cash and a notebook."

Lolis Eric Elie is executive story editor for the AMC show “Hell on Wheels,” author of Smokestack Lightning: Adventures in the heart of barbecue country, and producer of the PBS documentary ≠≠≠. His food writing has appeared in Saveur, Gourmet, Food Arts, The Oxford American and the Art of Eating. See his profile on Ethiopian chef Marcus Samuelsson on p. 34. Rooted in: New Orleans (USA) Can’t travel without: Noise-canceling headphones. “I can hear in-flight movies more clearly or pretend to be listening to music if I want to tune out.”

Selamta — meaning “Greetings” in Amharic — is published bimonthly on behalf of Ethiopian Airlines by JourneyGroup+C62, LLC. JourneyGroup+C62, LLC 418 Fourth Street, NE TK Building Charlottesville, VA 22902 Office #102 U.S.A. Bole Road +001 434 961 2500 (phone) Addis Ababa, Ethiopia +001 434 961 2507 (fax) +251 116 180365 (phone) EXECUTIVE GROUP Managing Director Executive Editor Creative Director

Philip De Jong Amanuel Mengistu Greg Breeding

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Photography Editor Associate Editor Sr. Writer/Photog. Writer/Researcher Researcher Editorial Assistant

Diane J. McDougall Phil De Jong Jr. Jodi Macfarlan Ron Londen Hope Mills Kalkidan Mulugeta Tsega Negussie

DESIGN Design Director Digital Director Production Designer

Mike Ryan Zack Bryant Lindsay Gilmore

PRODUCTION

Gediyon Kifle is an award-winning photographer who has traveled throughout Africa, Asia and the United States photographing subjects ranging from food to music to lifestyle. He collaborated with Marcus Samuelsson on two books, En Smakresa: Middagstips and The Soul of a New Cuisine, which received the James Beard Foundation Award for Best International Cookbook. See “Marcus Samuelsson” on p. 34. Rooted in: Washington, D.C. Can’t travel without: “My camera.”

Production Director Lead Developer Production/Sales Printing

Brad Uhl Josh Bryant Belsabe Girma Emirates Printing, Dubai

EDITORIAL BOARD Mengistu Adelahu Philip De Jong Tsedenia Tadesse Diane J. McDougall Henok Teferra Amanuel Mengistu

ADVERTISING Journeygroup+c62, LLC International sales

Roxanne Robbins spent a majority of her career in Washington, D.C., as a public relations specialist and sports journalist reporting onlocation from the White House, seven Summer and Winter Olympics, the Super Bowl and the Little League World Series. Roxanne now directs Tukutana — the nonprofit she founded to provide resources for East African children and communities. See “Bases Loaded” on p. 48. Rooted in: Kampala, Uganda Can’t travel without: “Packing cubes, to neatly compartmentalize the items in my check-in and carry-on luggage.”

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Azariah Mengistu TK Building Office #102 Bole Road Addis Ababa, Ethiopia +251 116 180365 (phone) +251 116 180367 (fax) azariah@C62media.com

North America Sales

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As the continent’s premier carrier and a member of the prestigious Star Alliance, Ethiopian Airlines brings Africa to the world and the world to Africa. Selamta does the same, celebrating the adventure of travel, the vitality of Africa’s role in global business affairs, and the richness of culture across all of Ethiopian Airline’s many, varied destinations. This complimentary copy is yours to keep. While every care is taken to ensure accuracy, the publisher and Ethiopian Airlines assume no liability for error or omissions in this publication. All advertisements are taken in good faith, and the opinions and views contained herein are not necessarily those of the publisher. All copyrights and trademarks are recognized. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without written permission by the publisher. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review. © 2013.

L I N DSAY G I L M O R E / J O U R N E YG RO U P

Candace Rose Rardon is a travel writer, photographer and sketch artist from the state of Virginia (USA). She recently completed her master’s in travel writing from London’s Kingston University and celebrated by driving an auto-rickshaw across India. Thankfully, she lived to write about it. See “Joy Ride by Rickshaw” on p. 42. Rooted in: Delhi, India Can’t travel without: “My sketchbook.”


The Power of Friendship


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co m p i l e d by h o p e m i l l s

panorama around addis 11 | commerce + capital 14 |

dIplomacy + development 16 | events + excursions 18 | hotels + hotspots 20 | style + substance 21

Around Addis

Artist-owned contemporary art spaces by Tsega N egussie

To discover Addis Ababa’s thriving contemporary art scene, begin with the following artist-owned art studios and galleries:

S E LO D I E G AI L L AR D

eyoum Ayalew is a contemporary artist whose art focuses on capturing reallife moments. His style is primarily realistic, with touches of expressionism, and he emphasizes traditional practices in hopes of preserving them. Seyoum is also a prominent spokesperson for the arts, having served as an arts and culture panelist at the World Economic Forum and currently serving as president of the Ethiopian Visual Arts Association.  for more of our picks, turn to page 12.

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Around Addis

abiyalew assefa

Abiyalew Assefa is a household name among art lovers and connoisseurs in Addis. After graduating from Addis Ababa University’s School of Fine Arts with a degree in graphic design, Abiyalew has been creating captivating paintings for the last 15 years that focus on nature and tradition. Abiyalew’s artwork can be found hanging in many prominent places, including the office of Ethioipa’s former prime minister. He is currently working on a 35-painting rendition of the beloved classic Amharic novel Fikir Eske Mekabir.

neTSa Art Village

Netsa Art Village is an art space unlike any other in Ethiopia. Appropriately named (Netsa means “free” in Amharic), this gallery is an outdoor parklike space where artists come to find inspiration or a quiet place to work. Although it has only been open for four years, this 48-square-meter space has become a safe haven for artists and art lovers alike. Started by 15 graduates of Addis Ababa University’s School of Fine Arts, the art village currently has 13 active artists who produce everything from sculptures to paintings to mixed media. Referred to as a “live contemporary art museum,” Netsa allows visitors to witness the process of art as it is created. 

Yoseph habtemariam

Yoseph Habtemariam is a successful contemporary artist who, in addition to painting, teaches art to young children at the Russian Center for Culture and Science in Addis Ababa’s Piazza district. Yoseph has traveled around the world showcasing his work in more than 20 locations. 12

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Semien Art Studio is an art gallery run by three friends: Abdulkader Mohammed, Kaleb Birhanu and Yacob Bizuneh. Tucked away in Piazza, this artistic gem opened nine years ago as primarily a place for these young artists to showcase their work. The wide variety of paintings on display range in style from realism to impressionism to expressionism. Through their work, the artists aim to shed light on the ups and downs of everyday Ethiopian life and to paint a picture of how they see the future of the country. 

( AL L ) E LO D I E G AI L L AR D

Semien art Studio


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Commerce + Capital

revolutionary rims

monopolizing lagos

The first-ever African city edition of Monopoly, the Parker Brothers’ classic realestate board game, has landed in Lagos. Though Morocco and South Africa have their own editions of the game, Lagos is the first African city to be featured in a customized edition, including Banana Island as the highest-price property and Kirikiri jail — the city’s maximum-security prison — as the “Go to Jail” card destination.

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Generating ghana

Blue Energy, a renewable-energy company based in the U.K., has developed a plan to construct the largest photovoltaic solar power plant in Africa. This project has been made possible in part by Ghana’s renewable energy law, which will grant a feed-in tariff to the company for 20 years. Once the plant is completed, Ghanaians will benefit from a 6-percent increase in Ghana’s generating capacity and from electricity being delivered to more than 100,000 houses.

FAMILY TIES

The beginning of 2013 brought new family ties between Addis Ababa and New Delhi, as Mayors Kuma Demeksa and Meera Aggarwal signed a twinning agreement that deemed the two capitals sister cities. This relationship allows for a sharing of unique insights into park management, small- and micro-enterprise development, and health and municipal services. Nearly 400 Indian companies are currently working in Ethiopia in the fields of information, communications technology and commercial agriculture.

( TO P ) MAT T PAM E R / J O U R N E YG RO U P, ( BOT TO M L E F T AN D BOT TO M R I G H T ) ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P

Soon, glasses may not be solely for those with bad eyesight. Augmented-reality glasses are becoming more than just a futuristic dream, as companies like Microsoft and Apple have been granted patents on spectacles that would stream additional information while the viewer simultaneously watches a live performance. Some of the features of these glasses could include instant replay, song lyric download and language translation.


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Diplomacy + Development

the golden horn

The number of South African rhinos poached in 2012 doubled from 2010’s number. The reason? The horn. It’s particularly valuable for creating traditional Asian medicines. Buyers, especially in Vietnam, are willing to pay black-market prices of roughly US$65,000 per kg. But tides are turning, as South Africa and Vietnam recently signed a deal that would position Vietnam to help protect South Africa’s biodiversity, including its rhinos. The deal will remain in effect — with coordinators from both sides helping to implement initiatives — for the next five years.

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( TO P left and bottom ) ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P

making of a mascot

You’ll likely recognize the friendly hippo mascot from the 29th Africa Cup of Nations, but what about the 13-year-old behind its creation? Tumelo Nkoana is an elementary-school student in Gauteng, a northern province of South Africa, who loves to draw. His winning “Takuma” mascot design was chosen from 182 other entries in a countrywide contest. The name “Takuma” comes from a schoolyard term, ntakukuma, which refers to someone who loses a game and yet comes back as a winner.

Roads to Success

The Tanzanian government is taking on a massive road construction project in hopes of improving trade for local farmers. Six major roads in the Katavi and Rukwa regions are getting a facelift in order to provide farmers access to markets in Malawi, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Living Longer Men and women are living longer than they were in 1970 — 11 additional years for men and 12 for women — according to a recent five-year international research project at the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. The findings bring especially good news for women in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Spain, who can expect to live longer than 70 years, in good health. In some ways, this means rethinking the “golden years.” Is 70 the new 50?


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Events + Excursions

A few festivals to look forward to this year — whether you’re in town for a business trip or a quick vacation.

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March 20–April 14, 2013

Cherry Blossom Festival, Washington, D.C. This annual festival, which celebrates friendship between the United States and Japan, coincides with the blooming of D.C.’s cherry trees — originally a gift from the mayor of Tokyo in 1912. More than 1.5 million people visit during bloom season to admire the pink and white blossoms.

www.yolyhotel.com tel (011.25111) 663.2828 p.o.box 5668 Addis Ababa

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( L E F T TO R I G H T ) L AS Z LO I LYE S , P H I L B R E N N E N

may 2013

January–April 2013

Cheung Chau Bun Festival, Hong Kong Cheung Chau is one of Hong Kong’s oldest islands. It’s also home to a unique festival dedicated to Pak Tai, the Taoist god of the sea. At midnight on May 17 (Buddha’s birthday, a public holiday), competitors climb towers — some up to 20 meters (60 feet) high — made of sweet buns, grabbing buns along the way for luck. If you prefer to stay grounded, you can still enjoy parades and the colorful fishing boats dotting the harbor. selamta.co/bunfestival

june 10-16, 2013

North by Northeast Festival, Toronto Toronto plays host to the 18th annual North by Northeast Festival. Whether you’re a film buff, music lover, app developer, marketer or tech guru, you’ll find something here to make you think. See the lineup of events and panels at selamta.co/nxne.

On board. Online. On the go. From your seat back to your smartphone, Selamta goes where you go. Selamta and Ethiopian Airlines: travel companions for life’s journey. Visit SelamtaMagazine.com


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Hotels + Hotspots

four seasons: keeping travelers connected

Knowing that travel isn’t always for pleasure, the Four Seasons is making it much easier for business guests to stay plugged in and connected. All house cars provided by the hotel company worldwide are now equipped with complimentary Wi-Fi connections, enabling guests to travel around town while charging phones, sending emails or working on spreadsheets — all before arriving at a desk.

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Kuala Lumpur: The Majestic Hotel Originally built in the 1930s, The Majestic was transformed from a hotel to the National Art Gallery in 1984. But last December, the hotel reopened, fully restored. The 300 rooms boast wooden floors and a cozy butterscotch wall coloring. With a spa, café, restaurant, tea lounge and bar, you won’t have many reasons to leave the premises.

( bottom left and right ) CO U RT E SY O F T H E WE L L E SL E Y, CO U RT E SY O F T H E MA J E ST I C H OT E L

London: The Wellesley

Step back into the roaring ’20s when you open the Art Deco–styled doors of The Wellesley. With crystal chandeliers, mirrored paneling and plenty of plush furnishings, this 36-room hotel also has a jazz lounge that plays host to known and soon-to-be-known artists. In addition, the U.K.’s largest custom-made humidor lives on the heated cigar terrace just outside the hotel’s Italianstyle Oval Restaurant.


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Style + Substance

classic cookbook With three London locations, Polpo restaurants have earned high praise from the local restaurant scene — and even won the Michelin Guide’s Bib Gourmand designation for two consecutive years. Now, there’s a cookbook designed as beautifully as the restaurants’ simple Italian menu. Using old Venetian typefaces and a spineless format (much easier to read from the kitchen counter), the pages tell a story with words, images and recipes. The mouth-watering cookbook won the U.K.’s Waterstones Book of the Year in 2012. Order a copy: selamta.co/polpo

Amp Your iPhone Designed and made in Italy using clay from one of the Renaissance’s ceramic epicenters, the Natural Acoustics iPhone Amplifier projects using horn acoustics — no batteries required! The amplifier’s shape mirrors the curvature of a horn, so you’ll get sound the all-natural way. selamta.co/amp

( CLO CKWISE F RO M TO P ) CO U RT E SY O F P R AL I N E , CARO L E B U SCH MAN N , CO U RT E SY O F E N & IS , CO U RT E SY O F 6 E M E IA

city pop art

Thanks to two local street artists (known collectively as 6emeia), many hours and countless cans of paint, São Paulo’s storm drains and manhole covers are now quite a bit more interesting. Revamping the urban elements with colorful paintings of animals, games, popsicles and more, the duo covered all the bases with their pop art.

metal master

Ghanaian sculptor El Anatsui first gained international attention at the Venice Biennale in 2007 with the metal tapestry he draped over a museum using thousands of bottle tops. Since then, he’s exhibited all over the world. He uses local materials and is strongly influenced by the indigenous art of his native Ghana. He also adds a personal touch when he sends work to galleries: He never tells curators how to hang his unique pieces, but rather leaves it up to them. It allows them to be artists, too, he explains. march/april 2013

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S p i r i t s i n Pa i n t Ethiopian icons from ancient times to today. Ethiopia’s incredible heritage of visual art has earned the nation international recognition. Short figures in patterned robes, wide almond-shaped eyes, and a palette of bright yellows, reds and greens — these are just a few of the visual features that have become identified with Ethiopian culture, appearing on everything from book covers to restaurant menus.

Such elements are, in fact, borrowed

from religious images deep in Ethiopia’s medieval past, although they continue to appear in paintings created by modern artists who stick to the traditional style, working on wooden panels and parchment like their predecessors.

b y

T i m

B a s c o m

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p h o t o s

b y

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d e

j o n g

j r .

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(Previous spread) An almost life-size portrait of St. George, patron saint of Ethiopia, (painted on leather) hangs in Bet Meskel, one of the rock-hewn churches of Lalibela.

Stroll the souvenir shops on Churchill Avenue in Addis Ababa, right across from the Main Post Office, and you will find dozens of newly painted icons ready for sale. Or visit the home of an Orthodox family, where you are likely to spot at least one of the modern-day images on the walls. In fact, devout Orthodox families sometimes set apart a whole room where members can retreat to light candles and pray before selected paintings on saints’ days. To learn about the history of Ethiopian icon-making is to learn about the history of the entire nation — and an easy starting place is the Ethnographic Museum of the Institute of Ethiopian Studies on the grounds of Addis Ababa University. If you have the opportunity, however, why not go right to the source, visiting one of the ancient monasteries scattered across the country? You are almost sure to be rewarded by an encounter with a true “original”: a wide-eyed, robed character painted in the 13th or 14th century who still glimmers back at you in distinctive red and yellow, staring as if to say, “I have been here all along. What about you?” To get to the highly acclaimed monasteries at Lake Tana, you’ll have to drive 11 hours north from Addis Ababa, and then hire a boat. Alternatively, from the mountain town of Lalibela, you can reach the oldest monastery by riding a mule two hours up a steep, rocky slope.


And then there is the famous Debre Damo monastery, occupying a fortress-like plateau east of Axum. A visit there requires being lifted straight up a cliff. The founder of the latter site was a sixth-century Syrian monk who could not have climbed the cliffs if not for a fabled python who hoisted him, becoming a sinuous feature in subsequent icons. Today, monks do all the lifting, but the rope they use requires nearly as much faith as trusting the python, being hand-pleated from worn leather. Once on top, you will be amazed by remarkable wood carvings, painted ceilings, bronze processional crosses and illuminated manuscripts that link you right back to one of the most beloved leaders of the early Orthodox Church, Abune Aregawi — a determined pilgrim who somehow traveled by sailboat and foot all the way from Damascus to this remote mountaintop more than 1,500 years ago. Centuries-old craft

Getatchew Haile, an expert on Ethiopian religious literature, explains that one of the earliest icons painted by native artisans in Ethiopia was likely a copy of an eighth-century image of the Virgin Mary, mother of Jesus, which was kept at a convent in distant Syria.

Ancient and modern (clockwise from left): A priest of the Debre Damo monastery pauses before an illustrated manuscript depicting the Virgin Mary and infant Jesus. In Axum, a similar icon is protected by a sheer fabric. In shops across the country, various elements can be purchased for use in private devotion.

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In medieval Ethiopian monasteries, the main rule was to “copy faithfully.” Because these artists were copying paintings brought from the Holy Land, they felt that the images might be real pictures of actual people and so did not want to deviate.

(Both photos) Heading to Mass, a priest ascends a leather rope up a steep cliffside — the only way to access Axum’s Debre Damo monastery. Supplies and tourists are hoisted up from above.

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This primal icon was believed to sweat miracle-working oil, and according to the illustrated Miracles of Mary kept in Lalibela, 12 Ethiopian priests went expressly to view the painting. Upon sighting the sacred object ensconced in a canopied window, dripping oil into an alabaster bowl, they became so enamored that, as the author of the book of miracles describes, “They started . . . clapping with their hands and tapping with their feet. They went round the icon of Our Lady Mary with a bright heart and with joyous mind, skipping before it like a calf.” Medieval Ethiopia might have remained cut off from the larger world, due to the Red Sea and a formidable ring of mountains. By the 14th century, however, King Dawit had sent an ambassador all the way across the Mediterranean to Venice, asking for a painter to train local icon makers. Eventually, a school of Ethiopian iconography formed under the most skilled of the local painters, Fre Seyon, who brought a wonderful Eastern sensibility to the work, offsetting simple human features with rippling, patterned clothing. In medieval Ethiopian monasteries, just as in European monasteries, monks were often trained to work in scriptoriums, where they copied religious texts and painted icons. The main rule, as Getatchew Haile points out, was to “copy faithfully.”


Since these artists were copying straight from paintings brought from the Holy Land, they felt that the images might be real pictures of actual people, including not only the Virgin Mary and Jesus, but also apostles and saints. As a result, they did not want to deviate. With each subsequent generation, the same reverence was shown so that, for example, Mary and the baby Jesus have continued to be pictured in the same time-honored fashion: caught in an intimate embrace as the baby lifts one hand to the mother’s heart or chin. Likewise, they have remained flanked by the same winged archangels, Michael and Gabriel, who typically peer at the pair intently, swords raised for protection. Naturally, as local Ethiopian saints became canonized, a greater degree of artistic freedom became possible. As a result, the contemporary visitor is likely to recognize a delightful set of indigenous figures, such as beloved Tekle Haymanot, who was said to have stood praying so long that one of his legs broke, forcing him to stand one-legged. Or Gäbrä Mänfäs Qeddus, who was known to wander in the wilderness clothed by nothing but his hair, represented as a tangled drape. He felt a deep compassion for wild animals, so he is typically pictured with lions and leopards at his sides.

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Two children watch over their goats on the lush, rural outskirts of Axum, in the shadow of the clifftop Abba Pentalewon monastery.


A priest reads from his Bible outside Bet Abba Libanos, one of the ancient rockhewn churches of Lalibela.

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M e a n i n g i n t h e pa i n t

Even in ancient times, such attention-grabbing images caused controversy, especially if they were attributed with miraculous powers. In part because of this phenomenon, the role of icons has been misunderstood by people outside Ethiopia, insists Dr. Ralph Lee, a professor at Holy Trinity Theological College in Addis Ababa. As he explains, Ethiopian Christians — who are members of the Oriental branch of Orthodox Christianity — have always been comfortable with mystery. In the Protestant West, Professor Lee maintains, spirit and body tend to be kept neatly separate, whereas in the East everything is spiritual, body included. Ethiopian icons, like the figure of Jesus whom they depict, are a paradoxical attempt to represent spiritual reality physically. “Everything the iconographer does has meaning,” Professor Lee explains. “For instance, they always start with dark colors and move to light.” “The eyes are always bigger,” Getachew Haile adds. “Good people’s faces are seen fully, but bad people are seen sideways, in profile. Also, bad people are always given ugly faces.”


A priest of the Asheten Mariam monastery — located a threehour hike uphill from Lalibela — carefully displays an illustrated Bible. (Below) Worshippers join a pre-dawn religious procession through Axum’s main square.

C u r r e n t- d ay i c o n o g r a p h y

For nearly a thousand years now, Ethiopian artists have been giving distinctive form to religious images, whether painting on rock walls or cured hides, and that tradition has certainly not ended. Making icons remains an important vocation. Some of the new artists have little formal training and paint only for the commercial market, producing images that cater to foreign interests — for example, some depict the celebrated Queen of Sheba (also known as Makeda), who bore King Solomon a son named Menelik, thought to have brought the Hebrew Ark of the Covenant to Ethiopia. Others have more traditional training, such as Gebre Merha, an artist in Addis Ababa who was raised in Axum, considered by some to be the cultural heart of Ethiopia. Gebre apprenticed under his grandfather, Yohannes, a priest who painted for churches at Axum and at the clifftop monastery of Debre Damo. Gebre recalls fondly how his grandfather used to prepare black paint from the wood-smoke carbon that accumulated on cooking pots. “Art was built up inside my blood and soul,” he says. “I was brought up in premises where the air always smelled of painting colors.”

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Today, Gebre carves and paints on wood supplied by his siblings back in Axum or on canvas and animal hides. He tends to focus on the figures of Mary and Jesus, capturing biblical events. However, he also produces popular saints like St. George, the Syrian dragon-slayer who became prominent in Ethiopia after an important battle in 1896, when colonial Italian forces invaded Ethiopia. After defeating the Italians at Adwa, some of the Ethiopian troops claimed they had been rallied by a mysterious warrior on a white horse: St. George himself. In Ethiopian icons, St. George is generally featured on the inside of a hinged cover that can be opened to reveal Mary and the baby Jesus. Once opened, this cover shows the knight on his horse, spearing a writhing serpent. Behind him in a tree is the maiden he has rescued, but his eyes are fixed on the far panel where Mary holds the baby Jesus. To spend time contemplating such a painting is to look through a window — a portal to Ethiopia’s remarkable past — connecting viewers to the master painter Fre Seyon and his 14th-century Italian tutors, to cliff-climbing Aregawi being lifted by a python, or even to the eighth-century image of Mary that dripped healing oil into an alabaster bowl in Syria. Whether you find the paintings at a museum or monastery, or on the wall of someone’s home, you will be invited back in history, and each visit is worth the time spent.

You can see Gebre Merha’s current work at his website (ethioicons-gebre.com) or arrange a visit to his home studio in Addis Ababa, where he still mixes his own paints using ash, red soil and dried leaves (+251-911-6201-19 or gebre.merha@yahoo.com). Pieces range from US$100 to several thousand dollars, depending on materials and size. The key, as Gebre insists, is to buy work that has been done on well-prepared hides that don’t curl or on densely grained wood that has been fully cured.

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To spend time contemplating such a painting is to look through a window — a portal to Ethiopia’s remarkable past.

Gebre Merha — an Addis Ababa–based artist — carries on his family's icon-making tradition, creating paintings such as the one at left, depicting the death of Jesus.


Meet the Ethiopian-SwedishAmerican chef and his new restaurant home in Harlem. by Lolis Eric Elie Photos by Gediyon Kifle

To

understand Marcus Samuelsson, you must check out his newest venture, Red Rooster Harlem. Both the man and the restaurant are an integration of the dominant artistic aesthetic of our time: assemblage. • Whether you are talking about the mix of found objects and classical techniques in the visual arts, the meeting of Oriental and Occidental in current fashion, the use of sampled beats in contemporary music, or the increasing importance of fish sauce, miso paste and chili peppers on menus the world over, artists these days are largely defined by the ways in which they corral disparate influences into a cogent personal statement. • This approach is the essence of Marcus Samuelsson as chef, restaurateur and man. march/april 2013

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Look at the chef himself. That face is classic Ethiopian, but and Romare Bearden. Here wrote Langston Hughes, James that modified Mohawk haircut is neo-American. The black-and- Baldwin and Ralph Ellison. Here played Duke Ellington, gold patterned trousers are chef’s pants — working clothes for Thelonious Monk and James Brown. The legacies of these men a man in his profession. The combination of black vest with — the musicians in particular — are guiding lights to artists vertical red stripes, the black tie with bright horizontal stripes throughout the black world. It is this rich legacy that Samuelsson wants to be part of. and the purple checkered shirt, however, could be Saville Row “Harlem has this incredible mystique,” he explains. “I want to be or Milan runway. But if Samuelsson is going for a formal look with the tie and sure that its food aspirations are as important as its art aspiravest, why is he wearing gold lamé sneakers? And that Red Roost- tions and music credentials.” Even the name, Red Rooster, is a vestige of old Harlem. As er chef’s coat is no chef’s coat at all, but a dark blue denim shirt with an embroidered restaurant logo. Yet somehow these dispa- he researched, Samuelsson kept coming across references to the legendary neighborhood speakeasy: “down rate elements form a coherent whole. at the Rooster” or “down at the Roo.” It helps that Samuelsson’s wife, Maya “It was where the ball players went,” Haile, is a fashion model, born in Ethiopia he says, “but it was also where [the late and professionally attuned to such details. Congressman] Adam Clayton Powell held “She inspects me every morning before I court. And there was also this common levleave the house,” says Samuelsson, 43. el of the everyday person. That’s the spirit Although his style generates conversathat I wanted. Those multiple facets.” tions, place has been the signature detail of “I want to be sure There is live music most nights of the Marcus Samuelsson’s identity. Even those that Harlem's food week at Red Rooster, either upstairs in who don’t know the chef’s name can recaspirations are as the Nook or downstairs at Ginny’s Supper ognize him by the itinerary of his life: born Club. The walls are filled with the work of in Ethiopia, raised in Sweden, first gained important as its young visual artists, most of whom have fame at New York’s Aquavit restaurant. art aspirations and lived or worked in Harlem, such as Sanford But with Red Rooster Harlem, Samuelsson music credentials.” Biggers, Lorna Simpson, Gary Simmons is identifying himself with his location and Rebekah Maysles. more intimately than ever before. Marcus Samuelsson One wall of the Nook area is lined Aquavit was Swedish before he got with bookshelves on which sit jars of there, and though he may have improved Chapman Farm pickles and Druvan klassisk the quality of the food, he didn’t make the sas gravlax (cured salmon), among other place more Scandinavian. Two of his other specialties. Other shelves hold cookbooks, restaurants — Riingo and Merkato — were based on foods of specific regions, but neither had any particular such as Samuelsson’s New American Table and Jean-Georges affinity for the New York neighborhood in which it was located. Vongerichten’s Simple Cuisine. There’s a copy of Monocle magazine, Riingo was an Asian fusion restaurant; Merkato, a Pan-African Richard M. Dorson’s book Negro Folktales and the CD Tokyo Reggae Classics. fusion restaurant. Both closed years ago. Unlike in the dining room, the tables in the Nook are com“The purpose of being in Harlem is completely different,” he says. “This place — I felt like it could be articulated so much munal. You may well be seated next to strangers. “I don’t want you to eat alone because you’re by yourself,” he says. “Those are more and not just lean on what it was. “I mean, it’s more than a restaurant. It has to do with nation- two different things.” Community is a key word in Samuelsson’s current vocabulary. It al history, hard-core local history. It has to do with each other, not just from the black and white narrative [but] from a human means many things: making the restaurant a part of the Harlem community, bringing the wider New York and international narrative.” communities to Harlem, and exporting the Samuelsson-Harlem aesthetic to the rest of the world. A look back in time The 2-year-old Red Rooster is located in the New York City neighborhood that is arguably the capital of the African diaspora. This Poor man’s cooking neighborhood was the site of the so-called Harlem Renaissance, On one Saturday morning, community relations consists of that 1920s-era flourishing of African-American art and letters. teaching a cooking class to a group of 10-year-olds from The Here lived Marcus Garvey, the Jamaican-born leader of the Spence School, an Upper East Side girls’ school. One of the parBack-to-Africa movement. Here worked artists Jacob Lawrence ents has won the class at a charity auction.

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Visit selamta.co/marcus to try your hand at creating this Red Rooster favorite, “Spiced bacon & egg with brown beans and pikliz.� march/april 2013

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“Poor man’s cooking is actually the most delicious food,” birth father, Tsegie, and is helping to support and educate his Samuelsson tells his pupils as he teaches them to make Swed- younger siblings in Ethiopia. He visits his adoptive mother, Anne ish meatballs much as his Swedish grandmother, Helga, taught Marie, in Sweden, and she has even traveled to Ethiopia with him him. These girls, whose favorite foods include white truffle pizza, to meet Tsegie. He has also connected with Zoe, a daughter he dig their fingers into the mixture of ground beef, pork, egg and fathered while briefly working in Austria in his early 20s. Samuelsson admits in the book that he is able to maintain breadcrumbs. Samuelsson repeats his praise of poor people’s food several his focus by pushing personal issues to the back of his mind. times, but these pre-teens aren’t particularly interested in the When he does interviews, he has a story to tell, and the focus of sociology of cuisine. Perhaps the teacher is speaking as much to this story now is Red Rooster — not the other intimate details of his life. It’s not so much that he declines to speak about these himself as to his students. It’s an ironic twist that Aquavit — where the chef first gained issues. His words just rush past them en route to the things he attention — is a fine-dining restaurant, elegant and expensive. wants to highlight. Forget that Samuelsson cooked the Samuelsson left the restaurant in 2008 and first state dinner for U.S. President Barack all but severed ties with Håkan Swahn, the Obama at the White House, or that he won owner. While he still worked there, “poor three James Beard awards while at Aquaman’s cooking” only made it to the menu vit. It’s Red Rooster Harlem that comes after being fancified and coupled with inreadily to the lips. And if his newest resgredients and techniques that poor people taurant succeeds, that success may well, in wouldn’t have time or money for. his eyes, dwarf all that he has previously That’s not to say that Red Rooster is accomplished. inexpensive. Entrees range from $18 for Samuelsson cooked But success is not a guarantee. Samumacaroni and cheese to $37 for a 16-ounce the first state elsson has had some failures: Aquavit in T-bone. But the menu draws its flavors priMinneapolis closed, as did Merkato 55 and marily from the African diaspora. dinner for Riingo. Pikliz, the quintessential Haitian U.S. President Yet he has a string of successes. The condiment, is little more than vinegar, Barack Obama at the Samuelsson Group owns a range of respeppers and vegetables. It comes served taurants in a range of locations, as is the with Caribbean spiced pork belly and White House. trend among celebrity chefs. In addition eggs. Fried catfish and grits is a typical to two fine-dining establishments in Swefisherman’s dish from the South Carolina den (Norda in Gothenburg and American coast. Bunny chow (lamb curry on bread) Table Brasserie and Bar in Stockholm), is a working-man’s plate from Durban, South Africa. The Berbere roasted chicken and the tacos of kitfo- there’s American Table Cafe and Bar in New York’s Lincoln Center complex and Marc Burger in Chicago and Costa Mesa, spiced tartare are inspired by Ethiopian cuisine. And of course Samuelsson’s own adopted heritage comes California. And of course there’s Red Rooster Harlem. If you want to dine through in the Swedish meatballs, gravlax and pickled beets, and here, you need to choose your time carefully or plan far ahead, ligon buller (brioche dough rolled with lingonberry jam). The combinations and details of these dishes aren’t the same as as the place is crowded every day. When he is at the restaurant, would be served in their places of origin, but that’s not the point. Samuelsson often greets patrons and signs cookbooks. These These are interpretations of simple, local traditions the world over. interactions can range from a brief “how are you?” to much longer conversations with regulars or friends. But in either case, it’s always clear that half of Samuelsson’s attention is on what’s A chef’s focus While Samuelsson will talk readily about food and culture, happening in the restaurant. He’s very much the New Yorker in the sense that New York he has historically been less eager to talk about personal matters — this despite his recent acclaimed memoir, Yes, Chef, City is all about business. And if Samuelsson himself is somewhich discusses the racial and political implications of his thing of an assemblage, it is only fitting that he make his home adoption by white, Swedish parents and his rise in the kitchens here. In this city of many cultures, in this neighborhood dripping with rich, eclectic history, in this restaurant brimming with of Europe and America. It seems that now that he is successful, he is working hard- divergent flavors, he masterfully finds a way to blend in while er to make room for the personal. He has reconnected with his making his name — and his food — stand apart.

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Berbere Roasted Chicken With Swiss Chard and Peanut Slaw

the Chicken Jus

the Chard

the Chicken

the Peanut Slaw

1 quart dark chicken stock

1 cup shallots, chopped

¼ cup sour cream

1 cup ginger, freshly grated

1 clove garlic, chopped

2 cups coconut milk

1 quart Swiss chard, sliced with stems separate

1 whole chicken, cut in half, breastbone and thighbones removed

Salt and freshly ground black pepper Directions | Combine dark stock and ginger in a saucepan and reduce by two-thirds. Add coconut milk and reduce by half. Strain jus and season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

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¼ cup mayonnaise

Salt

¼ bunch green asparagus, thinly sliced

½ cup white wine

Berbere spice

Juice of 1 lemon

1 cup chicken stock

Directions | Salt chicken 1 hour before roasting. Preheat oven to 250ºF. Dust chicken with Berbere spice and roast for one hour. To finish the chicken, heat olive oil in a cast-iron skillet and sear chicken skin-side down. Place half of the chicken on top of the chard and pour jus around the edges.

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Salt and freshly ground black pepper Directions | Sauté shallots and garlic until they become golden. Place chard stems in the saucepan and sweat until softened. Add white wine and chicken stock. Add chard leaves and wilt. Season with salt and pepper and remove from heat.

¼ bunch white asparagus, thinly sliced Peanuts, roasted Directions | Combine sour cream and mayonnaise. Season with lemon juice, salt and pepper. Dress 2 tablespoons of the asparagus with 1 tablespoon of roasted peanuts, as well as the sour cream and mayonnaise combination.


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His face appears like a flare in a midnight sky. One minute we’re paused on the side of the road in an 18-mile traffic jam outside Patna, India, contemplating our odds of survival; the next, a man in front of us is beckoning, leading us back into the fray with his kind brown eyes and impossible smile. I lean into the handlebars of my auto-rickshaw — a little three-wheeled vehicle with an even littler engine — and follow my new friend’s lead. No matter that he’s nearly hanging off the back of a truck, with 10 men in the truck bed next to him; he can somehow sense what lies ahead and direct us through it. At times he holds out a hand to one of the hundreds of lorries clogging the highway, buying us just enough seconds and space to squeeze in after. At other times, his hand is directed toward us — come, come, come, it beckons. The beauty of driving in India is that normal rules don’t always apply; at times we swing off the road and move forward by tackling its muddy shoulder. “It’s like eight hours of traffic jam,” my Mexican friend and teammate Citlalli comments, filming from the back seat. As my hands grip the handlebars ever tighter, I keep in view the face of our angel of the road. After three hours of potholes so deep they feel like moguls on a ski slope, the highway splits. We veer left, away from downtown Patna, and wave goodbye to our friend as his ride heads right. 44

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RUNNING WITH RICKSHAWS Our journey through India didn’t begin outside Patna but in a remote northeastern corner of the country, five days earlier. There, in the old hill station of Shillong, Citlalli and I gathered with 70 other teams, each composed of two or three people, for an adventure called the Rickshaw Run. Far from being a race, the run is less concerned about finishing first and more about finishing at all. Organized by a U.K.-based company, The Adventurists, the Rickshaw Run is one of seven adventures the group offers to intrepid — or should I say foolhardy? — travelers. From a Mototaxi Junket in Peru to an Ice Run across Siberia’s frozen tundra, each trip is designed not only to raise money for charity, but also to get back to what adventure travel is all about. As such, there’s no guidebook, no GPS and no guarantee you’ll make it to the end. The vehicle of choice in the Rickshaw Run is a three-wheeled auto-rickshaw, whose 7-horsepower engine is comparable to that of a lawnmower. Known elsewhere in Asia as tuk tuks, rickshaws are typically driven for short distances around cities. Never fans of the “typical,” The Adventurists have us covering an unthinkable distance of more than 2,000 miles in these flimsy machines. Held three times a year, the Rickshaw Run rotates its start and finish points, and so Citlalli and I found ourselves attempting to drive from Shillong to the far western city of Jaisalmer,


mere miles from the country’s border with Pakistan. “It’s like getting married,” Citlalli said about the race, the night before we launched. “If you think about it too much, it just seems crazy.” WATCHING THE COUNTRY CHANGE Shillong is the capital of the Indian state of Meghalaya, whose name in Sanskrit means “abode of the clouds.” As we descend 1,500 meters (4,950 feet) on our first day, gossamer strips of white hovering above the region’s densely jungled hills give some hint as to the name’s origin. Our second day brings us into the neighboring state of Assam, well known for its tea. We start each day before sunrise and so share the road with tea workers heading to their various estates. Tea plants line either side of the highway, as evenly manicured as hedges in an English garden. I can almost taste the cardamominfused chai as we speed past. Assam’s tea plantations soon melt into the rice paddies of West Bengal. Verdant fields stretch out to the horizon like shimmering folds of green silk, shifting from chartreuse to deep emerald and back again. Though many words of advice are given when planning a visit to India, I was never warned of its beauty, about how moving it is to spot a lone woman in a pink sari crouched below a black umbrella, planting rice seedlings in the noonday sun.

Each change in state and scenery begets more change: new colors of school uniforms, new crops growing by the road, new styles of dal (lentil stew) at the tin-roofed dhaba restaurants. This trip had seemed absurd, impossible even, in concept. But now that we’re here it feels entirely natural — as though there could be no other way to experience the immense diversity of India but by rickshaw. From heady incense in early mornings to garlands of sweet-smelling jasmine blossoms sold outside temples at night, each day is as much a journey of the senses as it is of the miles. Our route is punctuated by some of the country’s most celebrated spots, like charms on a bracelet: Varanasi, which revolves around the sacred Ganges River; Agra, where we race to the Taj Mahal at sunset; and Rajasthan, famous for its maharaja palaces and forts. Despite long days of driving, we manage to see each city for at least a few hours before jumping back into our rickshaws the next morning. And despite the size of the country, we continue to bump into other teams, delighting when we arrive at a guesthouse to find other brightly painted rickshaws parked outside. From the very beginning, Citlalli and I form a convoy with two other teams — one composed of an Irishman, an Australian and an Indian, and another of three 20-something guys from Bahrain, whose national flag streams out from the team’s roof rack. Our camaraderie with these new friends becomes as much a part of the adventure as is our exploration of India.

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REACHING THE DESERT The last change in landscape on the Rickshaw Run comes 10 days later as we enter the state of Rajasthan. Gone are Assam’s tea fields and Bengali rice paddies; in their place, the brushcovered dunes of the Thar Desert emerge, scattering sand across our path. On the final stretch into Jaisalmer, we share the road one last time — not with tea workers but camels, whole herds of them towing two-wheeled wooden carts, heading home with their owners beneath a sinking golden sun. The finish line is alive with story swapping and celebration, and yet I’m reluctant to hand over our keys. While I will surely return to India, it sadly won’t be to the front seat of a rickshaw — where every day brought a chance to share a cup of chai with locals, sit next to lorry drivers in the dhabas at day’s end, and revel in the ever-shifting, ever-stirring beauty of this country. With desert dust still on my skin, I think back to the traffic jam outside Patna and to the moment just before our angel of the road first appeared. After zipping in and out of lorries on our own for an hour, I had pulled over, desperate to catch my breath. As a crowd quickly formed, the white-haired shopkeeper in front of whose stall we’d stopped had walked toward us bearing two tiny cups of chai. Citlalli and I politely declined, attempting to explain that we, being out of small change, couldn’t pay for his steaming, milky tea. He had placed the cups in our hands anyway, saying, “I may be poor, but I still have a heart.” It is this vantage point — a glimpse into India’s very heart — I will miss the most. 46

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GLIMPSE INTO INDIA’S HEART In this country where people welcome a friendly stranger with openness and warmth, here are some ideas for how to connect and make friends: More Than Namaste | While there are 22 official languages in India, Hindi is the most widely spoken. After greeting an Indian with Namaste — literally “bow to you” in Sanskrit — test out more phrases. To learn someone’s name, ask them, Aapka naam kya hai? (AAP-ka NAAM kya hey), which can be shortened to just Aapka naam, (AAP-ka NAAM) or “Your name?” To really impress, if they ask if you speak Hindi, respond with thoda-thoda, (THOra-THO-ra) or “little-little.” Get Your Wobble On | The classic Indian head bobble — a nonverbal gesture that is an essential part of communicating in India — can mean yes, no or hello, or just provide a sign that you’re following the conversation. While it might feel natural to wave at locals, instead try tilting your head to one side; watch them break out in a smile as soon as they see you’re up on this countrywide custom. Trust Their Kindness | When traveling, it’s not always easy to know if you can trust a local who initiates a conversation or offers to help. By and large in India, though, the locals are just as curious about you as you are of them. They often ask where you’re from and how you like India, and they might even want to have their photo taken with you. Feel open to trust their kindness, allowing them to welcome you to their country.


Uganda’s Daniel Alio pitches in the first inning of a consolation game against Gresham, Oregon (U.S.), at the 2012 Little League World Series. Uganda won 3-2.

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Bases

Loaded

Uganda holds its own against the world — in Little League Baseball. by R o x anne R obbins

MAT T SLO C U M / CO R B IS

Brushing nerves aside, 11-year-old Daniel Alio

focused on one goal as he stepped to the plate: reach first base without getting tagged out. Alio got his wish — and more. “When I made contact with the ball, it just went automatically and kept going,” Alio says months later from the 11,500-acre sugar plantation in Lugazi, Uganda, where his school is located. “It went toward the big cameras in the outfield and far beyond the fence.” As it turned out, Alio had hit a two-run homer — one of baseball’s greatest feats — before a crowd of 5,827 wildly cheering spectators. Alio was representing Uganda as part of Africa’s first-ever team to cross the ocean and play in the 2012 Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. “The fans watching our game applauded so loudly,” Alio recalls. “I was full of great happiness as I rounded the bases. When I reached home plate, my team lined up to congratulate me. “People seeing the first African team — they were so happy. Even though we lost that game [3–9 to Panama], people wanted to take our photos and have us sign autographs. The people said, ‘Oh, you have won our hearts.’ It was amazing.” Little League Baseball is the largest organized youth sports program worldwide, with nearly 200,000 teams registered across more than 80 countries. Of these teams, only 16 qualify for the annual World Series in Williamsport. At the 2012 tournament, eight teams came from the United States (baseball’s

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birthplace), with eight other teams traveling from Canada, Chinese Taipei, Curacao, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Panama . . . and Uganda. Alio’s team is called the Lugazi Mehta Little League Team — sponsored by the Mehta Group and by Richard Stanley, a retired American businessman who, since 2002, has helped develop baseball in Uganda. Stanley served as a coach for the Uganda team at the 2012 World Series. To earn a spot in the tournament, the team needed to clinch the Uganda National Championship and then acquire funds and legal documentation to travel to Kutno, Poland. In Poland, they had to win the Mideast and African Regional Tournament. “When we arrived in Poland, it was a dream come true,” says Henry Odong, 35, the team manager. There, the boys surprised even themselves, defeating the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Kuwait to win the tournament. This was an especially significant accomplishment, Odong says, because the Lugazi Mehta Little League Team consisted entirely of Ugandan players, whereas the teams they played were composed mostly of American children whose parents work in the Middle East. With those wins, the team was on its way to the United States. Once there, the 11 boys and their coaches were showered with media coverage, parades

and visits with Major League players. The journey was not just the result of one team’s success, however; instead, it marked almost two decades of effort for Ugandan baseball. Odong fell in love with baseball in 1994 — when a visiting American brought the sport to his secondary school in Lugazi — and he’s spent the past 19 years advancing the sport in the area. During his lunch breaks at the engineering company where he works as a store accountant, Odong solicits sponsorships and seeks permission from school administrators to teach baseball to their students. Even in a football-loving nation, Odong says he’s found that once children try baseball, they’re hooked — hooked on the sensation of hitting the ball and watching it fly, of diving to catch the ball, of sliding

( AL L ) CO U RT E SY O F U G AN DA L I T T L E L E AG U E BASE BAL L

The proud Lugazi Mehta Little League Team traveled from its own club facility (at right) to Williamsport, Pennsylvania — the first-ever African team to compete in the Little League World Series.


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“We see ourselves

Tom Agaku (second from right) and his teammates cheer after Uganda wins a consolation baseball game 3-2 against Gresham, Oregon.

MAT T SLO C U M / CO R B IS

into bases. “The whole thing is very interesting,” he exclaims. Although Odong worked his players hard over the years to grow in their ball skills, he was never sure that one of his teams could make it to the pinnacle of baseball success: the Little League World Series. “I told the boys, ‘Even if we don’t get to go to America, let us continue playing because we enjoy the game.’” So when the team found itself in Williamsport in August 2012, Odong was thrilled beyond his wildest dreams. The trip marked a milestone in Ugandan baseball. Before, he explained, “Ugandan children — including me — who played the game had nowhere to go.” But now? “It’s possible that some of these young athletes might even develop into professional players one day.” “Wherever we’ve introduced baseball, kids are really willing to play,” he says. Indeed, there are currently 27 active leagues playing in Uganda, 16 of which are chartered with Little League Baseball. While young people in Uganda take immediately to the game, some parents and school officials are more hesitant, because they are not familiar with the sport. “To build understanding,” Odong explains, “we are hosting training clinics on how to coach and umpire. We want to educate adults in the game and attract their support and involvement.” One headmaster whom Odong has already won over is Geoffrey Nuwagaba of Mehta East Primary School, where several of the Ugandan Little League players are enrolled. Nuwagaba credits baseball with putting their 1,315-pupil school, community and nation on the map. “To me, it was a miracle that some of our students were able to travel to the United States,” Nuwagaba says with a broad smile. “I’m the headmaster and I don’t even have a visa.” “Henry [Odong] and baseball brought prestige to our school,” he adds. “We are now known from Lugazi to America.” In return, the school is providing free education to all Little League World Series players who attend. “We see ourselves as African ambassadors,” Alio says. “The series was not about winning the whole thing but about making history. We were the first team to ever represent Africa in the [Little League] World Series. Some people there had never heard of Uganda. Some people had heard of Uganda but did not know where it is.” The future seems bright for young baseball players in Uganda, as fields, equipment and coaches increase across the country. Odong is hopeful, too, that as Ugandans participate in international tournaments, they will spread enthusiasm for the sport when they return. For now, though, he’s keeping his eye on next year’s team . . . and setting their sights on August 2013 in Williamsport.


as African ambassadors.”

—Daniel Alio, 11 years old


spotlight the arts 55 | wordsmith 58 |

travel tools 59 | 24 hours 60 | cuisine 62 | 1,000 words 64 | Destination 66 | take 5 68

The Arts

Sauti sol dreams of greatness First in Kenya. Then, the world. by belinda otas

CO U RT E SY O F SAU T I SO L

A

ny live performance by Afropop Kenyan quartet Sauti Sol is sure to come with an eclectic display of showmanship. The group is backed by a troupe that alternates the roles of actors, singers and dancers, creating a dynamic interaction and connection with the audience. Take Sauti Sol’s performance of “Blue Uniform” during a Niko Na Safaricom Live concert, one of the biggest music tours in East Africa. For this song — which relates the relationship between citizens and the police in Kenya — actors filed on stage, playing the roles of a policeman and a policewoman, and a group of dancers soon joined, fusing traditional Kenyan moves with hip-hop. continued on page 56.

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s p ot l i gh t

(Clockwise from top left) Willis Chimano, Polycarp Otieno, Delvin Mudigi and Bien-Aime Baraza formed Sauti Sol in 2005.

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It’s this drama, coupled with the group’s vibrant, eccentric personalities and sense of style — a combination of skinny jeans and blazer jackets or shirts made from traditional, colorful Kenyan fabric — that gives the quartet its signature stage presence. “Whenever we perform, we bring energy,” says saxophonist and vocalist Willis Chimano, “and people notice this chemistry and synergy.” Indeed, be it on the European stage in Prague or at SXSW (the United States’ South by Southwest music festival), the boys bring Kenya and Africa with them, and the audience responds.

Filling a void Band members Chimano, Delvin Mudigi, Polycarp Otieno and Bien-Aime Baraza, each age 25, have been friends since their high-school days. They formed Sauti Sol in 2005, shortly before entering college. Sauti means “voice” in Swahili, and sol means “sun” in Spanish, which they say makes them “Voices of the Light.” Until Sauti Sol came on the Kenyan music scene, rarely did musical acts from the group’s generation sing live on stage or tell a local narrative to which a young audience could relate. “It was rare to find a young band that crafted live music onstage, with rich,

( AL L ) CO U RT E SY O F SAU T I SO L

Arts


“I think Kenyans are at a point where good music is more than the instruments and beats but also the message.” —Willis Chimano

three-part harmonies,” says Buddha Blaze, a well-known Kenyan music promoter, as quoted in a September 2012 NPR online article. “Here are some young people who don’t want to be rappers.” “Their music is fresh and lyrically strong,” adds David Muriithi, creative entrepreneur and managing director of the Creative Enterprise Centre, who keeps a pulse on the music scene in Kenya and East Africa. “It provides Kenyans with a sound that is local but with international appeal.” Muriithi remarks that the only local comparison is to Five Alive, Kenya’s first “boy band” — an a cappella group from the mid-1990s. Audiences across Kenya and East Africa have gravitated to Sauti Sol because “we sing about things that affect us,” says vocalist Baraza. “I think Kenyans are at a point where good music is more than the instruments and beats but also the message,” adds Chimano, referring to such popular songs as “Soma Kijana,” which advocates for education, and “Awinja,” which was written as a tribute to African mothers who work abroad in order to provide for their children. Chimano’s point is shared by Muriithi, who says the group’s ability to write songs that transcend boundaries is one key factor that has attracted audiences. “Sauti Sol’s power lies in their writing skills,” he says, adding that the band’s songs resonate with young people across Kenya, and that it will only be a matter

of time before they get an international publishing deal. Indeed, after two albums, an EP, and tours in Europe and East Africa — all within a space of three years — Sauti Sol is on a mission to be the biggest band Africa has ever given the world. Resisting stereotypes The band’s debut album, Mwanzo (Swahili for “beginning”), was released in August 2009, and a second, Sol Filosofia, followed in February 2011. Most recently, the band collaborated with Spoek Mathambo, the critically acclaimed South African artist renowned for his Afro-future sounds, which he incorporated into the group’s self-titled, six-track EP, Sauti Sol. The band’s influences range from Habib Koite and Daudu Kabaka to Janelle Monae and Coldplay. “We are trying to come up with our own sound,” says Delvin Mudigi, vocalist and drummer, “by mixing the African elements of our music, and trying to make it pop enough to go global.” “Our guitarist, Polycarp, is a legend,” Baraza adds. “His African riffs are inspired by the likes of Lokua Kanza, Papa Wemba and Franco, so you will always hear some crazy African guitar melody.” Even so, the band cannot be easily pegged into any of the usual descriptions of Kenyan music: Genge, Kapuka, Afrofusion, Afro-rock, Afro-electronic or Benga. “Sauti Sol sits in a very unique position,” Muriithi declares. “This trait is probably their pièce de résistance, where one can’t quite describe their music category.” Although band members are aware that they have yet to win the hearts of

everyone on the continent, Muriithi says the decision to fuse Swahili and English as their musical language gives them an edge to break out of Kenya and into the global music market. “Swahili is a beautiful language,” Chimano says. “You find that people who don’t get the language [still] relate to it.” With an impending third album due for release in 2014, the band will continue releasing singles and shooting music videos in the months ahead, and plans are in the works for tours around both Kenya and the United States in 2013. From the colors and rhythms of their native Kenya to a presentation style all their own, the members of Sauti Sol are taking Africa to the world’s stage and dreaming big for what’s to come. —Belinda Otas is a London-based journalist with a passionate interest in Africa, the African diaspora, politics, art and culture, gender and social development.

The group's eponymous, six-track EP, Sauti Sol — a collaboration with South African artist Spoek Mathambo — was released in 2012.

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Wordsmith

A New Frontier for African Literature

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cience fiction is only recently making inroads in Africa, despite the fact that African themes of magical realism, ancestral cultures and traditions lend themselves well to the genre. Science fiction’s budding popularity on the continent traces back to current authors such as Ghana’s Kojo Laing (Big Bishop Roko and the Altar Gangsters), South Africa’s Lauren Beukes (Zoo City and Moxyland), and Nigerian-American Nnedi Okorafor (Zahrah the Windseeker, Who Fears Death, Akata Witch). Yet there is plenty of room for even more voices. This is where AfroSF: Science fiction by African writers comes in. Edited by Zimbabwean Ivor W. Hartmann, AfroSF is said to be the firstever anthology of the genre by African writers. The book is a collection of 22 new and original short stories written by authors from Gambia, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the diaspora, imagining “a future from our African perspective,” as Hartmann writes in his introduction.

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by zahrah nesbitt - ahmed

The anthology symbolizes the vast potential for rich sci-fi stories to be told from a unique African perspective. There’s a little bit of everything — from time travel, ancestral spirits and technological advancements, to incurable diseases, corporate greed and global climate change — but here are a few favorites: In “Home Affairs,” Sarah Lotz paints a future where robots have replaced African bureaucrats. You might not be able to corrupt a machine, but getting on the wrong side of a computer can lead to identity loss. “Five Sets of Hands” by Cristy Zinn tells of an enslaved race that lives on Mars

and digs for ancient artifacts, touching on issues of oppression as well as courage in the face of injustice. “Masquerade Stories” by Chiagozie Fred Nwonwu explores the conflicts between traditional African values and modernity while postulating that aliens have been visiting earth for centuries. In Joan De La Haye’s “The Trial,” as the world population reaches the 9-billion mark, the courts are tasked with deciding who is considered a valuable member of society. Pairing new authors alongside awardwinners, the anthology symbolizes the vast potential for rich sci-fi stories to be told from a unique African perspective. So if you are searching for a strong collection of short stories — or are curious as to what Africans can bring to this specific genre — make sure to grab a copy. With its imaginative stories, this highly readable and entertaining anthology will transport readers to new, and unexplored, destinations. AfroSF is currently available as an e-book on Amazon: selamta.co/afroSF

CO U RT E SY O F AF ROSF

A review of AfroSF: Science fiction by African writers. |


s p ot l ig h t

Travel Tools

Skincare for the Air Five essential cosmetic tips for women who travel.

hands

facE eyes

lips

cheeks

Unlike those of times past, today’s journeys are more about the destination than the distance. A flight of 10 or 12 hours can take us to the other side of the world. But that still means spending many hours amid the dry air of a pressurized cabin — not to mention time-zone changes and disrupted sleep patterns. The pace of business today often means that when we arrive, we need to arrive looking and feeling our best, ready to take on the challenges of the journey. That’s especially true for women who travel for business.

For guidance, we sought the advice of someone whose corporate career involves frequent trips to destinations on several continents. She shared her top five recommendations for skincare and cosmetics during long flights: L’Oreal Paris Youth Code BB Cream Illuminator | If you only add one step to your travel regimen, this is the most important, because facial skin tends to dry out quickly on a plane. Add to that the difficulty of sleeping well on long flights, and this facial refreshment provides a perfect solution. It comes in two shades and not only moisturizes your skin but also evens and illumines it. Then, when you’re ready to land at your destination, simply reapply your favorite eye makeup. Neutrogena Oil-Free Eye Makeup Remover | If you plan to refresh your makeup at the end of a long flight, this eye makeup

remover takes off even waterproof eye makeup without leaving an oily residue.  Mineral Flowers Hand Cream (Chamomile) | Don’t forget your hands! This cream with chamomile smoothes and moisturizes your hands while healing and regenerating sensitive skin. Nars Cosmetics | To look fresh and beautiful, blush always helps. The Nars brand offers many different colors and sizes and won’t irritate sensitive skin. Mac Cosmetics Ruby Woo | This is the red lipstick most women are looking for. Apply right before leaving the plane, to look like a superstar. To make sure your lips won’t dry out, apply a rich moisturizer (e.g., Vaseline), leave on for five minutes, then wipe off and apply the lipstick. march/april 2013

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24 Hours

In Maputo

By elliot ross

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Experiencing the rhythms and flavors of Mozambique. |

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any visitors rush to the glorious, sandy beaches north of Maputo, squeezing their time in the capital city to just a few fleeting hours. But give your itinerary a bit more breathing room, and you’ll soon find yourself enthralled by the rhythms and flavors of this bulging metropolis. Wherever you go in the city, try to travel by minibus (chapa). Your US$0.18 fare will get you a lot more than just a bus ride. It’s also a surprising pleasure to have your conductor thrust himself out the window and burst into a joyous rendition of Percy Sledge’s 1966 classic, “When a Man Loves a Woman.” 8:30 a.m. For Maputo’s best coffee spot, seek out the venerable Cafe Continental in the bustle of Maputo’s commercial hub. Cozy up to the street-side terrace for a cup of café com leite (strong espresso mixed with hot milk), and take your pick from an extensive pastry menu. The noble pastel de nata — a succulent, irresistibly custardy treat — is a classic, and you can walk it off by taking a stroll around

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the 18th-century colonial fort, known as the Fortaleza, just around the corner. 9:30 a.m. The Fortaleza houses a museum of artifacts from the early Portuguese colonial period, with regular exhibitions of contemporary Mozambican painting, sculpture and photography. Clamber onto the low, thick battlements and you’ll find an excellent view of the city as it slopes downhill, including the tall trees of the old botanical gardens. Return after dusk to peer into the small fish market directly below, where market women drive their bargains and young men vigorously descale gleaming fish by candlelight. 10:30 a.m. While downtown (known as “Baixa”), dip into the Mercado Central

illustration by ale x perez

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In addition to great food, history and scenic views, Maputo offers an unlikely gallery for its beloved Malangatana Ngwenya: The artist’s final work — A Italiana (“The Italian Woman”) — adorns a Fiat in a local car dealership.

( CLO CKWISE F RO M TO P L E F T ) F E D O R SE L IVAN OV, E L L I OT ROSS , F E D O R SE L IVAN OV

How to get there » Ethiopian Airlines flies daily from Addis Ababa to Maputo International Airport.

to test out your bargaining skills for everything from fresh fruit to the latest mobile phones. Be sure to seek out a young woman named Yolanda Inacio, who sells the tastiest cashews from her stall. Inacio is somehow able to take new orders and fill others while, at the same time, holding spirited conversations, passing out exact change and operating three buzzing smartphones. It’s something of a marvel to witness her in action. 11:30 a.m. A five-minute walk up the hill behind the market will take you to the Museu Nacional de Arte (entry US$1.75), which boasts a compact permanent collection of work by the country’s foremost painters and sculptors. The country’s best-loved artist is the late Malangatana Ngwenya, whose work has enjoyed considerable international acclaim. Some of his most famous pieces are held here in the Museu Nacional de Arte, but it’s also worth popping into the garden of the neo-Gothic Museu de História Natural, where you’ll find a pair of his most ambitious murals set amid the greenery. 1:00 p.m. Hop into a taxi for a short drive across town to Vietnamita restaurant on Rua José Mateus, a scrappy lean-to joint that’s especially popular around lunchtime. Service is rapid and everything on the menu is US$2.80. (Both the grilled fish and fresh prawns are delicious, served up hot from the pan with rice or noodles.) 2:00 p.m. A 10-minute stroll from Vietnamita is the grand Polana Serena Hotel, where one of southern Africa’s most opulent spas recently opened. An hour’s full-body massage here could well be the most soothing experience that US$75 can buy in Maputo.

3:00 p.m. Plunge back into the city, this time in the company of Jane Flood, an English émigré with a superb knowledge of Maputo’s architectural and artistic heritage. Flood runs a number of fascinating tours, and one of her most popular is the Amancio “Pancho” Guedes tour. Equipped with a bundle of old blueprints and urban history books, this joyous ramble around town takes in some of the prolific Portuguese architect’s most spectacular creations: elegant city mansions, soaring tower blocks and his own home. (call ahead for a tour: +258-82-419-0574.) 5:30 p.m. Grab a sundowner in one of the many bars on Avenida Julius Nyerere. You won’t regret paying a bit extra for the spectacular view from Hotel Avenida’s rooftop bar, revealing the whole city sprawling gently toward the Indian Ocean. 7:00 p.m. By common consensus, the best dinner in Maputo can be found at

Zambi, a stylish, seafront restaurant. You’ll immediately recognize Zambi’s architecture as a Pancho Guedes creation, and the food served is worthy of his genius. There’s a wide range of Portuguese and Mozambican dishes, and this is one restaurant where you won’t want to skip dessert. Book a table early so as not to be disappointed. 10:00 p.m. Footsore and full of food, head for a good night’s sleep at the sumptuous Hotel Cardoso, perched on a clifftop at the city’s edge. If your room has a balcony, you’ll be able to step out before bed and watch the great ships cruising in Maputo Bay below. —Elliot Ross is a doctoral student at Columbia University in New York and a blogger with Africa Is a Country (africasacountry.com). He spent time in Maputo learning Portuguese and found it to be a wonderful city for long walks and late nights.

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Cuisine

Meet Paris, Meat-Free A vegetarian's guide to the City of Lights. |

by Marygrace Taylor

Paris is a place of brilliant lights, romantic atmosphere, captivating art and delicious food. But in a city renowned for dishes like steak frites, coq au vin and foie gras, is there any room for vegetarians? Turns out, the answer is a resounding oui! and the offerings are très magnifique. Here are four spots you won’t want to miss. le grenier de notre dame

Opened in 1978, Le Grenier de Notre Dame was the first vegetarian restaurant in Paris. Feast on veggiefriendly adaptations of French classics such as ratatouille or white bean cassoulet, or savor world flavors like Le Grenier’s couscous with raisins and chickpeas, or the macrobiotic plate with vegetables, tofu, white beans and seaweed in a savory tomato dressing. For a sweet ending, try the organic crêpes with vanilla ice cream and caramel. 18 rue de La Bûcherie, 6e, Saint-Michel/ Odéon // Metro: Saint Michel

rose bakery

Run by cookbook author Rose Carrarini, this Anglo-French bakery and restaurant prides itself on fresh, simple fare. Go healthy for breakfast with the house-made granola with honey and both sunflower and pumpkin seeds, or opt to indulge in the buttery cranberry scones. At lunchtime, refuel with light, veggierich fare like curry carrot coconut soup or butternut squash risotto. For an afternoon treat, don’t miss the carrot cake or sticky toffee pudding — Rose Bakery might be one of the only cafés in Paris to serve these traditional English desserts. 46 rue des Martyrs, 9e, Montmarte // Metro: NotreDame-de-Lorette 62

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pousse-pousse

You’ll feel healthier just reading the menu of this organic vegetarian restaurant and juice bar. For a balanced meal to power you through an afternoon of sightseeing, try the Pousse-Pousse plate with lentil, chickpea or seaweed caviar, salad with greens and sprouted grains, and seasonal vegetables. Get an extra boost of tasty nutrition with fresh fruit and vegetable juice “cocktails,” or satisfy your sweet tooth with raw, gluten-free chocolate cake. 7 rue Notre-Dame-de-Lorette, 9e, Pigalle // Metro: Notre-Dame-de-Lorette

( CLO CKWISE F RO M TO P L E F T ) BAR BAR A L SL AVI N , CO U RT E SY O F L ' AS D U FAL L AF E L , CO U RT E SY O F P O U SSE - P O U SSE , VISI T E N G E U

L'As du fallafel The line to place your order at this unassuming kosher Middle Eastern sandwich shop sometimes winds around the block. But one bite of Paris’ most authentic, satisfying falafel sandwich, and you’ll realize it was worth the wait. (It’s so good, in fact, the New York Times claimed it might make a vegetarian out of anyone.) Stuffed with crisp chickpea patties, creamy hummus, grilled eggplant slices and crunchy fresh vegetables, it’s guaranteed to keep you full until France’s famously late dinner hour. 34 rue des Rosiers, 4e, Marais // Metro: St-Paul


S T A Y

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1,000 Words

Return of the Walias photograph by christian liewig

Ethiopian fans cheer on their Walias at Mbombela Stadium in Nelspruit, South Africa. This January 21 game (played against Zambia’s Black Mambas and resulting in a final score of 1–1) represented Ethiopia’s return to the Africa Cup after a 31-year hiatus.

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s p ot l i gh t

Destination

Preservation of Paradise The wild beauty of Gabon. |

By anna hickman strock

Libreville G abon

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M I CHAE L N I CH O L S / NAT I O NAL G E O G R AP H I C

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ust below the bulge of West Africa lies the small, equatorial country of Gabon. Hailed as the last Eden, Gabon offers a paradise almost untouched by civilization, with pristine forests covering more than 80 percent of the country. The preservation of this paradise has been intentional — a feat made possible by dedicated international conservationists and the Gabonese government, spearheaded by Gabon’s former president himself. In 2002, President Omar Bongo Ondimba created 13 national parks, which encompass nearly 11 percent of Gabon’s total land mass — making the country second only to Costa Rica in percentage of preserved land. His groundbreaking decision was prompted in part by conservationist Dr. Michael Fay’s famous 1999 Megatransect — a 3,219-kilometer (2,000-mile) hike to the Gabonese coast. Fay’s 455-day journey had revealed a depth of virgin forest, undiscovered grasslands, and rare plant and animal life that could only exist in a preserved environment. He promptly presented his findings to Ondimba, and just a few years later, Ondimba terminated more than US$20 million in logging concessions, created the parks, and announced the cessation of environmentally damaging logging and hunting practices. These efforts created a vision that continues today through Ondimba’s son and successor, Ali Bongo Ondimba. Indeed, 11 years later, the value of preservation remains clear. “An excursion in a national park [is] truly wild and humbling,” says Heather Arrowood, who serves as a technical advisor for Organisation Ecotouristique du Lac Oguemoué, one of many organizations creating sustainable ecotourism in Gabon. Arrowood also serves as a guide with the Tsam Tsam Village project, a nonprofit that replaces local hunting income with ecotourism.


How to get there » Ethiopian Airlines flies daily from Addis Ababa to Libreville International Airport.

Dr. Michael Fay (shown at left, holding a chameleon) led the 3,219-kilometer hike to the Gabonese coast that, in part, prompted the creation of Gabon’s 13 national parks and preservation of its wildlife.

“An excursion in a national park [is] truly wild and humbling.”

( CLO CKWISE F RO M TO P L E F T ) M I CHAE L N I CH O L S / NAT I O NAL G E O G R AP H I C , M I CHAE L N I CH O L S / NAT I O NAL G E O G R AP H I C , M I CHAE L P O L I Z A / NAT I O NAL G E O G R AP H I C

—Heather Arrowood

“Compared to other tourism destinations,” Arrowood adds, “Gabon still has vast stretches of intact forest with some of the largest remaining populations of Congo Basin forest wildlife, including forest elephants, lowland gorillas, chimpanzees, red river hogs and giant pangolins.”  Creating access to preserved parks is a delicate task, as roads disrupt the purity of the landscape and ecosystems. Parks like Ivindo employ innovations such as electric-powered mini-jeeps to take visitors to deep forest camps. Once inside, beneath the towering Kongou waterfalls, the difficulties of travel fade. Stretching across 3.2 kilometers, these magnificent falls reach 56 meters at their highest point and are considered among the most stunning in Central Africa. The remote locations and inaccessibility of some of the Gabonese parks may not suit everyone, but for the more intrepid traveler, the mountainous terrain

and dense jungles promise adventure. Hikers in Bigourou might encounter the rare sun-tailed monkey, discovered in 1986 and protected in 1994. In Waka, indigenous Bobango tribe members share their intimate knowledge of the forests as ecoguides. Travelers seeking a cultural experience will find parks like Lopé — Gabon’s first UNESCO World Heritage Site — where gorillas, elephants and chimpanzees roam among the ghosts of human civilizations dating back at least 400,000 years. In Mwagna Park, visitors can still stand in the Bai Mwagna, a vast, sacred grassland that reverberates the deep, mystical wisdom of the Babango (pygmy). For closer proximity to Libreville — Gabon’s bustling, oceanside capital — visitors might choose Akanda or Pongara. These parks feature coastal flats, broad beaches, forests and mountains. They are also home to the world’s

largest population of leatherback turtles, significant congregations of humpback whales, hippos, manatees, elephants and hundreds of bird species, thus providing opportunities for bird-watching, sportfishing and forest exploration. With accommodations ranging from high-end resorts to rustic forest camps, the parks of Gabon offer adventure for the explorer, the passionate naturalist and the curious traveler alike. It is the nation’s hope that through continued preservation, Gabon will remain an environmental haven for generations to come.

—Anna Hickman Strock lived in Libreville during 2011–2012, while she worked with the local international school as a volunteer for community outreach. Her time there grew her love for the intense beauty of Gabon, its people and its culture. She is now a freelance writer living in Falls Church, Virginia (USA). march/april 2013

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Take 5

São Paulo’s Downtown Gems By claire rigby

As of June 2013, Ethiopian Airlines will begin flights to Guarulhos International Airport.

Packed with architectural treasure, São Paulo’s old-fashioned Centro presents a thoroughly unexpected side to the sprawling, high-rise megacity. Beyond the Mercadão (municipal market) and the Pinacoteca art museum — the area’s traditional tourist attractions — a growing number of galleries, restaurants and nightspots are making a visit to Centro de rigueur. A taxi is the way to go here, especially for those unfamiliar with the city, so hail a cab and check out these top downtown picks.

pivo

Cine Joia Just off the Centro circuit in the traditionally Japanese neighborhood of Liberdade, this beautiful, former 1950s cinema was given an exciting new lease on life in 2011 by the São Paulo nightlife impresario Facundo Guerra. The venue’s well-curated program has quickly made it a go-to spot for live music, enhanced by a state-of-the-art projection system that sets images and animations marching across the walls behind the band.

SOSO Arte Contemporânea

One of downtown’s best-kept secrets, this contemporary African art gallery is hidden away on the second floor of a nondescript office building. The owner is Angolan art lover and restaurateur Mario Almeida (who also owns the restaurant Bahia in Luanda, Angola). 68

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ramona

Glowing invitingly on a corner of São Luis, one of Centro’s finest avenues, Ramona is the see-and-beseen restaurant of the moment. It’s also a fine place to indulge in some hearty, contemporary Brazilian fare. Drop in at Alberta #3 two doors down for a nightcap, but beware: You might find yourself still there hours later, shoulder-to-shoulder with the hip crowd on the intimate dance floor downstairs.

Bar da Dona Onça

Another gem set inside the Copan building, this stylish bar-restaurant does a mixture of classic Brazilian cookery and international favorites. Kick off with a cashew-fruit caipirinha (a Brazilian cocktail made from cachaça, the local sugarcane spirit), and if it’s Saturday, don’t miss the chance to try the country’s most emblematic dish, feijoada — a rich stew of beans and assorted meats.

( CLO CKWISE F RO M TO P L E F T ) CO U RT E SY O F P IVO , CO U RT E SY O F CI N E J O IA , CO U RT E SY O F BAR DA D O NA O NÇA , CO U RT E SY O F R AM O NA , CO U RT E SY O F SOSO ART E CO N T E M P O R ÂN E A

Like an immense, modernist ocean liner in a sea of concrete high-rises, the curvaceous Copan building is one of the city’s most iconic buildings. Among other things, it houses São Paulo’s newest, most eclectic cultural hub: Pivô. Opened in September 2012 during the art Bienal (the city’s biennial art exhibition), the contemporary art center hosts occasional gallery exhibitions and an assortment of pop-up, don’t-miss events.


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Travel Tips

seated exercises These gentle exercises, which you can carry out easily during your flight, will help blood circulation and reduce any tiredness or stiffness that may result from sitting in one place for several hours. Check with your doctor first if you have any health conditions that might be adversely affected by exercise. Shoulder roll

Ankle circles

Hunch shoulders forward, then upward, then backward, then downward, using a gentle, circular motion.

Lift feet off the floor and draw a circle with the toes, simultaneously moving one foot clockwise and the other foot counterclockwise. Reverse circles. Do each direction for 15 seconds. Repeat if desired.

Arm curl

Foot pumps

Start with arms held at a 90-degree angle: elbows down, hands out in front. Raise hands up to chest and back down, alternating hands. Do this exercise in 30-second intervals.

Start with both heels on the floor and point feet upward as high as you can. Then put both feet flat on the floor. Then lift heels high, keeping the balls of your feet on the floor. Continue cycle in 30-second intervals.

Forward flex

Knee to chest

With both feet on the floor and stomach held in, slowly bend forward and walk your hands down the front of your legs toward your ankles. Hold the stretch for 15 seconds and slowly sit back up.

Bend forward slightly. Clasp hands around the right knee and hug it to your chest. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Keeping hands around knee, slowly let it down. Alternate legs. Repeat 10 times.

Overhead stretch

Knee lifts

Raise both hands straight up over your head. With one hand, grasp the elbow of the opposite hand and gently pull to one side. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

Lift leg with knees bent while contracting your thigh muscles. Alternate legs. Repeat 20 to 30 times for each leg.

illustrations by todd detwiler

Shoulder stretch

Other Tips for a Comfortable Flight

Reach right hand over left shoulder. Place left hand behind right elbow and gently press elbow toward shoulder. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

> For your own comfort, try to travel light.

> Avoid heavy meals during the flight.

> Wear loose clothing and elasticated stockings made of natural fiber.

> Take short walks once every two hours to improve circulation.

> Increase your normal intake of water and only drink alcohol in moderation.

> Try to touch your toes when waiting in the aisle, to stretch your hamstrings.

Neck roll

> Use moisturizing cream to keep your skin from drying out.

> Upon arrival at your destination, take a quick jog, brisk walk or a vigorous scrub to help stimulate circulation. Then, take a hot shower or a relaxing bath.

With shoulders relaxed, drop ear to shoulder and gently roll neck forward and to the other side, holding each position for about five seconds. Repeat five times.

> Take off shoes while on the plane to prevent your feet from swelling up, or wear shoes that will cope with expanding ankles.

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| Travel Tips

Traveling in Ethiopia Land » Ethiopia covers an area of 1.14 million square kilometers (944,000 square miles). Climate » There are two seasons: The dry season, October–May, and the wet season, June–September.

Topography » Ethiopia has an elevated central plateau varying in height between 2,000 and 3,000 meters. In the north and center of the country, there are some 25 mountains whose peaks rise above 4,000 meters. The most famous Ethiopian river is the Blue Nile (or Abbay), which flows north a distance of 1,450 kilometers from its source in Lake Tana to join the White Nile at Khartoum, Sudan.

People » The population is estimated at 78 million.

Economy » About 90 percent of the population earns a living from the land, mainly as subsistence farmers. Agriculture is the backbone of the national economy, and the principal exports from this sector are coffee, oil seeds, pulses, flowers, vegetables, sugar and foodstuffs for animals. There is also a thriving livestock sector, exporting cattle, hides and skins. Language » Ethiopia is a multiethnic state with 83 languages and 200 dialects. Amharic is the working language of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, while Oromiffa, Tigrigna and Guragina are widely spoken.

Courier & Money TransfeRS » Money transfers can be made through Western Union and MoneyGram. Both have representative branches in Addis Ababa and also make their services available from private and national banks. For courier services, DHL, Fedex, UPS, TNT and EMS have offices in Addis Ababa.

Communications » Telephones, fax machines and Internet access are available in Addis Ababa in most hotels and at private Internet service centers around the city. Working Hours » Government office hours are 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and 1:30–5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Working hours on Friday are 8:30–11:30 a.m. and 1:30– 5:30 p.m. Private and public businesses are often open on Saturdays. Public Holidays » Public holidays are celebrated according to the Ethiopian (Julian) Calendar (see “Time”). The calendar is seven years behind the Western or Gregorian Calendar, with the New Year falling in the month of September. January 7: Ethiopian Christmas (Genna)

volts 50 cycles AC. Plugs are European two-pin.

Immigration Requirements » Visas are required for all foreign visitors to Ethiopia, with the exception of nationals of Kenya and Sudan. Visa applications may be obtained at Ethiopia’s diplomatic missions overseas. Nationals of 37 countries are now allowed to receive their tourist visas on arrival in Ethiopia. The list includes: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, North Korea, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Taiwan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States.

Bole International Airport »

March 2: Victory of Adwa (1896) May 1: International Labor Day May 3: Ethiopian Orthodox Good Friday

May 5: Ethiopian Patriots (1941) Victory Day May 28: Fall of the Dergue (1991) Day

It follows the Julian calendar, which consists of 12 months of 30 days each and a 13th month of five or six days (on a leap year).

September 27: The Finding of the True Cross (Meskal)

Currency » The units of currency are

*These holidays are subject to moon sighting.

the birr and cents. Notes are 100, 50, 10, 5 and 1 birr. The 1 birr coin is also in circulation. ATMs (Automatic Teller Machines) are found in major Addis Ababa hotels, shopping malls and at the Bole International Airport. It is important to retain currency exchange receipts.

Health Requirements » A yellow fever certificate is required for some African destinations. Vaccination against cholera is also required for any person who has visited or transited a cholera-infected area within six days prior to arrival in Ethiopia.

ethiopianairlines.com

b) You must declare to customs officials at point of entry any cash in excess of US$3,000 (or the equivalent). If you have more than US$3,000 on departing, you must present a receipt from the purchasing bank.

The airport is about 5 kilometers from Meskel Square and Addis Ababa’s central business district. Passengers entering and departing Ethiopia must fill in entry and exit cards. Free luggage carts and paid porters are available in the baggage hall. All bags must go through X-ray check before you exit. When flying out of Bole International Airport, please note: Terminal 1 — all domestic flights and flights to Burundi, Djibouti, Rwanda, Somaliland, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen. Terminal 2 — all other international flights. Taxis are readily available and may be ordered inside the terminal. Privately owned taxis are not metered, nor do they have fixed rates. Agree upon the fare in advance.

September 11: Ethiopian New Year

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a) It is illegal to carry more than 200 birr when entering or departing Ethiopia.

January 24: Birth of Prophet Mohammed PBUH (Mauwlid)*

Time » Ethiopia is in the GMT +3 time zone.

Banking Hours » Banking hours are usually 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Friday and 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturdays. Most banks work through lunchtime; however, foreign exchange services are closed during lunch hours (noon–1 p.m.).

When it comes to currency:

January 19: Ethiopian Epiphany (Timkat)

May 5: Ethiopian Orthodox Easter Sunday

Electric Supply » Ethiopia uses 220

d) souvenirs (by visitors) with a value not exceeding 500 birr

October 15: Id ul Ahda (Sacrifice)*

Customs » Duty-free imports are permitted for up to: a) 200 cigarettes, 100 cigars or 250 grams of tobacco b) 2 liters of alcoholic beverages c) half a liter of perfume

Security » Security at the airport is tight, and travelers need to produce their air ticket and passport to enter the terminal. All other visitors are required to pay a fee of 10 birr in the car park and may be required to show identification.


Travel Tips |

learn amharic English-Amharic (phonetic) Learn some basic Amharic so that you can interact with the locals and enjoy your stay in Ethiopia by experiencing the rich culture of the Ethiopian people.

U seful Words Today Tomorrow Yesterday Now Quickly Slowly Mr Mrs Miss I

pronunciation guide

You He, She We

a as the a in father e as the e in set i as the i in ship o as the o in go u as the oo in boot gn as the gn in compagne (French) (M) Masculine; (F) Feminine; (P) Plural

They What? Who? When? How? Why? Which? Yes (all right) No Excuse me I am sorry Good Bad

fly ethiopian

N umbers Zare Nege Tilant Ahun Tolo Kes Ato Weyzero Weyzerit Ene Ersewo Essu, Essoa Egna Ennessu Min? Man? Metche? Endet? Lemin? Yetignaw? Eshi Aydelem /Ayhonem Yikirta Aznallehu Tiru / melkam Metfo

One

And

Two

Hulet

Three

Sost

Four

Arat

Five

Amist

Six

Sidist

Seven

Sebat

Eight

Semmint

Nine

Zetegn

Ten

Asser

Eleven

Asra-and

Twelve

Asra-hulet

Thirteen, etc.

Asra-sost, etc.

Twenty

Haya

Twenty-one, etc.

Haya-and, etc.

Thirty

Selasa

Thirty-one, etc.

Selasa-and, etc.

Forty

Arba

Fifty

Amsa

One hundred

And meto

One thousand

And shi  

D irections / E mergencies

M eeting and G reeting Hello

Halo

Good morning

Endemn adderu/ k(M)/sh(F)

Good afternoon Good evening

Endemn walu/k(M)/ sh(F)

Commerce

Where? (Place)

Yet?

Where is it?

Yet no?

Where? (Direction)

Wodet?

Street/road

Menged

Airport

Awiroplan marefeya

Where is the hotel?

Hotelu yet no?

Where are you going?

Yet iyehedu no? eh (M)/esh(F)

I am going to . . .

Wede... iyehedku no

Turn right

Wede kegn yitatefu/ tatef(M)/tatefi(F)

Turn left

Wede gra yitatefu tatef(M)/tatefi(F)

Go straight

Ketita yihidu/hid(M)/ higi(F)

Please stop here

Ezih Yikumu/kum(M)/ kumi(F)

Endemn ameshu/ eh(M)/esh(F)

Hotel

Hotel

Dehna hunu/ hun(M)/ hugne(F)

Room

Kifil

Bed

Alga

How are you?

Tenayistillign / endemen not? eh(M)/ esh(F)

To sleep

Metegnat

To bathe

Galan metateb

I am well, thank you (very much)

Dehna negn (Betam) amesegenallehu

Where is the toilet?

Metatebiya betu yet new?

You’re welcome

Minim aydel

Please come in

Yigbu/giba(M)/ gibi(F)

Where may I get something to drink?

Yemiteta neger yet agengalehu?

Coffee

Buna

Please sit down

Yikemetu/ tekemet(M)/ tekemechi(F)

One (cup of) coffee

And (sini) buna

Come

Na(M)/Ney(F)/Nu(P)

Beer

Birra

Go

Hid(M)/Higi(F)/Hidu(P)

Cold

Kezkaza

Stop

Kum(M)/Kumi(F)/ Irdugn(P)

Help

Irdagn(M)/irgegn(F)/ Irdugn(P)

Hospital

Hakem bet

Police

Polis

Goodbye

What is your name?

Simewo man no?h(M)/sh(F)

Hot

Muk

Tea

Shay

My name is . . .

Sime . . . no

Food

Migib

Where do you come from?

Keyet Metu? ah(M)/ ash(F) Hagero yet no?eh(M)/esh(F)

Meat

Siga

Fish

Assa

I come from . . .

Ke . . . metahu

Bread

Dabo

My country is . . .

Hagere . . . no

Butter

Kebe

Can you speak Amharic?

Amaregna yenageralu? tenageraleh(M)/ tenageriyalesh(F)

Sugar

Sikuar

Salt

Chow

Pepper

Berbere

Shop

Suk

To buy

Megzat

Sunday

Ihud

To sell

Meshet

Monday

Segno

Money

Genzeb

Tuesday

Maksegno

Cent

Santime

Wednesday

Erob

How much does this cost?

Wagaw sint no?

Thursday

Hamus

Friday

Arb

That is quite expensive

Betam wood no

Saturday

Kedame

Only a little

Tinish

I want to learn more

Yebelete memar ifelegalehu

How do you find Ethiopia?

Itiyopiyan endet agegnuat? hat(M)/ shat(F)

I like it here

Itiyopiya Tesmamtognal

Days of the Week

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fly ethiopian Length 0

| Fleet

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Bombardier Q400 Data (ET-ANI, ET-ANJ, ET-ANK, ET-ANL, ET-ANV, ET-ANW, ET-ANX, ET-ANY, ET-AQB, ET-AQC, ET-AQD, ET-ADE, ET-AQF) Seat Capacity: 78 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 29,574 kg; Landing, 28,123 kgs; Zero Fuel, 26,308 kg Operating Empty Weight:17.684 kg Total Cargo Volume: 14.3 cu.ft Boeing 737-700 (ET-ALK, ET-ALM, ET-ALN, ET-ALQ, ET-ALU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 102. Total: 118 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 70,080 kg; Landing, 58,604 kgs; Zero Fuel, 55,202 kg Operating Empty Weight: 41,015 kg Total Cargo Volume: 966 cu.ft

Boeing 737-800 (ET-APK, ET-ANZ, ET-AOA, ET-AOB, ET-APF, ET-APL, ET-APM, ET-APO) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 138. Total: 154 Max Gross Weight: Take Off, 79,010 kg Landing, 66,330kgs; Zero Fuel, 62,730 kg Operating Empty Weight: 43,545 kg Total Cargo Volume: 1,555 cu.ft

Boeing 757-200 ER (ET-ALZ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 154. Total: 170 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,699 kg, Landing, 89,812 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,485 kg Operating Empty Weight: 60,942 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 cu.ft Boeing 757-200 ER Cargo (ET-AJS) Cargo Capacity: 15 (88” x 125“) pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,892 kg; Landing, 95,254 kg; Zero Fuel, 90,718 kg Operating Weight: 53,010 kg Cargo Volume Main: 6,600 cu.ft Lower: 1,829 cu.ft

(ET-AMK) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 159. Total: 175. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,852 kgs. Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 61,072 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 Cu.ft. (ET-AJX) Cargo Capacity: 15 (88” x 125“) pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 109,316 kg; Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kg Operating Weight: 54,176 kg Cargo Volume Main: 6,600 cu.ft Lower: 1,762 cu.ft

Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner (ET-AOQ, ET-AOR, ET-AOS, ET-AOP, ET-AOT) A super-efficient airplane with new passenger-pleasing features. It will bring the economics of large jet transports to the middle of the market, using 20 percent less fuel than any other airplane of its size. Seat Capacity: 210 to 250 passengers Length: 186 ft Range: 8,000 to 8,500 nautical miles Height: 56 ft Configuration: Twin aisle Cruise Speed: Mach 0.85 Cross Section: 226 in Cargo Capacity: 5 pallets + 5 LD3s Wing Span: 197 ft Maximum Take Off Weight: 476,000 lb

MD-11CF Cargo (ET-AML, ET-AND) Cargo Capacity: Upper deck: 26 Pallets (96”x125”); Lower FWD Bay: 6 Pallets (96”x125”); Lower AFT Bay: 14 LD3 Containers Max Take Off. WT.: 630, 500 lb

Max Landing: 491,500 lb Zero fuel wt.: 461,500 lb Engine: GE CF6-80C201F Pallet: 26 pallets – Upper Volume – 86 ton

Boeing 767-300 ER (ET-ALL) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 213. Total: 237 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,879 kg; Landing, 145, 149 kg; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kg Operating Empty Weight: 91,367 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 cu.ft

(ET-ALC) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine, 24; Economy Class, 210. Total: 234 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 185,065 kg; Landing, 145,149 kg; Zero Fuel, 130,634 kg Operating Empty Weight: 90,416 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 cu.ft

Boeing 777-200LR (ET-ANN, ET-ANO, ET-ANP, ET-ANQ, ET-ANR) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 34, Economy Class 287. Total: 321 Max Gross Weight: Take Off, 347,450 kg; Landing, 223,160 kg; Zero Fuel, 209,100 kg Operating Empty Weight: 160,856 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,330 cu.ft Engines: GE90

Boeing 777-200LRF Cargo (ET-APU, ET-APS) Cargo Capacity: 27 (96" x 125") pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 766,800 lbs; Landing, 575,000 lbs; Zero Fuel, 547,000 lbs Cargo Volume: Main, 18,630 cu.ft.; Lower, 4,700 cu.ft. Length 0 74

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Fleet |

current commercial fleet Long Range Passenger Services 5 Boeing 787-8 (ET-AOQ, ET-AOR, ET-AOS, ET-AOP, ET-AOT) 5 Boeing 777-200LR (ET-ANN, ET-ANO, ET-ANP, ET-ANQ, ET-ANR) 12 Boeing 767-300 ER (ET-ALC, ET-ALH, ET-ALJ, ET-ALL, ET-ALO, ET-ALP, ET-AME, ET-AMF, ET-AMG, ET-AMQ, ET ANU, ET-AQG) Medium Range Passenger Services 4 Boeing 757-200 ER (ET-ALZ, ET-AMK, ET-AMT, ET-AMU) 8 Boeing 737-800 (ET-APK, ET-ANZ, ET-AOA, ET-AOB, ET-APF, ET-APL , ET-APM, ET-APO)

5 Boeing 737-700 (ET-ALK, ET-ALM, ET-ALN, ET-ALQ, ET-ALU) Domestic and Regional Passenger Services 13 Bombardier Q400 (ET-ANI, ET-ANJ, ET-ANK, ET-ANL, ET-ANV, ET-ANW, ET-ANX, ET-ANY, ET-AQB, ET-AQC) Cargo and Non-Scheduled Services 2 Boeing 777-200LRF (ET-APU, ET-APS) 1 Boeing 757-260 Freighter (ET-AJS) 1 Boeing 757-200 PCF (ET-AJX) 2 MD-11CF (ET-AML, ET-AND)

One Gold point leads to another With Star Alliance Gold Status you can enjoy additional comfort and peace of mind in over 1300 airports around the world. These invaluable extras include:

Priority Airport Check-in

Check-in through the priority check-in counters Boeing 757-200 ER continued (ET-AMT, ET-AMU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 155. Total: 171. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,892 kgs; Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 60,023 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 Cu.ft.

Airport Lounge Access

When you travel with a Star Alliance member airline, you and a guest can relax in over 1000 airport lounges

Priority Boarding

You can board at your convenience along with First and Business Class travellers.

Extra Baggage Allowance

We allow an additional 20 kg (44 pounds) where the weight concept applies, or one additional piece of luggage where the piece concept applies.

Priority Baggage Handling

Your luggage also gets priority treatment and is among the first to be unloaded.

Priority Reservation Waitlisting

When there aren’t any seats available on your preferred flight, we ensure that you sit at the top of the waiting list for another. Boeing 767-300 ER continued (ET-ALH) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 213. Total: 237. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 90,058 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-ALJ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 211. Total: 235. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,277 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 208. Total: 232. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 148,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,277 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AME) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 30, Economy Class 190. Total: 220. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 181,436 kgs; Landing, 137,892 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 92,087 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

(ET-AMQ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 30, Economy Class 195. Total: 225. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 90,426 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

(ET-AMF, ET-AMG, ET-ANU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine: 24, Economy Class: 213, Total: 237. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 87,419 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

(ET-ALO) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 211. Total: 235. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,499 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-ALP)

(ET-AQG) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 190. Total: 214. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 181,436 kgs; Landing, 137,892 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 92,087 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

Priority Airport Standby

If you miss your flight, member airline staff will arrange for you to be on the next available flight home.

You’ve earned it.

Visit www.staralliance.com to find out more. *Currencies vary among frequent flyer programmes.

Discover the Gold Status feeling

fly ethiopian


fly ethiopian

| International Route Map

ethiopian airlines international service Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire) Abuja (Nigeria) Accra (Ghana) Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) Bahir Dar (Ethiopia) Bamako (Mali) Bangkok (Thailand) Beijing (China) Beirut (Lebanon) Berbera (Somalia) Blantyre (Malawi) Brazzaville (Congo) Brussels (Belgium) Bujumbura (Burundi) Cairo (Egypt) Cotonou (Benin) Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) Dakar (Senegal) Dammam (Saudi Arabia) Dire Dawa (Ethiopia) Djibouti (Rep. of Djibouti) Douala (Cameroon) Dubai (UAE) Entebbe (Uganda) Frankfurt (Germany) Guangzhou (China) Harare (Zimbabwe) Hangzhou (China) Hong Kong (China) Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) Johannesburg (South Africa) Juba (Southern Sudan) Khartoum (Sudan) Kigali (Rwanda)

Kilimanjaro (Tanzania) Kinshasa (D. R. of Congo) Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) Kuwait City(Kuwait) Lagos (Nigeria) Libreville (Gabon) Lilongwe (Malawi) Lomé (Togo) London (United Kingdom) Luanda (Angola) Lubumbashi (Congo) Lusaka (Zambia) Malabo (Equitorial Guinea) Maputo (Mozambique) Mekelle (Ethiopia) Milan (Italy) Mombasa (Kenya) Mumbai (India) Muscat (Oman) Nairobi (Kenya) N’Djamena (Chad) Ndola (Zambia) New Delhi (India) Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) Pointe Noire (Congo) Paris (France) Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) Rome (Italy) Stockholm (Sweden) Tel Aviv (Israel) Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Victoria (Seychelles) Washington, D.C. (U.S.) Zanzibar (Tanzania)

Vancouver Seattle Portland

Minneapolis Chicago

Omaha Salt Lake City San Francisco San Jose Los Angeles Santa Ana San Diego

Denver

Las Vegas

Montréal Ottawa

Quebec

Syracuse Portland Toronto Rochester Boston Dayton Cleveland New York Philadelphia Cincinnati

Detroit

Kansas City Indianapolis Colorado Springs Washington, D.C. St. Louis

Albuquerqe

Phoenix Tucson

Memphis Nashville Oklahoma City Little Rock Columbia Atlanta Dallas

Houston San Antonio

New Orleans Tampa Miami

north atlantic ocean

Jacksonville Orlando Fort Lauderdale

Destinations with special agreements Cape Town (South Africa) Montréal, Quebec (Canada) Gaborone (Botswana) Helsinki (Finland) Jakarta (Indonesia) Kolkata (India) Manila (Philippines) Oslo (Norway) Ottawa, Ontario (Canada) Palermo (Italy) Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) Windhoek (Namibia) United States of America: Albuquerque, New Mexico Atlanta, Georgia Boston, Massachusetts Chicago, Illinois Cincinnati, Ohio Cleveland, Ohio Colorado Springs, Colorado Columbia, South Carolina Columbus, Ohio Dallas, Texas Dayton, Ohio Denver, Colorado Detroit, Michigan Fort Lauderdale, Florida Houston, Texas Indianapolis, Indiana Jacksonville, Florida Kansas City, Missouri

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ethiopianairlines.com

Las Vegas, Nevada Little Rock, Arkansas Los Angeles, California Memphis, Tennessee Miami, Florida Minneapolis, Minnesota Nashville, Tennessee New Orleans, Louisiana New York City, New York Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Omaha, Nebraska Ontario, California Orlando, Florida Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Phoenix, Arizona Portland, Oregon Portland, Maine Rochester, New York Saint Louis, Missouri Salt Lake City, Utah San Antonio, Texas San Diego, California San Francisco, California San Jose, California Santa Ana, California Seattle, Washington Syracuse, New York Tampa, Florida Tucson, Arizona

south pacific ocean

IN T E R NAT I O NA L ROU T E M A P key

Ethiopian destinations Destinations with special agreements Code share flights Future destinations One-way nonstop ASKY routes

São Paulo


International Route Map |

fly ethiopian

Helsinki Stockholm

Oslo

Moscow

Gothenburg

Aberdeen

Copenhagen

Belfast

Edinburgh Manchester

Dublin

London Brussels Paris

Warsaw Amsterdam

Dusseldorf

Frankfurt

Zurich Geneva Lyon

Toulouse

Prague Vienna Budapest

Munich

Marselle

Madrid

Berlin

Bucharest

Milan Sofia

Rome

Barcelona

Istanbul

Beijing

Lisbon

Palermo

Korea Larnaca

Beirut Tel Aviv

Damascus

Kuwait City

Cairo

Dammam Riyadh

Hangzhou

Dubai

New Delhi Guangzhou (Canton) Kolkata (Calcutta)

Muscat

Jeddah

Hong Kong

Mumbai Dakar

Khartoum Bamako

Conakry

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Freetown Monrovia

Abidjan

Djibouti Berbera

Abuja Cotonou

Lagos

Accra LoméMalabo

ADDIS ABABA

Brazzaville Pointe Noire Kinshasa Luanda

Dire Dawa

Juba

Yaounde

Douala

Libreville

Kuala Lumpur Singapore

Entebbe Nairobi Kigali Mombasa Bujumbura Kilimanjaro Zanzibar Dar es Salaam

Lubumbashi Ndola Lusaka Harare

Jakarta Victoria

indian ocean

Lilongwe Blantyre

ASKY N E T WO R K

south atlantic ocean Windhoeck

Gaborone

Maputo

Johannesburg

Bamako Durban Cape Town

Manila

Bangkok

Mekelle

Bahir Dar

N’Djamena

Conakry

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Freetown

N’Djamena Abuja

Cotonou

Monrovia

Abidjan

Accra

Lomé

Lagos

Malabo

Yaounde Douala Libreville Brazzaville Kinshasa

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fly ethiopian

| Domestic Route Map

red sea

Shire

Axum

Mekelle

Humera

Denakil Depression

ras dashan (4,620m) simien mountains

Gondar gulf of aden

Lalibela

tana

Bahir Dar

choke mountains

Asosa Dire Dawa Jijiga Ahmar mountains

Addis Ababa

dembidollo gore

koka

Gambella

zwai abiata

langano

Jimma

ogaden region shala

Mizan teferi

Arba Minch Jinka

ADDIS ABABA Main City Ticket Office Churchill Road PO Box 1755 Tel: 251-11-5517000 Fax: 251-11-5513047/5513593

ARBA MINCH Tel: 251-46-8810649 (CTO)

ASOSA Tel: 251-057-7750574/75 (CTO) 251-091-1255674 (CELL)

AXUM Tel: 251-34-7752300 (CTO) 251-34-7753544 (APT) 251-91-1255682 (CELL) Email: AXUTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM 78

ethiopianairlines.com

mendebo mountains

Kabri Dar

abaya

shamo

BAHIR DAR

Gode

GONDAR

Tel: 251-58-2200020 (CTO) 251-58-2260036 (APT) 251-91-1255675 (CELL) Email: BJRTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

Tel: 251-58-1117688 (CTO) 251-58-1140735 (APT) 251-91-1255676 (CELL) Email: GDQTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

DIRE DAWA

Humera

Tel: 251-25-1111147 (CTO) 251-25-1114425 (APT) 251-91-5320405 (Cell) Email: DIRAM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

GAMBELLA Tel: 251-47-5510099 (CTO) 251-91-1255677 (CELL)

GODE Tel: 251-25-7760015 (CTO) 251-25-7760030 (APT)

Tel: 251 - 34 4480556 251 - 911 255437

JIJIGA Tel: 251-25-7752030 (CTO) 251-25-7754300 (APT)

JIMMA Tel: 251-47-1110030 (CTO) 251-47-1110207 (APT) 251-91-1255678 (CELL) Email: JIMTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

LALIBELA Tel: 251-33-3360046 (CTO) 251-91-1255679 (CELL) Email: LLITAM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

MEKELLE

Tel: 251-400055 (CTO) 251-34-4420437 (APT) 251-91-1255680 (CELL) Email: MQXTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

SHIRE Tel: 251-34-4442224 (CTO) 251-91-1255681 (CELL) CTO – City Ticket Office APT – Airport Office CGO – Cargo Office CELL – Cell phone


Addis Ababa Map |

fly ethiopian

kennedy library

The main library at Addis Ababa University.

National Museum of ethiopia

Highlighting the history of Ethiopia from prehistoric times to the modern day. Kennedy Library

St.GEorge’s cathedral

A small octagonal Ethiopian Orthodox church built in 1896 as a token to St. George.

piazza district

russian

Another name for the historic district.

st

adwa

megabit 28 square/Arat kilo

st

st. george's cathedral

Inside this square stands a monument erected in memory of those patriots who defeated the Italian invading forces.

national museum

Piazza district

ring rd

anwar mosque

The main religious center for Muslims in and around the capital.

megabit 28 square/arat kilo anwar mosque taitu hotel

taitu hotel

parliAment building lorenzo

Opened in 1898 as Addis Ababa’s first hotel, established by Empress Taitu Betul.

tiezaz

st

colson

st

N iger

parliament building

Built during the reign of Emperor Haile Selassie I and still serving as the seat of Parliament today.

ave

st

zewditu hospital

sahara

The hospital in central Addis Ababa.

menelik

zewditu hospital

ethiopian national theatre

Founded in the 1940s when the government recruited a band to play Ethiopian songs accompanied by a modern orchestra.

african hall & ECA conference center

ethiopian national theatre ydnekachew tesema stadium

jomo kenyatta

africa hall and EcA conf. center

A fully integrated and secured complex with state-ofthe-art facilities. st

meskel square

ydnekachew tesema stadium

cameroon

chamber of commerce

d

r. .a.

A multi-use stadium in Addis Ababa used mostly for football matches as well as housing athletic facilities. st

chamber of commerce

AF

Established in 1947, providing technical and advocacy services to help businesses.

RIC

sierra leone st

meskel square

A site for public gathering or demonstrations and festivals — notably the Meskel Festival.

A ave ( bole

millennium exhibition hall

rd )

A modern building holding various-sized events including concerts, sport matches, exhibitions and trade shows.

Millennium Exhibition Hall

Bole International Airport

ring

rd

march/april 2013

79


fly ethiopian

| Sales Offices

ethiopian airlines

sales offices ANGOLA Largo 4 De Fevereiro Hotel Meridien Presidente Luanda, Angola Tel: 2442 310328/310615 Fax: 2442 310328 APT Mobile: 914 526675 BELGIUM Park Hill J. E. Mommaertslaan 16B 1831 Diegem Tel: 0032 2 712 05 86 Fax: 0032 2 725 83 92 Email: bruadmn@ethiopianairlines.com BURKINA FASO Avenue Kwame N`krumah mmb. Bati 01 BP 4883 Ouaga 01 Tel Office: 22650301024/25 Email: OUAAPT@ethiopianairlines.com DanielW@ethiopianairlines.com BURUNDI Avenue De La Victorie No. 09 PO Box 573, Bujumbura Tel : 257 226820/226038 APT: 257 229842 Mobile: 257 78841844 Email: henokm@ethiopianairlines.com CAMEROON Rue Tobie Kuoh Bonanjo, B.P 1326 Douala Telephone – reservation desk: 00237 33 43 02 46; Area Manager direct line: 00237 33 43 02 64; Fax line: 00237 33 43 01 67; Mobile Area Manager for Cameroon: 00237 77 93 79 29; AIRPORT OFFICE Tel: 00237 33 43 37 30; Cell: 00237 77 11 77 29 canada 1027 Yonge Street, Suite 106, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 2K9, Canada Tel: 416 922 9989 Fax: 416 922 1731 sales@ethiopiancanada.com Euro link Ltd., Address : 1027 Yonge Street, 1st Floor, Toronto, ON , M4W 2K9, Canada Phone : +1 (416) 922 9989 Fax : +1 (416) 922 1371 Toll Free : 1 855 269 0362 Email : gsa@ethiopiancanada.com CHAD Avenue Charles De Gaule PO Box 989, N’djamena CTO Tel: 235 2523143/2523027 Tel: 235 523143/523027 ATO Tel: 235 2522599 APT: 235 522599 Mobile: 235 6 6896226 CHINA L203 China World Tower 2, China World Trade Centre No.1 Jianguomenwai Ave. Beijing (100004) Tel: 8610 65050314/5/65069692 Fax: 8610 65054120 APT Tel: 8610 64591156 APT Fax: 8610 64599445 Email: KonjitT@ethiopianairlines.com Guangzhou World Trade Centre Complex 13th Floor, Room No. 1303-1305 Huan Shi Dong Road, China CTO Tel: 8620-87621101/0120/0836 Fax: 8620 87620837 APT Tel/Fax: 8620 36067405 Email: Yaredb@ethiopianairlines.com CONGO, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC Boulevard du 30 Juin No. 1525 Aforia Building-1st Floor Gombe, Kinshasa CTO Tel: 243 817 006 585/810 884 000 APT Mobile: 243 817 006 589 Email: fihres@ethiopianairlines.com fihapt@ethiopianairlines.com YinnesuF@ethiopianairlines.com

CONGO, REPUBLIC Avenue Foch, Brazzaville PO Box 14125 Tel: 242-22 281 0766 Email: Negaw@ethiopianairlines.com COTE D’IVOIRE Avenue Chardy Immeuble Le Paris PO Box 01 BP 5897 ABJ 01,Abidjan CTO Tel: 00 225 20219332 20215538/20219430 Fax: 00 225 20219025 CTO Mobile: 225 05061583 APT Tel: 225 21278819 APT Mobile: 225 05063294 CTO Email: GashawM@ethiopianairlines.com APT Email: abjapt@ethiopianairlines.com DJIBOUTI Bld Administrateur Bernard Djibouti Republique de Djibouti Tel: 00 253 35 42 35 Mobile 815512 Republique de Djibouti Email: DagmawiG@ethiopianairlines.com Website: www.ethiopianairlines.com Rue De Marseilles PO Box 90, Djibouti Tel: (253) 341216 Mobile: 815479 Fax: (253)350599 Email: JIBAP@ethiopianairlines.com EGYPT Concorde El Salam Hotel, 69 Abdelhamid Badawy Street, Heliopolis, Cairo Tel: 0800 0000 411(Reservations 24 hours) Tel: 202-2621 4934 (Admin) Fax: 202 2621 4934 APT: 202 2696 6620 Cargo: 20 10 6698255 Email: caires@ethiopianairlines.com APT: caiapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: etcargo@aviatrans-eg.com EQUITORIAL GUINEA Equatorial Guinea, Malabo Independence Avenue Admin Tel: 00240222657390 Email: ssgadmin@Ethiopianairlines.com CTO Tel: 00240333090588 Fax: 00240333090593 Email: ssgcto@ethiopianairlines.com Area Manager Email: TeshomeGb@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Email: ssgapt@ethiopianairlines.com ETHIOPIA Main City Ticket Office Churchill Road PO Box 1755, Addis Ababa Tel: 251 11 5517000/511931 251 11 6656666 (Reservation) APT Tel: 251 11 5178320 Fax: 251 11 6611474 FRANCE Ethiopian Airlines area office 66 Avenue des champs-Elysées 75008 Paris - France Phone: 33 1 53 892102 and 0 825 826 135 (ticketing) Fax: 33 1 53 771303 Email: Ethiopian-airlines.paris@wanadoo.fr Ethiopian Airlines CDG Airport office Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport – Terminal 2 Phone: +33 1 74 37 04 80 MAS: +33 6 70 81 90 24 Email: parapt@ethiopianairlines.com GABON Quartier London Rue Ogouarouwe Plaque No. 14 PO Box 12802, Libreville Tel: 241 760144/45 APT Tel: 05316666 Fax: 241 760146 CTO Tel: 741315 CTO Tel: 241 741315

GERMANY Ethiopian Airlines, Kaiserstraße 77, 60329 Frankfurt am Main, Germany Sales & Marketing: Tel: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 053 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 235 Email: salesET.germany@aviareps.com Reservations: Tel: (0180-5) 355 600 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 028 Email: reservationsET.germany@aviareps.com Ghana Kwame Nkrumah Avenue, Cocoa House, Ground Floor PO Box 3600, Accra CTO: Tel 233 302 664856/57/58 Fax: 233 302 673938 Mobile: 233 20 2011132 Email: MichaelY@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 233 302 775168/778993/ 233 302 776171 ext. 1322/1324 Mobile: 233 20 2013588 Email: accapt@ethiopianairlines.com HONG KONG Rm 1102 Lippo Sun Plaza 28 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong Tel: 852 2117 0233 Fax: 852 2117 1811 APT: 852 31508122 APT Fax: 852 31508125 SITA: HKGKKET, HKGAPET Email: DanielG@ethiopianairlines.com Shop no. 2 – 5 , Chintamani Plaza, Ground Floor, Andheri Kurla Road Andheri (East), Mumbai – 400 099 Toll Free : 1800 103 9933 / 0124- 4845900 Admin : 022-22163797 Sales : 022- 22162150 Accounts : 022- 22155667 Email : bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Ticket Office: bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Sales: bomsls@ethiopianairlines.com Accounts: bomfin@ethiopianairlines.com Admin: bomadm@ethiopianairlines.com New Delhi (APT) Toll Free No: 1800 103 9933 Tel: 91 11 2331202/0091 11 2331203 CTO: 91 11 2331204 ATO: 91 11 25654872 Fax: 91 11 25655710 Email: Delapt@ethiopianairlines.com www.ethiopianairlines.com ISRAEL 1 Ben Yehuda Street Room 2016, Tel Aviv CTO Tel: 972 3 797 1405 Fax: 972 3 516 0574 Email: TLVRES@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM APT Tel: 972 3 9754096 APT Fax: 972 3 9754097 Email: TLVAPT@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM Opensky-Cargo CGO Tel: 972-3-9724332 CGO Fax: 972-3-9731082 Email: david@opensky-cargo.co.il ITALY Piazza Barberini 52 00187 Rome, Italy CTO Tel: 39 06 42011199 Call center access Tel No: 06 45230459 Tel: 3906 4200 9220 Fax: 3906 481 9377 APT: 3906 6501 0621 APT Fax: 3906 6501 0621 CGO: 3906 65954113 Email: info.roma@ethiopianairlines.it romres@ethiopianairlines.it Milan Address Via Albricci, 9 20122 Milan Tel: +39 02 8056562 Fax: +39 02 72010638 Email: milres@ethiopianairlines.com

KENYA Bruce House Muindi Mbingu Street PO Box 42901-00100, Nairobi Tel: Res: +254 20311507/544; +254 723786649/734 666066 APT: 254 20 822236/822311 Fax: 254 20 2219007 Email: nbores@ethiopianairlines.com nboadm@ethiopianairlines.com Airport: nboapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: Freight In Time JKIA Cargo village, 2nd Avenue Box 41852-00100 Nairobi, Kenya Tel: 254 20-827480/827044/827248 Email: etmanager@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com etoperations@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com TSS Tower, Nkrumah Road PO Box 94600-80115, Mombasa, Kenya Tel: Res: +254 41 2319977/78/79 APT: +254 41 2011199 Cel: +254 714 618989 Email: MBATSM@ethiopianairlines.com MBARES@ethiopianairlines.com MBAAPT@ethiopianairlines.com LEBANON Beirut Gefinor Center Bloc-B, Clemenceau St. Tel: 961 1 752846/7 Fax: 961 1 752846/7 Email: BruckA@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 961 1 629814 Email: beyapt@ethiopianairlines.com MALAWI Kenyatta Drive, Bisnowaty Centre Tel: 00265 1771002/1308/6003/6001/20 31/6004 Fax: 01 772 013 ATO Fax: 01 700 782 Email: LLWCTO@ethiopianairlines.com LLWAPT@ethiopianairlines.com GodfreyL@ethiopianairlines.com W.Gondwe@sdvmalawi.com MALI Square Patrice Lumumba PO Box 1841, Bamako Tel: 00 223 20 22 2088 Fax: 00 223 20 22 6036 APT Mobile: 00 223 66 799 208 Email: DagnewM@ethiopianairlines.com MOZAMBIQUE Av. 25 de Setembro No. 1211 Tel: 258 21 308067/9, 21 325736 Fax: 258 21 303 596 NIGERIA CVC Building 3, Idowu Taylor, Victoria Island, Lagos, Nigeria PO Box 1602 Tel: 234 1 7744711/2 Fax: 234 1 4616297 APT: 234 1 7744710/7751921/3 Email: SolomonY@ethaiopianairlines.com lossales@ethiopianairlines.com lossr@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office, Aviation House Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja Lagos Tel: 234 1 7744710 Fax: 234 1 2711655 Email: losapt@ethiopianairlines.com Sheraton Abuja Hotel No. 1 Ladi Kwali Way, Maitema, Abuja Federal Capital Territory Suite No 173 Tel: 234 92906844/234 92904941 Email: ABVRES@Ethiopianairlines.com; ABVCTO@ Ethiopianairlines.com; ABVADMN@ Ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office -ABV: Ethiopian Airlines, Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport, Abuja-Nigeria Tel: 234 92903852, 234 92902761 Email: abvapt@ethiopianairlines.com; abvagt@ethiopianairlines.com; abvbag@ethiopianairlines.com www.ethiopianairlines.com Ethiopian Cargo LOS-office Nahco Cargo Complex MMIA Ikeja Lagos Tel Mobile: 234 7034065669

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Sales Offices and General Sales Agents | oman Muscat, Ruwi, MBD Area, PO BOX 962, Muscat, Postal code 100 Sultanate of Oman Cell: +968 93891448 Tel: +968 24816565 Fax: +968 24815815 Email: samim@ethiopianairlines.com

Juba South Sudan AirportMinistry Road, Panorama Building Cel: +211 956212301/ +211 955060355 Fax: 249 811 823600 Email: JUBCTO@ethiopianairlines.com JUBTSM@ethiopianairlines.com

Airport Office: Room 238, East Wing Terminal 3 London Heathrow, Airport Middlesex, TW6 1JT Tel: 44-208 745 4234/35 Fax: 44-208 745 7936 Email: lonapt@ethiopianairlines.com

RWANDA Union trade center (UTC) building First floor, office No. 25 CTO Tel: 250252570440/42, 2502525755045 Fax: 252570441 Mobile: 250788562469 (Area Manager) Email: BrukE@ethiopianairlines.com kglsm@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 2502525100000 Mobile: 250-788595536/788426164/ 788517905/788828865 Email: kglapt@ethiopianairlines.com kglagt@ethiopianairlines.com

Malakal Ethiopian Airlines South Sudan Hotel Room No 02 Malkal Tel: 00249(0)955722506 Vivacell Fax: 00249(0)920698951 MTN

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Airport Office Dulles International Airport PO Box 16855 Washington, DC 20041 Toll Free No: 800 4452733 Tel: 703 572 6809, 703 572 8740 Fax: 703 572 8738 Email: wasapt@ethiopianairlines.com

SAUDI ARABIA Medina Road, Adham Center PO Box 8913, Jeddah 21492 Tel: 9662 6512365/6614/9609 Fax: 9662 6516670 APT: 9662 6853064/196 APT Fax: 9662-685316 CGO Tel/Fax: 9662 6851041 Email: Jedcto@ethiopianairlines.com Jeddah Airport Fax: 966 2 6853196 Mobile: 966 504301358 Email: jedapt@ethiopianairlines.com Jeddah Cargo Office Tel: 966 2 6850756 / 6851041 Fax: 966 2 6851041 Email: jedcgo@ethiopianairlines.com Riyadh Ticket or Town Office Email: ruhcto@ethiopianairlines.com Mobile: 966 505217168 Dammam, Silver Tower Building, King Abdul Aziz Street, Al Khobar Tel: 966 (3) 8984696, Fax: 966 (3) 8991539 Cell: 966 0559540076 Email: YohannesB@ethiopianairlines.com SENEGAL Immeuble La Rotonde, Rue Dr. Theze PO Box 50800, CP 18524 DKR RP Tel: 221 33 823 5552/54 Fax: 221 33 823 5541 Apt Tel: 221 33 820 9396/5077 Email: Dkrres@ethiopianairlines.com SOMALI LAND CI Maarat al Khayr Building Tel: 252 2 520681/528445 Mobile: 252 2 4427575 Email: hgaet@hotmail.com SOUTH AFRICA 156 BRAM FISCHER DRIVE 2nd Floor Holiday House – Randburg CTO Tel: 27 11 7815950 CTO Fax: 27 11 7816040 APT Tel: 27 11 3903819 APT Fax: 27 11 3943438 CTO Email: YohannesTK@ethiopianairlines. com ATO jnbapt@ethiopianairliness.com SWEDEN Kungsgatan 37, SE-11156 Stockholm Tel: 46 0 8 440 0060/ 46 0 8 440 2900 ATO: 46 8 59360170 CTO: 46 8 4402900/4400060 Fax: 46 0 8 206622 Cell: 0046 709556073 APT: 46 859360170 Email: res.ethiopian@telia.com info.ethiopian@telia.com SUDAN 2 Square 2b Khartoum east Parlaman street, El Sheikh Mustefa El Amin Bldg Khartoum, Sudan Tel: 249 1 83762063/88 Fax: 2491 83788428 APT: 2491 8790991 Email: krtres@ethiopianairlines.com krtsm@ethiopianairlines.com

TANZANIA T.D.F.L Building Ohio Street PO Box 3187, Dar-es-Salaam Tel: 255 22 2117063 65/2125443 Fax: 255 22 2115875 Mobile: 255 754 285 899 786 110 066 Area Manager: 255 786 285 899 Email: Milatm@ethiopianairlines.com darres@ethiopianairlines.com Dar APT Tel: 255-22 2844243 Mobile: 255 786285898 Email: darapt@ethiopianairlines.com Boma Road, PO Box 93 Arusha, Tanzania CTO: 255 27 2506167 - 2504231, 2509904 TSM Mobile: 255-782-450224 Email: jrocto@ethiopianairlines.com arkres@ethiopianairlines.com Kilimanjaro Airport: 255 27 2554159 Email: jroapt@ethiopianairlines.com THAILAND 140 One Pacific Bldg, Unit 1807 18th Floor, Sukhumvit Road Klongtoey, Bangkok CTO Tel: 66 0 26534366/7 Fax: 66 0 26534370 Email: bkkcto@ethiopianairlines.com bkkres@ethiopianairlines.com bkksm@ethiopianairlines.com Suvarnabhumi Airport 2nd Flr, Unit Z2-016, Airlines Operation Bldg (Airport Office) APT Tel: 66 0 21343062/3/4 APT Fax: 66 0 21343060 Email: bkkapt@ethiopianairlines.com General Sales Agent (Cargo Only) Tel: 66 0 22379207/8/9 Fax: 66 0 22379200 Email: bkkgsa@csloxinfo.com TOGO Hotel Palm Beach, 1 Rue Komore PO Box 12923 CTO Tel: 228 22 21 70 74/ 22 21 87 38 CTO Fax: 228 22 22 18 32 APT Tel: 228 22 26 30 39/22822361240 Ext. 4313/4517 Email: SeblewA@ethiopianairlines.com lfwcto@ethiopianairlines.com lfwapt@ethiopianairlines.com UGANDA Plot 1 Kimathi Avenue, PO Box 3591 Kampala Tel: 4254796, 4345577, 4345577/8, 4345118 Fax: 4231455 Entebbe Tel: 4320570, 4321130 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES Flat 202, Pearl Bldg, Beniyas Street PO Box 7140, Dubai Tel: 9714 2237963/87 Fax: 9714 2273306 APT: 9714 2166833/1833/2161833 APT Fax: 9714 2244841/2822655 CGO: 9714 2822880/2163813 CGO Fax: 9714 2822655 CTO Email: dxbcto@ethiopianairlines.com APT Email: dxbapt@ethiopianairlines.com CGO Email: dxbcgo@ethiopianair-lines.com UNITED KINGDOM City office: 1 Dukes Gate, Action Lane London, W4 5DX Tel: 44-208 987 9086 (admin) 44-0800 635 0644 (reservations) Fax: 44-208 747 9339 Email: loners@ethiopianairlines.com

Reservation, Ticketing and Customer Relations 277 South Washington St. Suite 120 Alexandria, VA 22314 Toll Free No: 800 445 2733 Tel: 703 682 0569 Fax: 703 682 0573 Email: etusa@ethiopianairlines.com ZAMBIA Lusaka CTO Address Indo Zambia Bank Building Off Cairo Road, Plot No. 6907, PO Box 38392, Lusaka Direct Tel: 260 211 236401/02/03 Fax: 260 211 235644 Mobile: 260 955 236401/260 979 821971 Email: SenaitN@ethiopianairlines.com LUNRES@ethiopianairlines.com LUNCTO@ethiopianairlines.com APT Address Lusaka International Airport PO Box 38392, Lusaka Zambia Tel: 260 211 271141 Email: LUNAPT@ethiopianairlines.com ZANZIBAR Malindi opposite Ijimaa Mosque Tel: 255 774417070, 777667665 Email: znzapt@ethiopianairlines.com znzstation@ethiopianairlines.com ZIMBABWE Cabs Center, 4th Floor CNR Jason Moyo Avenue 2nd St. PO Box 1332, Harare Tel: 263 4790705/6/700735 Fax: 263 4795216, APT: 263 4575191 Email: FitsimtD@mweb.co.zw hreres@ethiopianairlines.com Country Name Call Center Numbers Bahrain 973-16199205 Belgium 32 28948303 Egypt 800 000 0411/202-21600-006 France 0800901031 Germany 8001818982 Hong Kong 800905629 India 18001039933/0124-4845900 Israel 972 3763 1052 Italy 39-0645230459 Lebanon 00961 142 7627 code 6247 North China 108007141635/864001589689 Saudi Arabia 800 814 0018 South Africa 0800984023 South China 108001401619/86-4001589689 Sweden 46-850513549 Thailand 18001562069708 United Arab Emirates (UAE) 8 000 3570 2401 United Kingdom 08006350644 United States of America 1800 445 2733

fly ethiopian

ethiopian airlines

general sales Agents

ANGOLA Reino Comercio Geral, Rue Marques Das Minas No.4, Luanda Angola Tel: 00244 222 445 713, Fax: 00244 222 335 713, Email: tchukombe@yahoo.com ARGENTINA Aviareps Tel: 54 1148933003, Fax: 54 114893005 AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND World Aviation System Mezannine Level, 403 George Street, Sydney NSW 2000 Australia Tel: (02) 9244 2096, Fax: (02) 9290 3441 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: MCH Holding Australia Pty Ltd. Unit 6, MIAC Building, 1international Drive, Tullamarine, Vic. 3040. Fax: 03 9093 1377, Tel: 03 9093 1355 Email: hiran@mchholding.com.au AUSTRIA & HUNGARY Aviareps AG, Landsberger Str.155, 80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: ATC Aviation ACC, Bldg. 262, Entr. 08, 3rd Fl, AT-1300 Vienna Tel: 43 1 7007 388 54, Fax: 43 1 7007 388 53 Email: vie@atc-aviation.com BAHRAIN Chamber of Commerce Building Tel: 973 17208504/17223315 Fax: 973 17210175 Email: bitgsa@Bahraintravel.com SITA: BAHTOET BANGLADESH MAAS Travels & Tours Ltd., Maas Travels & Tours, R.M Centre, 101 Gulshan Avenue, Gulshan, Dhaka-1212, Bangladesh Tel: 8802 9559852/9568388/9565380 Fax: 8802 956 5378, Email: mass@agni.com Globe Travel Tel: 253 354848 BELGIUM, LUXEMBOURG & NETHERLANDS Brussels RTO Tel: 0032 2712 0586 RTO Fax: 0032 2725 8392 Tel: 32 0 22750175/32 0 24034476 Fax: 32 0 24034479 Aviareps, Landsberg Str.155, 6087 Munchen, Germany Tel: 31 020 655 3680, Fax: 31 020 655 3686 Email: Mgaebler@aviareps.com Cargo: Kales Group B.V. Triport Building 1, 6th Floor Evert Van de beekstraat 46 1118 CL Schiphol, The Netherlands Tel: 31 20 653 4886, Fax: 31 20 653 4717 Email: danny.vanthienen@kales.com Niels.verhaest@kales.com, Danielle.meyers@kales.com BENIN Vitesse Voyage M/S ABD Vitesse Voyages, Rue de Ouidah, Immeuble Toxi Labo Carre 404, Cotonou, Benin Tel: 22921320167/22964054232, Fax: 229 21320170, Email: abdvitesse@yahoo.fr BRAZIL Aviareps Tel: 5511 3123 1800, Fax: 5511 3259 8440 BURKINA FASO EUROWORLD SARL, EURO WORLD (Burkina Faso), 01BP4883 OUAGADOUGOU, KWAME N'NKRUMAH, Ouagadougou-Burkina Faso Tel: 226 50 30 16 52/16 85, Fax: 226 50 30 18 86, Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com

Continued on next page » march/april 2013

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| General Sales Agents

CANADA Euro link Ltd., Address : 1027 Yonge Street, 1st Floor, Toronto, ON , M4W 2K9, Canada Phone : +1 (416) 922 9989 Fax : +1 (416) 922 1371 Toll Free : 1 855 269 0362 Email : gsa@ethiopiancanada.com Cargo: Airlines Service International (ASI), 5160 Explorer Drive, Unit 4, Suite F, Mississauga, Ontario 4W 4T7 Tel: 905629 4522, Fax: 905 629 4651 Email: asi@airlineservices.com CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC Africa Discovery, Avenue B. Boganda, PO Box 1182, Bangui, Central African Republic Tel: 236752511117 Fax: 49-69-26952940 Email: felicite@africa-discovery.net CHILE Aviareps Tel: 562 2362748/2362749, Fax: 562 2362750 CHINA Suite 702, Central Plaza, 227 Huang Pi North Road, Shanghai Tel: 86-21-63758388, Fax: 86-021-63758611 Email: cshi@hungnkit.com Hangzhou A-903 World Trade Center, No. 122 Shuguang Road, Hangzhou. P.C. 310007 Tel: 057187960600, Fax: 057187960677 East China, Hung & Kit Operational office, Suite 702, Central Plaza Tel: 86 21 63758388, Fax: 86 21 63758611 Email: royye@hungnkit.com North East China, Harbin Yuechheng Tourism Consulting Service Co., LTD Room 1604, Yengtze River Tel: 045182651966/0866/0366, Fax: 45182657678 Email: Zhou-fj@hotmail.com Southwest China, East Plaza 1-2-902, No.229 Zhiquan, section, East avenue, Chengdu, China Tel: 0086-28-84701460/80/90 Fax: 0086-28-84701470 Email: everlasting_riyue@126.com, www.riyuehangfu.com Cargo: SHA, BJS, HGH & CAN Megacap Logistics International Ltd; Room G 11/F, Shanghai Zhaofeng Universal Building, 1800 Zhongshan Road West Shanghai 200235 China Tel: 86 21 6440 0907, Fax: 86 21 6440 3435 Email: kevinchen@megacap.com.cn allantam@megacap.com.cn COLOMBIA Aviareps Tel: 571 317 2805/257 1818, Fax: 571 317 2890 Comoros Matembezi Travel & Tourism, Itsambouni, Moroni Tel: 2697730422/330400, Fax: 2697730075 Email: agence.matembezi@comorestelecom.com CONGO REPUBLIC Euro World Sarl, Immeuble Arc-En face chambre de Commerce, 1st floor-Centre Ville, Brazzaville Tel: 242 6712020/6713037 Cel: 971505589504, Fax: 31 020 655 3686 Email: a_chandirani@yahoo.com CONGO DRC Alamdar Tour & Travels, PO Box: 2976 Lubumbashi Tel: 243 818113377, Fax : 243 1801751933 Email: vazir@jefferytravels.com CYPRUS Orthodoxou Aviation Ltd., Orthodoxou Aviation Ltd, United Nations Street 44, 6042, Larmaca, Cyprus Tel: 357 24 841 150, Fax: 357 24 841 005 Email: aorthodoxou@orthodoxou.com.cy CZECH & SLOVAK REPUBLICS, POLAND UL Ujazdowskie, 20 Street, 00478 Warsaw Tel: 48-22-6253146, Fax: 48-22-6250467 Email: rgrabski&tal.pl

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Tal Aviation Poland Ltd. Tel: 48 22 627 2259, Fax: 48 22 625 3146 Email: ethiopian@tal.pl DENMARK, NORWAY, LITHUANIA & LATVIA Khyber International Khyber International, ester Farimagsagade 3, DK-1606 Copenhagen V Denmark Tel: 45 33121188, Fax: 4533933799 Email: Khan@khyber.dk, SITA: CPHZZET Cargo: Kales Airline Services DK - 7190 Billund Denmark Tel: 45 75354511, Fax: 45 75354569 DJIBOUTI Globe Travel, Bld Administrateur Bernard Djibouti Bld, PO Box 1161,Republique de DJIBOUTI Tel: 00253 354235/00253 351007, Fax: 00253 350599 Email: globe_ethiopian@intnet.com EGYPT Aviatrans Egyptian Air Service Co. Ltd PO Box 24 Orman Cairo Egypt Tel: 202 37484473, Fax: 202 37608959 Email: Aviatrans@aviatrans.com.eg FINLAND & ESTONIA Matkantekijat Oy-Tourplanners Ltd, Annankatu 16 B 29, 3 Krs 00120, Helsinki, Finland Tel: 358 9 687 78911, Fax: 358 9687 78910 Email: tuomas.mantysaari@matkantekijat.fi Cargo: Kales Airline Services oy Perintötie 2D, 01510 Vantaa, Finland Tel: 358 9 8700 350, Fax: 358 9 8700 3515 FRANCE Air promotion group (APG) 66 Avenue des Champs-Elysées75008 Paris - France Tel: 33 153 771316, Fax: 33 1 53 77 13 05 Email: s.de-saint-sauveur@apg.fr Cargo: Paris Cargo World France SARL PO Box 69003 Roissy CDG Cedex France Tel: 33 1 49 38 90 57, Fax: 33 1 49.38 90 63 Email: cecile@cargoworld.fr, Jhon.sloot@etcargo.fr, paul@cargoworld.fr GERMANY Ethiopian Airlines, Kaiserstraße 77, 60329 Frankfurt am Main, Germany Sales & Marketing: Tel: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 053 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 235 Email: salesET.germany@aviareps.com Reservations: Tel: (0180-5) 355 600 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 028 Email: reservationsET.germany@aviareps.com Cargo: ATC Aviation, Cargo City Süd, Geb.641, 60549 Frankfurt/Germany Tel: 49 0 69 698053 47, Fax: 49 0 69 698053 20 Email: fra@atc-aviation.com GREECE Gold Star Ltd. Tel: 30 210 3246706, Fax: 30 210 3246723 Email: ethiopian@goldstar.gr GUINEA GUINEE-VOYAGES Rue KA 011 BP 5842 Almamya, Conakry Tel: 224-30451992/30412435, Mobile: 00 224-60260554/ 60340144/60212320 Email: guineevoyages@yahoo.fr EI CISSE Amacif Bldg Conakrey Guinea Tel: 22460212320/340144 Fax: 224-30478063/22430012611 Email: guineevoyages@yahoo.fr HONG KONG Cargo: Pacific Air (HK) Limited Tel: 852 2759 4578, Fax: 852 2759 4316 Email: cargoeth@pacificair.com.hk

INDIA 30-B World Trade, Ground Floor, World Trade Centre, Mumbai 400 005 Email: bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Tel: Admin: 22163797 Fax: 22153725, Sales: 22162150, Res: 1800 103 9933 Toll free Supvr: 22166069, Accounts: 22155667 ATO: 66859410/66859411, Fax:66859412, 28366700 Ext: 3514 Cargo Tel: 26828415/26828416 Fax: 26828417, TSV: 26828128 Sabre: BOMCTET, BOMAMET, BOMSMET, BOMAPET, BOMCGET STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD RZQ Alps Building, 1st Floor, 14381496 56 Janpath, New Delhi 110 001 Tel: Admin: (011) 23312304 CTO: (011) 23312302/303 Cargo: (011) 25653739/25653740 APT: (011) 25654872 (011) 25652350 Ext 1284 Fax: (011) 25655710 Sabre: DELCTET, DELSMET, DELAPET Email: Solomony@ethiopianairlines.com etsales@sticgroup.com Sandeep Kumar Meena 9910061099 etreservations@sticgroup.com Kalpana Ganju Cargo: Rajiv Maini: 9871409345 Email: rajivmaini@sticgroup.com Bombay Airport Address: 14000125 Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport Terminal 2B, 2nd Floor Sahar, Mumbai 400 099 Toll Free No: 1800 103 9933, STIC Travels Bombay Contact Tel: 22182628 or 22182831 GURANS TRAVEL & TOURS P LTD Thapathali, Tripureswor ECU 14900115 PO Box 2727, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel: (9771) 4216818, Fax: (9771) 4212736 Email: imel@wlink.com.np Mr. Anil Amatya 9851049052 Mr. T. Joshi: 9851049731 New Delhi, Stic Travels PVT LTD, Stic House, R-907, New Rajinder Nagar,New Delhi-110 060, Tel: 110 060,28745569,28742485, Fax: 0091 11 28741491 Email: chairman@sticgroup.com, md@sticgroup.com, Kalpana Ganju Cargo: Rajiv Maini: 9871409345, rajivmaini@sticgroup.com BENZY HOLIDAYS PVT LTD, 14389141 101 Crystal Arcade, C. G. Road, Navrangpura Ahmedabad, 380 006 OVQ Tel: (079) 26403525, 30013430/32 Fax: 26403414 Email: sandeep@benzyethiopian.com accounts.amd@benzyethiopian.com Shoba Kokate 9920213661, shobha@akbartravels.in LEONARD TRAVELS PVT LTD WJX, Taj House, 5 Mahatama Ghandi Road, Pune-411001 India Tel: (020) 26056461, Fax: (020) 26130782 Email: bhojwanis@et.net Sharaf Cargo PVT LTD, MSC House Andheri East Mumbai 400 059 Tel: 91 226731 3001, Fax: 91 226731 3010 Email: oza@in.sharafcargo.com MAAS TRAVELS & TOURS LTD WEV 42380391 Namazi, Chamber, 16 Motijheel Comm Area Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh Tel: (8802) 7170517/9568388/9565380 Fax: (8802) 9565378 Email: amin.maas@gmail.com Resi: Azad: 8821569 Mobile: 0171524097 Azad Direct: (8802) 9887711 Resi: Amin: (8802) 9338548 (M) +8801819257221, Afzal Hossain: +8801711635146, 88028835802 Qayyum: 8801819220198 STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 14000114 No 3-5874/A, Grnd Flr, Vipanchi Estate Hyderguda, WKG Hyderabad 500 029, Andhra Pradesh Contact: Sandeep Menon Email: SANDEEP.MENON@sticgroup.com Tel: (040) 66618755 or 23231451, 6612955 Fax: (040) 66612966 Email: stichyd@sticgroup.com

Passengers and Cargo: STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 14000243 WIG G-5 Imperial Court, 33/1 Cunningham Road Bangalore 560 052, Karnataka Contact: Douglas Rozario (Passengers) Krishnan Balasamy (Cargo) Tel: (080) 22267613/22202408/22256194/ 22256195/22269189/22269180/81/82/83/ 86/87, Fax: (080) 22202409 Email: blr@sticgroup.com Email: Douglas.drozario@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 140002210 2nd Floor Sriniket WIW Old Thevera Road, Cochin 682 016, Kerala Contact: Mrs. Meenakshi Sethuram Tel: (0484) 2367476/477/478 Fax: (0484) 2367476 Email: cochin@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 2nd Floor, 301 Alfa Estate Bldg G.T.Road. Jallandhar 144001 , Punjab Contact: Mr. Amit Sharma Tel: (0181) 2232056/58 Fax: (0181)2230961 Email: sticqju@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 14000151 Camac Towers, Grnd Flr, 3C Camac Street Kolkata 700016, West Bengal WHQ Contact: Mr. Sirshendu Nag Tel: Tel: (033) 22174913/17 22292092, 294464/222265989 Fax: (033) 22266588 Email: sticccu@sticgroup.com Email: sirshendu.nag@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD Corporate Office Only STIC Travel Group 2nd Floor, Tower C, Cyber Greens DLF, Phase III Gurgaon, Haryana 122 002 Tel: 0124 4595300, Fax: 0124 4114197 Email: corporateoffice@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD, SCO 42-43-44 Sector 17A Chandigarh 160017, Punjab Contact: Mr. Satinder Sharma Tel: (0172) 2706562/67/2721336/337 Fax: (0172) 2702770 Email: sticixc@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 14000136 Temple Tower, 672 Anna Salai Nandanam Chennai 600 035 WER Contact: Mr L Nagraj Email: nagaraj@sticgroup.com Mobile: 9884027050 Tel: (044) 24330211/24351829 24330659/24330098 Fax: (044) 24330170 Email: sticmaa@sticgroup.com INDONESIA PT Ayubenga, Menara Imperium, JI.H.R.Rasima Saidn Kav.1, Jakarta 12980, Indonesia Tel: 62 021 8356214 Fax: 62 021 8363937 Email: Ayubjkt@ayaberga.co.id IRAN Iran National Airlines Corp. Tel: 9821 6002010, Fax: 9821 6012941 IRELAND PremAir Marketing services Tel: 353-1-663-3938, Fax: 353-1-661-0752 Email: ethiopian@premair.ie Cargo: Heavyweight Air Express Ltd Tel: 353 -1-811-8693, Fax: 353-1-811-8901 Email: hae.ie@heavy-weight.ie ISRAEL Opensky Cargo Ltd Tel: 972 3 972 4338 CTO Tel: 972 3 7971405 Central Reservation Office Tel: 972 3 7971400/1403/1404 Reservation Agent Tel: 972 3 7971407, ShebaMiles & Group desk Email: david@opensky-cargo.co.il


General Sales Agents | ITALY Cargo: ATC Tel: 39 02 506791, Fax: 39 02 55400116 Email: INFO@ATCMIL.IT, SITA: MILGSET/ CRT/CMIZZET, Tel: 39 06 65010715, Fax: 39 06 65010242, Email: INFO@ATCFCO.IT, SITA: ROMGSET JAPAN Air System Inc., Toranomon TBL Building 8F 1-19-9, Toranomon Minato-Ku, Tokyo 1050001 Tel: 03-3593-6608, Fax: 03-3593-6534 Email: Asipaxtyo@airsystem.ip Cargo: U-Transport Global Inc Tel: 81 3 3522 2286, Fax: 81 3 3522 2280 Email: minako-aso@utijapan.co.jp JORDAN Passenger & Cargo: Al Karmel Travel & Tourism Trading, Jabal Ei Hussin Khaleed Bin Waleed St. PO Box 926497 Tel: 962 6 5688301 Fax: 962 6 5688302 Email: alkarmel@alkarmel.com.jo KENYA Cargo: Freight In Time PO Box 41852-00100, Nairobi, Kenya Email: etmanager@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com Tel: 254 020-827044/827248/9 /827480 Ext: 132, Fax: 254 020-822709 Cell: 254 721 217141 Wireless: 254 020-3560579 KUWAIT Al-Sawan Co. W.L.L., M/S Al-Sawan Company W.L.L, Al Ghazali St (Al Rai), Kuwait Tel: 00965-4745190; Fax: 00965-4765661, Email: ceo@alsawan.com MALAYSIA Plancongan Abadi, Suite 13.O1A, 13th floor, Central Plaza, 50250 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Tel: 603 2141 2190, Fax: 603 2143 3272 Email: etkul@abadi.com.my MALTA Discover Momentum, L.L.C, 14350 North 87th Street Suite 265, Scottsdale, Arizona, 85260 USA Tel: 480 707 5566, Fax: 480 707 5575 Email: Jenny-Adams@discovertheworld.com/ www.discovertheworld.com MAURITANIA Agence Megrebine de Voyages, IRELAND BLYTH LTD, Aviation Pole, 5th floor, IBL House, Caudan, Port Louis Mauritius Tel: 230-203-2000/2082 Fax: 230-212-4050 Email: Ivedwards@iblgroup.com MAURITIUS & MADAGASCAR Ireland Blyth Ltd, Aviation Pole, 5th floor, IBL House, Caudan, Port Louis Mauritius Tel: 230-203-2000/2082, Fax: 230-2124050, Email: Ivedwards@iblgroup.com MEXICO Aviareps Tel: 5255-5212-1193, Toll free: 01800-5108212 (MEX), Fax: 5255-5553-5867 NEPAL Gurans Travel & Tours PVT LTD, Thapathali, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel: 00977 1 4216818, Fax: 00977 1 4212736, Email: imel@wlink.com.np NETHERLANDS Cargo: Global Airlines Services BV Amsterdam Airport Columbus Gebouw 1 Folkstoneweg 34 NL-1118 LM Amsterdam Airport Tel: 0031 20 653 71 00 Fax: 0031 20 653 55 04 Email: info@globalairline.nl OMAN National Travel & Tourism, Postal Code 113, Muscat, Oman Tel: 00968-24566046, Fax: 968 24566125 Email: nttoman@omantel.net.om

PAKISTAN Trade Winds Associates Pvt. Ltd., 33-Hotel Metropole, MerewetherRoad, Islamabad Tel: 009221-5661712-14 Fax: 009221-5661715 Email: aviation@tradewind.com.pk

SOMALILAND Nobel Travel Agency, 26 Jun Main Road, Emarat Alkhayrm Building, 1st floor office No. 14, Hargiessa, Somaliland Tel: 252 2 528445/4 427575 Email: ntahga@hotmail.com

Karachi Tel: 9221 3566 1712-13-14 & 16 Fax: 9221 3566 1715

SOUTH AFRICA Holiday Holdings International (Pty)Ltd, 156 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg, 2194, South Africa Tel: 27 11 289 8264, Fax: 27 11 289 8164 Email: g.simpson@holodayholdings.co.za

Lahore Tel: 9242-3630-5229, 9242-3636-5165 Fax: 9242-3631-4051 Tel: 2823040/2823350, Fax: 2824030 Tel: 6305229/6365165, Fax: 6314051 PERU Aviareps Tel: 511-2418289/2416767, Fax: 511-8278 PHILIPPINES Travel Wide Assoc. Sales Phils., Inc 8/F, Unit 817 Peninsula Court Bldg, 8735 Paseo de Roxas Ave, Makati City 1226,Philippines Tel: 63-2-5198789, Fax: 63-2-5195014 Web: www.twasp.com QATAR Fahd Travels, Doha, Qatar Tel: 00974-4432233, Fax: 00974-4432266 Email: fahd-travels@qatar.net.qa RUSSIA Aviareps, Olympic Plaza, 39, Prospect Mira Bldg.2, 129110 Moscow Russia Tel: 7 495 937 59 50, Fax: 7 495 937 59 51 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: GSA Russia Global Services Ltd. Amathuntos Avenue 8, Marina Complex Block A, No. 2, 4531 Limassol Cyprus Tel: 7 495 7953838, Mobile: 7 905 7801893 Email: Olga.Polyanskaya@aircargopro.com RWANDA Euro World Sarl, Kigali, Satguru International Tel: 250 570440/570442, Fax: 250 570441 Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com Cargo: S.A.R.L SDV PO Box 1338, avenue de la douane, Kigali, Rwanda Email: rodolphe.kembukuswa@bollore.com SAUDI ARABIA Al Zouman Aviation, Jeddah Tel: 966 2 6531222, Fax: 966 2 6517501 Email: aviation@alzouman.com.sa Alkhobar Tel: 966 3 8649000, Fax: 966 3 8941205 SERBIA CAT Aviation, Knez Mihajlova 30 Tel: 381 641135735 Email: qat@yubc.net SEYCHELLES Mason’s Travel Pty. Ltd. PO Box 459 Victoria Mahe Seychelles Tel: 0024 4288888 Fax: 248 4225273/248 4288820 Email: amason@masonstravel.com SIERRA LEONE IPC TRAVEL 22 Siaka Stevens Street Freetown Tel: 00 232-221481, Email: ipc@sierratel.si Email: info@ipctravel.com SINGAPORE CitiAir & Holidays Pte.Ltd.48 Serangoon Road, 01-10 Little India Arcade Singapore 217950 Tel: 6562971213, Fax: 6562971884 Email: citiair@pacific.net.sq Orient Air Pte. Ltd, 05-22,Cargo Agt Bldg D 9 Airline road, Changi Airfreight Center Singapore 819827 Tel: 65 6214 2193/6 or 65 6214 2192, Fax: 65 6214 2199 SOMALIA Safeway Travel, Tourism and Cargo Agency, Maka Al-Mukarama street, Area number 4, Mogadishu Tel: 618304444 Email: safewayagency@hotmail.com

Cargo: Aero-Link Consulting Warehouse 34, Cargo, Section, P.O Box 1307, O.R. Tambo International Airport, Gauteng, 1627 Tel: +27 11 390 3132/3366, Fax: +27 11 390 3139/3149 Email: jeremy@aero-link.co.za 156 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg, 2194, South Africa Tel: 27112898264, Fax: 27112898164 Email: g.simpson@holidayholdings.co.2a SOUTH KOREA Sharp Aviation K Inc Tel: 82 2 722156, Fax: 82 2 7342813 Email: jclee@sharp.co.kr Cargo: Sharp Inc Tel: 82 2 7221567, Fax: 82 2 7342813 Email: sspaik@sharp.co.kr SPAIN & PORTUGAL AirTravel Management Calle Diego de leone, 69 40A-28006, Madrid, Spain Tel: 34 91 4022718, Fax: 34 91 4015239 Email: ethiopian@airlinesairmat.com Cargo: CRS Airline’s Representatives Conchita Supervia, 15–Local 08028 BARCELONA (SPAIN) Tel: 34 931888690, Fax: 34 93409251 SRI LANKA VMS Aviation Air Services PVT LTD #164 Galle Road, Colombo 04, Sri Lanka Hussien: 0094 777590100 Tel: 0094 11 2502139 / 0094 11 4377815 6 Fax: 0094 11 2502190 Email: vikky@eureka.lk hussein@vmstravels.net SWEDEN Khyber International Tel: 46-8 4111826, Fax: 46-8 4111826 Email: ethiopianairlies@khyberise Cargo: Kales Airline Services Tel: 46 40 36 38 10 Fax 46 40 36 38 19 Cargo: Kales Airline Services Tel: 46 8 594 411 90, Fax: 46 8 594 42244 SWITZERLAND Airline center/AVIAREPS, AIRLINECENTER, Badenerstresse, Zurich,Switzerland Tel: 4122 91 98999 Fax: 4122 91 98900 Email: twelti@aviareps.com AIRNAUTIC AG, Peter Merian Str.2 CH-4002, Cargo: Basel Switzerland Basel Tel: 41 61 227 9797 Fax: 41 61 227 9780 Email: info@airnautic.ch SYRIA Passenger & Cargo: Al Tarek Travel & Tourism Fardous St, PO Box 30185 Tel: 963 11 2216265 / 2211941 Fax: 963 11 2235225 TAIWAN Apex Travel Services Ltd., 6F-3 No. 57, Fi Shin N. Rd Taipei, Taiwan Tel: 886 2 2740 7722, Fax: 886 2 2740 5570 Email: tpetorg@1b.hinet.net Cargo: Global Aviation Service (Taiwan) Inc. Tel: 886 2 2658 0255, Fax: 886 2 2659 7610 Email: cgo@gastwn.com gastwn@ms12.hinet.et

fly ethiopian

TANZANIA Arusha, Boma Road Tel: 255 2 72504231/6167 255 2 72509904-TSM Kilimanjaro Airport Tel: 255 2 72554159 Email: jrocto@ethiopianairlines.com arkapt@ethiopianairlines.com THAILAND Cargo: Oriole Travel & Tour Tel: 662 2379201 9, Fax: 662 2379200 Email: ealbkket@loxinfo.co.th TUNISIA Atlantis International LTD, S.A., 29, Ave Du Japon, Immueble Fatma, 1073 Montplaisir, Tunis, Tunisia Tel: 216 71 908 999/216 906 000 Fax: 216 71 904 110 Email: atlantis@atlantis.tn TURKEY Panorama Havacilik Ve Turizm Ltd., Cumhuriyet Cad. Apt. 185/1, Harbiye 34373, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: 90 212 2315919, Fax: 90 212 2344999 Email: Ethiopian@arartur.com.tr Cargo: Airmark GSA Tas. Ltd. Sti.Omar Avni mah, Dumen Sok., No: 11/4 34437, Taksim, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: 90 212 444 1 472, Fax: 90 212 249 474 8 Email: management@air-mark.com UGANDA Cargo: Freight In Time Ltd., PO Box 70942 Kampala, Uganda Tel: 256 0774 898075, Fax: 256 414 223996 Email: amit@freight-in-time.com UNITED KINGDOM Cargo: Air Liaison Ltd - Heavyweight Air Express Group Tel: 44-1753 210 008, Fax: 44-208 831 9309, Email: ethiopianops@air-liaison.net UNITED ARAB EMIRATES ABU DHABI Salem Travel Agency, bun Dhabi, UAE Tel: 97126273333/6218000, Fax: 009712-6211155, Email: info@salemtravelagency.com DUBAI Passenger & Cargo: Asian Air Travel & Tour Agency, N.R.L Group bldg.AlGharhoud, Dubai, UAE Tel: 009714 2826322, Fax: 009714 2825727, Email: hnrml@nrlgroup.ae UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Cargo: Heavy Weight Air Express (HW) Toll Free No: 800 445 2733, Tel: 630 595 2323/571 480 5200, Fax: 630 595 3232, Email: hea.us@heavy-uweight.com VENEZUELA Aviareps Tel: 58 212 2866951, Fax: 58 212 2866951 VIETNAM Hai Au Building (11th Floor) 39b Truong Son Str., Tan Banh Dist Ho Chi Monh City Vietnam Tel: 84835472487, Fax: 84835472481-86 Email: guangdx@vector-aviation.com Vector Aviation Co. Ltd Hai Au Building (11th Floor), 39B Truong Son Str.,Tan Binh Dist,HO CHI MINH City,Veitnam Tel: 848 3547 2487, Fax: 848 3547 2481-86 YEMEN Marib Travel & Tourism, Ali Abdul Mughni Street, Sanaa,Yemen Tel: 9671-274199, Fax: 9671-271803 Email: manager@marib-tours.com ZAMBIA Cargo: EAS Zambia Ltd Bid Air Cargo, Kenneth Kaunda International Airport, PO Box 37287 Lusaka Tel: 27 11230460021, Fax: 27865910066 ZANZIBAR Passenger & Cargo: MARHABA HOTELS TRAVELS & TOURS LTD Tel: 255 24 2231527-28 Email: marhaba@zanzinet.com march/april 2013

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A warm southern Ethiopian welcome awaits you at Haile Resort, a low-rise resort-style hotel encompassing 7.5 acres of tropical beauty. Just a walk away from Lake Hawassa, our Resort features a variety of activities whether you are coming for a business meeting or a family vacation. Make yourself comfortable and relax in the peaceful surrounding of our spacious guest rooms. Little extras such as refrigerator, 26� flat panel HD LCD TVs and in-room Sidama Coffee, will ensure A warm your stay southern has all the Ethiopian comforts ofwelcome home. awaits you at Haile Resort, a low-rise resort-style hotel encompassing acres of tropical Our spacious pool7.5 area, complete with abeauty. waterfall, is a great relax.Hawassa, We also offer Just a walk awayplace fromto Lake our a complimentary fitness centerofsoactivities you can keep up you Resort features a variety whether with workout whilemeeting away from are your coming for aroutine business or ahome. family After a long day, try our Spa featuring massage vacation. and body treatment. Make yourself comfortable and relax in the peaceful surrounding our spacious guest Stay connected with our of free Wireless Internet rooms.located in our hotel lobby. Access Enjoy fresh seafood continental cuisine in the Our spacious pooland area, complete with a contemporary of Shola Grill. We Or gather waterfall, is aambience great place to relax. also offer a with friends and colleagues for a cocktail, light keep meal up complimentary fitness center so you can and great entertainment at the Lobby Lounge. with your workout routine while away from home. After a long day, try our Spa featuring massage We forward to welcoming you to Haile Resort, andlook body treatment. and sharing all the wonderful things we have to We look forward to welcoming you to Haile offer! Resort, and sharing all the wonderful things we have to offer!

Tel. +251-116-630155 Fax: +251-116-630690 Head Office: Bole Road, Alem Building, 8th Floor Email: reservation@haileresort.com.et Email: mkt@haileresort.com.et Website: www.haileresort.com.et


entertainment Boeing 777/787 movies 86 | boeing 777/787 TV 89 | non-777/787 international 90 | non-777/787 regional 91 | audio 92

Life of Pi

Y

oung Pi Patel lives a comfortable life in India, where his father runs a zoo. When the family decides to move to Canada, they embark on a voyage – animals in tow – across the Pacific. After a shipboard catastrophe, Pi is cast adrift on a lifeboat, with a Bengal tiger as his only companion. With their mutual survival at stake, Pi makes an unexpected connection with the fearsome beast, before the two complete a remarkable journey of adventure and discovery. PG / 128 minutes / Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan, Adil Hussain

march/april 2013

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entertainment

Am I on a Boeing 777/787? Is the screen in front of you a touch screen? Then, yes.

| Boeing 777/787 Flights

?

March Movies blockbusters

classic movies

Life of Pi Young Pi Patel lives a comfortable life in India, where his father runs a zoo. When the family decides to move to Canada, they embark on a voyage – animals in tow – across the Pacific. After a shipboard catastrophe, Pi is cast adrift on a lifeboat, with a Bengal tiger as his only companion. With their mutual survival at stake, Pi makes an unexpected connection with the fearsome beast, before the two complete a remarkable journey of adventure and discovery. PG / 128 minutes / Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan, Adil Hussain

Chasing Mavericks Based on the true story of surfer Frosty Hesson, this is an adventure thrill ride set at Northern California’s Mavericks — one of the most notorious big-wave breaks on earth. The story is of a brave young surfer who trains with an old-school master of the sport to reach heights that few men ever dare on towering monster waves. In the process, master and protégé learn to maneuver life itself. Much in the vein of The Karate Kid, this is a wonderfully uplifting film with some of the greatest surfing ever filmed. PG / 116 minutes / Jonny Weston, Gerard Butler, Elisabeth Shue

The Jewel of the Nile Romance novelist Joan Wilder is traveling around the world. Invited by Omar, a wealthy Arabian, to travel with him to his homeland, Joan accepts. It turns out that Omar wants to usurp the role of a holy man known as “The Jewel of the Nile.” PG / 106 minutes / Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner, Danny DeVito

Big At a magic wish machine, a boy wishes to big. When he wakes up the next morning, he finds himself in an adult body literally overnight. PG / 104 minutes / Tom Hanks, Elizabeth Perkins, Robert Loggia

taken 2 Liam Neeson returns as Bryan Mills, the retired CIA agent with a “particular set of skills” who stopped at nothing to save his daughter Kim from kidnappers. When the father of one of the villains Bryan killed swears revenge and takes Bryan and his wife hostage in Istanbul, Bryan enlists Kim to help them escape. Bryan then employs his unique tactics to get his family to safety and take out the kidnappers, one by one. PG-13 / 92 minutes / Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen, Maggie Grace

hitchcock This is the story of famed film director Alfred Hitchcock’s relationship with his wife, Alma – as much of a creative collaboration as a marriage – and how it was tested during the making of “Psycho.” PG-13 / 99 minutes / Anthony Hopkins, Helen Mirren, Scarlett Johansson

Catch .44 In this modern Film Noir, the ladies are smart, tough and they know how to do their jobs. For Tes and her two sharp-shooting cohorts, Kara and Dawn, the job sounded simple: intercept a shipment for their crime boss at an isolated diner. But when an unstoppable chain of events unfolds, everyone realizes that no one is who they seem to be. R / 94 minutes / Malin Åkerman, Nikki Reed, Deborah Ann Woll

Backwards When a fiercely competitive 30-year-old rower fails to make the Olympic boat for the second time, she takes a coaching job at a school but struggles to adjust to life off the race course. PG / 89 minutes / Sarah Megan Thomas, James Van Der Beek, Glenn Morshower

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Peter Pan Follow Peter Pan, the irrepressible boy who refuses to grow up, on his adventures in Neverland with the Lost Boys, Princess Tiger Lily and the Indians, and vile Captain Hook and his band of pirates. With just a sprinkle of pixie dust from Tinkerbell, you can join Wendy, Michael and John on their escapades with Peter in this exhilarating fantasy for all ages. G / 78 minutes / Bobby Driscoll, Kathryn Beaumont, Hans Conried

asian movies

Teri Meri Kahaani Can we truly love one person throughout our life and hope that fate makes us meet with the same person in every life of ours? This story takes us through a journey of eternal love between a couple who has vowed to love each other not only in this life but in every life to follow. PG-13 / 120 minutes / Shahid Kapoor, Priyanka Chopra, Prachi Desai

nigerian MOVIES

Sister of Virtue A selfless sister resorts to selling palm oil in order to fund the education of her ambitious younger brothers after the death of their parents. She is shocked when they later repay her sacrifice by cruelly mocking and rejecting the love of her life. PG-13 / 110 minutes / Eve Esin, Mary Remmy, Francis Duru

ebube A poor village girl goes to work as a maid for a career woman in the city. Both parties are initially delighted with each other; however, the joy comes to an abrupt halt when the madame of the house discovers some newly acquired gifts that her husband had intended to present to the maid. PG-13 / 125 minutes / Paul Sambo, Mercy Johnson, Juliet Mgburukwe


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Am I on a Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is not a touch screen, please see p. 86-87.

Boeing 777/787 Flights |

entertainment

april Movies blockbusters

classic movies

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Life of pi Young Pi Patel lives a comfortable life in India, where his father runs a zoo. When the family decides to move to Canada, they embark on a voyage – animals in tow – across the Pacific. After a shipboard catastrophe, Pi is cast adrift on a lifeboat, with a Bengal tiger as his only companion. With their mutual survival at stake, Pi makes an unexpected connection with the fearsome beast, before the two complete a remarkable journey of adventure and discovery. PG / 128 minutes / Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan, Adil Hussain

Edward Scissorhands Edward has all the essentials for a standard body, with the exception of a pair of hands. For what is initially thought to be a temporary period, he is fitted with long, scissor-like extremities that are hardly conducive to day-to-day life. PG-13 / 105 minutes / Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder, Dianne Wiest

The adventure follows the journey of title character Bilbo Baggins, who is swept into an epic quest to reclaim the lost Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor from the fearsome dragon Smaug. Approached out of the blue by the wizard Gandalf the Grey, Bilbo finds himself joining a company of 13 dwarves led by the legendary warrior, Thorin Oakenshield. Their journey will take them into the Wild; through treacherous lands swarming with Goblins and Orcs, deadly Wargs and Sorcerers. PG-13 / 170 minutes / Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage

Parental Guidance Comedy legends Billy Crystal and Bette Midler play Artie and Diane Decker, who are called in by their daughter (Marisa Tomei) to help care for their three grandkids. When their old-school parenting methods collide with their daughter’s new-school ways, the once-orderly household spins out of control. PG / 105 minutes / Billy Crystal, Bette Midler, Marisa Tomei

Jack Reacher A homicide investigator digs deeper into a case involving a trained military sniper who shot five random victims. PG-13 / 130 minutes / Tom Cruise, Rosamund Pike, Richard Jenkins

Mulan Based on one of China’s most popular legends, Mulan chronicles the daring adventures of a young woman whose irrepressible spirit clashes with her tradition-bound society. When her ailing father is ordered to join the Emperor’s army and fight the Huns, Mulan secretly takes his place, disguising herself as a man. Accompanied by Mushu, her feisty, firebreathing “guardian” dragon, Mulan becomes a brave and disciplined warrior, and, in a bold and selfless act of courage, brings victory to her country and honor to her family. PG / 88 minutes / Ming-Na Wen, Eddie Murphy, BD Wong

asian movies

A Monster in Paris It’s 1910, and Raoul is a Parisian delivery man by day and scientist by night who is determined to brainstorm an important new invention. With the help of his friend Emile, a cinema projectionist with women on the brain, Raoul attempts an experiment in a greenhouse that has an unexpected side effect – a tiny flea has suddenly expanded until it’s seven feet tall. PG / 90 minutes / Mathieu Chedid, Vanessa Paradis, Gad Elmaleh

hitchcock This is the story of famed film director Alfred Hitchcock’s relationship with his wife, Alma – as much of a creative collaboration as a marriage – and how it was tested during the making of “Psycho.” PG-13 / 99 minutes / Anthony Hopkins, Helen Mirren, Scarlett Johansson

Ferrari Ki Sawaari How the pursuit of an Indian cricket legend’s Ferrari makes a young boy’s dreams of playing cricket at Lords a reality. PG / 105 minutes / Sharman Joshi, Boman Irani, Ritwik Sahore

Home Alone The highly successful and beloved family comedy about a young boy named Kevin who is accidentally left behind when his family takes off for a vacation over the holiday season. PG / 103 minutes / Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern

nigerian MOVIES

Somewhere in africa In Kimbala, West Africa, a bloodthirsty military leader establishes a new regime overthrowing the president. A journalist heads on a mission to expose the injustice that has taken place. NC-17 / 108 minutes / Majid Michel, Martha Ankomah, Amanobia Opuku Boakyi

mother’s love Two children struggle to cope with the fact that their parents have divorced and that there is a new woman in their father’s life. Although she does her best to treat the children lovingly, the conflict deepens by their mother’s sudden diagnosis of cancer. NC-17 / 138 minutes / Yvonne Nelson, Yvonne Okoro, Adjetey Anang march/april 2013

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Am I on a Boeing 777/787? Is the screen in front of you a touch screen? Then, yes.

| Boeing 777/787 Flights

?

march-april Movies KIDS CLASSICS

HOLLYWOOD CLASSIC MOVIEs

Big At a magic wish machine, a boy wishes to big. When he wakes up the next morning, he finds himself in an adult body literally overnight. PG / 104 minutes / Tom Hanks,  Elizabeth Perkins, Robert Loggia

THAT THING YOU DO

Guy Patterson works as a salesman at his father’s appliance store and plays the drums in his spare time, fancying himself a jazz musician. One day, a buddy of Guy’s tells him a local rock band, The One-Ders (pronounced “wonders”), is in need of a drummer — they have Battle of the Bands coming up and their usual timekeeper has broken his arm. Guy agrees to sit in, but when it’s time to play their best original, a love ballad called “That Thing You Do,” Guy lays in a sharp, driving beat that turns the tune into an up tempo pop-rocker. PG / 108 minutes / Tom Hanks, Liv Tyler, Charlize Theron

Home Alone The highly successful and beloved family comedy about a young boy named Kevin who is accidentally left behind when his family takes off for a vacation over the holiday season. PG / 103 minutes / Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern

Edward Scissorhands Edward has all the essentials for a standard body, with the exception of a pair of hands. For what is initially thought to be a temporary period, he is fitted with long, scissorlike extremities that are hardly conducive to day-to-day life. PG13 / 105 minutes / Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder, Dianne Wiest

The Poseidon Adventure The Poseidon is charting its course on New Year’s Eve. Just after midnight, Captain Harrison spots the mother of all tidal waves. It is the last thing that Harrison sees before drowning — the Poseidon is turned upside down, with only a handful of survivors. PG / 117 minutes / Gene Hackman, Ernest Borgnine, Shelley Winters

Volcano Disaster visits L.A. in the form of an underground volcano — not the big earthquake all the citizens expect. Mike Roark, a by-the-book emergency management director, is spending the weekend with his daughter when the volcano blows. PG-13 / 104 minutes / Tommy Lee Jones, Anne Heche, Gaby Hoffmann

Like Mike A 14-year-old orphan becomes an NBA superstar after trying on a pair of sneakers with the faded initials “M.J.” inside. PG / 99 minutes / Bow Wow,  Jonathan Lipnicki, Morris Chestnut

Love Me Tender Clint Reno stayed home while his brother went to fight in the Civil War for the Confederate Army. When his brother Vance comes back from the war, he finds that his old girlfriend, Cathy, has married Clint. PG / 104 minutes / Richard Egan, Debra Paget, Elvis Presley

The Jewel of the Nile The Jewel of the Nile takes up where Romancing the Stone left off, with romance novelist Joan Wilder traveling around the world with her boyfriend, Jack Colton. Invited by Omar, a wealthy Arabian potentate, to travel with him to his homeland, Joan readily accepts. It turns out that Omar wants to usurp the role of an Arab holy man known as “The Jewel of the Nile,” and Joan finds herself thrown in prison with the hapless spiritual leader. PG / 106 minutes / Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner, Danny DeVito

My Cousin Vinny When sweet Northern college kid Bill and his buddy Stan are picked up and thrown into the slammer in a hick Southern town, at first it looks like no big deal. Then they are informed that they are accused of murder. Penniless and without a single friend in the area, Bill decides to call his goofy cousin Vinny, who has somehow recently become a lawyer. Vinny, who has never tried a criminal case in his short life as a lawyer, rides south to defend his trusting relative. R / 120 minutes / Joe Pesci, Marisa Tomei, Ralph Macchio

Cheaper By The Dozen With his wife doing a book tour, a father of 12 must handle a new job and his unstable brood. PG / 98 minutes / Steve Martin,  Bonnie Hunt, Hilary Duff

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asian MOVIES

Teri Meri Kahaani This story takes us through a journey of eternal love between a couple who has vowed to love each other not only in this life but in every life to follow. PG-13 / 120 minutes / Shahid Kapoor, Priyanka Chopra, Prachi Desai

Ferrari Ki Sawaari How the pursuit of an Indian cricket legend’s Ferrari makes a young boy’s dreams of playing cricket at Lords a reality. PG / 105 minutes / Sharman Joshi, Boman Irani, Ritwik Sahore

tezz To revenge his past, Aakash Rana plants bomb in a train endangering the lives of 500 passengers. PG-13 / 115 minutes / Anil Kapoor, Ajay Devgn, Senem Temiz nigerian MOVIES Sister of Virtue A selfless sister resorts to selling palm oil in order to fund the education of her younger brothers after the death of their parents. She is shocked when they later repay her sacrifice by cruelly mocking the love of her life. PG-13 / 110 minutes / Eve Esin, Mary Remmy, Francis Duru Somewhere in africa In Kimbala, West Africa, a bloodthirsty military leader establishes a new regime overthrowing the president. A journalist heads on a mission to expose the injustice that has taken place. NC-17 / 108 minutes / Majid Michel, Martha Ankomah, Amanobia Opuku Boakyi Crying Freeman A stranger penetrates a wealthy tycoon’s loosely guarded mansion and shoots his wife dead. The case is assigned to an agent and while trying to unravel the mystery, the detective becomes caught up in what may have been a romance gone wrong. NC-17 / 110 minutes / Jibola Dabo, Mercy Johnson, Yul Edochie


?

Am I on a Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is not a touch screen, please see p. 86-87.

Boeing 777/787 Flights |

entertainment

march-april Television lifestyle

Videofashion News Episode: Spring/Summer 2013 / 30 mins. From the catwalks to the sidewalks and everywhere in between, Videofashion News tracks designer collections, the designers themselves, the models, and the behind-thescenes celebrities of the fashion universe at shows, parties and other cool-kids-only events.

Delinquent Gourmet Episode: Cagliari, Sardinia / 30 mins. Chef Rodney Bowers travels to Cagliari to taste and cook the best of Sardinian cuisine while adding his own flair to some of the city’s most popular local dishes.

A Day in the Life Episode: Misty Copeland / 30 mins. Ever wondered what 24 hours in the life of a billionaire is like? In this new documentary series, Morgan Spurlock uses his trademark wit and humor to give an insight into 16 very different lives.

Destination Extreme Episode: Alps / 30 mins. The Alps are the original action sports destination. Their epic mountains are a skiing Mecca and are prime terrain for BASE jumping and mountain biking, including one of the most extreme and physically demanding mountain bike downhill races in the world. This episode also explores the culture and adventure of the Alps.

discovery

Natural Wonders of Africa Episode: Natural Park: The Management / 60 mins. Africa is a continent that mixes the spectacular with the unusual. From north to south it offers such a variety of landscapes that a single life wouldn’t suffice to explore them all.

Deepest Dive Episode: The Story of Trieste / 30 mins. Fifty years ago, two men attempted to reach the deepest part of the oceans — the floor of the Mariana Trench, an area known as Challenger Deep.

Wildlife Nannies Episode: Wombat Brady / 30 mins. The “Wildlife Nannies” inform us about animal baby rescue operations in North America and Europe, as well as of the people involved.

destination guides

Historic Walks Episode: Washington DC: Monuments and Icons / 30 mins. Historic Walks explores some of the world’s most fascinating districts, tracing the unique footpaths where history was made. In each show the viewer is taken beyond the standard guidebook facts and immersed in a visual experience enhanced by the contributions of passionate experts.

Lie to Me Episode: Life Is Priceless / 60 mins. In the wake of a building collapse, Lightman is brought in to determine who is at fault and discovers a massive cover-up.

World Café Asia Episode: Kuala Lumpur / 30 mins. Discover the taste of Asia and follow our roving host, Bobby Chinn, as he unleashes the culinary delights of the East and takes us through a labyrinth of street stalls, markets and hot spots.

New Girl Episode: Kryptonite / 30 mins. Nick and Schmidt convince Jess to get her stuff out of her ex-boyfriend Spencer’s apartment; Jess meets new roommate Winston, who has returned from playing basketball in Latvia. Winston tries to get his old room back from Schmidt.

World Café Asia Episode: Beijing / 30 mins. Discover the taste of Asia and follow our roving host, Bobby Chinn, as he unleashes the culinary delights of the East and takes us through a labyrinth of street stalls, markets and hot spots.

Ultimate Wildlife Episode: Learning and Play / 30 mins. Gorilla, bat-eared fox or coati – every young animal gets the lessons it needs for adult life by playing with its siblings or by watching and learning from older animals.

Wild Rides Episode: Crashing Kathmandu / 30 mins. Halfway through India on the Rickshaw Run, Buddy is traveling toward Kathmandu. But as the finish line gets closer, bandits, engine trouble and a rickshaw roll all threaten to call time on the adventure.

drama

Globe Trekker Episode: London City Guide / 30 mins. On the cutting edge of contemporary art and music, London is the world’s capital of cool and one of Europe’s most memorable cities. Jonathan Atherton finds himself among snap-happy tourists on the trail of famous landmarks such as Trafalgar Square and Soho, and then explores the alternative London of Gay Pride and Bangladeshi Brick Lane.

COMEDY

Last Man Standing Episode: Grandparents Day / 30 mins. When Vanessa forces a reluctant Mike to attend Grandparents Day at their grandson Boyd’s preschool, Mike manages to insult the daycare teacher and Boyd gets kicked out of school. Boyd’s mom, Kristin, tells Mike that he now has to look after him, so Mike takes the 2-year-old to work with him. 

Malcolm in the Middle Episode: Hal Coaches / 30 mins. Hal has finally made a deal with Ed for the boys to have their own computer. They find out that Ed is a philanderer and has a ton of undeleted emails from the women in their neighborhood to prove it. Reese sees this as an opportunity to blackmail him to his own twisted scheme. Then, Hal decides to coach Dewey’s losing team into better soccer players.

Bones Episode: The Maggots in the Meathead / 60 mins. Remains found at the Jersey Shore are identified as a 23-year-old who partied the night before. Brennan watches what she believed to be a documentary on the Jersey Shore, but was actually a reality show. kids

Angelina Ballerina Episode: Angelina and Alice Mousikova / 30 mins. Angelina pirouettes centre stage capturing the joys and frustrations of growing up and learning from her mistakes along the way.

Bob the Builder Episode: High Tide for Lofty / 10 mins. The eternal philosophy of Bob, the ever-friendly and helpful builder, is “Can we fix it? Yes, we can!”

Thomas and Friends Episode: Thomas and the Runaway Kite / 10 mins. When Mavis does not say hello, Emily assumes she is sad and chuffs to the quarry to cheer her up with some new flowers.

Fireman Sam Episode: Fireworks for Mandy / 10 mins. Norman and his friends love to play, and their adventures can have disastrous results! The children know that help is always close — thanks to the brave Fireman Sam. march/april 2013

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Am I on a Non-Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is a touch screen, please instead see p. 82-85.

| Non-Boeing 777/787 / International Flights

Addis Ababa to EU, Middle East, Asia (Outbound) march Movies

april Movies

?

EU, Middle East, Asia to Addis Ababa (Inbound) march Movies

april Movies

life of pi Young Pi Patel lives a comfortable life in India, where his father runs a zoo. When the family decides to move to Canada, they embark on a voyage – animals in tow – across the Pacific. After a shipboard catastrophe, Pi is cast adrift on a lifeboat, with a Bengal tiger as his only companion. PG / 128 minutes / Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan, Adil Hussain

Parental Guidance Artie and Diane Decker are called in by their daughter to help care for their three grandkids. When their old-school parenting methods collide with their daughter’s newschool ways, the once-orderly household spins out of control. PG / 105 minutes / Billy Crystal, Bette Midler, Marisa Tomei

Chasing Mavericks The story of a brave young surfer who trains with an old school master of the sport to reach heights that few men ever dare on towering monster waves. In the process, master and protégé learn to manoeuvre life itself. PG / 116 minutes / Jonny Weston, Gerard Butler, Elisabeth Shue

Mulan When her ailing father is ordered to join the Emperor’s army, Mulan secretly takes his place, disguising herself as a man. Accompanied by Mushu, her fire-breathing “guardian” dragon, Mulan becomes a brave warrior, and, in a selfless act of courage, brings victory to her country and honour to her family. PG / 88 minutes / MingNa Wen, Eddie Murphy, BD Wong

life of pi (FRENCH)

Jack Reacher (FRENCH)

Chasing Mavericks (FRENCH)

mulan (French)

classic movies The Jewel of the Nile Joan Wilder is traveling around the world. Invited by an Arabian potentate to travel with him to his homeland, Joan accepts. It turns out that Omar wants to usurp the role of a holy man known as "The Jewel of the Nile". PG / 106 minutes / Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner, Danny DeVito asian movies Teri Meri Kahaani Can we truly love one person throughout our life and hope that fate makes us meet with the same person in every life of ours? This story takes us through a journey of eternal love between a couple who have vowed to love each other not only in this life but in every life to follow. PG-13 / 120 minutes / Shahid Kapoor, Priyanka Chopra, Prachi Desai

classic movies

Ultimate Wildlife Episode: Learning and Play / 30 mins. Gorilla, bat-eared fox or coati – every young animal gets the lessons it needs for adult life by playing with its siblings or by watching and learning from older animals.

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classic movies

Edward Scissorhands Edward has all the essentials for a standard body, with the exception of a pair of hands. For what is thought to be a temporary period, he is fitted with scissor-like extremities that are hardly conducive to day-to-day life. PG-13 / 105 minutes / Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder, Dianne Wiest asian movies Ferrari Ki Sawaari How the pursuit of an Indian cricket legend's Ferrari makes a young boy's dreams of playing cricket at Lords a reality. PG / 105 minutes / Sharman Joshi, Boman Irani, Ritwik Sahore

march-april TV

New Girl Episode: Kryptonite / 30 mins. Nick and Schmidt convince Jess to get her stuff out of her ex-boyfriend's apartment; Jess meets new roommate Winston; Winston tries to get his old room back from Schmidt.

claSsic movies

Big At a magic wish machine, a boy wishes to big. When he wakes up the next morning, he finds himself in an adult body literally overnight. PG / 104 minutes / Tom Hanks, Elizabeth Perkins, Robert Loggia

Home Alone The highly successful and beloved family comedy about a young boy named Kevin who is accidentally left behind when his family takes off for a vacation over the holiday season. PG / 103 minutes / Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern

march-april TV

Videofashion News Episode: Spring/Summer 2013 / 30 mins. From the catwalks to the sidewalks, Videofashion News tracks designer collections, the designers themselves, the models, and the behind-the-scenes celebrities of the fashion universe at shows, parties, and other events.

Destination Extreme Episode: Alps / 30 mins. The Alps are the original action sports destination. Their epic mountains are a skiing Mecca and are prime terrain for BASE jumping and mountain biking, including one of the most extreme mountain bike downhill races in the world.

Lie to Me Episode: Life is Priceless / 60 mins. In the wake of a building collapse, Lightman is brought in to determine who is at fault, and discovers a massive cover-up.

Wildlife Nannies Episode: Wombat Brady / 30 mins. The 'Wildlife Nannies' inform us about animal baby rescue operations in North America and Europe, as well as of the people involved.

Malcolm in the Middle Episode: Hal Coaches / 30 mins. Hal has finally made a deal with Ed for the boys to have their own computer. They find out that Ed is a philanderer and has a ton of undeleted e-mails from the women in their neighbourhood to prove it. Reese sees this as an opportunity to blackmail him to his own twisted scheme. Then, Hal decides to coach Dewey's losing team into better soccer players.


Non-Boeing 777/787 / Regional Flights |

Addis Ababa to Africa (Outbound) march Movies

Peter Pan Follow Peter Pan, the boy who refuses to grow up, on his adventures in Neverland with the Lost Boys, Princess Tiger Lily and the Indians, and vile Captain Hook and his band of pirates. With just a sprinkle of pixie dust from Tinkerbell, you can join Wendy, Michael and John on their escapades with Peter in this fantasy for all ages. G / 78 minutes / Bobby Driscoll, Kathryn Beaumont, Hans Conried nigerian MOVIES sister of virtue For a long time Umene village has existed peacefully without a king. With the recent atrocities that have taken place in the community, the oracle reveals that for peace to reign again there must be a change of leadership. . One of the elders learns from the chief priest that the man who presents a Decanter of Hope in the village will be crowned king. PG / 110 minutes / Kenneth Okonkwo, Amaechi Muonagor, Chika Ike

Africa to Addis Ababa (Inbound) april Movies

life of pi Young Pi Patel lives a comfortable life in India, where his father runs a zoo. When the family decides to move to Canada, they embark on a voyage – animals in tow – across the Pacific. After a shipboard catastrophe, Pi is cast adrift on a lifeboat, with a Bengal tiger as his only companion. PG / 128 minutes / Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan, Adil Hussain

nigerian MOVIES somewhere in africa Daniella is an aspiring rapper who has toiled for years in the studio with the support of her overenthusiastic and loyal manager. She dreams of superstardom, but to no avail, until one of her friends makes her an offer she cannot refuse. R / 110 minutes / Mercy Johnson, Angela Okorie, Walter Anga

march-april TV

Bones Episode: The Maggots in the Meathead / 60 mins. Decomposed remains found at the Jersey Shore are identified as a 23 year old who partied the night before at a popular nightclub. Brennan surprisingly proves her pop culture savvy and anthropological expertise after watching what she believed to be a documentary on the inhabitants of the Jersey Shore, but was actually a reality show set there.

entertainment

march Movies

Backwards When a fiercely competitive 30 year old rower fails to make the Olympic boat for the second time, she takes a coaching job at a school but struggles to adjust to life off the race course. PG / 89 minutes / Sarah Megan Thomas, James Van Der Beek, Glenn Morshower

nigerian MOVIES ebube A poor village girl goes to work as a maid for a career woman in the city. Both parties are initially delighted with each other; however the joy comes to an abrupt halt when the madam of the house discovers some newly acquired gifts that her husband had intended to present to the maid. PG-13 / 125 minutes / Paul Sambo, Mercy Johnson, Juliet Mgburukwe

april Movies

A Monster in Paris Raoul is a Parisian delivery man by day and scientist by night that is determined to brainstorm a new invention. With the help of his friend Emile, Raoul attempts an experiment in a greenhouse that has an unexpected side effect – a tiny flea has suddenly expanded until it's seven feet tall. PG / 90 minutes / Mathieu Chedid, Vanessa Paradis, Gad Elmaleh nigerian MOVIES mother's love Two children struggle to cope with the fact that their parents have divorced and that there is a new woman in their father's life. Although she does her best to treat the children lovingly, the conflict deepens by their mother’s sudden diagnosis of cancer. NC-17 / 138 minutes / Yvonne Nelson, Yvonne Okoro, Adjetey Anang

march-april TV

A Day in the Life Episode: Misty Copeland / 30 mins. Ever wondered what 24 hours in the life of a billionaire is like? In this new documentary series, Morgan Spurlock uses his trademark wit and humour to give an insight into 16 very different lives.

Deepest Dive Episode: The Story of Trieste / 30 mins. Fifty years ago, two men attempted to reach the deepest part of the world ocean - 35,800 feet down to the floor of the Mariana Trench in the South Pacific, an area known as Challenger Deep. Through recently discovered archival footage, audio recordings, original interviews, and animation, Deepest Dive: The Story of the Trieste tells the tale of Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard and US Navy Lt. Don Walsh and their vessel, the bathyscaphe Trieste. This Deepest Dive is a feat that has still never been equalled.

Last Man Standing Episode: Grandparents Day / 30 mins. When Vanessa forces a reluctant Mike to attend Grandparents Day at their grandson Boyd's preschool, Mike manages to insult the day care teacher and Boyd gets kicked out of school. Boyd's mom, Kristin, tells Mike that he now has to look after him, so Mike takes the two-year-old to work with him. 

Natural Wonders of Africa Episode: Natural Park: The Management / 60 mins. Africa is a continent which mixes the spectacular with the unusual. From North to South it offers such a variety of landscapes that a single life wouldn’t suffice to explore them all.

Delinquent Gourmet Episode: Cagliari, Sardinia / 30 mins. Chef Rodney Bowers travels to Cagliari to taste and cook the best of Sardinian cuisine while adding his own flair to some of the city's most popular local dishes.

march/april 2013

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| Audio for All Flights

mar-apr Broadcast Channels Music From Ethiopia Enjoy a channel alive with only the best songs from Ethiopia. Artists such as Haile Roots, Nati Haile and Reshad Kedir perform a collection of satisfying sounds epitomizing the harmonious talents of Ethiopia today.

mar-apr Album Compilations Ethiopian African Enjoy a selection of albums brimming with sounds from the heart of Africa. Listen to collections from Yabba Funk, Victor Deme, Angelique Kidjo and many more.

Ethiopian Traditional Music (Music From Ethiopia)

Ethiopian Instrumental Ethiopian Instrumental is an elaborate and expressive collection of instrumental pieces. Theodros Mitiku, Tilaye Gebre and The Express Band, among others, will soothe you completely through a mixture of their delicate and energetic sounds.

All That Jazz All That Jazz is a concoction of every character within jazz. A handful of artists, such as Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole and Donald Byrd, give warming performances in this mix. From old classics to smooth contemporary, All That Jazz is sure to cover all corners of this nonchalant musical style. Easy Listening Easy Listening allows you to switch off and recline, as a very laid-back medley of tunes sing you into total serenity. Coldplay, Ed Sheeran and Lisa Hannigan perform their most soothing songs to help you completely repose.

Enjoy collections from some of the greatest artists in Ethiopia today. Artist like Jamboo Joote, Tikue Weldu and Mohammed Tawil. Sit back and appreciate.

Ethiopian Classic Here, enjoy albums full of world-renowned performers, orchestras and soloists, performing major works from some of history’s greatest composers; Bach, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven and many more.

Ethiopian Country Here, a fusion of Country albums for you to enjoy. A range of artists, from Buddy Miller to Sara Evans, are here to share a collection of their hits with you.

Ethiopian Hip Hop/R&B A melodic mix of Hip Hop tunes and R&B hits, with a large selection of albums for you to listen to. This includes artists such as Snoop Dogg, Tinie Tempah and Jennifer Hudson.

Chart Hits Chart Hits is a channel solely dedicated to the latest chart-toppers in pop and rock. If you want to be up-to-speed with the most current hits in music today, then tune into Chart Hits, where Gotye, Lana Del Rey and Beyoncé will definitely activate your musical taste buds. Country This channel offers a blend of cooling Country sounds. With hits from both classic and modern artists, you are sure to experience the refreshing flavors of authentic country music. Jeff Bridges, Emmylou Harris and Lady Antebellum perform some of their best works for you today.

Ethiopian Instrumental Here, we offer an expressive and inspiring collection of Instrumental albums for you to enjoy.

Ethiopian Jazz From old classics to smooth contemporary, here you will find an excellent collection of Jazz albums. You’ll find every great Jazz musician here, from Miles Davis to Billie Holiday to Louis Armstrong.

Ethiopian Kids World Hits World Hits is an eclectic collection of music from all over the globe. This channel allows you to experience all ranges of talent in all ranges of music. Artists such as Salah Al Zadjali, Destra and Axelle Red take this opportunity to introduce to you their own personal worlds, through the medium of music. Classical Collection Classical Collection showcases world-renowned performers, orchestras and soloists, performing major works from some of the best composers in history. The London Symphony Orchestra with Josef Krips, Walter Klien and the Württemberg Chamber Orchestra provide a classical assortment. Classic Rock Rife with roaring riffs and smooth bass lines, Classic Rock is a channel wholly dedicated to true rock n’ roll. Here, Pink Floyd, T. Rex and Jimi Hendrix play a handful of the greatest rock songs in history.

Here, a cheerful compilation of albums, full of upbeat songs for all your little ones to enjoy.

Ethiopian Oldies Enjoy taking a trip down memory lane, through this extensive collection of nostalgic albums. This includes some of the greats, such as Al Green, Elvis Presley and Fleetwood Mac.

Ethiopian Pop If you’re looking for the latest hits, then enjoy this medley of the most current Pop albums out now. This includes albums from Beyonce, Lady Gaga and David Guetta.

Ethiopian Rock Relish in a sea of Rock, with albums from legendary rock n’ rollers to the latest stars of 2012; Bob Dylan, The Strokes and The Black Keys.

Golden Oldies Take a walk down memory lane with a compilation of nostalgic hits. Golden Oldies presents R.E.M., Tina Turner and Duran Duran, who lead the way with a string of classics, taking you right back to when they were No. 1.

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Ethiopian World Here, enjoy a diverse collection of hit albums from all over the globe! Amplify your cultural consciousness through sounds from Ely Guerra, Ocean Hai and Oliver Haidt.


Crossword | 1 Potato 5 River islet 8 ____-fi movie Across 11 Kitchen gadget 1 Potato 16 Squares things 5 River islet 18 Biblical high priest 19 Golfer Woosnam 8 ___-fi movie 11 Kitchen20 Beethoven’s gadget “Moonlight ___” 16 Squares21 Able thingsto come and go as one wishes? 18 Biblical high priest 25 Poi source 19 Golfer Woosnam 26 Life story, in brief 20 Beethoven’s “Moonlight 27 Barley brew ___” 28 Creme cookie 21 Able to29 come andusually go as Spouses, 32 Dashed one wishes? 33 Holy ones (Abbr.) 25 Poi source 36 French romance 26 Life story, in brief 39 Greek god of love 27 Barley 40 brewConcert gear 28 Creme 41 Revolutionary cookie Guevara 29 Spouses, usually 42 Bell sound 32 Dashed 43 Subcompact 33 Holy ones (Abbr.) 45 Go ballistic 36 French 46 romance Bird genus 47 A by 39 Greek god ofsong love Bartholomew 40 Concert gear Roberts? 41 Revolutionary Guevara 53 Short-lived Chinese 42 Bell sound dynasty 54 Collides with 43 Subcompact 55 Toward shelter, 45 Go ballisticnautically 46 Bird genus 56 Coercion Football goals (Abbr.) 47 A song 57 by Bartholomew 58 Aspect Roberts? 59 Voice vote 53 Short-lived Chinese 60 Window part dynasty61 Comedienne Margaret 54 Collides with Hi-___ graphics 55 Toward62 shelter, nautically 65 Endorses 56 Coercion 67 Farm structure 57 Football68 goals (Abbr.) Sole supporter? 58 Aspect 70 Greek letter 72 Numbered work 59 Voice vote 74 part German resort 60 Window 77 Stanwyck’s Oscar 61 Comedienne Margaret nominated role, ___ 62 Hi-___ graphics Dallas 79 Scorch 65 Endorses 80 Design detail 67 Farm structure 81 Hawaii’s Mauna ___ 68 Sole supporter? 82 Modus operandi of 70 Greek letterEbenezer Scrooge? 87 Circle 72 Numbered workmeas. New Zealand parrots 74 German88 resort 89 King 77 Stanwyck’s Oscar 90 Caterpillar hairs nominated role, 91 One ___ ___ time Dallas 92 Joker, e.g. 79 Scorch 93 British gun Type of limit 80 Design 95 detail 96 Word of possibility 81 Hawaii’s Mauna ___ 97 Bullring cheer 82 Modus 98 operandi of crisis Unforeseen Ebenezer 101 Scrooge? Skirt feature 102 Soft shoe 87 Circle meas. 103 Kindparrots of jacket 88 New Zealand 104 Milky white gem 89 King 108 The kinship of a sports 90 Caterpillar team, hairspossibly?

91 One ___ time 92 Joker, e.g. 93 British gun

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Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com

97 Bullring cheer

10 One ___ million

44 Bury

shortened 38 Musical Yoko 40 Initial stake

musically 76 Rice wine 77 Take a powder

80 Smart Rounded, in botany Belgian river Catch sight of Wax producer Flag Big city atmosphere prediction Kind of support Flout Author Zola Hollow Opposite of 59 Across Bowl over Sharif of film Water carrier Heidi’s home Strong cleaner Short punch Eskimo knife Camera type, briefly 111 Prevent march/april cry 2013 93 112 Triumphant 113 Jeu de mots

93 Big city atmosphere 52 Skirmish 16 Toward the stern 115 Magnetism 45 Hearty entree 11 Elders 98 Math Unforeseen crisis 17 Judicious 83 prediction 58 Beach souvenir 116 subj. 94 Kind of support feeder 12 Data 101 Skirt feature 84 61 Bubbly drink48 Mississippi 20 Trashed 117 Shack 63 Fencing swords 22 Engine13 needGarage contents 118 Frozen 49 Aircraft95 Flout 102 Soft dessert shoe 85 98 Author Zola House 23 Alliance acronym 119 Incinerates compartment 14 Hot time in64 Heartbreak Haiti 103 Kind of jacket 86 99 Hollow writer 24 Standard 120 King, in Cádiz 50 Dairy case item 15 Actress ___ Dawn 104 Milky white gem 92 100 Opposite of 59 Across 66 Lethargy 29 Actor Grant or 121 “Take your pick” 51good Expels101 Bowl over 108 Thein kinship 93 67 “They were ___ 122 Very, Versailles of a sportsJackman Chong friends.” 52 Skirmish 104 Sharif of film team, possibly? 30 Darns16 Toward the stern 68 Layers Water carrier 31 La Scala highlight DownMagnetism 58 Beach 105 souvenir 115 17 Judicious 69 The best of times 94 106 Heidi’s home 33 Frightens 1 Ancient colonnade 61 Bubbly drink 20 Trashed 116 Math subj. 95 71 Belfast grp. 107 Strong cleaner 34 Songbird 2 Impoverished 63 Fencing swords 22 Engine need 117 Shack 98 73 Tennis’s Sampras 108 Short punch 35 Clothing joints 3 Golden rule word 74 Fill with joy 64 Heartbreak House 118 Frozen Alliance acronym 99 109 Eskimo knife 36 For all 23 to hear 4 Viña ___ Mar,dessert Chile 37 Dolphinfishes, 24 Standard 75 A single note, writer 110 Camera type, briefly 119 Incinerates 100 5 Man of morals musically shortened 111 Prevent 6 ___ -de-France 120 King, in Cádiz 29 Actor Grant76 or Rice wine 66 Lethargy 38 Musical Yoko 112 Triumphant cry 7 Argentine aunt 67 “They 113 wereJeu___ 121 “Take your pick” 40 Initial stake Jackman 77 Take a powder 101 de mots 8 Sashays 78 Battery type good friends.” 30 Darns 122 Very, in Versailles 42 Skin problem 104 114 It’s often left hanging 9 Coffee shops 79 Herringlike fish around 43 Motel 31 employee 68 Layers La Scala highlight 105 10 One ___ million 44 Bury 33 Frightens 80 Smart 69 The best of times Down 106 11 Elders 83 Rounded, in botany entree 12 Data grp. on page 94. 107 1 Ancient colonnade45 Hearty34 Songbird 84 Belgian river71 BelfastAnswers 48 Mississippi feeder 13 Garage contents 73 Tennis’s Sampras 35compartment Clothing joints 2 Impoverished 108 85 Catch sight of 49 Aircraft 14 Hot time in Haiti 86 Wax producer 74 Fill with joy 36 For all to hear 3 Golden rule word 109 50 Dairy case item 15 Actress ___ Dawn 92 Flag 51 Expels37 Dolphinfishes, 75 A single note, 4 Chong Viña ___ Mar, Chile 110

5 Man of morals 6 ___-de-France 7 Argentine aunt

Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com

Across Just Saying...

entertainment


Solution Answers to puzzle from page 93. S P U D

A I T

S C I

D I C E R

Image Ethiopia provides E L I I A N S O N A T A A T O N E S ImageImage Ethiopia provides Ethiopia provides the services: thefollowing following services: F O O T L O O S E A N D F A N C Y F R E E the following services: Magazine 1/13 Hard Sudoku Selamta Magazine 1/13 Medium Selamta Sudoku PuzzleJunction.com Selamta Magazine 1/13 Very Easy Sudoku PuzzleJunction.com B I O A L E O R E O T A R O - -Individual and Individual andgroup group traveltravel - Individual and travel group H E L P M A T E S R A N S T S - -Trekking Trekking - Trekking To solve the Sudoku puzzle, eachC row, H column To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box A M O U R E R O S A M P S Eand box - -Bird watching Bird-watching Bird watching must contain the numbers 1 to 9. must contain the numbers 1 to 9. must contain the numbers 1 to 9. - -Photographic tours M I N I S N A P A R A C L A N G - Photographic Photographic tourstours 5 T L E O F R U M7 - -Off-the beaten-track expeditions 3 4 O H5 O H O4 7A1 9 - Off-the beaten-track expeditions Off-the beaten-track expeditions Y N D A B O T - -Visits projects of development projects Visits-ofVisits ofdevelopment development projects D 9U R E S2 S 4 2A 3L E1 E 7 9 S U I 3 H I6 4T7 S T5 D S

E Y E A9 9 S A S5 H 1 7S I D3 8 C H O R5 E 6S 4 O K S 13S T 7 Y 8 8 3 5 9 S H O E P H I O P U S E M S 8 1 3 71 6 5 S E A R S P E C L O A S T E L L A 4 29 5 1 8 9 C R3 Y A 1 L 8L T H E W A Y T O T H E B A N K 8 9 T4 A E 5 3 3 R A6 D 5 K E A S S I R E S E 5 C A R D S T E N 1 6S P E E D A T1 A 2 M 1 A4 Y3 O 5L E5 9 E 4M E 8R G E 5N C Y 8 2 PuzzleJunction.com Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com S L I T Copyright M ©2012 O PuzzleJunction.com C M ACopyright O ©2012 O P A L J U S T O N E B I G H A P P Y F A M I L Y 1/30/13 12:45 A L G H U T F R A P P E A PM L LPMU R E 1/30/13 1/30/1312:45 12:45 PM R E Y A N Y T R E S B U R N S

Bole Mega Road, Mega Building, 4th floor Office: Bole 4th Office:Office: BoleRoad, Road, MegaBuilding, Building, 4thfloor floor Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Addis Ethiopia AddisAbaba, Ababa, Ethiopia

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Sudoku Solution

8 9 6 1 5 4 3 7 2

4 2 5 3 6 7 9 8 1

2 8 9 5 7 3 6 1 4

5 1 4 6 8 2 7 9 3

6 3 7 9 4 1 5 2 8

1 6 3 7 9 8 2 4 5

7 5 2 4 1 6 8 3 9

9 4 8 2 3 5 1 6 7

4 9 5 8 7 1 6 2 3

1 6 3 9 4 2 7 8 5

FAMILY RESTAURANT ad.indd 1

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2 7 8 5 3 6 1 4 9

8 5 1 6 9 3 2 7 4

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9 3 4 2 1 7 5 6 8

5 1 2 3 6 4 8 9 7

6 4 9 7 8 5 3 1 2

3 8 7 1 2 9 4 5 6

medium

3 7 1 8 2 9 4 5 6

easy

Sudoku Solution Sudoku Solution Solutions to Sudoku from page 95. 3 1 9 6 5 4 8 2 7

4 6 8 1 7 2 3 9 5

5 7 2 3 8 9 1 6 4

1 9 7 4 2 8 6 5 3

2 3 4 7 6 5 9 1 8

6 8 5 9 1 3 4 7 2

9 2 3 5 4 6 7 8 1

7 5 6 8 3 1 2 4 9

8 4 1 2 9 7 5 3 6

ሺንጂንሽን

1/30/13 11:15 AM

የጉዞዞወኪል

Facilitate Visa to: Known for Burritos, Enchiladas, Tacos, Fajitas, Quesadillas and much, much more, including special desserts. Open from 7am-10pm every day, all day including holidays. Fridays & Saturdays open 24 hrs (special menu)

Address: Bambis Olympia Area, Addis Ababa familyrestaurant@gmail.com Phone: 0930-00-02-45 or 0118-50-02-79

Tour Packaging to

Phone: Mobile: Fax: Email:

+251-115543706 / 7 +251-911516434 +251-115543708 abebewubneh@gmail.com xinjingshen2009@gmail.com Getu Commercial Bldg., 4th Floor, No. 412 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

difficult

Phone: +251-(0)11-5549265/66/67 Phone: +251-(0)11-5549265/66/67 Phone: +251-(0)11-5549265/66/67 +251 115 549268 Fax: +251 Fax: Fax: +251115 115549268 549268 Mobile: +251 911 517508 Mobile: +251 Mobile: +251911 911517508 517508 E-mail: info@imageethiopia.com E-mail: info@imageethiopia.com E-mail: info@imageethiopia.com Website: www.imageethiopia.com Website: www.imageethiopia.com Website: www.imageethiopia.com

PuzzleJunc


www.abayminchlodge.com www.abayminchlodge.com

Magazine 1/13 Very Easy Sudoku

To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box must mustcontain containthe thenumbers numbers11toto9.9.Solutions on page 94. easy

3 4 5 7 9 7 9 3 4 7 8 5 3 5 9 8 5 1 1 8 9 3 3 6 5 1/13 Medium Sudoku 5 1 2 1 4 3 5

Addis AddisAbaba: Ababa:

PuzzleJunction.com

medium

PuzzleJunction.com

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4 3 9 6 7 5 2 8 1 5 7 8 1 9 2 4 3 6 6 2 1 4 3 8 5 9 7

1 9

7

2

9

4 1

5 3 8

4 2 8

7 1

Sudoku Solution

5 97 9 45

4 1 2 8 6 3 9 6 7 5 2 3 1 4 8 5 3 8 1 6 4 2 9 7 8 9 5 6 4 2 3 7 1 7 4 3 9 5 1 6 8 2 Copyright 1 2 6©2012 3 PuzzleJunction.com 8 7 4 5 9 6 7 1 2 9 5 8 3 4 2 8 4 7 3 6 9 1 5

6

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8 3

Bahir BahirDar Dar

Reservations Reservations

To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box ©20121PuzzleJunction.com must containCopyright the numbers to 9.

4 1 5 6 7 2 3 3 9 5 6 4 1 7 6 Sudoku Solution 1 8 9 3 8 4 2 5 6 1 7 9 3 1/13 Hard Sudoku 7 9 2 8 1 3 6 5 4 1 1 6 5 9 4 7 3 2 8 5 82915 364 57 68 94 879 41 23

ABAY MINCH LODGE sandmp@ethionet.et sandmp@ethionet.et Email: Email: info@abayminchlodge.com info@abayminchlodge.com Fax: Fax: +251115508903 +251115508903 Fax: Fax: +251582180811 +251582180811 Experience the Real Beauty +251115521575 +251115521575 Tel: Tel: +251115531879 +251115531879 Tel: Tel: +251582181039 +251582181039 of Nature

difficult

Magazine

PuzzleJunction.com entertainment

colorful colorful fruit fruit and and exotic exotic trees. trees. For For our our beautiful beautiful gardens gardens filled filled with with ofofour ourlodge. lodge.Come Comeand andenjoy enjoy birds birds which which areare truly truly thethe hallmark hallmark will will hear hear thethe melodious melodious sound sound ofof When When you you open open your your windows, windows, you you various various species species ofof trees trees allall around. around. filled filledwith withfragnances fragnancesfrom fromthethe you you can can breath breath thethe freshest freshest ofof airair sider sider Abay Abay Minch Minch Lodge. Lodge. It isIt where is where tion tion and and exotic exotic feel, feel, better better conconin thewith beautiful city of Bahir Dar with nature nature and and abundant abundant vegetavegetaIf you If you areare looking looking forfor a place a place rich rich

If you are looking for a place rich with nature and abundant vegetaininthe the beautiful beautiful city city ofofBahir Bahir Dar Dar tion and exotic feel, better consider Abay Minch Lodge. It is where you can breath the freshest of air filled with fragnances from the various species of trees all around. When you open your windows, you will hear the melodious sound of birds which are truly the hallmark of our lodge. Come and enjoy our beautiful gardens filled with colorful fruit and exotic trees.For

Reservations

5

Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com

Magazine

Sudoku |

Addis Ababa:

Bahir Dar

ofofNature Nature Tel: +251115531879 Tel: +251582181039 +251115521575 Experience Experience the theReal RealBeauty Beauty Fax: +251115508903 Fax: +251582180811 Email: info@abayminchlodge.com sandmp@ethionet.et

LODGE LODGE ABA ABA YY MINCH MINCH www.abayminchlodge.com


fly ethiopian

| Vintage

Mishka Babicheff — the first Ethiopian to qualify as a pilot — receives final instructions before beginning his first solo flight from Jijiga, Ethiopia, in September 1930.

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የኢትዮጵያ ቢራ ከ

ጀምሮ

THE BEER OF ETHIOPIA SINCE 1922 ከ18 ዓመት በታች ለሆኑ የተከለከለ

march/april 2013

101


1963–2013

Celebrating 50 Years of

African Unity selamta magazine Congratulates the African Union for Five Decades of Promoting Pan-African Cooperation. As the official in-flight magazine of Africa's fastest-growing airline, Selamta is proud to join with others across the African continent in congratulating the African Union on its 50th Jubilee Anniversary. For the past five decades, this institution and its predecessor, the Organization of African Unity, have served as the premier institution promoting diplomatic cooperation and economic integration across the African continent. We salute these efforts and offer our best wishes for success as the AU pursues its ambitious agenda for the future.

T h e i n - f l i g h t m ag a z i n e o f e t h i o p i a n a i r l i n e s

98

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Selamta March–April 2013