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july/aug ust 2 0 13

T h e

i n - f l i g h t

m a g a z i n e

o f

e t h i o p i a n

a i r l i n e s

Four Days Danak覺l

in the

Exploring the salt lake and fierce desert of northeastern Ethiopia.


Contents |

selamta

Features On the Cover

mal i n f e z e hai

Lake Assol, in Ethiopia’s Danakil Depression, is created by salt water that flows through underground passages from the Red Sea.

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Four Days in the Danakil Exploring the fierce desert of northeastern Ethiopia.

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Made in China 2.0

A handful of “maker spaces” are bringing creative energy to the Chinese economy.

Sunset hues illuminate the bell tower at St. Peter’s Church, at the southern end of Tel Aviv’s beach.

Tel Aviv by Bike

G L E N NA G O R D O N

Rolling through the city to reach the beach.

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Selamta brings Africa to the world and the world to Africa. Join us online for more of the adventure of travel, the vitality of business and the richness of culture found in Ethiopia, Africa and the world.

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july/august 2013

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selamta

| Contents

Departments

62 6 news Ethiopia as an OAU/AU official carrier, plus new routes and renewed Dreamliner service.

A look at the legacy of former Prime Minister Meles Zenawi.

Panorama

58 Cuisine Exploring a Senegalese favorite. 60 Nature Chad’s efforts to protect its valuable elephants.

16 commerce + capital Car-washing goes waterless in Dubai, and coffee debuts in India.

62 Destination Bangkok’s floating markets.

20 events + excursions Adventure in Kilimanjaro and jazz in Johannesburg. 22 Hotels + Hotspots A looking-glass hotel in Bangkok, plus noble luxury in Frankfurt. 24 style + substance An espresso-touting tricycle and artisanal Kenyan jewelry.

Spotlight 53 24 Hours Stockholm: Fall in love with Sweden’s captivating capital. selamtamagazine.com

Don’t miss...

57 Wordsmith A review of Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

13 Around Addis The capital city’s most inviting green spaces.

18 diplomacy + development A movement to empower adolescent girls in Ethiopia, Nigeria and Rwanda, plus a fence that wards off lions.

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56 TRAVEL TOOLS “Read it later” apps give you access to online articles while in the air.

66 1,000 words London, England.

duty-free catalog Arguably the best African shopping in the sky — a selection of must-have items at duty-free prices.

Fly Ethiopian 69 travel tips In-flight exercises to keep you limber, helpful pointers for travel to Ethiopia, and a quick introduction to Amharic. 72 fleet 74 route maps 78 Sales and agents offices

Entertainment 83 movies, tv, audio 92 puzzles

I G O R OSTAP CH U K / G E T T Y / H E M E R A

5 from the ceo


From the CEO |

selamta

Welcome Aboard Esteemed Customers,

ክቡራን ደንበኞቻችን

n this issue of Selamta, we commemorate the first-year anniversary of the untimely death of Mr. Meles Zenawi, the late Prime Minister of Ethiopia. Prime Minister Meles was a visionary leader who inspired many in our country and across Africa with a message of progress and African renaissance. His vision was to see Ethiopia transform itself into a middleclass-income nation. He dedicated his entire life to freedom, economic development and poverty eradication across Ethiopia. Under his leadership in the past decades, access to basic health care, clean water and education has dramatically increased, and the country has consistently registered doubledigit economic-growth figures. Millions of Ethiopians have managed to cross the poverty line. Following Prime Minister Zenawi’s vision and hard work, Ethiopia is poised to become a leading regional energy exporter and continental leader in agricultural innovation in the coming years. His personal encouragement and support enabled Ethiopian Airlines to develop the largest cargo network in Africa, which is now fully supporting the airfreight of Ethiopia’s exports of flowers and agricultural products. Prime Minister Zenawi’s vision for development strongly resonates with us here at Ethiopian Airlines. Ethiopian is playing a pivotal role in achieving this vision by facilitating the air transport needs of many who are working hard to make the African renaissance a reality. While Mr. Meles Zenawi is still greatly missed as a leader, we are committed to working hard to fulfill his vision.  In our just-ended fiscal year, we have served more than 5.5 million passengers, mostly traveling between Africa and the rest of the world. We would like to thank our customers for the strong vote of confidence on our ground and in-flight services, efficient network of connectivity, fleet modernization and expansion activities, and aircraft-technology leadership. Our new services to Brazil, South Korea, the Philippines and Singapore will provide more connectivity between Africa, Asia and South America and will build on our position as Africa’s truly indigenous global airline. With five airplanes in service, many of our passengers are enjoying unparalleled comfort with the new and unique features of the B-787 Dreamliners. We are also retrofitting our B-767 airplanes with refurbished seats in our Cloud Nine cabin. With new destinations, new ultra-modern aircraft and African-flavored Ethiopian hospitality, we are serving your travel needs better than ever before. Thank you for choosing to fly with us, and enjoy your flight.

ቡራን መንደኞቻችን በኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድ ለመብረር እንኳን ደህና መጣችሁ! ይህን የሰላምታ መፅሄት እትም መታሰቢያነቱን ለቀድሞው የኢትዮጵያ ጠቅላይ ሚኒስትር ክቡር አቶ መለስ ዜናዊ በማድረግ የክቡርነታቸውን ህልፈት አንደኛ ዓመት እንዘክራለን። ጠቅላይ ሚኒስትር መለስ ለሀገራችንም ሆነ ለመላው አፍሪካ የታላቅ ዕድገትና የህዳሴ ራዕይን የሰነቁ መሪ ነበሩ። አቶ መለስ ህልማቸው የነበረው ኢትዮጵያ መካከለኛ ገቢ ያላት ሀገር ሆና ማየት በመሆኑ ለኢትዮጵያ ነፃነት፣ ድህነትን ለማጥፋትና የኢኮኖሚ እድገት ለማምጣት ህይወታቸውን ሙሉ ደክመዋል። እርሳቸው አመራር ላይ በነበሩባቸው ባለፉት አስርት ዓመታት ሀገሪቱ በጤና ሽፋን፣ በንፁህ የመጠጥ ውሃ አቅርቦትና በትምህርት አስገራሚ እድገት ከማስመዝገቧም በተጨማሪ ለተከታታይ ዓመታት ባለ ሁለት አሀዝ የኢኮኖሚ እድገት አስመዝግባለች ። በዚህም ምክንያት በሚሊዮኖች የሚቆጠሩ ኢትዮያጵን ከድህነት መላቀቀ ችለዋል። በርሳቸውም ራዕይና ያላሰለሰ ጥረት ምክንያት ኢትዮጵያ በምስራቅ አፍሪካ ዋነኛ የሀይል አቅራቢ ከመሆኗም በላይ በቀጣዮቹ ዓመታት በግብርና ቴክኖሎጂና ምርታማነት በአፍሪካ የቀዳሚነት ስፍራን እንድትይዝ ያስችላታል። አቶ መለስ የኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድ የዕቃ ጭነት አገልግሎት እንዲሰፋና እንዲያድግ ከፍተኛ አስተዋፅዎ በማድረጋቸው በአሁኑ ወቅት ይህ የዕቃ ጭነት አገልግሎት የሀገሪቱን የአበባና የግብርና ምርቶች ለውጭ ገበያ በማጓጓዝ ከፍተኛ ሚና በመጫወት ላይ ይገኛል። የጠቅላይ ሚኒስቴር መለስ ዜናዊ የእድገት ራዕይ በኛ በኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድ ሰራተኞች ዘንድም የሰረፀ ነው። አየር መንገዱ የአየር ትራንስፖርትን በማስፋትና በማቀላጠፍ የአፍሪካን ህዳሴ እውን ለማድረግ የሚደረገውን ጥረት በከፍተኛ ሁኔታ በማገዝ ላይ ይገኛል። የክቡር አቶ መለስን በሳል የአመራር ብቃት ያጣን ቢሆንም ለራዕያቸው ዕውን መሆን በቁርጠኝነት እየሰራን እንገኛለን። ባለፈው የድርጅቱ የበጀት ዓመት ከ5.5 ሚሊዮን በላይ መንገደኞችን ያጓጓዝን ሲሆን ከዚህም ከፍተኛውን ቁጥር የሚይዙት በአፍሪካና በተቀረው ዓለም መካከል የተደረጉ በረራዎች ናቸው። በበረራ አገልግሎት አሰጣጣችን፣ በአማራጭ የበረራ መስመሮቻችን፣ በአዳዲስ አውሮፕላኖቻችን፣ በምንከፍታቸው ተጨማሪ መዳረሻዎች እንዲሁም በቴክኖሎጂ መሪነታችን በመተማመን እኛን የበረራ ምርጫቸው ያደረጉ መንገደኞች በሙሉ እናመሰግናለን። ወደ ብራዚል፣ ደቡብ ኮሪያ፣ ሲንጋፖርና ፊሊፒንስ የምንጀምራቸው አዳዲስ በረራዎች በአፍሪካ ፣ በእሲያና በደቡብ አሜሪካ መካከል ያለውን የአየር ግኑኝነት ወደ ላቀ ደረጃ ከማድረስ ባሻገር የኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድ በአፍሪካ የበላይነቱን አስጠብቆ እንዲቆይ ያስችለዋል። በርካታ መንገደኞቻችን አሁን በስራ ላይ ባሉት አምስት ቦይንግ 787 ድሪም ላይነር አውሮፕላኖች በመብረር ምቾታቸውንና ዘመናዊነታቸውን እያጣጣሙ ነው። ከዚህም በተጨማሪ የቦይንግ 767 አውሮፕላኖቻችንን የአንደኛ ማዕረግ መቀመጫዎች ዘመናዊ በሆነ መልኩ እየቀየርናቸው ነው ። አዳዲስ በምንከፍታቸው ጣቢያዎቻችን፣ በአዳዲስና ዘመናዊ አውሮፕላኖቻችን እንዲሁም አፍሪካዊ ውበት ባለው የኢትዮጵያዊነት መስተንግዶአችን የበረራ ፍላጎታችሁን በማርካት ልናገለግላችሁ ከመቼውም ጊዜ በላይ ተዘጋጅተናል። የኢትዮጵያ አየር መንገድን የበረራ ምርጫችሁ በማድረጋችሁ በድጋሚ እናመሰግናለን! መልካም በረራ!

I

Tewolde GebreMariam

Chief Executive Officer, Ethiopian Airlines July/august 2013

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| News

Ethiopian Selected as Official Carrier

50 OUA - UA

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ethiopianairlines.com

Ethiopian Airlines is proud to announce that it was selected as an official carrier for the 50th-anniversary celebration of the Organisation of African Unity/African Union, with its theme of “Pan-Africanism and African Renaissance.” The celebration started in April 2013 and will last for one year. “Ethiopian and the African Union,” announced Ethiopian CEO Tewolde GebreMariam, “have been working together for five decades toward the shared objective of an integrated, peaceful and prosperous Africa that takes its rightful place on the global stage. Today, thanks to the work of the African Union and indigenous African airlines like Ethiopian, the African renaissance is here.” As an official carrier, Ethiopian will support and promote the many activities planned throughout the continent in connection with the milestone anniversary.

P HI L D E J O N G J R / J O U R N E YG RO U P

selamta


News |

Resuming Dreamliner Service

Africa Aviation Day

Ethiopian Airlines is pleased to announce that it resumed Boeing 787 Dreamliner service on April 27, 2013, with a flight from Addis Ababa to Nairobi — the first commercial flight in the world since the grounding of all Dreamliners in January due to battery issues on Japanese carriers. “We would like to thank Ethiopian Airlines for the patience, support and leadership shown throughout the period that the 787 Dreamliner has been grounded,” said Ray Conner, president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “We congratulate the airline on the return to commercial service of their 787 fleet. Ethiopian is a leading airline in Africa and we take pride in their achievement.” Ethiopian is the first airline in Africa and the third in the world to own and operate the Dreamliner.

significant new routes

P HI L D E J O N G J R / J O U R N E YG RO U P

Brazil

South America is now the fifth continent in Ethiopian Airlines’ route network, with the July 2013 launching of services to São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Flights will be operating through the airline’s second hub, in Lomé, Togo, with transatlantic service on the 787 Dreamliner. Brazil has one of the

selamta

For the first time ever, the International Air Transport Association held its annual Africa Aviation Day in Addis Ababa, in partnership with Ethiopian Airlines. Close to 100 airline representatives and aviation stakeholders attended from across Africa to explore the challenges and opportunities for aviation on the continent. Various workshops explored aviation as an essential driver of Africa’s socioeconomic transformation, as well as the daunting challenges facing the African aviation industry (including high fuel prices, high taxation and infrastructure limitations).

South Korea

fastest-growing economies and the fifth largest in the world. São Paulo, the biggest city in the southern hemisphere, is the economic and financial hub of the country. Rio de Janeiro, its second-largest city, is the most-visited in the southern hemisphere and is home to Christ the Redeemer statue, one of the New Seven Wonders of the World.

Ethiopian Airlines commenced four weekly flights to Seoul, South Korea, in June. Seoul is the fourthlargest metropolitan economy in the world (after Tokyo, New York and Los Angeles) and home to four UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Tewolde GebreMariam, CEO of Ethiopian, called attention to “Africa’s economic boom and its growing trade, investment, business and tourism ties with Asia. “We are also happy to start these flights at a historical moment when Ethiopia and South Korea are celebrating the 50th year of the establishment of their diplomatic relations.”

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MELES ZENAWI Remembering a visionary African leader.

RO N LO N D E N / J O U R N E YG RO U P

By Hai lu T ekle hai manot

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ethiopianairlines.com


News |

selamta

T

his August marks a year since the untimely loss of Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, a visionary leader not only for Ethiopia but also for the whole of Africa. He was a rare breed of politician who fought tirelessly against poverty and put Ethiopia on the path to socioeconomic development. Soon after coming into office in 1995, Meles and his party were tasked with the daunting challenge of bringing Ethiopia together and out of destitution, something that many deemed impossible. Meles envisioned that by tapping the human and natural resources of the country — not by looking to the outside — an Ethiopian renaissance would be realized. Meles was also convinced, although many disagreed, that the government could and must play a central role in the transformation, by developing the necessary economic and social infrastructure.

Across Ethiopia last August (shown here in Bahir Dar), the country memorialized the late Prime Minister. His leadership in all facets of the country and continent is greatly missed.

unprecedented growth Under Meles’ stewardship, the Ethiopian government spearheaded the construction of necessary infrastructure that was too big for the private sector (or had no short-term return for that sector). By creating conducive investment policies, Meles also saw the country steadily move away from reliance on aid and grants to a high degree of foreign direct investment and greater involvement of the private sector. Ethiopia, once associated only with famine, was estimated in 2012 to be one of the fastestgrowing economies in the world and the fastest-growing in Africa1 — unprecedented for a

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country not dependent upon oil or other mineral resources. From 1996 to 2010, Ethiopia’s gross domestic product grew from 37 billion birr (roughly US$2 billion) to 159 billion birr2. This growth was broad-based, with industry, services and agriculture growing at average rates of 15 percent, 12.5 percent and 9 percent respectively. The development of infrastructure also grew, including the development of hydropower dams, roads, universities and health facilities. Between 1995 and 2013, for example, Ethiopia constructed seven dams, bringing the total electricity production of the nation to more than 2,000 MW. (Before 2001, that number was only 478 MW.) Over the next three years, two more dams will be completed (including the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile River, the biggest hydroelectric power plant in Africa) — bringing total electricity production close to 10,000 MW. This is in addition to wind, solar and biofuel power-production projects currently under construction. During Meles’ tenure, health coverage increased from 40 percent of the population to 89 percent; the number of students enrolled in higher institutions grew from 77,000 to 260,000; and percapita income more than doubled, from US$400 to US$971. In fact, Ethiopia has the third-fastest annual Human Development Index growth rate in the world since 20003. According to the international antipoverty movement ONE, Ethiopia is one of only a few African countries making significant progress toward meeting the 2015 Millennium Development Goals — a set of eight goals covering everything from health care and education to environmental sustainability, agreed upon by all of the world’s countries. When once asked by a journalist about the legacy he wished to leave, Meles responded, “I would like to be remembered as a leader who showed Ethiopia the path that would lead it out of poverty.” Indeed, Meles considered poverty the main enemy of the country, and his life’s work was geared toward eliminating it. Most pundits agree that Meles transformed Ethiopia, put it on a growth trajectory and turned it into one of the most respected voices on the continent. 10

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An eye on aviation The Ethiopian aviation industry would also come to benefit from Meles’ vision and leadership. In particular, he supported Ethiopian Airlines’ ambitious growth plans, regarding Ethiopian not only as a national carrier but also as a strategic asset and the flagship African airline. Indeed, in Meles’ two decades of leadership, Ethiopian would become the fastest-growing airline in Africa, marking milestone after milestone in the industry. This was achieved through the support of the Ethiopian government in developing the necessary infrastructure and crafting conducive conditions for Addis Ababa’s emergence as the continent’s preferred gateway. Meles also oversaw the growth of Ethiopia’s export sector. One example is the floriculture industry, which in a short period of time flourished from nonexistent to making the country the continent’s second-largest flower exporter. This would lead to the growth of Ethiopian Airline’s cargo wing, which is essential to the country’s perishable exports. A force in Africa Through his involvement in the aviation sector and with his political savvy, Meles put Addis Ababa on the map as a center for diplomatic and policy discussions. He also brought other African leaders to consensus on issues of common concern. Specifically, he focused attention on Africa’s position on climate change and was active in mediating border and resource disputes, particularly in the Horn of Africa. Often described as a charming man when dealing with foreign diplomats and politicians, Meles proved an apt negotiator, persuasive in his dealings. His original aspirations to become a medical doctor changed as he became a student of economics and its implications for developing a country like Ethiopia. He soon came to believe that a one-size-fitsall economic solution was not for Africa and strongly debated it. Throughout the years, he would make believers out of many. Even those who stood diametrically opposed to his economic and political ideologies admit that he was one of the few contemporary African leaders who excelled in intellectual exercise. Meles was indeed a statesman of not only Ethiopia but also the African

continent, taking center stage in the 2002 restructuring of the Organisation of African Unity into the African Union. He staunchly argued that the road to democratization and prosperity in the continent is development, peace, security and the ability of Africans to decide their own fate. Throughout the last decade, he took leadership of the New Partnership for African Development and the African Peer Review Mechanism, bringing significant achievements to the continent and serving as a strong advocate of its interests on the international stage, including the G8 and G20 summits. Although Meles died at age 57, history will remember him as an African giant. Indeed, he would be remembered as one of the leaders who paved the way for a new continent confident of itself and its future. Almost a year before his passing, Meles declared: “Africa is indeed rising. The African renaissance has begun, and it is within our means to keep it going. It is within our means to create a new pole of global growth in Africa, to fully stabilize our continent and to make sure it takes it rightful place in the global scheme of things.” Through his lifelong dedication to the cause of his country and his continent, Meles Zenawi saw the beginnings of his dreams realized, and Africa will truly miss his contribution. 1

2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable

Development. 2Unless otherwise stated, statistics are sourced from the National Bank of Ethiopia. 3

2010 Human Development Report.

—Hailu Teklehaimanot is a senior public relations officer for Ethiopian Airlines.


About |

selamta

Contributors Volume 30 | Number 4

Selamta — meaning “Greetings” in Amharic — is published bimonthly on behalf of Ethiopian Airlines by JourneyGroup+C62, LLC. JourneyGroup+C62, LLC 418 Fourth Street, NE TK Building Charlottesville, VA 22902 Office #102 U.S.A. Bole Road +001 434 961 2500 (phone) Addis Ababa, Ethiopia +001 434 961 2507 (fax) +251 116 180365 (phone) EXECUTIVE GROUP Managing Director Executive Editor Creative Director

Philip De Jong Amanuel Mengistu Greg Breeding

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Diane J. McDougall Phil De Jong Jr. Jodi Macfarlan Ron Londen Hope Mills Kalkidan Mulugeta Tsega Negussie

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PRODUCTION Production Director Lead Developer Production/Sales Printing

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Mildred K. Barya is the author of three poetry collections: Give Me Room to Move My Feet, The Price of Memory After the Tsunami and Men Love Chocolates But They Don’t Say. She has also published a number of short stories and previously worked as a journalist and human-resources advisor. Currently, she teaches creative writing at Alabama School of Fine Arts and maintains an active writers resource blog at mildredbarya.com. Read her review of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s latest book on p. 57. Rooted in: Alabama (USA) Most-missed cuisine while traveling: “Pumpkins mixed with beans, home-style.”

Martin Brusewitz is a Swedish islamologist, photographer and journalist who spends a lot of his time on the road. He does most of his reporting and writing for Swedish magazines and newspapers. For this issue of Selamta, he returned to one of his favorite countries, Ethiopia, to visit what has been a long-time dream destination. See “Four Days in the Danakil” on p. 26. Rooted in: Not rooted Most-missed cuisine while traveling: “Nyponsoppa — a magical drink only found in Sweden, which for many years formed the base of my nutritional intake. It’s best served warm. And sometimes with ice cream.”

Malin Fezehai is a photographer and filmmaker. After studying photography in her native Sweden, she moved to New York to attend the International Center of Photography. She now specializes in portraiture and reportage photography. Fezehai has worked in Ethiopia, Brazil, Peru, Ghana, Sri Lanka, the South Pacific, Haiti and the United States. Check out her coverage of the Danakil Depression on p. 26. Rooted in: New York City (USA) Most-missed cuisine while traveling: “Kalles Kaviar — a Swedish caviar that I put on eggs in the morning.”

North America Sales

Sam Voelkel 418 Fourth Street, NE Charlottesville, VA 22902 U.S.A. +001 434 961 2500 (phone) +001 434 961 2507 (fax) samv@journeygroup.com

As the continent’s premier carrier and a member of the prestigious Star Alliance, Ethiopian Airlines brings Africa to the world and the world to Africa. Selamta does the same, celebrating the adventure of travel, the vitality of Africa’s role in global business affairs, and the richness of culture across all of Ethiopian Airlines’ many, varied destinations. This complimentary copy is yours to keep. While every care is taken to ensure accuracy, the publisher and Ethiopian Airlines assume no liability for error or omissions in this publication. All advertisements are taken in good faith, and the opinions and views contained herein are not necessarily those of the publisher. All copyrights and trademarks are recognized. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without written permission by the publisher. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review. © 2013.

Glenna Gordon is a freelance documentary photographer and writer who splits her time between West Africa and New York. In addition to her own photo projects, she also covers news and features, does work for NGOs, and trains photographers in Africa. Read about her recent trip to Tel Aviv on p. 44. Rooted in: New York City (USA) and Ghana Most-missed cuisine while traveling: “More than anything, I miss cooking for myself. I’m happy to eat whatever is good wherever I am, but I do miss my morning coffee-and-eggs ritual in New York, or even just opening the fridge and whipping up a quick sandwich.” Celeste LeCompte is a freelance writer based in San Francisco and Guangzhou who writes about innovation and the environment. Living up to a New Year’s resolution to “say yes,” she accepted a short-notice invitation to China at the end of 2011 and fell in love with the country’s dynamic, changing culture (and its food). Read her story about the maker movement in China on p. 40. Rooted in: San Francisco, California (USA) and Guangzhou, China Most-missed cuisine while traveling: “Mission-style burritos with extra avocado.”


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co m p i l e d by caro l i ne e b e r ly an d l isa a . ryan

panorama around addis 13 | commerce + capital 16 |

dIplomacy + development 18 | events + excursions 20 | hotels + hotspots 22 | style + substance 24

Around Addis

Going Green in the capital city Visitors seeking a retreat from the hustle and bustle of the capital city need not go far: Many a green space can be found around Addis, if you know where to look. Here, we share our top picks for enjoying the finest flora and fauna the city has to offer.

MI CHAE L TSE G AYE

turn to page 14 to see our picks.

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Around Addis

Ethio-Cuba Friendship Memorial

Learn a little at this historic spot, a tribute both to the Cubans who fought alongside Ethiopia in the 1977-78 Ethio-Somali war and to the resulting goodwill between the countries. The park is a patchwork of grassy spots, concrete areas and fountains, plus sculptures and plaques with photos of soldiers. Nonlocals pay 5-10 birr to enjoy the sights, which might also include an impromptu soccer match; locals get in for 1 birr.

ferensay park

While away a few quiet hours in this urban oasis, located across from the French Embassy. The 54,201-square-meter park is home to the Netsa Art Village, an artist collective that energizes the contemporary arts scene in Ethiopia and beyond. Sculptures by Netsa artists and native trees dot the landscape, and pathways wind through the greenery. Be sure to have 1 birr on hand for the entrance fee.

Bihere Tsige Flower Garden

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Lion Zoo Park

Catch a glimpse of history while checking out this park’s fearless felines — formerly gifted to Emperor Haile Selassie and housed at the Emperor’s Palace. But the Leopantels Abyssinica (a rare lion species that’s local to Ethiopia) are not the only attraction here, as monkeys, tortoises, rabbits, ducks and fish can also be spotted. Entrance fee is 2 birr for locals/10 birr (less than US$1) for foreigners.

( all ) MI CHAE L TSE G AYE

Pack a picnic and take your pick of gardens for a leisurely afternoon amid the blooms. Featuring more than 6,000 varieties of flowers, shrubs and trees, Bihere celebrates all that gives Addis Ababa its name (“New Flower,” in Amharic). Birdwatchers will also delight in the hundreds of species that flit about within the 400,000-square-kilometer (150-square-mile) park, and monkeylovers won’t want to miss the gelada baboons that call Bihere home. (A visit to the baboons costs a little extra, in addition to the 1 birr entrance fee.)


The internal and external non-stick coating of the Starflon pots from Tramontina allow a fast cooking process and are easy to clean. For those who appreciate practicality with a touch of class.

AVAIABLE IN ETHIOPIA AT:


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Commerce + Capital

An Eco-Friendly Enterprise

Shahiya.com Sizzles

Travelers who fall in love with Middle Eastern cuisine will be pleased to discover Shahiya (Arabic for “appetite”), an online recipe portal with 7,000 recipes in its virtual files. The fun, freshly colored site allows its 1.1 million users to search for cuisine by country, and it has even spurred a social network of sorts among readers who offer comments and reviews. Now, the 3-year-old company may be in for another growth spurt, as it’s poised to receive a US$250,000 investment by Lebanon-based Bader Young Entrepreneurs Program. 16

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Coffee Comes to India

In a country long known for its tea culture, coffee is now creating a buzz. Though India’s consumption is still relatively small (less than 2 percent of global demand), international coffee giants like Starbucks and Lavazza are moving in and opening shops, attracted by the opportunity to corner a growing market. Experts predict that fewer beans will be exported from India as more are consumed inside the country — which might hurt the high-end roasters who vie for India’s crop of robusta beans.

Start Your Engines

Nairobi-based auto manufacturer Mobius Motors has engineered an affordable-buttough off-road vehicle that’s fit for the rugged African landscape. These four-byfours are made of sturdy steel frames and lack nonessential components, making them cost-effective and easy to maintain. The company hopes its fleet will help put small business owners on the move and support services like postal delivery, school transit and medical care.

( C W F RO M TO P ) SE T H N I CK E RSO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P, CO U RT E SY O F M O B I U S M OTO RS , AN D R E W CABAL L E RO - R E YN O L DS / G E T T Y, Z AR JAN / G E T T Y

In the dry and dusty climate of Dubai, two resourceful brothers have found a way to make routine car-washing a little easier on the earth: They’re going waterless. Using the biodegradable (and nontoxic) water-free formula they engineered, along with microfiber cloths, the Kohli brothers wash more than 200 cars a day, saving gallons of water along the way. Since the formula binds with dirt to “lift” particles off the vehicle, they say the process is scratchproof and kinder to your ride than the high-salt-content water of the Middle East.


The Power of Friendship


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A Smarter Scarecrow

Thirteen-year-old Richard Turere found a way to turn junkyard items into treasure for his Maasai cattle-herding community. By rigging a car battery, solar panel, motorcycle indicator box and some torch bulbs, Turere created a fence that casts moving light to ward off lions from his family’s livestock near Nairobi National Park. (A scarecrow-and-torch contraption, which put off static light, wasn’t fooling the beasts.) Turere’s influence is spreading far beyond his home: The youngster’s invention is being used around Kenya, and he even gave a TED talk in Longbeach, California, earlier this year.

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ash ley walton / J O U R N E YG RO U P

Diplomacy + Development


bold Move for Mali

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) JAM E S AK E NA / SO L AR SIST E R , E L L E N E B E NAU / G E T T Y, CO U RT E SY O F G I R L H U B

Though only 4 percent of the people of Mali are Internet-users, the country may be about to witness a jolt to its domain use: Starting this July, registrations at .ML will be offered free of charge. The move is being managed by a company called Freedom Registry, which had helped make the domain for the tiny South Pacific community of Tokelau (.TK) one of the most active on the Web. As a result, Mali hopes to boost business inside the country and inspire outside entrepreneurs to invest.

Bright Ideas Solar Sister is giving women of rural Africa the tools to become entrepreneurs through the distribution of solar-powered lamps. Their Business in a Bag model supplies participants with an inventory of lamps (replacing toxic kerosene lanterns), along with sales training and marketing support. The women earn a commission from their sales and help recruit more women into the program, creating a chain-effect that benefits both individual families and their communities.

Girl Hub

Together, the U.K.’s Department for International Development and the Nike Foundation have started a movement to make sure that adolescent girls in Ethiopia, Nigeria and Rwanda are seen and heard. Girl Hub is engaging young women through social communications, innovative programs and policy education. Partnering with likeminded organizations, such as Women’s World Banking and The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Girl Hub is empowering girls to become women leaders of tomorrow.


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Events + Excursions

Let the Games Begin (Again) JULY 2013

FEBRUARY 20-MARCH 3, 2014

Last summer, London’s Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park accommodated throngs of international fans for the 2012 Olympic Games. Then its gates were shuttered and a transformation began so facilities could be reinvented to suit London-sized happenings (which won’t require 17,500 spectator seats). One year after the opening ceremony, the park is ready to reopen. Copper Box, a multi-use sporting venue, will host a variety of sporting (and nonathletic) events, and a section of North Park will welcome city dwellers and travelers to commune with nature.

Adventure-seekers, now’s the time to start training for the mother of all triathlons — the Kili[MAN] Adventure Challenge, February 20 to March 3, 2014, in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. There’s nothing tame about this athletic event: Participants first summit Kilimanjaro and then go head-to-head in a mountain-bike race around the mountain before rounding out the competition with a marathon.

Feast for the Senses Live jazz, poetry recitations, art exhibits — these are the events that energize Johannesburg during the Johannesburg Arts Alive Festival, September 1 to 10. For 10 creative days, both local and international artists take the stage, and arts- and music-lovers of all stripes flock to the city. SEPTEMBER 1-10, 2013 20

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CO U RT E SY O F VISI T B R I TAI N , ( L TO R ) JAM E S B R E W / G E T T Y, J O H N H O G G / J O HAN N E SB U RG ARTS AL IVE

In a Word: Extreme


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Hotels + Hotspots

View From Above

Latest and Greatest

Mövenpick Hotel & Apartments Bur Dubai is the newest of the Swiss-based company’s luxury properties in Dubai. For those on an extended stay, the hotel offers one- and two-bedroom serviced apartments alongside its traditional guest rooms. Take in the sun on the rooftop pool or pop into Spices, a modern restaurant featuring both classic and exotic cuisine from around the world. There’s no shortage of nearby attractions: historic centers, the Al Mamzar Beach Park and the Dubai Mall — the world’s largest mall and home to the Dubai Aquarium, an Olympic-sized ice rink and Kidzania. 22

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noble luxury

You don’t have to be royalty to get the royal treatment: Hotel Hessischer Hof, in Frankfurt, Germany, is a privately owned Five Star Alliance hotel elegantly outfitted with antique furniture and artwork from the castle of the Royal Family of Hesse. The gourmet restaurant, Sèvres, offers a regal setting in which to spoil yourself (order the three-course Indulgence Menu), complemented by an impressive international wine selection. Throughout your stay, you’re bound to feel like a king or queen.

( C W F RO M TO P ) CO U RT E SY O F ST . R E G IS H OT E L BAN G KO K , CO U RT E SY O F H OT E L h essisch er H O F, CO U RT E SY O F M OVE N P I CK H OT E L AN D APART M E N TS

If you’re looking to get a unique perspective of Bangkok, the St. Regis hotel is the perfect looking glass. With floor-to-ceiling windows, nearly every room offers sweeping views of Thailand’s capital, and the open, upscale restaurant terraces allow you to float above it all. Simply stepping out of the hotel’s second-story entrance will lead you directly to the local Ratchadamri skytrain station, where you can take in the area’s impressive architecture and the Royal Bangkok Sports Club’s manicured fairways — quite the panorama.


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Style + Substance

Noteworthy Nigerian

Time Magazine has named 34-year-old Nigerian Nollywood star Omotola Jolade-Ekeinde one of the world’s most influential people and Africa’s most renowned leading lady. She’s honored in the category of “2013 icons,” alongside U.S. first lady Michelle Obama, singer Beyonce and Duchess Kate Middleton. This actress/singer/motherof-four has been an Amnesty International campaigner and a U.N. World Food Programme Ambassador. She also founded the Omotola Youth Empowerment Programme, aimed at engaging and inspiring Nigerian youth.

Espresso on-the-go

A pair of London-based designers are looking to take coffee to the streets with Velopresso, an espresso-vending tricycle. The sleek design prototype features a pedal-powered grinder and a gas-fired espresso machine, neither of which requires electricity or motors. Quiet, eye-catching and off-grid, you don’t have to be a coffee drinker to appreciate this concept.

Making Good Time

Using a grid of simple analog clocks, a Swedish design duo known as Humans Since 1982 has created a mesmerizing installation where clock hands configure to display a larger digital time display. “A million times” — currently on view at the Victor Hunt gallery in Brussels, Belgium — is the penultimate piece in a series of clock projects. 24

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New York–based luxury fashion brand Maiyet is showcasing the work of Kenyan artisans as part of its 2013 jewelry line. Partnering with Nest, a nonprofit committed to training and developing artisan businesses, the brand offers a uniquely curated line of globally inspired clothing, shoes, accessories and jewelry. Among other treasures, these 18k-gold-plated organic drop earrings are available exclusively at Barneys New York.

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) CO U RT E SY O F O M OTO L A J O L AD E - E K E I N D E , IVAN CO L E MAN , CO U RT E SY O F MAIYE T, CO U RT E SY O F H U MANS SI N CE 19 82

Global Trends


HARD WON, BEST SHARED. Not for sale to persons under the age of 18. Drink Responsibly. The JOHNNIE WALKER, BLACK LABEL and KEEP WALKING words, the Striding Man device and associated logos are trademarks. ŠJohn Walker & sons 2011.


Four Days in the Danakil 26

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Exploring the fierce desert of northeastern Ethiopia. Brusewitz by Martin ezehai y malin f photos b

Dallol’s colorful sulfur formations are created by a chemical process that causes the ground to bubble, sizzle and sputter.

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The crew abandons its car after encountering the third flat tire within a few hours; someone will be sent back for it later.

he first flat tire is not a big deal. Our driver gets out, unscrews the broken tire, replaces it with a new one, and we are on our way again. Simple. With the second flat tire comes the same procedure, but this time it’s accompanied by a slight look of worry and some cursing. By the third, facial expressions are serious, almost grim, and voices are tense.

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A Toyota Land Cruiser carries tourists toward the active Erta Ale volcano.

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After delivering salt to Mekelle, the camel caravans return to Dallol by way of a route beneath the Eastern Range of the

epression Danakil D

Ethiopian Highlands.

by the Numbers

1,200

three The number of continental plates that meet in this hotter-than-Hades basin in northeastern Ethiopia.

14° N, 40.5° E

34˚

The average annual temperature, in degrees Celsius (93.2˚F). The hottest in the world. (There’s a reason the locals call it “the place the devil plows.”)

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Square kilometers constituting the area’s salt mine. (That’s 463 square miles.)

116

Elevation — in meters below sea level — of the Danakil salt mines.

Infinite The hues — shades of red, yellow, orange and green — that color Danakil’s field of bubbling sulfur volcanoes, triggered by chemical reactions in the ground.

1,903 → 2,950 The jump in tourists from 2010–2011 to 2011–2012, making it Ethiopia’s fastest-growing tourist attraction.


We have used our last extra wheel. The 40º C (104º F) air lies like a heavy blanket around us. With every breath, I feel it pour down my lungs, thick as honey and dry as sand. This is not the place to get stuck without a car. In fact, it’s one of the last places on earth you would want to be trapped.  We are in the Danakil Depression, a burning hot, hostile desert in the northeastern corner of Ethiopia — named the cruelest place on earth by National Geographic. In 1927, L.M. Nesbitt became the first European explorer to successfully cross this land. Afterward, he wrote: “We were fortunate in getting through with the loss of only three men killed by the Danakils, one turned insane through heat, and ten camels and three mules died of fatigue.” The average annual temperature of 34º C recorded in the Danakil Depression is the highest in the world. In the summer, the temperature often comes close to the 50º C mark. The people living here call it “the place the devil plows.” This is where three continental plates meet or, more accurately put, pull away from each other. The gap formed between the separating plates is swallowing the land and soon, in geological terms (that is, around 10 million years), the waters of the Red Sea will rush in, drown the entire region, and a new sea will be formed. Africa will lose its horn. But for now, this is far from being an ocean; it is nothing but dry desert.  At the same time, the Danakil is one of Ethiopia’s fastest-growing tourist attractions. A total of 1,903 tourists visited in 2010–2011. The next year, that figure rose to 2,950. I traveled here with a photographer to discover what it is about this brutal location that keeps drawing people in. With us is our guide, Negasi Teklay, plus four drivers and two guards. In four Land Cruisers loaded with water, food and fuel to last us through our stay, we left the town of Mekelle a few days earlier to explore the Danakil and meet its people, called the Afar.

IMG_0645.JPG

IMG_0918 (1).JPG

The native, nomadic Afar people (above) have named the Danakil the “place the devil plows” and the Erta Ale volcano (left) the “gateway to hell.”

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Meriam and her family work inside their cooking tent — an essential part of their nomadic lifestyle.

This resilient population has inhabited this corner of the world for centuries, probably millennia, moving with their herds through the tough land. It is believed they used to grow crops in the Ethiopian highlands but then transferred to a nomadic lifestyle in the lowlands of the Danakil. Exactly when is not known. Their traveling lifestyle hasn’t left many traces behind, although 2,000-year-old stone inscriptions reveal that nomads inhabited the Danakil at that time. The Afar language is believed to come from an old Ethiopian tongue of the highlands and is classified as a Cushitic language. The Afar are known to be a fearless and harsh warrior people organized into clans. About 2.5 million Afar live in Ethiopia, Eritrea and Djibouti, with approximately 1.5 million in Ethiopia alone. Most still live a nomadic or half-nomadic life. Camels on the moonscape We are sitting in the broken-down car, the heat waiting outside like a predator. I can feel it trickle in through the door, reaching for me. Here, the landscape tortures cars, plaguing them to death with sand, heat and pure roughness. “A car you can operate for 20 years elsewhere in Ethiopia is done after a year here,” says Yemane Gebre Anenya, one of the drivers. We abandon the car; somebody will be sent back for it later. The repacking is done quickly, the journey continues, and the left-behind vehicle soon disappears in the clouds of dust rising from the rushing wheels of our cars. We drive through what looks like a moonscape, barren and dry, with big rocks rising along the road like dried-out, cracked-up beasts. Apart from the occasional truck driver stirring up massive storms of dust, we don’t see anyone or anything for hours. Then, all of a sudden, we spy movement on the horizon. Camels. Hundreds of them. The animals are tied to each other from tail to mouth, creating a pearl necklace of the desert, trudging along in a slow, constant trot. Around their big feet lies a soft haze of dirt and dust, like clouds hovering around mountaintops. They are coming from the salt mine in Dallol. The camel caravans look and operate pretty much the same as they have for at least 2,000 years. They travel from Mekelle to Dallol, a seven-day journey, and then back. Going to Dallol, they are loaded with water and cattle feed that they consume during the trip. En route to Mekelle, they carry salt. Some stop halfway, and the drivers sell the salt in the town of Berhaile instead of taking it all the way up to the highlands: The travel is shorter but the profit smaller.

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“A car you can operate for 20 years elsewhere in Ethiopia is done after a year here.” —Yemane Gebre An enya, driver

A caravan of camels — each packed with 200–300 kilos of salt — embarks on the seven-day journey from salt mine to market.

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The source of the salt is Lake Assol; the landscape here is totally flat, covered in white salt and a thin shroud of clear water. Underground passages connect the Red Sea with the Danakil, creating the salt lake. Winds and rain every now and then make the lake flood. When it retracts, it leaves behind enormous amounts of salt on the surrounding plains, creating a giant salt mine covering 1,200 square kilometers (463 square miles). Salt as valuable currency Until the early 20th century, salt blocks (amole) were used as currency in Ethiopia. The salt mine — together with tourism — is the most important source of income for the Afar living in the area. The majority of the people running the trade caravans are Christian highlanders from the Tigray region, but the Afar tax every single camel, donkey and mule that carries salt. They also run commerce along the trade routes and find temporary employment cutting and loading the salt. A few hundred kilometers to the west, huge trucks can be seen working the salt fields of Djibouti, but here in the Danakil, everything with an engine is forbidden. “The Afar believe that the introduction of machinery would bring bad luck and destroy the salt,” Negasi Teklay tells me as we make our way from the salt lake toward the mine. It’s five o’clock in the afternoon when we reach the salt mine in Dallol. Out on the plain we meet Futsum Zbelos, one of hundreds of caravan drivers who profits from the salt trade. He is loading up his camels and donkeys. His clothes are torn and dirty, sweat drips from his chin, and a stream of blood from a cut is painting a red stripe down his right leg. He’s been here since four in the morning, working with intensity as the heat grows ever more ferocious. “I have to hurry up,” he says. “All the camels are loaded and waiting.” On the ground there is a big pile of prepared salt blocks, each the size of telephone directories, cut from the ground with a steel blade. The blocks are tied together in

A young Afar woman, Hassena.

Limestone rocks reach toward the sky near the sulfur fields of Dallol.

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The camel caravan’s leader heaps blocks of salt atop a donkey in the 39º C (102º F) heat. “It’s fine today,” he says. “This is the cold season.”

“The Afar believe that the introduction of machinery would bring bad luck and destroy the salt.” —Negasi

Teklay,

guide

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The Afar people have inhabited this corner of the world for centuries.

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A young Afar girl tends to her family’s animals in Berhale, a small town on the desert’s outskirts.

clusters of four or eight, and Futsum picks them up from the ground and throws them over the back of a donkey. He secures the load with a rope, pulling it tightly around the animal. Scars from where the rope has been tied before draw lines on the donkey’s belly. Futsum has just a few more salt blocks to load before beginning the seven-day trip on foot back to Mekelle. He will walk through many of the nights to stay out of the heat, eating bread cooked on an open fire and praying for the salt price to be as high as possible when he reaches Mekelle. It’s 14 birr (roughly US$0.78) per block today. Could be 15 birr tomorrow.

The salty water of Dallol’s lake comes from the Red Sea through underground passages.

A beautiful, alien landscape We spend the night not far from the salt mine in a dusty settlement called Hamedila. It consists of about 100 simple huts built around a radio tower and is home to roughly 500 Afar people. I’m sitting in the shade on a rickety wooden bed when Abdullah Ali Noor, the village administrator, approaches. He first came here 20 years ago to work at the salt mine. In the last few years, the area has seen a large increase in the number of tourists — a boost that he says is good for the village. “It’s not easy to make a living here,” he says. “Nothing grows.” But even while he and his fellow villagers welcome tourists, they don’t want to see the landscape changed in the hands of outsiders. “Many people are interested in coming here to build hotels, but we don’t let anybody build anything — not even a toilet,” he says. “This is our land.” During the rainy season, water from the surrounding highlands pours down into the Danakil, flooding large areas and destroying roads while the temperature starts rising. It gets too wet and warm for tourists, and even the Afar abandon Hamedila, moving on to other villages or towns as their huts — built from pieces of wood, plastic and burlap — slowly fall apart.  I remember years ago when I first read about the Danakil Depression. At that time it was even more unknown than it is today. What caught my attention was a description of sulfur fields as a “weird alien landscape full of colors.” That location, it turns out, is not far from Hamedila, on the other side of the salt fields behind a rocky mountainside. We take off — drive through the fields, pass the camels getting loaded, climb the rocky mountain. Suddenly it’s there. And it exceeds all of my expectations. The fields look as if they’ve been picked out of the imagination of a child: The entire area is an explosion of colors, a firework of thousands of nuances of red, yellow, orange and green. Chemical reactions in the ground form a giant field of small, bubbling and spurting sulfur volcanoes that constantly reform the structure of the landscape. Negasi Teklay tells me that he comes here often, “and even from day to day, the landscape changes.”

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At the edge of hell The next day, we head toward the “gateway to hell” — the active Erta Ale volcano. After a rough, five-hour car ride on what one of the drivers calls “the worst road in Ethiopia,” we reach a small village at the base of the volcano. From here we have to walk. But as the sun is still high in the sky, starting out now would be suicide. So we wait. There are only rocks and a few stone huts around, so we sit idly in the shade. When dusk arrives, we start our trek up the side of the volcano. The walk is steep, and soon night tumbles upon us, pitch-black and dense. The light from our flashlights dances like fireflies around us as we slip, stumble and stagger up the mountainside. After three hours of walking, we get to the top. We are not far from the crater — perhaps the area’s greatest draw for adventure tourists like me. I look into the night and out there, a few hundred meters away, the compact darkness is disturbed by a deep red glow as if a city is burning behind the rocks. I take a deep breath before walking the last hundred meters over to the edge. Looking down, each of us falls silent, staring at the glowing lava, lost in thought. The cruelest place on earth, perhaps. A spectacular, beautiful, harsh place of endless desert, fiery volcanoes and baking heat. Yet for the Afar, for thousands of years, it has provided the backdrop for everyday life. It is home.

Danakil, “the place the devil plows.”

Young Muhammad (top) aspires to be a doctor, because his home of Hamedila (an Afar settlement pictured in the distance) has no hospitals.

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A handful of “maker spaces� are bringing creative energy to the Chinese economy. By Celeste LeCompte | Illustrations by Seth Nickerson

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china

op on the new high-speed rail line in Guangzhou, China, and within 45 minutes you’ll arrive at the outskirts of Shenzhen. The city, made famous by its booming manufacturing industry — the engine of Chinese economic growth over the past few decades — is a sprawling region of plain, gated factory buildings and high-rise towers. Visitors often liken its colorful night skyline to a futuristic film set. ■ But set foot in OCT LOFT, the city’s ultra-chic arts-and-design district, and you’ll get a taste of a new and different economy. The hiss of latte machines and live jazz are the soundtrack here. Boutiques featuring handmade items fill repurposed industrial buildings, alongside bars and restaurants. Murals brighten the exterior walls, and eye-catching sculptures line the brick sidewalks. On the second floor of Building A5, a cheerful, glass storefront with lime-green walls displays books, toys and curious electronic gadgets. This is Chaihuo, Shenzhen’s first “maker space.” It’s a sort of community center where members get together not to play basketball but to build robots, learn programming skills and dream up do-it-yourself (DIY) technology projects. Chaihuo is one of about a dozen such places in China. The first, XinCheJian, appeared in Shanghai in 2010, followed shortly by others in Beijing, Hangzhou and other cities around the country. Several more new spaces are opening this year. What makes Chaihuo special, though, is its connection to both the broader maker movement and an ongoing shift in global manufacturing. july/august 2013

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“For me, it’s about the people — having a place to share, a place to talk.”

— Jas e n Wa ng , C ha i h u o m e mb e r

A maker space in A manufacturing mecca The toys and DIY electronics kits in the window display at Chaihuo were made by members. They’re all for sale, attracting passersby to play with the fun, hands-on offerings and browse the publications. Behind the retail front lies a collaborative workspace, for which members pay at least 128 RMB (US$20) per month to access. Dominating the workspace is a large wood table, used as a work surface for anything ranging from soldering to programming to socializing. Classes and events are held here as well. Most maker spaces around the world put an emphasis on access to shared equipment, such as wood and metal lathes, drills, saws, and milling machines. The total number of maker spaces around the world is small — estimated by many to be in the hundreds, not thousands — but growing rapidly, with dozens of new shops opening across the United States, Europe, the Middle East and Africa over the past year or two. In most of these places, the maker movement is framed as a way of giving everyone the tools to turn an idea into reality. The TechShop, a San Mateo, California-based network of maker spaces in the United States, compares its business model to a gym or fitness club; but instead of treadmills and personal trainers, it offers its 5,000 members access to fabrication equipment (such as laser cutters) and trained staff, which it calls “dream coaches.” In Shenzhen, things are different because Chaihuo doesn’t offer many tools. In part, that’s because of the site’s proximity to the global supply chain for parts and pieces. Instead of learning to use the equipment themselves, many Chaihuo members turn to the thousands of custom suppliers around the Shenzhen area, who can turn out custom laser-cut designs, circuit boards and milled metal screws far more quickly and cheaply than the DIYers could themselves. Rather than focus on tools, Chaihuo focuses on building community and encouraging collaboration. “For me,” says Jasen Wang, a Chaihuo member, “it’s about the people — [having] a place to share, a place to talk.”

A new economic engine Indeed, Shenzhen is the beating heart of the world’s electronics supply chain. The city’s exuberant, if gritty, feel is largely due to the millions of young people who have flocked here from small towns across China, in a gold rush of employment. The country’s cautious economic opening to the West in the late 1970s began here and it continues today. Everything from tiny electronic components to high-end consumer devices is made in thousands of factories throughout the city. But there’s one piece of the puzzle that many in the industry say China is missing: insight into the design and creative process. Zach Smith, a former co-founder of MakerBot Industries, serves as program director for HAXLR8R, a Shenzhen-based startup accelerator. He thinks that product innovation is the No. 1 differentiator for U.S. companies today. If China’s won the manufacturing game, it’s still lagging behind the West when it comes to original creativity. The impact of this gap is far-reaching for China. The country earns less than 5 cents on every dollar spent on the global consumer electronics that are manufactured within its borders. The rest is divided up among other companies in the value chain — especially those that hold the intellectual property and brand power. As China begins to lose its cost advantage over other countries, it can no longer count on manufacturing’s traditional low-margin, high-volume economics. Because of this, both regional and national government agencies have begun to invest in efforts to build 42

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homegrown Chinese businesses and products that keep more of the wealth inside the country. One strategy that politicians are trying is investment in makers. In late 2011, Shanghai proposed to fund 100 maker spaces (dubbed “innovation houses”) throughout the city, six of which had opened by March 2013. The network of maker spaces will include the usual mix of manufacturing equipment, classes and membership activities. The goal: to cultivate a creative spark among China’s entrepreneurial class. Making room for fun — and funding While it may seem counterintuitive as an economic strategy, the main way that maker spaces are teaching creativity is by pushing participants to stop thinking about “making” as work. “Most Chinese people, if they do something, are always thinking, How do I turn this into a product and make money? They are not thinking, I am just doing this for fun,” says Min Lin Hsieh, a globetrotting software engineer who was born in Taiwan and worked in California’s Silicon Valley for several years before starting the first Chinese maker space, XinCheJian. Many in the Chinese maker community say the reason for this is simple: mortgages. In China, the pressure to own a home is immense, particularly for young men. “They are always talking about how much pressure they have,” Hsieh continues. “If they don’t have a house, they can’t find a wife. It’s money and time. They can’t just enjoy making.” That’s slowly changing. Minimum wages have increased steadily over the past several years, doubling in Shenzhen between 2009 and 2011. These changes, paired with greater scrutiny of labor practices, have slashed overtime hours. The average workweek, as a result, has shortened from six days to five. With more free time and rising wages, notes Eric Pan, founder of Chaihuo, there’s a growing class of educated technology workers who are starting to discover making as a hobby. He and others say that developing a culture where making can be fun is a key piece of the creative process that leads to commercial innovation. Take the examples of Jasen Wang and Terry Ouyang. Wang’s DIY robotics kit, Makeblock, started as a personal project. The set of durable, machined aluminum mix-and-match parts for constructing your own robots caught on with other users at Chaihuo, and Wang soon quit his day job to focus on developing the product full time. His campaign on the online fundraising platform Kickstarter brought in $185,000 — more than six times its initial goal. Makeblock now supports four full-time employees and is nearing completion of its first venture investment round. Terry Ouyang, a software developer and long-time Chaihuo member, started out working with others on projects they found on DIY websites, but when it came to generating new projects, he froze. “I wanted to work on my own thing, but I didn’t have any ideas,” he says. Through the Chaihuo community, though, he met a designer with an idea. The two began talking, and today they’re working on a personal health-monitoring device for iPhone users. That’s precisely the kind of thing Pan wants to see more of. After all, Chaihuo takes its name from a Chinese expression: Zhòngrén shi chái huyàn go ( ), which translates as “the fire burns high when everybody adds wood to it.” As the name suggests, Pan is hoping that, by joining forces, the small twigs of China’s emerging maker culture can stoke a creative fire.


Tel Avivans flock to the city’s beaches from dawn till dusk when the weather is warm.

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“Where are you going?” my grandmother asks as I’m getting ready to leave her small apartment. • Most of the time, my grandmother doesn’t know what country I’m in. I live a very independent, adult life that involves traveling between New York and subSaharan Africa, where I work as a photojournalist. I swap SIM cards as I cross borders and don’t bother her with the details. But once I’m in Tel Aviv, sleeping on her couch, my clothes and camera gear spread out in the living room, I’m still expected to answer questions. • Today, I tell her, I have one destination in mind: the beach.

A street musician plays the cello.


A Doors to a home in Neve Tzedek, a picturesque part of the old city.

And so now, this independent adult is preparing to bike around a city that I don’t really know. Though I’m halfIsraeli and have visited Israel countless times, this is one of the first times I’ve ventured out in Tel Aviv on my own. I’m generally shepherded from point A to point B by an entourage of cousins, aunts, other distant relatives and well-wishers who all want nothing more than to feed me. Tel Aviv is a city of roughly 400,000 in a country of nearly 8 million. Although not traditionally known for biking, it’s a small, flat and easily navigable place and so is quickly making a name for itself as one of the world’s most bikeable cities. From the wide boulevards downtown to the cobblestone alleys in Jaffa (the ancient part of the city), to the hopping boardwalk by the beach, most parts of the city can be reached by bike. Add to that the fact that taxis are expensive and traffic is always an issue, and it makes sense why bikes are the perfect mode of transportation for exploring this Mediterranean hotspot of modernist architecture and ancient history. “Tel Aviv is becoming Amsterdam,” says Yotam Avizohar of the Israel Bicycle Association, referring to the Dutch city known for its bike-loving reputation. In fact, the city has added more than 120 kilometers (roughly 75 miles) of bike lanes in the past five years, with more to come, according to a spokesperson for the Tel Aviv mayor’s office. As an agricultural powerhouse in the arid Middle East, Israel has gained its reputation as an international leader in green technology and green living out of both necessity and choice. Biking — rather than driving — is an integral part of Tel Aviv’s environmentally friendly and active culture. Some Israelis have their own bikes, and others prefer to use the convenient Tel-O-Fun system, which allows renters to pick up and drop off a bike as needed at one of more than 150 locations around town.

Finding a bike, finding the beach I walk out of my grandma’s apartment near the city center, past the dentist’s office and the corner café, and into the blazing heat. I’ve always been more of a wanderer than a traveler with a destination, but today isn’t for wandering. My agenda is set: Rent a bike. Get to the beach. Modest aims, really, but given my shaky grasp of spoken Hebrew and my penchant for distraction, I have to constantly visualize the turquoise water only a couple of kilometers away to keep me on track. (Most people in Tel Aviv speak English, and bigger street signs have Hebrew and English transliteration, but barreling by on a bike makes it hard to catch street signs or stop for directions. Thankfully, all I need to do is head west.) 46

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A sidewalk café beckons passersby with its fresh juices, including lemonade with fresh nana (mint) — a local favorite.


Pedestrians and bikers on the move in Tel Aviv, a city quickly garnering a bikefriendly reputation.

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The beach at Tel Aviv’s western edge is packed during the day (with umbrellas and chairs rented from nearby hotels) and offers a more reflective beauty at night (lower right).

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I walk by the falafel stand, my grandmother’s favorite flower shop and several delicious bakeries before turning onto Kikar Rabin, where I’ll be renting a Tel-O-Fun bike. In just minutes, I manage to procure my very own brightgreen model. After a few seat adjustments and a quick gear check, I’m pedaling west on Frishman, a narrow yet primary Tel Aviv artery that will eventually get me to the water. I ride down the newly created bike lanes and eventually navigate past throngs of slow-walking pedestrians to hit the intersection at Dizengoff Center, where Israel’s first mall still attracts thousands of shoppers each day. Sidewalk cafés by the dozen tempt me: ice-cold lemonade with fresh nana (mint) — a Tel Aviv favorite; chopped salads filled with diced tomatoes, cucumbers and the occasional radish; and gelato shops that would make any Italian salivate. I’m hot and sweaty in the midday sun and distracted by the limestone alleyways that beckon me to explore. Florentine, a neighborhood just south of the center, is filled with warehouses converted into art spaces and nightclubs, but the activity usually doesn’t get going until late at night. And Neve Tzedek, dotted with local designer boutiques, restaurants and cafés, is another great place to explore, but it’s too sedate for the afternoon I have planned. The winding neighborhoods filled with decaying midcentury architecture — shuttered apartment buildings for those who eschew Tel Aviv’s new high rises — eventually give way as Frishman slopes uphill. I shift gears on my TelO-Fun to keep my pace. As I approach the beach, I pedal past expensive hotels and busloads of old Russian tourists and their younger American counterparts. At the top of the mild hill, I stop at a traffic light and glimpse my first view of sea shining in the horizon. The water of the Mediterranean is bathtub-warm this time of year, and the sandy, yellow beach is packed with umbrellas, ice-cream stands, half-naked children and glistening sunbathers.

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A drummer entertains passing bikers on Rothschild Boulevard in central Tel Aviv.

A more conservative contingent of Orthodox and other religious Jews generally heads to the stretch of beach farther north, just before the Tel Aviv wharf. Everything south of the wharf could easily be confused for Rio or Miami, or any other strip of beach near a city, for that matter. I drop off my Tel-O-Fun at a docking station (I’ll get a new one when I’m ready to leave) and wander around in search of the perfect patch of sand. In the center, the fancier hotels offer premium-priced chaise lounges. To the south, the beach stretches toward Jaffa, a formerly Arab enclave that’s now home to many hip young Israelis. About halfway down the beach, the always-popular Manta Ray restaurant is, as expected, crowded with patrons waiting in a less-thanpatient queue, while a handful of other places serving ice cream, beer, soda and fresh fruit juice also do brisk business. I head center-south, ditch my stuff and jump immediately into the ocean, my sweaty bike ride rewarded with soft waves and water just a touch cooler than the air. I float and drift with the tides, losing track of time. The sun sets over the Jaffa clock tower, the water shimmers, the crowds thin, and it’s dark by the time I’m ready to bike back. Riding on Rothschild Boulevard, a wide road with a dedicated bike lane in the median, I find that I’m in good company alongside throngs of young Israelis on bikes. I join a semi-circle of riders at an intersection to listen to a long-haired, shirtless man drumming away as if performing in front of thousands of fans. The street is his stage, and DJs at a nearby club turn up their amps to compete with his rhythm. I listen to the music for a while and eventually ride back home — the soundtrack of the boulevard still audible as I cycle away.

A rooftop dinner party in Jaffa, the ancient part of the city that’s now home to many hip young Israelis.

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Two Wheels in Tel Aviv

Where to start when planning your bicycling adventure.

Tel-O-Fun: These bikes are perfect for getting around town or just making a quick hop from one point to another. They couldn’t be more convenient — you can pick them up or drop them off just about anywhere (it’s rare to go more than a few blocks in central Tel Aviv without seeing a stand). Note that the bikes vary in condition. Cost: The idea is that you ride the bike a short distance and park it at a Tel-O-Fun docking station, then later pick out a new one. So the base price is low (just 17 NIS/day — about US$5), but you get charged any time you don’t turn your bike into a new docking station within half an hour (from an additional 5 NIS/hour up to a whopping 2,100 NIS/day). www.tel-o-fun.co.il/en

Cycle: One of many small boutique rental shops, Cycle is centrally located and staffed with helpful folks who will make sure you find the best bike for your needs. For 25NIS /hour, or 65 NIS/day, you can rent a bike with a basket, lock and helmet. By far the best option for more serious cyclists. www.cycle.co.il

Buy your own ride: For stays in the city lasting longer than a few days, head down to the Jaffa Flea Market and buy yourself a cheap bike that you can ditch or sell at the end of your trip. Make sure to give these bikes a test ride and, if possible, take a local along with you for haggling.

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spotlight 24 hours 53 | travel tools 56 | wordsmith 57 | cuisine 58 | nature 60 | Destination 62 | 1,000 words 66

24 Hours

stockholm Fall in love with Sweden’s captivating capital.

T O L ASE R / G E T T Y

by br i ttany sh oot

he Swedish capital since 1634, Stockholm has truly earned its occasional nickname, “Venice of the North.” More than a dozen beautiful bridges link its 14 interconnected islands, and passenger ferries and cargo ships dot the plentiful waterways that snake throughout the archipelago. Forty percent of the city’s public space is reserved for lush green expanses, seven nature reserves, and every manner of manicured park and pathway. cont i nued on page 54.

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24 Hours i llustrat i ons by matt pam er

bakve r k e t

LAO WAI

Öst e r mal ms Salu hal l

UNDER THE BRIDGES

GRAND HOTEL

VASA MUSEET

GRANDPA RETRO ETC PET SOUNDS

How to get there » Ethiopian Airlines flies daily from Addis Ababa to StockholmBromma Airport.

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Stockholm is also distinctly diverse: Nearly 15 percent of its residents were born abroad, and bits of conversations in many languages swirl about regardless of where you travel throughout the city. It’s therefore no surprise that Stockholmers take great pride in their city’s assorted artistic offerings and unique architecture, which spans eight centuries. Perhaps its eclectic population and rich cultural history is what makes the city such a perfect blend of Old-World charm and modern sophistication. 9 a.m. Scandinavians are serious about their carbs, so start the day like a local and head to Bakverket for a sweet breakfast of kanelbullar (homemade cardamom cinnamon rolls) and apricot jam, washed down with a cup of strong coffee. As the sun’s rays cast a bright light over the city, bike commuters whiz by in an orderly fashion, including women in skirts and heels and men in fitted suits. Next, snag a few more sweets from the award-winning Chokladfabriken, founded in 1997 by pastry chef Martin Isaksson and his wife, Ellinor. The shop uses only the finest raw ingredients to create the city’s best chocolates, from pistachio marzipan bars to licorice toffee delights.


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( L TO R ) J O HAN MA AL L E R B U RG / G E T T Y, K AT I E PAL M E R

In Stockholm — nicknamed “Venice of the North” for its plentiful waterways — the fika, meaning “coffee break,” is often enjoyed with cinnamon-and-cardamomspiced pastries.

10 a.m. Walk off breakfast as you head through the city toward one of Stockholm’s prominent landmarks. The Vasa Museet is a strangely compelling, stories-high museum built to fit an almost completely intact 17th-century warship, which sank less than one nautical mile off the dock during its maiden voyage in 1628. The Vasa is a rather amusing monument to Swedish colonial hubris and perseverance: After it sat under the marina for three centuries, archaeologists and wreck divers worked doggedly to retrieve it in 1961 (the exact reason for their collective obsession is still a bit uncertain). 12 p.m. The 17 vendors in the eclectic food hall of Östermalms Saluhall represent a wide range of cuisine, with many family-operated stalls that have served the same local specialties for generations. Try the lemon sole with beet root at Lisa Elmqvist, where fourth-generation chefs bake, fry and poach daily catches and fresh shellfish on-site. At Tysta Mari, sample the pickled herring with mashed potatoes, a regional favorite. And no visit to Scandinavia is complete without sampling some smørrebrød, a traditional Danish open-face sandwich of cold meats or smoked fish on dark rye bread, also favored by many Swedes. 1 p.m. Take a stroll through the Södermalm district, where you can pick up stylish Scandinavian housewares and

vintage threads at reasonable rates. In the unisex clothing boutique Grandpa, try on a warm cable-knit sweater or grab a set of tumblers for your next dinner party. Just down the road, stop into Retro Etc for secondhand home décor and new oneof-a-kind kitchen accessories designed for in-house label Koloni. To pick up the latest Swedish pop hits (and impress your friends back home), head into Pet Sounds, a record shop named after the Beach Boys’ 1966 album and known for curating the best in classic rock, folk and reggae. Take a break at outdoor coffee cottage Fjällgatan’s Kaffestuga, overlooking the harbor with a breathtaking view of Djurgärden island. 4 p.m. Hop aboard Strömma’s Under the Bridges two-hour boat tour for a closer peek at what the central islands have to offer, including the Gröna Lund amusement park, Skansen open-air museum, rolling meadows of Djurgården and the newly redeveloped waterfront area along the Hammarby Sjöstad. From your seat in the covered boat, you’ll sail under 15 bridges, past the inner city and old city district Gamla Stan (a must-see on your next trip), and through the locks that connect Lake Mälaren to the Baltic Sea. When you pass near the inner city harbor, keep your eyes open to spot the exact location where the Vasa sank nearly four centuries ago. 6:30 p.m. Before you mosey back to-

ward the city center, call ahead for a table at Lao Wai. This small hidden gem features a Sichuanese-Taiwanese-inspired vegetarian menu and traditional Chinese tea service. Start with the Chinese hedgehog mushroom appetizer before digging into your Qing Chao Shu Cai vegetable stir-fry or Ma Po Dou Fu, a spicy pepper and faux meat dish that will equally impress the most staunch vegetarian and committed omnivore. Save room for the panna cotta with a decadent sea buckthorn sauce, made from the bright orange berries of the common Eurasian shrub. 9 p.m. Before you head to bed at the Grand Hotel, stop for a nightcap at the hotel’s Wine Cellar. Choose wisely, as Wine Cellar boasts one of the best collections of distinctive wines in the Nordic countries. Then ascend the stairs to your suite, where you’ll be offered a view of the inner harbor, Royal Palace and Gamla Stan. If you pass another guest in the hallway, whisper a friendly god natt — “good night” — to end a great day.

—Brittany Shoot is a San Francisco–based journalist who lived in Copenhagen for the past three years and frequently travels throughout Scandinavia with her Danish husband and inlaws. She bundled up in her favorite sweater from Stockholm’s Grandpa boutique while writing this piece. july/august 2013

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Travel Tools

Reading Online in the Air “Read it later” apps give you online content whenever and wherever you need it. |

by ron lond E n

In today’s hyper-connected world, many busy travelers look to their flight for a chance to unwind, to disconnect, to maybe catch up on a little reading. But there’s a problem if some of your catch-up reading is only available online.

Instapaper (US$3.99) The first major player among the “time-shifting” reading 56

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apps is the venerable Instapaper, offering a minimalist interface. For Instapaper, it’s all about the little, user-friendly touches: midnight viewing mode, for reading in the dark; tilting to scroll; folders for organizing stories. It also suggests a set of curated “good read” stories, based on user popularity.

Pocket (free) Formerly called “Read It Later,” Pocket was relaunched in 2012 as a free app and service emphasizing publisher partnerships to extend the shelf life of online stories. Pocket offers a tile-based visual interface on both its app and web application. This allows Pocket to display a related photo for stories, making it easier to scan through content. In addition to articles, Pocket also allows users to archive images and videos (though saved videos require an online connection to view).

Readability (free) If evaluating these apps for user experience alone, Readability fits in the middle: Not as sleek and simple as Instapaper, and with a less crafted interface than Pocket. But there is one nice touch: When you’re scrolling through a long article, the scroll bar provides an estimated reading time for finishing the story. Like Instapaper, it suggests stories for a good read. My own experience with “time-shifting” reading apps began with Instapaper. But today, the app feels quite dated. Though I have used all three services, I now find myself depending almost exclusively on Pocket. Its sharing capability is superb, and its interface is modern, beautiful and consistent across platforms, making offline reading something to look forward to during a long flight.

I L LU ST R AT I O N : ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P

Fortunately, there’s an app for that — several, in fact. Each offers an online account with a “read it later” shortcut on your web browser, allowing you to quickly file online stories into the system before you disconnect and board your flight. The articles you choose are then downloaded onto your smartphone or tablet — meaning you don’t need an Internet connection in order to read them later. Also, the stories are presented in a clean format, without advertising or other distractions. Such “time-shifting” apps allow the busy traveler to set aside many articles for reading on the plane (after finishing Selamta, of course). Here’s a look at three leading contenders:


s p ot l ig h t

Wordsmith

On the Fringe A review of Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. |

by m i ldred k . barya

“Adichie presents fresh discussions on race and the lenses through which people make assumptions about others.”

CO U RT E SY O F AL F R E D A K N O P F

W

riters have long explored themes of identity and belonging, and Chimamanda Adichie’s Americanah deals with “borderline identities” — those people born in Africa but currently living or working in the United States. These Africans have been forced to reinvent themselves as they face the challenge of maintaining their “presence” on more than one continent. Although they have not become Americans, they’ve ceased to be the Africans they once were. In fact, when they return to Nigeria, they are often referred to as “Americanah,” the inspiration for Adichie’s title. Told in the close third-person narrative, Adichie presents fresh discussions on race and the familiar lenses through which people make assumptions about others and convince themselves that they’re right. The main character, Ifemelu, left Nigeria for college in the United States, studied communications and has become a successful blogger there. From the first chapter, Ifemelu is able to put her nose in the air and smell the places she visits. Princeton in the summer smells like nothing; Baltimore, brine; Brooklyn, sunwarmed garbage; New Haven, neglect; while Philadelphia has the musty scent of history.

She similarly makes descriptive assessments of the people in her life — the characters on the train or those who occupy the seat next to her on the plane, as well as Blaine, her African-American boyfriend and later ex. She regards her relationship with him “like being content in a house but always sitting by the window and looking out.” With Curt, her white boyfriend and later ex, “she became, in her mind, a woman free of knots and cares, a woman running in the rain with the taste of sunwarmed strawberries in her mouth.” After 13 years in America, she decides to return to Nigeria, where the true love of her life lives: Obinze, the one person who made her feel “a self-affection.” “He made her like herself. With him, she was at ease; her skin felt as though it was her right size.” The Obinze-Ifemelu connection serves as the heart of the book. Yet readers also stay engaged because of Adichie’s lens on the Americanah who are seeking consolation in their shuttling back and forth. As she blogs about life in the U.S., Ifemelu occasionally becomes as judgmental as those she’s criticizing — falling into the same stereotypes and insecurities. Yet Ifemelu remains an empathetic character, a symbol of all those who are less aware of who they truly are — those who resort to telling themselves stories they want to believe, even when the power of telling cannot change things to what they should be. july/august 2013

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s p ot l i gh t

Cuisine

Fish as Feast Exploring a Senegalese favorite. |

by l isa a . ryan .

|

i llustrat i ons by m i key burton

In Dakar, Senegal, a large, freshly caught fish lies on the counter, staring up at Diamila Sow. Her hair swept back in a scarf, she mashes garlic and peppers with her pestle into an aromatic paste to stuff the capitaine, or dorade, or whatever white fish looked best at the market today. As she lowers the meat — seasoned to the gills — into a pan of hot oil, a familiar sizzle fills her kitchen.

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FI L I P P O TAFI

Diami, as she is known, runs a onewoman business, cooking and delivering Senegalese meals. She prepares some of the area’s best ceebu jen — a traditional meal of fresh fish served over a cornucopia of vegetables in a tomato-based sauce, all atop rice cooked in the flavor-rich stock. You’ll find vendors selling it on almost any street corner in Dakar. One local ex-patriot says, “Each time I meet someone who has just arrived in Dakar, I offer two pieces of advice: Learn some greetings in Wolof and order some ceebu jen from Diami. The greetings will open the door for you to meet your neighbors, and the food will make you want to stay in Senegal forever.” From Mauritania in the north to Nigeria in the Gulf of Guinea, West Africa’s coastal waters are among the world’s most productive fishing grounds, with approximately 1.6 million tons of fish caught annually. Traditional artisanal fishing remains a key economic component in West Africa alongside larger industrial fisheries. Fish is an important protein source for West Africans, as many of their staple foods are carbohydrate-rich crops (think yams, rice and maize), dependent on unpredictable rainfall. Moving inland, the Senegal, Volta and Niger Rivers are also significant dietary and economical sources of fish. The Bozo people of Mali, some 1,264 kilometers (785 miles) from the coast, have lived in nomadic fishing villages along the Niger River for thousands of years, earning their title, “masters of the river.” Traveling around West Africa you’ll find different countries boasting their own traditional fish recipes. The local specialty in Bamako, Mali, is la capitaine sangha — Nile perch (fresh from the Niger river) with a hot chile sauce garnish, whole fried bananas and rice. In Togo, where ground maize porridge (akume) forms the base of many dishes, akume with ademe sauce combines maize and cassava dough balls cooked in a sauce of ademe, a native green, mixed with smoked and salted fish, crab and beef. In Senegal, ceebu jen is recognized by many names: thieboudienne, tiéboudienne, thiep bou dien, cep bu jën — variations of the Wolof words rice (ceeb) and fish (jen). Internationally, it’s akin to Spanish paella

and Creole jambalaya, a one-pot, multilayered dish where flavors build on each other during the cooking process. First, a whole, white fish is stuffed with roff, a savory mixture of garlic, salt, chile peppers, scallions and parsley. To further infuse the fish with flavor, slices are cut along its sides to make pockets for more roff. After frying in peanut oil until lightly browned, the fish is set aside to be steamed later with the vegetables. It’s important to use the same pan, now perfectly seasoned by the fish, to simmer chopped cabbage, potatoes, eggplant, carrots, onions (and usually hot chiles) in a tomato-based sauce. Pieces of guedge, a smoky, dried fish, are added for deep flavor. After cooking, the vegetables are removed, and short or broken rice steams in the now richly complex broth, hopefully forming some dried, crispy xooñ on the bottom of the pot that makes for a satisfying crunch. Like many Senegalese and West African dishes, the rice is topped with the hearty stew, crowned with the fish and often served on a large platter to be enjoyed communally. Diami’s ceebu jen is well worth the 10,000 CFA (US$20), because one order serves five people. She delivers personally, always with a fresh lime garnish, and even brings extra xooñ to her regular customers. Even they admit, though, that ceebu jen is incredible everywhere

in Dakar. If you’re looking for a dine-in experience, Chez Loutcha, on Rue Mousse Diop in downtown Dakar, serves up large portions at reasonable prices in a lively Senegalese atmosphere. If all this whets your appetite for fish, many traditional Senegalese recipes can be found online and are adaptable to whatever produce or fish you have available. Try your hand at poisson yassa (fish in a lemony onion and mustard sauce) or pastels (savory fish turnovers). Whatever the dish, you’re likely to find yourself falling for the piscine cuisine of West Africa — hook, line and sinker. Visit selamta.co/pastels to dive into another Senegalese recipe.

Ceebu jen — a mix of fish, rice and cooked vegetables — is one of Senegal’s most popular dishes. july/august 2013

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s p ot l i gh t

Nature

In Danger

Chad's efforts to protect its valuable elephants. |

sto ry an d p h oto g r ap hs by x avi e r marchal

“Less than 40 years ago, an estimated 1.3 million elephants roamed across Africa. Today, fewer than 425,000 remain.”

Aerial view of an elephant herd in Chad’s Zakouma National Park. 60

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W

e are spending the night in the bush under millions of stars, near a vast, open plain and a water hole that attracts a large quantity of wildlife. At a distance, a lion call briefly interrupts our thoughts. The next morning we will attend the capture operation of an elephant. A collar with a radio emitter will be attached to his neck, to follow the movements of his herd — all in the name of conservation research. Before dawn we are on our way, entering deep into Zakouma National Park. Our group is composed of park rangers, a specialist wildlife vet, a leading environmentalist from Ethiopia and several guests — high officials from Chad and ambassadors representing Denmark, Norway, Brazil, Canada and the European Union. We ambassadors have traveled from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to acknowledge Chad’s efforts to protect its elephants. The elephants have taken refuge in a dense forest. The vet, followed by two armed rangers, disappears into the thicket as we wait. The elephants are close but invisible. The pilot of a small aircraft, hovering in the sky above them and controlling the operation, informs the team on the ground that there are more than 300 animals. The wind is stable, making the approach somewhat easy. It is hot and dry. A few hundred meters in front of us, the vet has removed his shoes and walked quietly inside the herd. From 30 meters (32 yards) away, he takes aim at one elephant’s upper rear leg and lets the tranquilizer dart fly. The rest of the herd immediately runs away. At the vet’s signal, we approach the giant animal, down on his side, panting in the heat. We watch as the collar is secured around his neck. An antidote is then injected so that the animal is almost immediately back on his feet, slightly shaky at first. His first movement is to feel the collar with his trunk. Then he gasps air through his trump, moves a bit and flaps his ears before instinctively running toward the rest of his herd. Sobering realities Less than 40 years ago, an estimated 1.3 million elephants roamed across Africa. Today, fewer than 425,000 remain. Poaching has resumed on a large scale, and

Z a ko u m a N at i o n a l Pa r k chad

17,000 African elephants were killed in 2011 alone, according to CITES (Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). The reasons for this dramatic situation are multiple: • persistent demand for ivory, especially from Asia • demographic growth and a resulting loss of elephant habitat • poor governance, due to lack of appreciation for the value of the elephant • poverty, which pushes communities to over-exploit resources and makes them vulnerable to abuse by criminal networks The elephant, a charismatic symbol of the African continent, has been included since 1989 on CITES’ list of most endangered species. In West and Central Africa especially, elephants are disappearing to the point that the situation has become critical. Chad is one country that has decided to act decisively. Chad’s response Zakouma National Park, in the southeast of Chad, was the country’s first national park, created in 1963 and currently celebrating its 50th anniversary. The park’s more than 3,000 square kilometers encompass a combination of fertile soils and water systems that can support a huge animal biomass. Extensive elephant poaching, however, has reduced Zakouma’s herd from an estimated 4,300 in 2002 to fewer than 400 today. In 2010, African Parks Foundation assumed management of the park, in partnership with the government of Chad and the European Union, which has helped fund the park since 1989. The EU ambassador to Chad, Hélène Cavé, applauds Chad for recognizing “the importance of conservation as a fundamental part of her development.” APF manages seven parks across the

continent, with hopes of doubling that number by 2020. Its goal of protecting wildlife includes collaring and tracking endangered animals in order to assess how best to prevent poaching.  During Chad’s dry season, elephants stay close to water sources within the park limits, where rangers on horseback can more easily protect them from poachers. But when the rains come, elephants follow their instincts to familiar travel routes outside Zakouma. Rangers do their best to follow and protect them from poachers. Park authorities therefore involve the surrounding communities in the elephants’ protection — installing radios in each village so that threats from poachers can be quickly reported. One longterm goal is to expand the park’s perimeter in order to create a stable wider entity. The challenges of Zakouma National Park mirror those of the African continent. The battle to save the continent’s last elephants — the remaining representatives of an emblematic species that once populated the plains and forests by the millions — is intrinsically linked to Africa’s sustainable and diversified development.

Poaching for ivory tusks has greatly depleted Africa’s elephant population, bringing the continent’s total down from an estimated 1.3 million 40 years ago to fewer than 425,000 today. —Xavier Marchal served with the European Union since 1988 and was the EU ambassador to Ethiopia from 2010 to 2013. He died in May 2013 after the writing of this article. He served in many African countries, including Sudan and Zimbabwe. Passionate about nature, he dedicated his free time to promoting conservation in Africa. july/august 2013

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s p ot l i gh t

Destination

Only Boat, Only River Bangkok’s floating markets. |

by Candace rose rardon

b a n g ko k thailand

62

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—continued on page 64

AL E X AN D E R SHAL AM OV / G E T T Y

S

he is the picture of grace: A woman lowering her oar into the water and, with what seems like a single fluid stroke, maneuvering a wooden boat from one side of the canal to the other, right to where I’m sitting. We say good morning to each other as I glance over her wares. Her bow is filled with leafy potted plants and bunches of tiny green bananas, but I point to a pile of tender young coconuts — my first purchase of the day at Tha Ka Floating Market, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) east of Bangkok. With a few thwaps of her knife, she cracks open the top of a coconut, inserts a plastic straw and hands it to me. Her name is Ow, and like most of the women vendors, she wears a wicker hat whose broad brim and sloping shape resembles a lampshade. Her boat curves up at both ends and is just wide enough for her to sit cross-legged on its floor. While I sip the sweet, cool juice, Ow returns to the rest of the boats on the opposite side of the canal. Although both sides are lined with concrete pathways, most of the activity takes place along the one across from me. I watch boats jostle gently against one another, bow against bow, creating a percussive rhythm as shoppers mill


yeshi

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s p ot l i gh t

Destination

At Tha Kha floating market, the boats themselves are the stalls — offering everything from fresh produce to native dishes fried right on the spot.

“For those who call these quiet, winding canals home, life is still lived on the water.” 64

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This continued well into the 1800s, when the development of roads and rails slowly diminished the need for floating markets. Almost all of the ones within Bangkok are now gone, as people have drifted farther from the riverbanks. In Tha Ka, however, the market appears to be thriving, and I am surprised by the equal number of locals and tourists. Among them is a woman named Hun, her smooth black hair pulled into a low ponytail. She tells me that the market began more than 100 years ago — 150 years, maybe. “Before,” she says, “it was only Thai people, to buy and exchange fruit, food, shirts, everything on the boat. “Long ago, it was not like this—” she says, gesturing to the walkway we’re standing on and to the three bridges spanning the canal, all constructed in the last 10 years. “Before, everybody cannot walk. Before, it was only boat, only river.” While it is family that draws Hun back here every weekend (her husband’s sister lives nearby), I wonder what about the market still attracts other locals. “They come for everything; it’s cheaper than Bangkok,” Hun says, confirming my hunch. I had noticed that prices are right on par with street food elsewhere in Thailand — a fact that, with enough purchases, proves dangerous for both my

wallet and my stomach. Belly full of thin rice noodles and oliang (iced black coffee), I say goodbye to Hun and set off to explore the canals. At one end of the market, it’s possible to hire a boat for a 45-minute ride. I’m even given my own wicker hat to wear. Recalling the easy grace with which Ow had negotiated the canal, I attempt the same. As my guide, Malee, rows behind me, I dip my oar into the water, losing myself in the lush surroundings. Verdant groves of coconut trees grow along the river, mingling with fuchsia bougainvillea and neon birds of paradise. A dog paddles past, only his ears and nose above the surface. Hun had told me there are still 400 people living in Tha Ka village, and Malee and I pass by some of their houses, with narrow offshoots of the canal leading up to their doors like driveways. I think of all that has changed since the market first opened, and yet for those who call these quiet, winding canals home, life is still lived on the water. Only boat, only river. —Candace Rose Rardon is a writer, photographer and sketch artist currently based in India. One of her favorite things about her temporary home is its proximity to Southeast Asia, where new discoveries are only a short flight away.

( L TO R ) Q I ZH O U / G E T T Y / H E M E R A , H E M E R A T E CH N O LO G I E S / G E T T Y

—continued from page 62 about, stopping in front of various boats to talk, buy and eat. To join them, I cross over the canal on a rickety bridge, the middle of which can be raised by hand to let boats with taller loads pass. Brightly colored bunting has been strung from side to side, giving the market a festive air on this balmy Sunday morning. The boats themselves are the stalls, some overflowing with fresh fruit and vegetables: Red chilies, mangoes and golden jackfruit slices tempt customers with their distinct fragrances. Elsewhere, women fry up dishes right in their boats: mussels and bean sprouts sizzling on round iron griddles, the air above them growing hazy with smoke. Trading on the river has deep roots in Thailand, as it does elsewhere across Southeast Asia, reaching back to the 1300s. The country’s many rivers — and the communities that lived along them — encouraged such trade.


july/august 2013

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s p ot l i gh t

1,000 Words

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Travel Tips

seated exercises These gentle exercises, which you can carry out easily during your flight, will help blood circulation and reduce any tiredness or stiffness that may result from sitting in one place for several hours. Check with your doctor first if you have any health conditions that might be adversely affected by exercise. Shoulder roll

Ankle circles

Hunch shoulders forward, then upward, then backward, then downward, using a gentle, circular motion.

Lift feet off the floor and draw a circle with the toes, simultaneously moving one foot clockwise and the other foot counterclockwise. Reverse circles. Do each direction for 15 seconds. Repeat if desired.

Arm curl

Foot pumps

Start with arms held at a 90-degree angle: elbows down, hands out in front. Raise hands up to chest and back down, alternating hands. Do this exercise in 30-second intervals.

Start with both heels on the floor and point feet upward as high as you can. Then put both feet flat on the floor. Then lift heels high, keeping the balls of your feet on the floor. Continue cycle in 30-second intervals.

Forward flex

Knee to chest

With both feet on the floor and stomach held in, slowly bend forward and walk your hands down the front of your legs toward your ankles. Hold the stretch for 15 seconds and slowly sit back up.

Bend forward slightly. Clasp hands around the right knee and hug it to your chest. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Keeping hands around knee, slowly let it down. Alternate legs. Repeat 10 times.

Overhead stretch

Knee lifts

Raise both hands straight up over your head. With one hand, grasp the elbow of the opposite hand and gently pull to one side. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

Lift leg with knees bent while contracting your thigh muscles. Alternate legs. Repeat 20 to 30 times for each leg.

i llustrat i ons by todd detwi ler

Shoulder stretch

Other Tips for a Comfortable Flight

Reach right hand over left shoulder. Place left hand behind right elbow and gently press elbow toward shoulder. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

> For your own comfort, try to travel light.

> Avoid heavy meals during the flight.

> Wear loose clothing and elasticated stockings made of natural fiber.

> Take short walks once every two hours to improve circulation.

> Increase your normal intake of water and only drink alcohol in moderation.

> Try to touch your toes when waiting in the aisle, to stretch your hamstrings.

Neck roll

> Use moisturizing cream to keep your skin from drying out.

> Upon arrival at your destination, take a quick jog, brisk walk or a vigorous scrub to help stimulate circulation. Then, take a hot shower or a relaxing bath.

With shoulders relaxed, drop ear to shoulder and gently roll neck forward and to the other side, holding each position for about five seconds. Repeat five times.

> Take off shoes while on the plane to prevent your feet from swelling up, or wear shoes that will cope with expanding ankles.

July/august 2013

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fly ethiopian

| Travel Tips

Traveling in Ethiopia Land » Ethiopia covers an area of 1.14 million square kilometers (944,000 square miles). Climate » There are two seasons: The dry season, October–May, and the wet season, June–September. Topography » Ethiopia has an elevated central plateau varying in height between 2,000 and 3,000 meters. In the north and center of the country, there are some 25 mountains whose peaks rise above 4,000 meters. The most famous Ethiopian river is the Blue Nile (or Abbay), which flows north a distance of 1,450 kilometers from its source in Lake Tana to join the White Nile at Khartoum, Sudan.

People » The population is estimated at 78 million.

Economy » About 90 percent of the population earns a living from the land, mainly as subsistence farmers. Agriculture is the backbone of the national economy, and the principal exports from this sector are coffee, oil seeds, pulses, flowers, vegetables, sugar and foodstuffs for animals. There is also a thriving livestock sector, exporting cattle, hides and skins. Language » Ethiopia is a multiethnic state with 83 languages and 200 dialects. Amharic is the working language of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, while Oromiffa, Tigrigna and Guragina are widely spoken.

Electric Supply » Ethiopia uses 220 volts 50 cycles AC. Plugs are European two-pin. Time » Ethiopia is in the GMT +3 time zone. It follows the Julian calendar, which consists of 12 months of 30 days each and a 13th month of five or six days (on a leap year).

Currency » The units of currency are the birr and cents. Notes are 100, 50, 10, 5 and 1 birr. The 1 birr coin is also in circulation. ATMs (Automatic Teller Machines) are found in major Addis Ababa hotels, shopping malls and at the Bole International Airport. It is important to retain currency exchange receipts. Banking Hours » Banking hours are usually 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Friday and 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturdays. Most banks work through lunchtime; however, foreign 70

ethiopianairlines.com

exchange services are closed during lunch hours (noon–1 p.m.).

a) 200 cigarettes, 100 cigars or 250 grams of tobacco

Courier & Money TransfeRS » Money transfers can be made through

c) half a liter of perfume

Western Union and MoneyGram. Both have representative branches in Addis Ababa and also make their services available from private and national banks. For courier services, DHL, Fedex, UPS, TNT and EMS have offices in Addis Ababa.

Communications » Telephones, fax machines and Internet access are available in Addis Ababa in most hotels and at private Internet service centers around the city. Working Hours » Government office hours are 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and 1:30–5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Working hours on Friday are 8:30–11:30 a.m. and 1:30– 5:30 p.m. Private and public businesses are often open on Saturdays.

Public Holidays » Public holidays are celebrated according to the Ethiopian (Julian) Calendar (see “Time”). The calendar is seven years behind the Western or Gregorian Calendar, with the New Year falling in the month of September. January 7: Ethiopian Christmas (Genna)

b) 2 liters of alcoholic beverages

d) souvenirs (by visitors) with a value not exceeding 500 birr

When it comes to currency: a) It is illegal to carry more than 200 birr when entering or departing Ethiopia. b) You must declare to customs officials at point of entry any cash in excess of US$3,000 (or the equivalent). If you have more than US$3,000 on departing, you must present a receipt from the purchasing bank.

Immigration Requirements » Visas are required for all foreign visitors to Ethiopia, with the exception of nationals of Kenya and Sudan. Visa applications may be obtained at Ethiopia’s diplomatic missions overseas. Nationals of 37 countries are now allowed to receive their tourist visas on arrival in Ethiopia. The list includes: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, North Korea, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Taiwan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States.

January 19: Ethiopian Epiphany (Timkat)

Bole International Airport »

January 24: Birth of Prophet Mohammed PBUH (Mauwlid)* March 2: Victory of Adwa (1896) May 1: International Labor Day May 3: Ethiopian Orthodox Good Friday May 5: Ethiopian Orthodox Easter Sunday May 5: Ethiopian Patriots (1941) Victory Day May 28: Fall of the Dergue (1991) Day September 11: Ethiopian New Year September 27: The Finding of the True Cross (Meskal) October 15: Id ul Ahda (Sacrifice)* *These holidays are subject to moon sighting.

Health Requirements » A yellow fever certificate is required for some African destinations. Vaccination against cholera is also required for any person who has visited or transited a cholera-infected area within six days prior to arrival in Ethiopia. Customs » Duty-free permitted for up to:

imports

are

The airport is about 5 kilometers from Meskel Square and Addis Ababa’s central business district. Passengers entering and departing Ethiopia must fill in entry and exit cards. Free luggage carts and paid porters are available in the baggage hall. All bags must go through X-ray check before you exit. When flying out of Bole International Airport, please note: Terminal 1 — all domestic flights and flights to Burundi, Djibouti, Rwanda, Somaliland, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen. Terminal 2 — all other international flights. Taxis are readily available and may be ordered inside the terminal. Privately owned taxis are not metered, nor do they have fixed rates. Agree upon the fare in advance.

Security » Security at the airport is tight, and travelers need to produce their air ticket and passport to enter the terminal. All other visitors are required to pay a fee of 10 birr in the car park and may be required to show identification.


Travel Tips |

learn amharic English-Amharic (phonetic) Learn some basic Amharic so that you can interact with the locals and enjoy your stay in Ethiopia by experiencing the rich culture of the Ethiopian people.

U se f ul Words Today Tomorrow Yesterday Now Quickly Slowly Mr Mrs Miss I

pronunciat i on gu i de

You He, She We

a as the a in father e as the e in set i as the i in ship o as the o in go u as the oo in boot gn as the gn in compagne (French) (M) Masculine; (F) Feminine; (P) Plural

They What? Who? When? How? Why? Which? Yes (all right) No Excuse me I am sorry Good Bad

fly ethiopian

N u m bers Zare Nege Tilant Ahun Tolo Kes Ato Weyzero Weyzerit Ene Ersewo Essu, Essoa Egna Ennessu Min? Man? Metche? Endet? Lemin? Yetignaw? Eshi Aydelem /Ayhonem Yikirta Aznallehu Tiru / melkam Metfo

One

And

Two

Hulet

Three

Sost

Four

Arat

Five

Amist

Six

Sidist

Seven

Sebat

Eight

Semmint

Nine

Zetegn

Ten

Asser

Eleven

Asra-and

Twelve

Asra-hulet

Thirteen, etc.

Asra-sost, etc.

Twenty

Haya

Twenty-one, etc.

Haya-and, etc.

Thirty

Selasa

Thirty-one, etc.

Selasa-and, etc.

Forty

Arba

Fifty

Amsa

One hundred

And meto

One thousand

And shi  

D i rect i ons / E m ergenci es

Meet i ng and G reet i ng Hello

Halo

Good morning

Endemn adderu/ k(M)/sh(F)

Good afternoon Good evening

Endemn walu/k(M)/ sh(F)

Co m m erce

Where? (Place)

Yet?

Where is it?

Yet no?

Where? (Direction)

Wodet?

Street/road

Menged

Airport

Awiroplan marefeya

Where is the hotel?

Hotelu yet no?

Where are you going?

Yet iyehedu no? eh (M)/esh(F)

I am going to . . .

Wede... iyehedku no

Turn right

Wede kegn yitatefu/ tatef(M)/tatefi(F)

Turn left

Wede gra yitatefu tatef(M)/tatefi(F)

Go straight

Ketita yihidu/hid(M)/ higi(F)

Please stop here

Ezih Yikumu/kum(M)/ kumi(F)

Endemn ameshu/ eh(M)/esh(F)

Hotel

Hotel

Dehna hunu/ hun(M)/ hugne(F)

Room

Kifil

Bed

Alga

How are you?

Tenayistillign / endemen not? eh(M)/ esh(F)

To sleep

Metegnat

To bathe

Galan metateb

I am well, thank you (very much)

Dehna negn (Betam) amesegenallehu

Where is the toilet?

Metatebiya betu yet new?

You’re welcome

Minim aydel

Please come in

Yigbu/giba(M)/ gibi(F)

Where may I get something to drink?

Yemiteta neger yet agengalehu?

Coffee

Buna

Please sit down

Yikemetu/ tekemet(M)/ tekemechi(F)

One (cup of) coffee

And (sini) buna

Come

Na(M)/Ney(F)/Nu(P)

Beer

Birra

Go

Hid(M)/Higi(F)/Hidu(P)

Cold

Kezkaza

Stop

Kum(M)/Kumi(F)/ Irdugn(P)

Help

Irdagn(M)/irgegn(F)/ Irdugn(P)

Hospital

Hakem bet

Police

Polis

Goodbye

What is your name?

Simewo man no?h(M)/sh(F)

Hot

Muk

Tea

Shay

My name is . . .

Sime . . . no

Food

Migib

Where do you come from?

Keyet Metu? ah(M)/ ash(F) Hagero yet no?eh(M)/esh(F)

Meat

Siga

Fish

Assa

I come from . . .

Ke . . . metahu

Bread

Dabo

My country is . . .

Hagere . . . no

Butter

Kebe

Can you speak Amharic?

Amaregna yenageralu? tenageraleh(M)/ tenageriyalesh(F)

Sugar

Sikuar

Salt

Chow

Pepper

Berbere

Shop

Suk

To buy

Megzat

Sunday

Ihud

To sell

Meshet

Monday

Segno

Money

Genzeb

Tuesday

Maksegno

Cent

Santime

Wednesday

Erob

How much does this cost?

Wagaw sint no?

Thursday

Hamus

Friday

Arb

That is quite expensive

Betam wood no

Saturday

Kedame

Only a little

Tinish

I want to learn more

Yebelete memar ifelegalehu

How do you find Ethiopia?

Itiyopiyan endet agegnuat? hat(M)/ shat(F)

I like it here

Itiyopiya Tesmamtognal

Days o f t h e Week

July/august 2013

71


fly ethiopian Length 0

| Fleet

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60m

70m

Bombardier Q400 Data (ET-ANI, ET-ANJ, ET-ANK, ET-ANL, ET-ANV, ET-ANW, ET-ANX, ET-ANY, ET-AQB, ET-AQC, ET-AQD, ET-ADE, ET-AQF) Seat Capacity: 78 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 29,574 kg; Landing, 28,123 kgs; Zero Fuel, 26,308 kg Operating Empty Weight:17.684 kg Total Cargo Volume: 502 cu.ft Boeing 737-700 (ET-ALK, ET-ALM, ET-ALN, ET-ALQ, ET-ALU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 102. Total: 118 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 70,080 kg; Landing, 58,604 kgs; Zero Fuel, 55,202 kg Operating Empty Weight: 41,015 kg Total Cargo Volume: 966 cu.ft

Boeing 737-800 (ET-APK, ET-ANZ, ET-AOA, ET-AOB, ET-APF, ET-APL, ET-APM, ET-APO, ET-AQM) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 138. Total: 154 Max Gross Weight: Take Off, 79,010 kg Landing, 66,330kgs; Zero Fuel, 62,730 kg Operating Empty Weight: 43,545 kg Total Cargo Volume: 1,555 cu.ft

Boeing 757-200 ER (ET-ALZ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 154. Total: 170 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,699 kg, Landing, 89,812 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,485 kg Operating Empty Weight: 60,942 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 cu.ft Boeing 757-200 ER Cargo (ET-AJS) Cargo Capacity: 15 (88” x 125“) pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,892 kg; Landing, 95,254 kg; Zero Fuel, 90,718 kg Operating Weight: 53,010 kg Cargo Volume Main: 6,600 cu.ft Lower: 1,829 cu.ft

(ET-AMK) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 159. Total: 175. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,852 kgs. Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 61,072 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 Cu.ft. (ET-AJX) Cargo Capacity: 15 (88” x 125“) pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 109,316 kg; Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kg Operating Weight: 54,176 kg Cargo Volume Main: 6,600 cu.ft Lower: 1,762 cu.ft

Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner (ET-AOQ, ET-AOR, ET-AOS, ET-AOP, ET-AOT) A super-efficient airplane with new passenger-pleasing features. It will bring the economics of large jet transports to the middle of the market, using 20 percent less fuel than any other airplane of its size. Seat Capacity: 210 to 250 passengers Length: 186 ft Range: 8,000 to 8,500 nautical miles Height: 56 ft Configuration: Twin aisle Cruise Speed: Mach 0.85 Cross Section: 226 in Cargo Capacity: 5 pallets + 5 LD3s Wing Span: 197 ft Maximum Take Off Weight: 476,000 lb

MD-11CF Cargo (ET-AML, ET-AND) Cargo Capacity: Upper deck: 26 Pallets (96”x125”); Lower FWD Bay: 6 Pallets (96”x125”); Lower AFT Bay: 14 LD3 Containers Max Take Off. WT.: 630, 500 lb

Max Landing: 491,500 lb Zero fuel wt.: 461,500 lb Engine: GE CF6-80C201F Pallet: 26 pallets – Upper Volume – 86 ton

Boeing 767-300 ER (ET-ALL) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 213. Total: 237 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,879 kg; Landing, 145, 149 kg; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kg Operating Empty Weight: 91,367 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 cu.ft

(ET-ALC) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine, 24; Economy Class, 210. Total: 234 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 185,065 kg; Landing, 145,149 kg; Zero Fuel, 130,634 kg Operating Empty Weight: 90,416 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 cu.ft

Boeing 777-200LR (ET-ANN, ET-ANO, ET-ANP, ET-ANQ, ET-ANR, ET-AQL) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 34, Economy Class 287. Total: 321 Max Gross Weight: Take Off, 347,450 kg; Landing, 223,160 kg; Zero Fuel, 209,100 kg Operating Empty Weight: 160,856 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,330 cu.ft Engines: GE90

Boeing 777-200LRF Cargo (ET-APU, ET-APS) Cargo Capacity: 27 (96" x 125") pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 766,800 lbs; Landing, 575,000 lbs; Zero Fuel, 547,000 lbs Cargo Volume: Main, 18,630 cu.ft.; Lower, 4,700 cu.ft. Length 0 72

10 m

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ethiopianairlines.com

30m

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Fleet |

fly ethiopian

current commercial fleet Long Range Passenger Services 5 Boeing 787-8 (ET-AOQ, ET-AOR, ET-AOS, ET-AOP, ET-AOT) 6 Boeing 777-200LR (ET-ANN, ET-ANO, ET-ANP, ET-ANQ, ET-ANR , ET-AQL) 12 Boeing 767-300 ER (ET-ALC, ET-ALH, ET-ALJ, ET-ALL, ET-ALO, ET-ALP, ET-AME, ET-AMF, ET-AMG, ET-AMQ, ET ANU, ET-AQG) Medium Range Passenger Services 4 Boeing 757-200 ER (ET-ALZ, ET-AMK, ET-AMT, ET-AMU) 9 Boeing 737-800 (ET-APK, ET-ANZ, ETAOA, ET-AOB, ET-APF, ET-APL , ET-APM, ET-APO, ET-AQM)

5 Boeing 737-700 (ET-ALK, ET-ALM, ETALN, ET-ALQ, ET-ALU) Domestic and Regional Passenger Services 13 Bombardier Q400 (ET-ANI, ET-ANJ, ETANK, ET-ANL, ET-ANV, ET-ANW, ET-ANX, ET-ANY, ET-AQB, ET-AQC) Cargo and Non-Scheduled Services 2 Boeing 777-200LRF (ET-APU, ET-APS) 1 Boeing 757-260 Freighter (ET-AJS) 1 Boeing 757-200 PCF (ET-AJX) 2 MD-11CF (ET-AML, ET-AND)

Boeing 757-200 ER continued (ET-AMT, ET-AMU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 155. Total: 171. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,892 kgs; Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 60,023 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 Cu.ft.

Boeing 767-300 ER continued (ET-ALH) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 213. Total: 237. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 90,058 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-ALJ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 211. Total: 235. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,277 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AMQ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 30, Economy Class 195. Total: 225. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 90,426 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-ALO) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 211. Total: 235. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,499 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

(ET-ALP) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 208. Total: 232. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 148,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,277 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AME) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 30, Economy Class 190. Total: 220. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 181,436 kgs; Landing, 137,892 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 92,087 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AMF, ET-AMG, ET-ANU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine: 24, Economy Class: 213, Total: 237. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 87,419 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AQG) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 190. Total: 214. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 181,436 kgs; Landing, 137,892 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 92,087 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.


fly ethiopian

| International Route Map

ethiopian airlines international service Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire) Abuja (Nigeria) Accra (Ghana) Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) Bahir Dar (Ethiopia) Bamako (Mali) Bangkok (Thailand) Beijing (China) Beirut (Lebanon) Berbera (Somalia) Blantyre (Malawi) Brazzaville (Congo) Brussels (Belgium) Bujumbura (Burundi) Cairo (Egypt) Cotonou (Benin) Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) Dakar (Senegal) Dammam (Saudi Arabia) Dire Dawa (Ethiopia) Djibouti (Rep. of Djibouti) Douala (Cameroon) Dubai (UAE) Entebbe (Uganda) Frankfurt (Germany) Guangzhou (China) Harare (Zimbabwe) Hangzhou (China) Hong Kong (China) Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) Johannesburg (South Africa) Juba (Southern Sudan) Khartoum (Sudan) Kigali (Rwanda) Kilimanjaro (Tanzania)

Kinshasa (D. R. of Congo) Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) Kuwait City(Kuwait) Lagos (Nigeria) Libreville (Gabon) Lilongwe (Malawi) Lomé (Togo) London (United Kingdom) Luanda (Angola) Lubumbashi (Congo) Lusaka (Zambia) Malabo (Equitorial Guinea) Maputo (Mozambique) Mekelle (Ethiopia) Milan (Italy) Mombasa (Kenya) Mumbai (India) Muscat (Oman) Nairobi (Kenya) N’Djamena (Chad) Ndola (Zambia) New Delhi (India) Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) Pointe Noire (Congo) Paris (France) Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) Rome (Italy) Seoul (South Korea) Stockholm (Sweden) Tel Aviv (Israel) Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Victoria (Seychelles) Washington, D.C. (U.S.) Zanzibar (Tanzania)

Vancouver Seattle Portland

Minneapolis Omaha

Salt Lake City San Francisco San Jose Los Angeles Santa Ana San Diego

Denver

Chicago

Montréal Ottawa

Syracuse Portland Toronto Rochester Boston Dayton Cleveland New York Philadelphia Cincinnati

Detroit

Kansas City Indianapolis Colorado Springs Washington, D.C. St. Louis

Memphis Nashville Oklahoma City Little Rock Columbia Atlanta Dallas Tucson Columbus Houston New Orleans Jacksonville San Antonio Orlando Tampa Fort Lauderdale Miami

Las Vegas Ontario Phoenix

Albuquerqe

north atlantic ocean

Destinations with special agreements Cape Town (South Africa) Montréal, Quebec (Canada) Gaborone (Botswana) Helsinki (Finland) Jakarta (Indonesia) Kolkata (India) Manila (Philippines) Oslo (Norway) Ottawa, Ontario (Canada) Palermo (Italy) Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) Windhoek (Namibia) United States of America: Albuquerque, New Mexico Atlanta, Georgia Boston, Massachusetts Chicago, Illinois Cincinnati, Ohio Cleveland, Ohio Colorado Springs, Colorado Columbia, South Carolina Columbus, Georgia Dallas, Texas Dayton, Ohio Denver, Colorado Detroit, Michigan Fort Lauderdale, Florida Houston, Texas Indianapolis, Indiana Jacksonville, Florida Kansas City, Missouri

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ethiopianairlines.com

Las Vegas, Nevada Little Rock, Arkansas Los Angeles, California Memphis, Tennessee Miami, Florida Minneapolis, Minnesota Nashville, Tennessee New Orleans, Louisiana Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Omaha, Nebraska Ontario, California Orlando, Florida Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Phoenix, Arizona Portland, Oregon Portland, Maine Rochester, New York Saint Louis, Missouri Salt Lake City, Utah San Antonio, Texas San Diego, California San Francisco, California San Jose, California Santa Ana, California Seattle, Washington Syracuse, New York Tampa, Florida Tucson, Arizona

south pacific ocean

IN T E RNAT I O NA L ROU T E M A P ke y

Ethiopian destinations Destinations with special agreements Code share flights Future destinations One-way nonstop ASKY routes

Rio de Janeiro São Paulo


International Route Map |

fly ethiopian

Helsinki Stockholm

Oslo

Moscow

Gothenburg

Aberdeen

Copenhagen

Belfast

Edinburgh Manchester

Dublin

London Brussels Paris

Warsaw Amsterdam

Dusseldorf

Frankfurt

Zurich Geneva Lyon

Toulouse

Prague Vienna Budapest

Munich

Marselle

Madrid

Berlin

Bucharest

Milan Sofia

Rome

Barcelona

Istanbul

Beijing

Lisbon

Palermo

Seoul Korea

Larnaca

Beirut Tel Aviv

Damascus

Kuwait City

Cairo

Dammam Riyadh

Hangzhou

Dubai

New Delhi Guangzhou (Canton) Kolkata (Calcutta)

Muscat

Jeddah

Hong Kong

Mumbai Dakar

Khartoum Bamako

Conakry

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Freetown Monrovia

Abidjan

Djibouti Berbera

Abuja Cotonou

Lagos

Accra LoméMalabo

Yaounde

ADDIS ABABA

Libreville Brazzaville Pointe Noire Kinshasa Luanda

Ho Chi Minh City

Dire Dawa

Juba

Douala

Kuala Lumpur Singapore

Entebbe Nairobi Kigali Mombasa Bujumbura Kilimanjaro Zanzibar Dar es Salaam

Lubumbashi Ndola Lusaka Harare

Jakarta Victoria

indian ocean

Lilongwe Blantyre

ASKY N E T WO R K

south atlantic ocean Windhoeck

Gaborone

Maputo

Johannesburg

Bamako Durban Cape Town

Manila

Bangkok

Mekelle

Bahir Dar

N’Djamena

Conakry

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Freetown

N’Djamena Abuja

Cotonou

Monrovia

Abidjan

Accra

Lomé

Lagos

Malabo

Yaounde Douala Libreville Brazzaville Kinshasa

July/august 2013

75


fly ethiopian

| Domestic Route Map

red sea

Shire

Axum

Mekelle

Humera

Denakil Depression

ras dashan (4,620m) simien mountains

Gondar gulf of aden

Lalibela

tana

Bahir Dar

choke mountains

Asosa Dire Dawa Jijiga Ahmar mountains

Addis Ababa

dembidollo gore

koka

Gambella

zwai abiata

langano

Jimma

ogaden region shala

Mizan teferi

Arba Minch Jinka

ADDIS ABABA Main City Ticket Office Churchill Road PO Box 1755 Tel: 251-11-5517000 Fax: 251-11-5513047/5513593

ARBA MINCH Tel: 251-46-8810649 (CTO)

ASOSA Tel: 251-057-7750574/75 (CTO) 251-091-1255674 (CELL)

AXUM Tel: 251-34-7752300 (CTO) 251-34-7753544 (APT) 251-91-1255682 (CELL) Email: AXUTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM 76

ethiopianairlines.com

mendebo mountains

Kabri Dar

abaya

shamo

BAHIR DAR

Gode

GONDAR

Tel: 251-58-2200020 (CTO) 251-58-2260036 (APT) 251-91-1255675 (CELL) Email: BJRTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

Tel: 251-58-1117688 (CTO) 251-58-1140735 (APT) 251-91-1255676 (CELL) Email: GDQTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

DIRE DAWA

Humera

Tel: 251-25-1111147 (CTO) 251-25-1114425 (APT) 251-91-5320405 (Cell) Email: DIRAM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

GAMBELLA Tel: 251-47-5510099 (CTO) 251-91-1255677 (CELL)

GODE Tel: 251-25-7760015 (CTO) 251-25-7760030 (APT)

Tel: 251 - 34 4480556 251 - 911 255437

JIJIGA Tel: 251-25-7752030 (CTO) 251-25-7754300 (APT)

JIMMA Tel: 251-47-1110030 (CTO) 251-47-1110207 (APT) 251-91-1255678 (CELL) Email: JIMTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

LALIBELA Tel: 251-33-3360046 (CTO) 251-91-1255679 (CELL) Email: LLITAM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

MEKELLE

Tel: 251-400055 (CTO) 251-34-4420437 (APT) 251-91-1255680 (CELL) Email: MQXTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

SHIRE Tel: 251-34-4442224 (CTO) 251-91-1255681 (CELL) CTO – City Ticket Office APT – Airport Office CGO – Cargo Office CELL – Cell phone


Addis Ababa Map |

fly ethiopian

kennedy library

The main library at Addis Ababa University.

National Museum of ethiopia

Highlighting the history of Ethiopia from prehistoric times to the modern day. Kennedy Library

St.GEorge’s cathedral

A small octagonal Ethiopian Orthodox church built in 1896 as a token to St. George.

piazza district

russ i an

megabit 28 square/Arat kilo

adwa

Inside this square stands a monument erected in memory of those patriots who defeated the Italian invading forces.

national museum

st

st. george's cathedral

Another name for the historic district.

st

Piazza district

ri ng rd

anwar mosque

The main religious center for Muslims in and around the capital.

megabit 28 square/arat kilo anwar mosque taitu hotel

taitu hotel

parliAment building loren zo

Opened in 1898 as Addis Ababa’s first hotel, established by Empress Taitu Betul.

ti ez az

st

colson

st

ik ave

N i ger

parliament building

sa

h ara

st

zewditu hospital

The hospital in central Addis Ababa.

ethiopian national theatre

m enel

zewditu hospital

Founded in the 1940s when the government recruited a band to play Ethiopian songs accompanied by a modern orchestra.

african hall & ECA conference center

ethiopian national theatre ydnekachew tesema stadium

jo mo kenyatta

africa hall and EcA conf. center

A fully integrated and secured complex with state-ofthe-art facilities. st

meskel square

ydnekachew tesema stadium

ca

A multi-use stadium in Addis Ababa used mostly for football matches as well as housing athletic facilities.

m eroon

chamber of commerce

d

r. .a.

Built during the reign of Emperor Haile Selassie I and still serving as the seat of Parliament today.

st

chamber of commerce

AF

Established in 1947, providing technical and advocacy services to help businesses.

RIC

sierra leone st

meskel square

A site for public gathering or demonstrations and festivals — notably the Meskel Festival.

A ave ( bole

millennium exhibition hall

rd )

A modern building holding various-sized events including concerts, sport matches, exhibitions and trade shows.

Millennium Exhibition Hall

Bole International Airport

ring

rd

July/august 2013

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fly ethiopian

| Sales Offices

ethiopian airlines

sales offices ANGOLA Largo 4 De Fevereiro Hotel Meridien Presidente Luanda, Angola Tel: 2442 310328/310615 Fax: 2442 310328 APT Mobile: 914 526675 BELGIUM Park Hill J. E. Mommaertslaan 16B 1831 Diegem Tel: 0032 2 712 05 86 Fax: 0032 2 725 83 92 Email: bruadmn@ethiopianairlines.com BURKINA FASO Avenue Kwame N`krumah mmb. Bati 01 BP 4883 Ouaga 01 Tel Office: 22650301024/25 Email: OUAAPT@ethiopianairlines.com DanielW@ethiopianairlines.com BURUNDI Avenue De La Victorie No. 09 PO Box 573, Bujumbura Tel : 257 226820/226038 APT: 257 229842 Mobile: 257 78841844 Email: henokm@ethiopianairlines.com CAMEROON Rue Tobie Kuoh Bonanjo, B.P 1326 Douala Telephone – reservation desk: 00237 33 43 02 46; Area Manager direct line: 00237 33 43 02 64; Fax line: 00237 33 43 01 67; Mobile Area Manager for Cameroon: 00237 77 93 79 29; AIRPORT OFFICE Tel: 00237 33 43 37 30; Cell: 00237 77 11 77 29 canada 1027 Yonge Street, Suite 106, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 2K9, Canada Tel: 416 922 9989 Fax: 416 922 1731 sales@ethiopiancanada.com Euro link Ltd., Address : 1027 Yonge Street, 1st Floor, Toronto, ON , M4W 2K9, Canada Phone : +1 (416) 922 9989 Fax : +1 (416) 922 1371 Toll Free : 1 855 269 0362 Email : gsa@ethiopiancanada.com CHAD Avenue Charles De Gaule PO Box 989, N’djamena CTO Tel: 235 2523143/2523027 Tel: 235 523143/523027 ATO Tel: 235 2522599 APT: 235 522599 Mobile: 235 6 6896226 CHINA Beijing Room 704, SK Tower, A6 Jianguomenwai Avenue, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100022, China Office Tel: 0086 010 65050315, Fax: 0086 010 65054120 Email: bjsadm@ethiopianairlines.com, Reservation Tel: +86 010-65050315 (Call Center: 4001589689), Email: bjssup@ ethiopianairlines.com, etbjscto1@megacap. com.cn Beijing Capital International Airport –Terminal 3 Email: bjsapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo Tel: +86 10-64556409/ +86 10-64558536, Email: etpek@megacap.com.cn Guangzhou Room 502, 5th Floor, Podium Building of Guangdong Int’l Hotel, 339 East Huanshi Zhong Road, Guangzhou, 510098, China Email: cancto@ethiopianairlines.com Reservation Tel: 0086 020 87621101 / Office Fax: 0086 020 87620837 Call Center: 4001589689, Email: etcancto1@ megacap.com.cn, canres@ethiopianairlines.com Baiyun Int’l Airport Tel: 0086 2036067405 Email: canapt@ethiopianairlines.com

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ethiopianairlines.com

Cargo Tel: 0086 20-36066253, Fax: 0086 20 36050345, Email: Tim.shen@sino-eth.com Hangzhou Room 1809 Building 2, Qiangjiang International Times Plaza, No. 111 Chengxing Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310020, China Email: GirumTb@ethiopianairlines.com Office Tel: 0086 0571 87960600, Fax: 0086 0571 87960677, Call Center: 4001589689, Email: ethghcto1@megacap.com.cn Hangzhou Xiaoshan International Airport Email: allhghetAirportStaff@ethiopianairlines. com Cargo Office Tel: 0086 0571-86691731, Fax: 0086 0571-86691730, Email: jeff.jiang@megacap. com.cn CONGO, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC Boulevard du 30 Juin No. 1525 Aforia Building-1st Floor Gombe, Kinshasa CTO Tel: 243 817 006 585/810 884 000 APT Mobile: 243 817 006 589 Email: fihres@ethiopianairlines.com fihapt@ethiopianairlines.com YinnesuF@ethiopianairlines.com CONGO, REPUBLIC Avenue Foch, Brazzaville PO Box 14125 Tel: 242-22 281 0766 Email: Negaw@ethiopianairlines.com COTE D’IVOIRE Avenue Chardy Immeuble Le Paris PO Box 01 BP 5897 ABJ 01,Abidjan CTO Tel: 00 225 20219332 20215538/20219430 Fax: 00 225 20219025 CTO Mobile: 225 05061583 APT Tel: 225 21278819 APT Mobile: 225 05063294 CTO Email: GashawM@ethiopianairlines.com APT Email: abjapt@ethiopianairlines.com DJIBOUTI Bld Administrateur Bernard Djibouti Republique de Djibouti Tel: 00 253 35 42 35 Mobile 815512 Republique de Djibouti Email: DagmawiG@ethiopianairlines.com Website: www.ethiopianairlines.com Rue De Marseilles PO Box 90, Djibouti Tel: (253) 341216 Mobile: 815479 Fax: (253)350599 Email: JIBAP@ethiopianairlines.com EGYPT Concorde El Salam Hotel, 69 Abdelhamid Badawy Street, Heliopolis, Cairo Tel: 0800 0000 411(Reservations 24 hours) Tel: 202-2621 4934 (Admin) Fax: 202 2621 4934 APT: 202 2696 6620 Cargo: 20 10 6698255 Email: caires@ethiopianairlines.com APT: caiapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: etcargo@aviatrans-eg.com EQUITORIAL GUINEA Equatorial Guinea, Malabo Independence Avenue Admin Tel: 00240222657390 Email: ssgadmin@Ethiopianairlines.com CTO Tel: 00240333090588 Fax: 00240333090593 Email: ssgcto@ethiopianairlines.com Area Manager Email: TeshomeGb@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Email: ssgapt@ethiopianairlines.com ETHIOPIA Main City Ticket Office Churchill Road PO Box 1755, Addis Ababa Tel: 251 11 5517000/511931 251 11 6656666 (Reservation) APT Tel: 251 11 5178320 Fax: 251 11 6611474

FRANCE Ethiopian Airlines area office 66 Avenue des champs-Elysées 75008 Paris - France Phone: 33 1 53 892102 and 0 825 826 135 (ticketing) Fax: 33 1 53 771303 Email: Ethiopian-airlines.paris@wanadoo.fr Ethiopian Airlines CDG Airport office Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport – Terminal 2 Phone: +33 1 74 37 04 80 MAS: +33 6 70 81 90 24 Email: parapt@ethiopianairlines.com GABON Quartier London Rue Ogouarouwe Plaque No. 14 PO Box 12802, Libreville Tel: 241 760144/45 APT Tel: 05316666 Fax: 241 760146 CTO Tel: 741315 CTO Tel: 241 741315 GERMANY Ethiopian Airlines, Kaiserstraße 77, 60329 Frankfurt am Main, Germany Sales & Marketing: Tel: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 053 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 235 Email: salesET.germany@aviareps.com Reservations: Tel: (0180-5) 355 600 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 028 Email: reservationsET.germany@aviareps.com Ghana Kwame Nkrumah Avenue, Cocoa House, Ground Floor PO Box 3600, Accra CTO: Tel 233 302 664856/57/58 Fax: 233 302 673938 Mobile: 233 20 2011132 Email: MichaelY@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 233 302 775168/778993/ 233 302 776171 ext. 1322/1324 Mobile: 233 20 2013588 Email: accapt@ethiopianairlines.com HONG KONG Rm 1102 Lippo Sun Plaza 28 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong Tel: 852 2117 0233 Fax: 852 2117 1811 APT: 852 31508122 APT Fax: 852 31508125 SITA: HKGKKET, HKGAPET Email: DanielG@ethiopianairlines.com INDIA Shop no. 2 – 5 , Chintamani Plaza, Ground Floor, Andheri Kurla Road Andheri (East), Mumbai – 400 099 Toll Free : 1800 103 9933 / 0124- 4845900 Admin : 022-22163797 Sales : 022- 22162150 Accounts : 022- 22155667 Email : bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Ticket Office: bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Sales: bomsls@ethiopianairlines.com Accounts: bomfin@ethiopianairlines.com Admin: bomadm@ethiopianairlines.com New Delhi (APT) Toll Free No: 1800 103 9933 Tel: 91 11 2331202/0091 11 2331203 CTO: 91 11 2331204 ATO: 91 11 25654872 Fax: 91 11 25655710 Email: Delapt@ethiopianairlines.com www.ethiopianairlines.com ISRAEL 1 Ben Yehuda Street Room 2016, Tel Aviv CTO Tel: 972 3 797 1405 Fax: 972 3 516 0574 Email: TLVRES@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM APT Tel: 972 3 9754096 APT Fax: 972 3 9754097 Email: TLVAPT@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM Opensky-Cargo CGO Tel: 972-3-9724332 CGO Fax: 972-3-9731082 Email: david@opensky-cargo.co.il

ITALY Piazza Barberini 52 00187 Rome, Italy CTO Tel: 39 06 42011199 Call center access Tel No: 06 45230459 Tel: 3906 4200 9220 Fax: 3906 481 9377 APT: 3906 6501 0621 APT Fax: 3906 6501 0621 CGO: 3906 65954113 Email: info.roma@ethiopianairlines.it romres@ethiopianairlines.it Milan Address Via Albricci, 9 20122 Milan Tel: +39 02 8056562 Fax: +39 02 72010638 Email: milres@ethiopianairlines.com KENYA Bruce House Muindi Mbingu Street PO Box 42901-00100, Nairobi Tel: Res: +254 20311507/544; +254 723786649/734 666066 APT: 254 20 822236/822311 Fax: 254 20 2219007 Email: nbores@ethiopianairlines.com nboadm@ethiopianairlines.com Airport: nboapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: Freight In Time JKIA Cargo village, 2nd Avenue Box 41852-00100 Nairobi, Kenya Tel: 254 20-827480/827044/827248 Email: etmanager@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com etoperations@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com TSS Tower, Nkrumah Road PO Box 94600-80115, Mombasa, Kenya Tel: Res: +254 41 2319977/78/79 APT: +254 41 2011199 Cel: +254 714 618989 Email: MBATSM@ethiopianairlines.com MBARES@ethiopianairlines.com MBAAPT@ethiopianairlines.com LEBANON Beirut Gefinor Center Bloc-B, Clemenceau St. Tel: 961 1 752846/7 Fax: 961 1 752846/7 Email: BruckA@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 961 1 629814 Email: beyapt@ethiopianairlines.com MALAWI Kenyatta Drive, Bisnowaty Centre Tel: 00265 1771002/1308/6003/6001/20 31/6004 Fax: 01 772 013 ATO Fax: 01 700 782 Email: LLWCTO@ethiopianairlines.com LLWAPT@ethiopianairlines.com GodfreyL@ethiopianairlines.com W.Gondwe@sdvmalawi.com MALI Square Patrice Lumumba PO Box 1841, Bamako Tel: 00 223 20 22 2088 Fax: 00 223 20 22 6036 APT Mobile: 00 223 66 799 208 Email: DagnewM@ethiopianairlines.com MOZAMBIQUE Avenida 25 De Setembro No. 270, Edificio Time Squre, Bloc 4, First floor No. 6 Tel: +258 21 314421 NIGERIA CVC Building 3, Idowu Taylor, Victoria Island, Lagos, Nigeria PO Box 1602 Tel: 234 1 7744711/2 Fax: 234 1 4616297 APT: 234 1 7744710/7751921/3 Email: SolomonY@ethaiopianairlines.com lossales@ethiopianairlines.com lossr@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office, Aviation House Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja Lagos Tel: 234 1 7744710 Fax: 234 1 2711655 Email: losapt@ethiopianairlines.com Sheraton Abuja Hotel No. 1 Ladi Kwali Way, Maitema, Abuja Federal Capital Territory Suite No 173


Sales Offices and General Sales Agents | Tel: 234 92906844/234 92904941 Email: ABVRES@Ethiopianairlines.com; ABVCTO@ Ethiopianairlines.com; ABVADMN@ Ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office -ABV: Ethiopian Airlines, Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport, Abuja-Nigeria Tel: 234 92903852, 234 92902761 Email: abvapt@ethiopianairlines.com; abvagt@ethiopianairlines.com; abvbag@ethiopianairlines.com www.ethiopianairlines.com Ethiopian Cargo LOS-office Nahco Cargo Complex MMIA Ikeja Lagos Tel Mobile: 234 7034065669 oman Muscat, Ruwi, MBD Area, PO BOX 962, Muscat, Postal code 100 Sultanate of Oman Cell: +968 93891448 Tel: +968 24816565 Fax: +968 24815815 Email: samim@ethiopianairlines.com RWANDA Union trade center (UTC) building First floor, office No. 25 CTO Tel: 250252570440/42, 2502525755045 Fax: 252570441 Mobile: 250788562469 (Area Manager) Email: BrukE@ethiopianairlines.com kglsm@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 2502525100000 Mobile: 250-788595536/788426164/ 788517905/788828865 Email: kglapt@ethiopianairlines.com kglagt@ethiopianairlines.com SAUDI ARABIA Medina Road, Adham Center PO Box 8913, Jeddah 21492 Tel: 9662 6512365/6614/9609 Fax: 9662 6516670 APT: 9662 6853064/196 APT Fax: 9662-685316 CGO Tel/Fax: 9662 6851041 Email: Jedcto@ethiopianairlines.com Jeddah Airport Fax: 966 2 6853196 Mobile: 966 504301358 Email: jedapt@ethiopianairlines.com Jeddah Cargo Office Tel: 966 2 6850756 / 6851041 Fax: 966 2 6851041 Email: jedcgo@ethiopianairlines.com Riyadh Ticket or Town Office Email: ruhcto@ethiopianairlines.com Mobile: 966 505217168 Dammam, Silver Tower Building, King Abdul Aziz Street, Al Khobar Tel: 966 (3) 8984696, Fax: 966 (3) 8991539 Cell: 966 0559540076 Email: YohannesB@ethiopianairlines.com SENEGAL Immeuble La Rotonde, Rue Dr. Theze PO Box 50800, CP 18524 DKR RP Tel: 221 33 823 5552/54 Fax: 221 33 823 5541 Apt Tel: 221 33 820 9396/5077 Email: Dkrres@ethiopianairlines.com SOMALI LAND CI Maarat al Khayr Building Tel: 252 2 520681/528445 Mobile: 252 2 4427575 Email: hgaet@hotmail.com SOUTH AFRICA 156 BRAM FISCHER DRIVE 2nd Floor Holiday House – Randburg CTO Tel: 27 11 7815950 CTO Fax: 27 11 7816040 APT Tel: 27 11 3903819 APT Fax: 27 11 3943438 CTO Email: YohannesTK@ethiopianairlines. com ATO jnbapt@ethiopianairliness.com SWEDEN Kungsgatan 37, SE-11156 Stockholm Tel: 46 0 8 440 0060/ 46 0 8 440 2900 ATO: 46 8 59360170

CTO: 46 8 4402900/4400060 Fax: 46 0 8 206622 Cell: 0046 709556073 APT: 46 859360170 Email: res.ethiopian@telia.com info.ethiopian@telia.com SUDAN 2 Square 2b Khartoum east Parlaman street, El Sheikh Mustefa El Amin Bldg Khartoum, Sudan Tel: 249 1 83762063/88 Fax: 2491 83788428 APT: 2491 8790991 Email: krtres@ethiopianairlines.com krtsm@ethiopianairlines.com Juba South Sudan AirportMinistry Road, Panorama Building Cel: +211 956212301/ +211 955060355 Fax: 249 811 823600 Email: JUBCTO@ethiopianairlines.com JUBTSM@ethiopianairlines.com Malakal Ethiopian Airlines South Sudan Hotel Room No 02 Malkal Tel: 00249(0)955722506 Vivacell Fax: 00249(0)920698951 MTN TANZANIA T.D.F.L Building Ohio Street PO Box 3187, Dar-es-Salaam Tel: 255 22 2117063 65/2125443 Fax: 255 22 2115875 Mobile: 255 754 285 899 786 110 066 Area Manager: 255 786 285 899 Email: Milatm@ethiopianairlines.com darres@ethiopianairlines.com Dar APT Tel: 255-22 2844243 Mobile: 255 786285898 Email: darapt@ethiopianairlines.com Boma Road, PO Box 93 Arusha, Tanzania CTO: 255 27 2506167 - 2504231, 2509904 TSM Mobile: 255-782-450224 Email: jrocto@ethiopianairlines.com arkres@ethiopianairlines.com Kilimanjaro Airport: 255 27 2554159 Email: jroapt@ethiopianairlines.com THAILAND 140 One Pacific Bldg, Unit 1807 18th Floor, Sukhumvit Road Klongtoey, Bangkok CTO Tel: 66 0 26534366/7 Fax: 66 0 26534370 Email: bkkcto@ethiopianairlines.com bkkres@ethiopianairlines.com bkksm@ethiopianairlines.com Suvarnabhumi Airport 2nd Flr, Unit Z2-016, Airlines Operation Bldg (Airport Office) APT Tel: 66 0 21343062/3/4 APT Fax: 66 0 21343060 Email: bkkapt@ethiopianairlines.com General Sales Agent (Cargo Only) Tel: 66 0 22379207/8/9 Fax: 66 0 22379200 Email: bkkgsa@csloxinfo.com TOGO Hotel Palm Beach, 1 Rue Komore PO Box 12923 CTO Tel: 228 22 21 70 74/ 22 21 87 38 CTO Fax: 228 22 22 18 32 APT Tel: 228 22 26 30 39/22822361240 Ext. 4313/4517 Email: SeblewA@ethiopianairlines.com lfwcto@ethiopianairlines.com lfwapt@ethiopianairlines.com UGANDA Plot 1 Kimathi Avenue, PO Box 3591 Kampala Tel: 4254796, 4345577, 4345577/8, 4345118 Fax: 4231455 Entebbe Tel: 4320570, 4321130 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES Flat 202, Pearl Bldg, Beniyas Street PO Box 7140, Dubai Tel: 9714 2237963/87 Fax: 9714 2273306 APT: 9714 2166833/1833/2161833 APT Fax: 9714 2244841/2822655 CGO: 9714 2822880/2163813

CGO Fax: 9714 2822655 CTO Email: dxbcto@ethiopianairlines.com APT Email: dxbapt@ethiopianairlines.com CGO Email: dxbcgo@ethiopianair-lines.com UNITED KINGDOM City office: 1 Dukes Gate, Action Lane London, W4 5DX Tel: 44-208 987 9086 (admin) 44-0800 635 0644 (reservations) Fax: 44-208 747 9339 Email: loners@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office: Room 238, East Wing Terminal 3 London Heathrow, Airport Middlesex, TW6 1JT Tel: 44-208 745 4234/35 Fax: 44-208 745 7936 Email: lonapt@ethiopianairlines.com UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Airport Office Dulles International Airport PO Box 16855 Washington, DC 20041 Toll Free No: 800 4452733 Tel: 703 572 6809, 703 572 8740 Fax: 703 572 8738 Email: wasapt@ethiopianairlines.com Reservation, Ticketing and Customer Relations 277 South Washington St. Suite 120 Alexandria, VA 22314 Toll Free No: 800 445 2733 Tel: 703 682 0569 Fax: 703 682 0573 Email: etusa@ethiopianairlines.com

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ethiopian airlines

general sales Agents ANGOLA Reino Comercio Geral, Rue Marques Das Minas No.4, Luanda Angola Tel: 00244 222 445 713, Fax: 00244 222 335 713, Email: tchukombe@yahoo.com ARGENTINA Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 1001-1002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503-010, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Aviareps AG, Landsberg, Str. 155,80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73 , Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND World Aviation System Mezannine Level, 403 George Street, Sydney NSW 2000 Australia Tel: (02) 9244 2096, Fax: (02) 9290 3441 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: MCH Holding Australia Pty Ltd. Unit 6, MIAC Building, 1international Drive, Tullamarine, Vic. 3040. Fax: 03 9093 1377, Tel: 03 9093 1355 Email: hiran@mchholding.com.au

ZAMBIA Lusaka CTO Address Indo Zambia Bank Building Off Cairo Road, Plot No. 6907, PO Box 38392, Lusaka Direct Tel: 260 211 236401/02/03 Fax: 260 211 235644 Mobile: 260 955 236401/260 979 821971 Email: SenaitN@ethiopianairlines.com LUNRES@ethiopianairlines.com LUNCTO@ethiopianairlines.com

AUSTRIA & HUNGARY Aviareps AG, Josephspitalstr, 15, 80331 Munchen, Germany

APT Address Lusaka International Airport PO Box 38392, Lusaka Zambia Tel: 260 211 271141 Email: LUNAPT@ethiopianairlines.com

Cargo: ATC Aviation ACC, Bldg. 262, Entr. 08, 3rd Fl, AT-1300 Vienna Tel: 43 1 7007 388 54, Fax: 43 1 7007 388 53 Email: vie@atc-aviation.com

ZANZIBAR Malindi opposite Ijimaa Mosque Tel: 255 774417070, 777667665 Email: znzapt@ethiopianairlines.com znzstation@ethiopianairlines.com ZIMBABWE Cabs Center, 4th Floor CNR Jason Moyo Avenue 2nd St. PO Box 1332, Harare Tel: 263 4790705/6/700735 Fax: 263 4795216, APT: 263 4575191 Email: FitsimtD@mweb.co.zw hreres@ethiopianairlines.com Country Name Call Center Numbers Bahrain 973-16199205 Belgium 32 28948303 Egypt 800 000 0411/202-21600-006 France 0800901031 Germany 8001818982 Hong Kong 800905629 India 18001039933/0124-4845900 Israel 972 3763 1052 Italy 39-0645230459 Lebanon 00961 142 7627 code 6247 North China 108007141635/864001589689 Saudi Arabia 800 814 0018 South Africa 0800984023 South China 108001401619/86-4001589689 Sweden 46-850513549 Thailand 18001562069708 United Arab Emirates (UAE) 8 000 3570 2401 United Kingdom 8000163449 United States of America 1800 445 2733

AVIAREPS Airline Management Ges. Mbh, Argentinier Strasse 2/4, a-1040,Vienna, Austria AVIAREPS Hungary Ltd., Borbely utca 5-7, 1/104, 1132, Budapest, Hungary Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42 Email: xcheffel@aviareps.com

BAHRAIN Chamber of Commerce Building Tel: 00973-17-224917 / +973-17223315 Fax: 973 17210175, Email: bitgsa@bahraintravel. com.bh, SITA: BAHTOET BANGLADESH MAAS Travels & Tours Ltd., Maas Travels & Tours, R.M Centre, 101 Gulshan Avenue, Gulshan, Dhaka-1212, Bangladesh Tel: 8802 9559852/9568388/9565380 Fax: 8802 956 5378, Email: mass@agni.com Globe Travel Tel: 253 354848 BELGIUM, LUXEMBOURG & NETHERLANDS Brussels Kales Airline Services, Park Hill, J.E. Mommaertslaan 18A, B - 1831 Diegem Tel: +32 2 716.00.60, Fax: +32 2 716.0086, Email: et.be@kales.com The Netherlands Kales Airline Services, Triport 1 Building, 6th floor, Evert Van de beekstraat 46, NL - 1118 CL Schiphol Tel: +31 20 655.36.36, Fax: +31 20 655.36.51, Email: airlines.nl@kales.com BENIN Vitesse Voyage M/S ABD Vitesse Voyages, Avenue Maro Militaire, Immeuble Toxi Labo Carre 404, Cotonou, Benin Tel: 22921320167/22964054232, Fax: 229 21320170, Email: abdvitessevoyage@yahoo.fr BRAZIL Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str. 155, 80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73 , Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com

Continued on next page » July/august 2013

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| General Sales Agents

BURKINA FASO EUROWORLD SARL, EURO WORLD (Burkina Faso), 01BP4883 OUAGADOUGOU, KWAME N'NKRUMAH, Ouagadougou-Burkina Faso Tel: 226 50 30 16 52/16 85, Fax: 226 50 30 18 86, Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com CANADA Euro link Ltd., Address : 1027 Yonge Street, 1st Floor, Toronto, ON , M4W 2K9, Canada Phone : 1 (416) 922-1000/(416) 318 3664/ 1-416 922 7000 ex 2301, Fax: (416) 922-1003 Toll Free : 1 855 269 0362 Email : sbabra@skylinkgroup.com Cargo: Airlines Service International (ASI), 5160 Explorer Drive, Unit 4, Suite F, Mississauga, Ontario 4W 4T7 Tel: 905629 4522, Fax: 905 629 4651 Email: asi@airlineservices.com CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC Africa Discovery, Avenue B. Boganda, PO Box 1182, Bangui, Central African Republic Tel: 23675501260/70551136 Fax: 49-69-26952940 Email: dorothee@africa-discovery.net CHILE Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str. 155, 80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax:49 89 54 50 68 42 info@AVIAREPS.com CHINA Beijing Megacap Logistics International Co., Ltd., Room 704, SK Tower, A6 Jianguomenwai Avenue, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100022, China Tel: 0086 010 65050315, Fax: 0086 010 65054120, Reservation Tel: +86 01065050315, Email: bjssup@ethiopianairlines. com, etbjscto1@megacap.com.cn (airport: bjsapt@ethiopianairlines.com) Cargo Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., F225 Complex Business Office Building, No.566-16 Shunping Road, Shunyi District, Beijing, China Tel: +86 10-64556409, +86 10-64558536, Email: etpek@megacap.com.cn Guangzhou Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., Room 502, 5th Floor, Podium Building of Guangdong Int’l Hotel, 339 East Huanshi Zhong Road, Guangzhou, 510098, China Reservation Tel: 0086 020 87621101, Office Fax: 0086 020 87620837, Email: etcancto1@ megacap.com.cn (airport: canapt@ethiopianairlines.com) Cargo Sino-Eth Logistics International Co., Ltd., Room 1615, main tower, Guangdong Int’l Building, No. 339, Huan Shi Road East, Guangzhou Tel: 0086 20-36066253, Fax: 0086 20 36050345, Email: Tim.shen@sino-eth.com Hangzhou Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., Room 1809 Building 2, Qiangjiang International Times Plaza, No. 111 Chengxing Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310020, China Reservations Tel: 0086 0571 87960600, Office Fax: 0086 0571 87960677, Email: ethghcto1@ megacap.com.cn (airport: allhghetAirportStaff@ethiopianairlines.com) Cargo Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., Room 2015, Aviation Freight Station Area B, No.5 Airport Road, Xiaoshan Airport, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China Tel: 0086 0571-86691731, Fax: 0086 057186691730, Email: jeff.jiang@megacap.com.cn Shanghai Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., Unit 11G, Shanghai Zhaofeng Universal Bldg, No.1800 Zhong Shan Road West, Shanghai, 200235, China Tel: 0086 021 64401083, Fax: 0086 021 64400192, Email: etshacto1@megacap.com.cn Cargo Megacap Logistics International Co. Ltd., 325A, No. 168 Suhang Road, Pudong International Airport, Shanghai, China 80

ethiopianairlines.com

Tel: 0086-021-68354523, Fax: 86-02168356537, Email: Eric.Fei@megacap.com.cn COLOMBIA Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str. 155,80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com Comoros Matembezi Travel & Tourism, Itsambouni, Moroni Tel: 2697730422/330400, Fax: 2697730075 Email: agence.matembezi@comorestelecom.com CONGO REPUBLIC Euro World Sarl, Immeuble Arc-En face chambre de Commerce, 1st floor-Centre Ville, Brazzaville Tel: 242 6712020/6713037 Cel: 971505589504, Fax: 31 020 655 3686 Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com/ vinu.abraham@satgurutravel.com CONGO DRC Alamdar Tour & Travels, PO Box: 2976 Lubumbashi Tel: 243 818113377, Fax : 243 1801751933 Email: vazir@jefferytravels.com CYPRUS Orthodoxou Aviation Ltd., Orthodoxou Aviation Ltd, United Nations Street 44, 6042, Larmaca, Cyprus Tel: 357 24 841 150, Fax: 357 24 841 005 Email: aorthodoxou@orthodoxou.com.cy CZECH & SLOVAK REPUBLICS, POLAND Tal Aviation Poland, UL Ujazdowskie, 20 Street, 00478 Warsaw Tel: 48-22-6250467, Fax: 48-22-6253146 Email: rgrabski&tal.pl Tal Aviation Poland Ltd. Tel: 48 22 627 2259, Fax: 48 22 625 3146 Email: ethiopian@tal.pl DENMARK, NORWAY, LITHUANIA & LATVIA Khyber International, Vester Farimagsagade 3, DK-1606 Copenhagen V Denmark Tel: 45 33121188, Fax: 4533933799 Email: sales@khyber.dk, SITA: CPHZZET Cargo: Kales Airline Services DK - 7190 Billund Denmark Tel: 45 75354511, Fax: 45 75354569 DJIBOUTI Globe Travel, Bld Administrateur Bernard Djibouti Bld, PO Box 1161, Republique de DJIBOUTI Tel: 00253 354235/00253 351007, Fax: 00253 350599, Email: globeethiopian@intnet.com EGYPT Aviatrans Egyptian Air Service Co. Ltd PO Box 24 Orman Cairo Egypt Tel: 202 37484473, Fax: 202 37608959 Email: Aviatrans@aviatrans.com.eg FINLAND & ESTONIA Tour Planner, Matkantekijat Oy-Tourplanners Ltd, Annankatu 16 B 29, 3 Krs 00120, Helsinki, Finland Tel: 358 9 687 78911, Fax: 358 9687 78910 Email: tuomas.mantysaari@matkantekijat.fi Cargo: Kales Airline Services oy Perintötie 2D, 01510 Vantaa, Finland Tel: 358 9 8700 350, Fax: 358 9 8700 3515 FRANCE Air promotion group (APG) 66 Avenue des Champs-Elysées75008 Paris - France Tel: 33 153 771316, Fax: 33 1 53 77 13 05 Email: ethiopianairlines@apg.fr Cargo: Paris Cargo World France SARL PO Box 69003, Roissy CDG Cedex France Tel: 33 1 49 38 90 57, Fax: 33 1 49.38 90 63 Email: cecile@cargoworld.fr, Jhon.sloot@etcargo.fr, paul@cargoworld.fr GERMANY Ethiopian Airlines, Kaiserstraße 77, 60329 Frankfurt am Main, Germany Sales & Marketing: Tel: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 053 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 235 Email: salesET.germany@aviareps.com Reservations: Tel: (0180-5) 355 600 Fax: 0049 (0) 69 770 673 028 Email: reservationsET.germany@aviareps.com Cargo: ATC Aviation, Cargo City Süd, Geb.641, 60549 Frankfurt/Germany Tel: 49 0 69 698053 47, Fax: 49 0 69 698053 20

Email: fra@atc-aviation.com GREECE Gold Star Ltd., 3 Nikodimou & 33 Nikis Str. 10557, Athens, Greece Tel: 30 211 1002030, Fax: 30 210 3246723 Email: sales@goldstar.gr GUINEA GUINEE-VOYAGES, EI CISSE Amacif Bldg Conakrey Guinea Tel: 0022463260554/62650181/64260554 (Mobile: 00 224-60260554/ 60340144/60212320), Tel: 22460212320/340144, Fax: 22430478063/22430012611/ 00224-30477734 Email: guineevoyages@yahoo.fr EI CISSE Amacif Bldg Conakrey Guinea Tel: 22460212320/340144 Fax: 224-30478063/22430012611/ 0022430477734, Email: guineevoyages@yahoo.fr HONG KONG Cargo: Pacific Air (HK) Limited Tel: 852 2759 4578, Fax: 852 2759 4316 Email: cargoeth@pacificair.com.hk INDIA STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., Alps Building, 1st floor, 56 Janpath, New Delhi – 110001 Tel: (011) 23312304 / 23320845, Fax: (011) 23329235, Contact: Mr Tadesse Tilahun (TadesseT@ethiopianairlines.com), Mr Sandeep Kumar Meena (mobile: 9910061099, etsales.del@sticgroup.com), Ms Kalpana Ganju (etreservation.del@sticgroup.com), Mr Praful Khosla (mobile: 9910378441, praful.khosla@ sticgroup.com) STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., No 3-5-874/A, Ground floor, Vipanchi Estate, Hyderguda, Hyderabad – 500029, Andhra Pradesh Contact: Mr.Unni Ashok Kumar (ashok.kumar@sticgroup.com) Tel: (040) 66618755 / 23231451 / 23210131, Fax: (040) 66612966, Email: hyderabad@ sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., G-5, Imperial Court, 33/1 Cunningham Road, Bangalore – 560052, Karnataka Contact: Mr.Vinod / Mr.Shankar Tel: (080) 22267613/22202408/22256194, Fax: (080) 22202409, Email: bangalore@ sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., 2nd floor, Sriniket Building,, Old Thevera Road, Cochin – 682016, Kerala Contact: Mrs. Meenakshi Sethuram Tel: (0484) 2367476/477/478, Fax: (0484) 2367472, Email: cochin@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., Room No 53, 5th floor, Chitrakoot Building, 230A, A.J.C. Bose Road, Kolkata – 700020, West Bengal Contact: Ms. Sudeshna Tel: (033) 22890440, 22890441, 22890442, Fax: (033) 22890443, Email: kolkata@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., SCO 42-43, Sector 17A,, Chandigarh 160017, Punjab Contact: Mr. Satinder Sharma Tel: (0172) 2706562/67/2721336/337, Fax: (0172) 2702770, Email: chandigarh@sticgroup. com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., Temple Tower, 672, Anna Salai Nandanam, Mount Road, Chennai – 600035 Contact: Mr. Rajesh Pandian (rajesh.pandian@ sticgroup.com, mobile: 9840105460), Tel: (044) 24330211/24351829/24330659/243 30098, Fax: (044) 24330170, Email: chennai@ sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT. LTD., 2nd floor, 301 Alfa Estate Building – 39, G.T. Road, Jallandhar – 144001, Punjab Contact: Mr. Amit Sharma Tel: (0181) 2232056/58, Fax: (0181) 2230961, Email: jallandhar@sticgroup.com

26403414, Email: rajesh@benzyethiopian.com, accounts.amd@benzyethiopian.com LEONARD TRAVELS PVT LTD, Tej House, 5 Mahatma Gandhi Road, Pune 411 001 Tel: (020) 26056451 or 26131647, Fax: (020) 2613782, Manager: Vandana Hasabnis, 9960231082 or 9623346382, Director: Mrs Bhojwani, (020) 26347611 Mobile: 9325066588, Email: ethiopian@leonardtravels.com, bhojwanis@eth.net MAAS TRAVELS & TOURS LTD, 101 R. M. Center, 5th Floor, Gulshan Avenue , Gulshan 2, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh Tel: (8802) 8835802, 03, 8835460, 8837484, Fax: (8802) 8826678, Email: maas@agni.com, managersalesmaas@gmail.com, amin.maas@ gmail.com, 88028837474 Resi: Azad: 8821569, mobile: 0171524097 Azad Direct: (8802) 9887711 Resi: Amin: (8802) 9338548 (M) +8801819257221 Afzal Hossain +88 01711635146 88028835802 Qayyum: 8801819220198, Reservation: Nasreen + 88 01730062981 VMS AVIATION AIR SERVICES PVT LTD, 164 Galle Road, Colombo 4, Srilanka Tel: (9411) 2502149, 2502209, 4377815, Fax: (9411) 2502190, Email: vikky@eureka.lk (mobile: 0094777752328), Hussein@vmstravels. net (mobile: 0094777590100) SHARAF CARGO PVT LTD (Cargo), Acme Centre, 2nd Floor, Opp Vadilal House, Mithakali Six Roads, Navrangpura, , Ahmedabad 380 009 Tel: 079 65454080 or 65454081/82/83, Fax: 079 66133503 Branch Mgr Mr. Dharmesh Panchal (9898060627), Email: panchal.ETAMD@ in.sharafcargo.com Asst Sales Mgr Mr. Nikhil Ketkar (9825319740), Email: ketkar.ETAMD@ in.sharafcargo.com GM Mr. Subeer Bharadwaj (9821086836), Email: bharadwaj.ETAMD@in.sharafcargo.com INDONESIA (M/S PT. Ayuberga) Menara Imperium, JI.H.R.Rasima Saidn Kav.1, Jakarta 12980, Indonesia Tel: 62 021 8356214, Fax: 62 021 8363937 Email: Ayubjkt@ayaberga.co.id Cargo: PT global Sarana Angkasa Wisma Soewarna Suit 2k, Soewarna Business Park, Soekarno Hatta International Airport, Jakarta 19110 Indonesia Tel: 62 21 5591 1428, Fax: 62 21 5591 1427 Email: ade@gsa.indonesia.com IRAN Iran National Airlines Corp. Tel: 9821 6002010, Fax: 9821 6012941 IRELAND PremAir Marketing Services Ltd, 7 Herbert Street, Dublin 2, Dublin, Ireland Tel: 00353-1-663 3933, Fax: 353-1-661-0752 Email: info@premair.ie/eamon.flanagan@ premair.ie Cargo: Heavyweight Air Express Ltd Tel: 353 -1-811-8693, Fax: 353-1-811-8901 Email: hae.ie@heavy-weight.ie ISRAEL Opensky Cargo Ltd Tel: 972 3 972 4338, CTO Tel: 972 3 7971405 Central Reservation Office Tel: 972 3 7971400/1403/1404 Reservation Agent Tel: 972 3 7971407, ShebaMiles & Group desk Email: david@opensky-cargo.co.il ITALY Cargo: ATC Tel: 39 02 506791, Fax: 39 02 55400116 Email: INFO@ATCMIL.IT, SITA: MILGSET/ CRT/CMIZZET, Tel: 39 06 65010715, Fax: 39 06 65010242, Email: INFO@ATCFCO.IT, SITA: ROMGSET

BENZY HOLIDAYS PVT LTD, 101 Crystal Arcade, JAPAN C. G. Road, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 006 Air System Inc., Toranomon TBL Building 8F Contact: Shoba Kokate (Tel: 9920213661, 1-19-9, Toranomon Minato-Ku, Tokyo 105-0001 shobha@akbartravels.in), Rajesh Bhatia, Sales Tel: 03-3593-6608, Fax: 03-3593-6534 Manager (Tel: 7820003525), Iqbal Mody (Tel: Email: Asipaxtyo@airsystem.ip 9923798441) Tel: (079) 26403525, 30013430/32, Fax:


General Sales Agents | Cargo: U-Transport Global Inc Tel: 81 3 3522 2286, Fax: 81 3 3522 2280 Email: minako-aso@utijapan.co.jp JORDAN Passenger & Cargo: Al Karmel Travel & Tourism Trading, Jabal Ei Hussin Khaleed Bin Waleed St. PO Box 926497 Tel: 962 6 5688301, Fax: 962 6 5688302 Email: alkarmel@alkarmel.com.jo KENYA Cargo: Freight In Time PO Box 41852-00100, Nairobi, Kenya Email: etmanager@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com Tel: 254 020-827044/827248/9 /827480 Ext: 132, Fax: 254 020-822709, Cell: 254 721 217141, Wireless: 254 020-3560579 KUWAIT Al-Sawan Co. W.L.L., M/S Al-Sawan Company W.L.L, Al Ghazali St (Al Rai), Kuwait Tel: 00965-4745190; Fax: 00965-4765661, Email: ceo@alsawan.com MALAYSIA Abadi Aviation Services S/B, Suite 1603, Level 16 Central Plaza, Jalan Sultan Ismail, 50250 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Tel: (+603) 21412190/21420581/8, Fax : (+603) 21410429, Email: etkul@abadi.com.my Cargo: Abadi Aviation Services S/B, Lot GFM-5D Malaysia Airlines Advanced Cargo Centre, Free Commercial Zone, Kuala Lumpur International Airport, 64000 Sepang, Selangor, Malaysia. Tel: (+603) 87871198/1179, Fax: (+603) 87871108, Email: albertyeoh@abadi.com.my MALTA Discover Momentum, L.L.C, 14350 North 87th Street Suite 265, Scottsdale, Arizona, 85260 USA Tel: 480 707 5566, Fax: 480 707 5575 Email: Jenny-Adams@discovertheworld.com/ www.discovertheworld.com MAURITANIA Agence Megrebine de Voyages, IRELAND BLYTH LTD, Aviation Pole, 5th floor, IBL House, Caudan, Port Louis Mauritius Tel: 230-203-2000/2082, Fax: 230-2124050, Email: Ivedwards@iblgroup.com MEXICO Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str.155,80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com MOZAMBIQUE Lusoglobo Travel, Av 25 De Setembro 1211 Maputo Republica De Mozambique, Mozambique Tel: 258 21308067, Fax: 258 21303596 Email: lusoglobo@tvcabo.co.mz NEPAL Gurans Travel & Tours PVT LTD, Thapathali, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel: 00977 1 4216818, Fax: 00977 1 4212736, Email: imel@wlink.com.np NETHERLANDS Cargo: Global Airlines Services BV Amsterdam Airport Columbus Gebouw 1 Folkstoneweg 34 NL-1118 LM Amsterdam Airport Tel: 0031 20 653 71 00, Fax: 0031 20 653 55 04 Email: info@globalairline.nl OMAN National Travel & Tourism, Postal Code 100 Sultanate of Oman Tel: 00968-246 60300, Fax: 968 24566125 Email: nttoman@omantel.net.om PAKISTAN Trade Winds Associates Pvt. Ltd., 33-Hotel Metropole, MerewetherRoad, Islamabad Tel: 009221-5661712-14, Fax: 009221-5661715 Email: aviation@tradewind.com.pk Karachi Tel: 9221 3566 1712-13-14 & 16 Fax: 9221 3566 1715

Lahore Tel: 9242-3630-5229, 9242-3636-5165 Fax: 9242-3631-4051, Tel: 2823040/2823350, Fax: 2824030 Tel: 6305229/6365165, Fax: 6314051 PERU Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str.155, 80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73 Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com PHILIPPINES Travel Wide Assoc. Sales Phils., Inc 8/F, Unit 817 Peninsula Court Bldg, 8735 Paseo de Roxas Ave, Makati City 1226,Philippines Tel: 63-2-5198789, Fax: 63-2-5195014 Web: www.twasp.com QATAR Fahd Travels, Doha, Qatar Tel: 00974-4432233, Fax: 00974-4432266 Email: fahd-travels@qatar.net.qa Cargo: Fahd Cargo Dar Al kotob area, Diamond Hotel Building, Doha, Qatar Fax: 00974 4431 1010, Tel: 00974 4441 4928 Email: fahdtravels@gmail.com RUSSIA Aviareps, Olympic Plaza, 39, Prospect Mira Bldg. 2, 129110 Moscow, Russia Tel: 7 495 937 59 50, 07 812 740 3820 Fax: 7 495 937 59 51, 07 812 740 3821 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: GSA Russia Global Services Ltd. Amathuntos Avenue 8, Marina Complex Block A, No. 2, 4531 Limassol Cyprus Tel: 7 495 7953838, Mobile: 7 905 7801893 Email: Olga.Polyanskaya@aircargopro.com RWANDA Euro World Sarl, Kigali, Satguru International Tel: 250 570440/570442, Fax: 250 570441 Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com Cargo: S.A.R.L SDV PO Box 1338, avenue de la douane, Kigali, Rwanda Email: rodolphe.kembukuswa@bollore.com SAUDI ARABIA Al Zouman Aviation, Jeddah Tel: 966 2 6531222, Fax: 966 2 6517501 Email: aviation@alzouman.com.sa Alkhobar Tel: 966 3 8649000, Fax: 966 3 8941205 Serbia, Slovenia, Croatia CAT Aviation, Knez Mihajlova 30 Tel: 381 641135735 Email: qat@yubc.net SEYCHELLES Mason’s Travel Pty. Ltd. Revolutgion Avenue PO Box 459 Victoria Mahe Seychelles Tel: 0024 4288888 Fax: 248 4225273/248 4288820 Email: amason@masonstravel.com SIERRA LEONE IPC Tours, 22 Siaka Stevens Street, P.O. Box 1434, Freetown, Sierra Leone Tel: 00 232-221481, Fax: 232 22 227 470 Email: info@ipctravel.com, Email: ipc@sierratel.si Email: ipctravelagency@yahoo.com SINGAPORE CitiAir & Holidays Pte. Ltd. 48 133 New Bridge Road #14-05 China Town Point, Singapore 059413 Tel: (65) 6538 6860/ 3787/ 2678, Fax: (65) 6538 3183, Email: maplesin@singnet.com.sg Orient Air Pte. Ltd, 05-22,Cargo Agt Bldg D 9 Airline road, Changi Airfreight Center Singapore 819827 Tel: 65 6214 2193/6 or 65 6214 2192, Fax: 65 6214 2199 SOMALIA Safeway Travel, Tourism and Cargo Agency, Maka Al-Mukarama street, Area number 4, Mogadishu Tel: 618304444 Email: safewayagency@hotmail.com

SOMALILAND Nobel Travel Agency, 26 Jun Main Road, Emarat Alkhayrm Building, 1st floor office No. 14, Hargiessa, Somaliland Tel: 252 2 528445/4 427575 Email: ntahga@hotmail.com SOUTH AFRICA Holiday Holdings International (Pty)Ltd, 156 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg, 2194, South Africa Tel: 27 11 289 8264, Fax: 27 11 289 8164 Email: g.simpson@holodayholdings.co.za Cargo: Aero-Link Consulting Warehouse 34, Cargo, Section, P.O Box 1307, O.R. Tambo International Airport, Gauteng, 1627 Tel: +27 11 390 3132/3366, Fax: +27 11 390 3139/3149 Email: jeremy@aero-link.co.za 156 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg, 2194, South Africa Tel: 27112898264, Fax: 27112898164 Email: g.simpson@holidayholdings.co.2a SOUTH KOREA Sharp Aviation K Inc 8th floor, Injo Building, 111-1 Seorin-dong, Jongno-gu Seoul, 110-110, Korea Tel: 82-2-722-1567, Fax: 82 2 7342813 Email: sspaik@sharp.co.kr/www.co.kr Cargo: Sharp Inc Tel: 82 2 7221567, Fax: 82 2 7342813 Email: sspaik@sharp.co.kr SPAIN & PORTUGAL AirTravel Management Calle Diego de leone, 69 40A-28006, Madrid, Spain Tel: 34 91 4022718, Fax: 34 91 4015239 Email: airmat@airlinesairmat.com Cargo: CRS Airline’s Representatives Conchita Supervia, 15–Local 08028 BARCELONA (SPAIN) Tel: 34 931888690, Fax: 34 93409251 SRI LANKA VMS Aviation Air Services PVT LTD 07-3 81183 (HO) RG, Galadari Hotel 64 Lotus Road, Colombo 1, Sri Lanka Hussien: 0094 777590100, Tel: 94 1 447370 / Fax: 94 1 437249, Email: vmstrv@eureka.lk, hussein@vmstravels.net SWEDEN Khyber International Tel: 46-8 4111826, Fax: 46-8 4111826 Email: ethiopianairlies@khyberise Cargo: Kales Airline Services Tel: 46 40 36 38 10 Fax 46 40 36 38 19 Cargo: Kales Airline Services Tel: 46 8 594 411 90, Fax: 46 8 594 42244 SWITZERLAND Airline center/AVIAREPS, AIRLINECENTER, Badenerstresse, Zurich,Switzerland Tel: 4122 91 98999, Fax: 4122 91 98900 Email: twelti@aviareps.com AIRNAUTIC AG, Peter Merian Str.2 CH-4002, Cargo: Basel Switzerland Basel Tel: 41 61 227 9797 Fax: 41 61 227 9780 Email: info@airnautic.ch

fly ethiopian

THAILAND Cargo: Oriole Travel & Tour Tel: 662 2379201 9, Fax: 662 2379200 Email: ealbkket@loxinfo.co.th TUNISIA Atlantis International LTD, S.A., 29, Ave Du Japon, Immueble Fatma, 1073 Montplaisir, Tunis, Tunisia Tel: 216 71 908 999/216 906 000 Fax: 216 71 904 110 Email: atlantis@atlantis.tn TURKEY Panorama Havacilik Ve Turizm Ltd., Cumhuriyet Cad. Apt. 185/1, Harbiye 34373, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: 90 212 2315919, Fax: 90 212 2344999 Email: Ethiopian@arartur.com.tr, mdogan@ arartur.com.tr/info@panoramaglobal.net Cargo: Airmark GSA Tas. Ltd. Sti.Omar Avni mah, Dumen Sok., No: 11/4 34437, Taksim, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: 90 212 444 1 472, Fax: 90 212 249 474 8 Email: management@air-mark.com UGANDA Cargo: Freight In Time Ltd., PO Box 70942 Kampala, Uganda Tel: 256 0774 898075, Fax: 256 414 223996 Email: amit@freight-in-time.com UNITED KINGDOM Cargo: Air Liaison Ltd - Heavyweight Air Express Group Tel: 44-1753 210 008, Fax: 44-208 831 9309, Email: ethiopianops@air-liaison.net UNITED ARAB EMIRATES ABU DHABI Salem Travel Agency, bun Dhabi, UAE Tel: 97126273333/6218000, Fax: 009712-6211155, Email: info@salemtravelagency.com DUBAI Passenger & Cargo: Asian Air Travel & Tour Agency, N.R.L Group bldg.AlGharhoud, Dubai, UAE Tel: 009714 2826322, Fax: 009714 2825727, Email: hnrml@nrlgroup.ae UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Cargo: Heavy Weight Air Express (HW) Toll Free No: 800 445 2733, Tel: 630 595 2323/571 480 5200, Fax: 630 595 3232, Email: hea.us@heavy-uweight.com VENEZUELA Praca da Liberdade, 130-10th F Suite 10011002, Liberdade, Sao Paulo-Brazil, CEP 01503010, Sao Paulo, Brazil Aviareps AG, Landsberg Str.155,80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42, Email: info@AVIAREPS.com VIETNAM Hai Au Building (11th Floor) 39b Truong Son Str., Tan Banh Dist Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Tel: 84835472481-86, Fax: 84835472487 Email: quangdx@vector-aviation.com.vn Vector Aviation Co. Ltd Hai Au Building (11th Floor), 39B Truong Son Str.,Tan Binh Dist,HO CHI MINH City,Veitnam Tel: 848 3547 2487, Fax: 848 3547 2481-86

SYRIA Passenger & Cargo: Al Tarek Travel & Tourism Fardous St, PO Box 30185 Tel: 963 11 2235225, Fax: 963 11 2211941 Email: moutaz2728@yahoo.com

YEMEN Marib Travel & Tourism, Beirut Street (Next to Sudanese Embassy Sanaa, Yemen) Tel: 00971-426833, Fax: 009671-426836 Email: manager@marib-tours.com

TAIWAN Apex Travel Services Ltd., 6F-3 No. 57, Fi Shin N. Rd Taipei, Taiwan Tel: 886 2 2740 7722, Fax: 886 2 2740 5570 Email: tpetorg@1b.hinet.net

ZAMBIA Cargo: EAS Zambia Ltd Bid Air Cargo, Kenneth Kaunda International Airport, PO Box 37287 Lusaka Tel: 27 11230460021, Fax: 27865910066

Cargo: Global Aviation Service (Taiwan) Inc. Tel: 886 2 2658 0255, Fax: 886 2 2659 7610 Email: cgo@gastwn.com gastwn@ms12.hinet.et

ZANZIBAR Passenger & Cargo: Marhaba Hotels Travels & Tours Ltd Tel: 255 24 2231527-28, Fax: Fax: 255 24 2231526, Email: marhaba@zanzinet.com

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entertainment Boeing 777/787 movies 83 | boeing 777/787 TV 87 | non-777/787 international 88 | non-777/787 regional 89 | audio 90

42 H

ero is a word we hear often in sports, but heroism is not always about achievements on the field of play. 42 tells the story of two men — the great Jackie Robinson and legendary Brookyn Dodgers General Manager Branch Rickey — whose brave stand against prejudice forever changed the world by changing the game of baseball. In 1946, Rickey put himself at the forefront of history when he signed Robinson to the team, breaking Major League Baseball’s infamous color line. PG-13 / 128 minutes / Chadwick Boseman, Harrison Ford, Nicole Beharie

july/august 2013

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entertainment

| Boeing 777/787 Flights

Am I on a Boeing 777/787? Is the screen in front of you a touch screen? Then, yes.

?

JULY Movies blockbusters

Trance R / 102 minutes / James McAvoy, Rosario Dawson, Vincent Cassel

Simon, a fine art auctioneer, teams up with a criminal gang to steal a Goya painting worth millions of dollars, but after suffering a blow to the head during the heist he awakens to discover he has no memory of where he hid the painting. When physical threats and torture fail to produce answers, the gang’s leader, Frank, hires hypnotherapist Elizabeth Lamb to delve into the darkest recesses of Simon’s psyche. As Elizabeth begins to unravel Simon’s broken subconscious, the line between truth, suggestion and deceit begin to blur.

Stoker When India Stoker loses her beloved father and best friend, Richard, in a tragic auto accident on her 18th birthday, her quiet life on the family’s secluded estate is suddenly shattered. Exquisitely sensitive, India exhibits an impassive demeanor that masks the deep feelings and heightened senses that only her father understood. R / 99 minutes / Mia Wasikowska, Matthew Goode, Nicole Kidman

Scooby-Doo! Big Top Scooby-Doo! Scooby-Doo and the gang investigate the mystery of a chain of jewel robberies, thought to be undertaken by werewolves. The team decides to go undercover as circus performers in order to catch those responsible. PG / 90 minutes / Frank Welker, Mindy Cohn, Grey DeLisle

The Endless Summer They call it “The Endless Summer,” the ultimate surfing adventure, crossing the globe in search of the perfect wave. From the uncharted waters of West Africa, to the shark-filled seas of Australia, to the tropical paradise of Tahiti and beyond, two California surfers, Robert August and Michael Hynson, accomplish in a few months what most people never do in a lifetime — they live their dream. PG / 95 minutes / Robert August, Bruce Brown, Wayne Miyata

A Good Day to Die Hard John McClane arrives in Moscow to track down his estranged son, Jack, and is stunned to discover he’s working undercover to protect a government whistleblower, Komarov. With their own necks on the line, the McClanes are forced to overcome their differences in order to get Komarov to safety. R / 98 minutes / Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney, Sebastian Koch

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone Superstar magicians Burt and Anton have ruled the Las Vegas strip for years, raking in millions with illusions as big as Burt’s growing ego. But lately the duo’s greatest deception is their public friendship, while secretly they’ve grown to loathe each other. But there’s still a chance Burt and Anton can save the act if Burt can get back in touch with what made him love magic in the first place. PG-13 / 90 minutes / Steve Carell, Steve Buscemi, Olivia Wilde

Love, Marilyn Coinciding with the 50th Anniversary of Marilyn Monroe’s death, Love, Marilyn features remarkable footage and audiotapes along with Marilyn’s own handwritten letters, diaries, notes, poems, journals and notebooks, which document her private life against the backdrop of her very public life and loves. PG-13 / 105 minutes / F. Murray Abraham, Elizabeth Banks, Adrien Brody

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Boeing 777/787 Flights |

entertainment

AUGUST Movies blockbusters

mud PG-13 / 130 minutes / Matthew McConaughey, Tye Sheridan, Jacob Lofland

Mud is an adventure about two boys, Ellis and his friend Neckbone, who find a man named Mud hiding out on an island in the Mississippi. Mud describes fantastic scenarios — he killed a man in Texas and vengeful bounty hunters are coming to get him. He says he is planning to meet and escape with the love of his life, Juniper, who is waiting for him in town. Skeptical but intrigued, Ellis and Neckbone agree to help him. It isn’t long until Mud’s visions come true and their small town is besieged by a beautiful girl with a line of bounty hunters in tow.

12 Rounds: Reloaded An emergency medical technician finds himself caught in a deadly 12-round game of cat and mouse with a man tied to his past. With little time to spare and the life of his wife hanging in the balance, the paramedic must figure out why he’s been chosen to be the pawn in this maniac’s game before it’s too late. R / 95 minutes / Randy Orton, Cindy Busby

Trance Simon, a fine art auctioneer, teams up with a criminal gang to steal a Goya painting worth millions of dollars, but after suffering a blow to the head during the heist he awakens to discover he has no memory of where he hid the painting. When physical threats and torture fail to produce answers, the gang’s leader, Frank, hires hypnotherapist Elizabeth Lamb to delve into the darkest recesses of Simon’s psyche. R / 102 minutes / James McAvoy, Rosario Dawson, Vincent Cassel

The Reef 2: High Tide When a bullying shark named Troy kidnaps Cordelia, Pi and Junior rally their friends for a daring rescue mission. Pi and Cordelia have just become the proud parents of a fresh-faced fry named Junior when Troy returns to the reef in time for high tide. But just as Pi begins training his friends and neighbors for battle, a newcomer named Ronny shows up claiming that his ideas can save everyone from ending up in Troy’s belly. PG / 80 minutes / Drake Bell, Andy Dick, Fran Drescher

A Good Day To Die Hard John McClane arrives in Moscow to track down his estranged son, Jack, and is stunned to discover he’s working undercover to protect a government whistleblower, Komarov. With their own necks on the line, the McClanes are forced to overcome their differences in order to get Komarov to safety and thwart a potentially disastrous crime in the most desolate place on Earth: Chernobyl. R / 98 minutes / Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney, Sebastian Koch

42 42 tells the story of the great Jackie Robinson and legendary Brookyn Dodgers General Manager Branch Rickey, whose brave stand against prejudice forever changed the world by changing the game of baseball. In 1946, Rickey put himself at the forefront of history when he signed Robinson to the team, breaking Major League Baseball’s infamous color line. PG-13 / 128 minutes / Chadwick Boseman, Harrison Ford, Nicole Beharie

Gambit A British thief discovers that no plan is infallible when he recruits a beautiful woman to help him steal a priceless statue from an impossibly wealthy widower. Despite the fact that his pretty accomplice bears an uncanny resemblance to his affluent target’s late wife, things quickly spin out of control once the job gets under way. PG-13 / 89 minutes / Colin Firth, Cameron Diaz, Alan Rickman

july/august 2013

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Am I on a Boeing 777/787? Is the screen in front of you a touch screen? Then, yes.

| Boeing 777/787 Flights

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JULY-August Movies KIDS CLASSICS

HOLLYWOOD CLASSIC MOVIEs

Rio Blu is a rare macaw who thinks he is the last of his kind. When Blu discovers there’s another, he leaves the comforts of his cage in smalltown Minnesota and heads to Rio. G / 96 minutes / Jesse Eisenberg, Anne Hathaway, George Lopez

THAT THING YOU DO

Guy Patterson works as a salesman at his father’s appliance store and plays the drums in his spare time, fancying himself a jazz musician. One day, a buddy of Guy’s tells him a local rock band, The One-Ders (pronounced “wonders”), is in need of a drummer — they have Battle of the Bands coming up and their usual timekeeper has broken his arm. Guy agrees to sit in, but when it’s time to play their best original, a love ballad called “That Thing You Do,” Guy lays in a sharp, driving beat that turns the tune into an uptempo pop-rocker. PG / 108 minutes / Tom Hanks, Liv Tyler, Charlize Theron

toys When a general inherits a toy-making company and begins making war toys, his employees band together to stop him. PG / 118 minutes / Robin Williams, Michael Gambon, Joan Cusack

asian MOVIES English Vinglish Money, fame and knowledge of English. In India, these three factors play a huge role in how society judges an individual. This is the story of a woman who does not know English and is made to feel insecure. She is determined to overcome this insecurity and teach the world a lesson. PG / 134 minutes / Sri Devi, Adil Hussain. Mehidi Nebbou Student Of The Year The road from youth to adulthood is paved with emotions. This is the story of Abhimanyu and Rohan, who traverse the path of competition, envy, triumph, failure and heartbreak in their mini-universe of St. Teresa’s High School, Dehradun. PG-13 / 127 minutes / Varun Dhawan, Siddharth Malhotra, Alia Bhatt Khiladi 786 Born to an owner of a marriage bureau, Mansukh has been a failure ever since he has tried to help his father in their family business. All the relationships he tried to make have resulted in separation, even before marriage took place. NC-17 / 144 minutes / Mithun Chakraborty, Akshay KumarAsin, Himesh Reshammiya Secret garden What happens when a boy and a girl swap bodies? A hilarious comedy, that’s what! PG / 85 minutes / Wallace Chung, Sitar Tan, Kang Ta

Edward Scissorhands Edward has all the essentials for a standard body, with the exception of a pair of hands. For what is initially thought to be a temporary period, he is fitted with long, scissorlike extremities that are hardly conducive to day-to-day life. PG13 / 105 minutes / Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder, Dianne Wiest

The Poseidon Adventure The Poseidon is charting its course on New Year’s Eve. Just after midnight, Captain Harrison spots the mother of all tidal waves. It is the last thing that Harrison sees before drowning: The Poseidon is turned upside down, leaving only a handful of survivors. PG / 117 minutes / Gene Hackman, Ernest Borgnine, Shelley Winters

Volcano Disaster visits L.A. in the form of an underground volcano — not the big earthquake all the citizens expect. Mike Roark, a by-the-book emergency management director, is spending the weekend with his daughter when the volcano blows. PG-13 / 104 minutes / Tommy Lee Jones, Anne Heche, Gaby Hoffmann

Aliens in the Attic Aliens in the Attic is an adventurecomedy about kids on a family vacation who must fight off an attack by knee-high alien invaders with world-destroying ambitions — all while the youngsters’ parents remain clueless about the battle. PG / 86 minutes / Ashley Tisdale, Robert Hoffman, Carter Jenkins

The next magic A young man suffering from depression and low self-esteem meets and falls in love with a girl. Love changes everything; he becomes a completely different person. PG / 85 minutes / Wallace Chung, Sitar Tan, Kang Ta nigerian MOVIES Miss Queen (part 1) Parents rarely get a chance to spend time alone. So when a new teacher suggests a trip for her students, the parents are so engrossed in the anticipation of their approaching liberty that they fail to notice the strange aura the teacher exhibits. PG / 75 minutes / Tonto Dikeh, Muna Obiekwe, Oge Okoye

Love Me Tender Clint Reno stayed home while his brother went to fight in the Civil War for the Confederate Army. When his brother Vance comes back from the war, he finds that his old girlfriend, Cathy, has married Clint. PG / 104 minutes / Richard Egan, Debra Paget, Elvis Presley

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The Jewel of the Nile The Jewel of the Nile takes up where Romancing the Stone left off, with romance novelist Joan Wilder traveling around the world with her boyfriend, Jack Colton. Invited by Omar, a wealthy Arabian potentate, to travel with him to his homeland, Joan readily accepts. It turns out that Omar wants to usurp the role of an Arab holy man known as “The Jewel of the Nile,” and Joan finds herself thrown in prison with the hapless spiritual leader. PG / 106 minutes / Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner, Danny DeVito

My Cousin Vinny When sweet Northern college kid Bill and his buddy Stan are picked up and thrown into the slammer in a hick Southern town, at first it seems to be no big deal. Then they are informed that they are accused of murder. Penniless and without a single friend in the area, Bill decides to call his goofy cousin Vinny, who has somehow recently become a lawyer. Vinny, who has never tried a criminal case in his short life as a lawyer, rides south to defend his trusting relative. R / 120 minutes / Joe Pesci, Marisa Tomei, Ralph Macchio

Gulliver’s Travels Jack Black stars in the 20th Century Fox adaptation of Jonathan Swift's Gulliver’s Travels with this fantasyfilled comedic production. This take on the timeless tale revolves around a shipwrecked mailroom clerk (Black) who discovers an island in the heart of the Bermuda Triangle, where he is the biggest occupant in comparison to its tiny inhabitants. PG / 85 minutes / Jack Black, Jason Segel, Emily Blunt

Miss Queen (part 2) Parents rarely get a chance to spend time alone. So when a new teacher suggests a trip for her students, the parents are so engrossed in the anticipation of their approaching liberty that they fail to notice the strange aura the teacher exhibits. PG / 75 minutes / Tonto Dikeh, Muna Obiekwe, Oge Okoye Level Don Change When the opportunity arises for a village girl to leave for the city, she blindly takes it and follows an old school friend to the city under the false impression that she is there to enroll in university. PG-13 / 93 minutes / Uche Elendu, Prince Nwafor, Mary Remmy


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Am I on a Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is not a touch screen, please see p. 86-87.

Boeing 777/787 Flights |

entertainment

july-august Television lifestyle

Journey into Wine Episode: Inland Victoria / 30 mins. Isabelle tastes her way through the difference in climate of this outback hinterland and finds out just how much the Victorian wine industry owes to gold.

discovery

Doting Fathers of the Atlas Mountains Episode: Caring Fathers / 60 mins. Settled in the Moroccan Atlas Mountains, the Barbary Macaque is the only monkey species north of the Sahara. He is remarkable for the intensely caring relationship fathers develop with youngsters.

destination guides

Globe Trekkers Episode: Rio de Janeiro / 30 mins. The capital city of Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, was one of the most famous cities during the colonial era. Now, it is still known for its sugar cane, gold, coffee and, of course, soccer. Join Ian Wright as he travels the southeast coast of Brazil, starting with the beach at Copacabana.

drama

The Mentalist Episode: Cherry Picked / 60 mins. While CBI tackles an unusual kidnapping case, Patrick tries to figure out which prison guard allowed Lorelei to escape. COMEDY

Touch Episode: Safety in Numbers / 60 mins. Jake is still in the custody of Child and Family Services. Despite Martin knowing that Jake is now communicating with him via numbers, Martin is still concerned that the review will find him an unfit parent as he chases these numbers. kids

Food Lovers Guide to the Planet Episode: Ancient Traditions / 30 mins. Around the world, different artisans keep the traditional ways of cooking. In this episode, we will explore their culinary and cultural heritage.

A Day in the Life Episode: Will.i.am / 30 mins. An exclusive look into the lives of fascinating people. In this episode, we get an insight to the life of sensational artist and music producer Will.i.am.

Homes of Brazil Episode: Sao Paulo / 30 mins. Sao Paulo is a megalopolis that is often considered soulless, but it’s a city where intense creative freedom reigns. This concrete landscape has inspired many artists and great architects. Ethiopian Airlines

Megacities Episode: San Paulo / 30 mins. It’s the second largest city on earth — and the most important city in Brazil. More than 10 million people live in Sao Paulo. But fitting people isn’t a problem. The challenge is the city’s trash.

American Restoration Episode: Tyler’s Promotion / 30 mins. A customer brings in a gramophone for restoration. Later, a museum curator brings in an early20th-century cement gun for repair.

Pilot Pocket Guides Episode: Paris / 30 mins. The Pilot Pocket Guides take us around some of the world’s most dynamic cities, giving us the lowdown on getting around, where to go and where to stay. The guides are fast-paced and informative, with pop-ups giving more specific information. In this episode, we visit romantic Paris!

Pawn Stars Episode: Stalled Deals / 30 mins. A 1918 Buick Touring Car is driven to the shop; Rick and Chumlee encounter a tennis racket signed by tennis legend Arthur Ashe; a guy brings in a set of fake books used to smuggle guns out of Germany after WWII.

Ethiopian Airlines Documentary Duration: 10 mins. This is a documentary on the history of Ethiopian Airlines, founded in 1945. African Unity Duration: 10 mins. This short film showcases the collaborative efforts of the African Union and Ethiopian Airlines for an integrated Africa. The film is introduced by Ethiopian Airlines’ CEO.

Treks in a Wild World Episode: Trekking In Zambia & Malawi / 30 mins. Holly Morris travels to the spectacular southern African countries of Zambia and Malawi, trekking in the footsteps of the famous 19thcentury missionary explorer David Livingstone.

Best Job in the World Episode: Ben Goes Wild / 30 mins. Ben is at the Great Barrier Reef: diving the S.S. Yongala, taking part in the yacht race and greeting his parents when they visit Hamilton Island.

New Girl Episode: Re-Launch / 30 mins. Jess is laid off from her teaching job and volunteers to be a shot girl at Schmidt’s “rebranding” party.

How I Met Your Mother Episode: The Magician’s Code Part Two / 30 mins. Ted makes a fateful phone call to his old girlfriend Victoria, Barney’s magic trick gets him in trouble with airport security just as he’s about to leave on a trip with Quinn, and Robin tries to take the perfect birth announcement photo.

Handy Manny Episode: Pepe’s Rocket / Best Vacation Ever / 30 mins. Manny’s nephew Pepe brings a toy rocket for a contest until he loses it and has to re-build a new one; Manny and the tools create a tropical paradise in Elliot’s backyard after he twists his ankle and misses out on his island vacation.

Fish Hooks Episode: Doris Flores Gorgeous / Underwater Boy / 30 mins. Bea has a lot of dates these days and doesn’t spend time with Oscar and Milo. So, Oscar makes up a fake girlfriend to impress her. But he goes too far in making everyone believe him. Meanwhile, Clamantha tries to get a kiss from Oscar.

The Middle Episode: Second Act / 30 mins. Frankie contemplates a new career after Mr. Ehlert lets her go; Sue mentors a popular freshman girl; and Mike considers punishing Brick for his rudeness. Treks in a Wild World Episode: Best Canadian Treks Vol 2 / 30 mins. In Volume 2 of the Best Canadian Treks, Bradley Cooper takes a trip back in time as he treks along the Viking Trail in search of the remains of the oldest European colony in North America — at the very spot where the historic Vikings landed their ships.

july/august 2013

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Am I on a Non-Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is a touch screen, please instead see p. 83-87.

| Non-Boeing 777/787 / International Flights

Addis Ababa to EU, Middle East, Asia (Outbound) july Movies The Incredible Burt Wonderstone Magicians Burt and Anton have ruled the Las Vegas strip for years. But lately the duo’s greatest deception is their friendship, while secretly they’ve grown to loathe each other. There’s still a chance Burt and Anton can save the act if Burt can get back in touch with what made him love magic. PG-13 / 90 minutes / Steve Carell, Steve Buscemi, Olivia Wilde The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (FRENCH) classic movies The Jewel of the Nile Joan is traveling with her boyfriend. Invited by a wealthy Arabian potentate to travel to his homeland, Joan accepts. It turns out that Omar wants to usurp the role of an Arab holy man, and Joan finds herself in prison. PG / 106 minutes / Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner, Danny DeVito asian movies English Vinglish Money, fame and knowledge of English. In India, these three factors play a huge role in how society judges an individual. This is the story of a woman who does not know English and is made to feel insecure. She is determined to overcome this insecurity, master the language and teach the world a lesson. PG / 134 minutes / Sri Devi, Adil Hussain. Mehidi Nebbou Secret garden What happens when a boy and a girl swap bodies? A hilarious comedy, that’s what! PG / 85 minutes / Wallace Chung, Sitar Tan, Kang Ta

august Movies

42 42 tells the story of Jackie Robinson and Brookyn Dodgers General Manager Branch Rickey, whose stand against prejudice forever changed the world. In 1946, Rickey put himself at the forefront of history when he signed Robinson, breaking Major League Baseball’s infamous color line. PG-13 / 128 minutes / Chadwick Boseman, Harrison Ford, Nicole Beharie 42 (FRENCH) classic movies Love Me Tender Clint Reno stayed home while his brother went to fight in the Civil War for the Confederate Army. When his brother Vance comes back from the war, he finds that his old girlfriend, Cathy, has married Clint. PG / 104 minutes / Richard Egan, Debra Paget, Elvis Presley asian movies Student Of The Year The road from youth to adulthood is paved with myriad emotions. This is the story of Abhimanyu and Rohan, who traverse the path of competition, envy, triumph, failure, manipulation and heartbreak in their mini-universe of St. Teresa’s High School, Dehradun. PG-13 / 127 minutes / Varun Dhawan, Siddharth Malhotra, Alia Bhatt

july-august TV

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EU, Middle East, Asia to Addis Ababa (Inbound) july Movies

Love, Marilyn Love, Marilyn features remarkable footage and audiotapes along with Marilyn’s own handwritten letters, diaries, notes, poems, journals and notebooks, which document her private life against the backdrop of her very public life and loves. PG-13 / 105 minutes / F. Murray Abraham, Elizabeth Banks, Adrien Brody

Gambit A British thief discovers that no plan is infallible when he recruits a beautiful woman to help him steal a statue from a wealthy widower. Despite the fact that his accomplice bears an uncanny resemblance to his target’s late wife, things quickly spin out of control once the job gets under way. PG-13 / 89 minutes / Colin Firth, Cameron Diaz, Alan Rickman

love, marilyn (FRENCH)

gambit (French)

claSsic movies aliens in the attic Aliens in the Attic is an adventure/comedy about kids on a family vacation who must fight off an attack by knee-high alien invaders with world-destroying ambitions — all while the youngsters’ parents remain clueless about the battle. PG / 86 minutes / Ashley Tisdale, Robert Hoffman, Carter Jenkins asian movies The next magic A young man suffering from depression and low self-esteem meets and falls in love with a girl. Love changes everything; he becomes a completely different person. PG / 85 minutes / Wallace Chung, Sitar Tan, Kang Ta

Best Job in the World Episode: Ben Goes Wild / 30 mins. Ben is at the Great Barrier Reef: diving the S.S. Yongala, taking part in the yacht race and greeting his parents when they visit Hamilton Island.

The Middle Episode: Second Act / 30 mins. Frankie contemplates a new career after Mr. Ehlert lets her go; Sue mentors a popular freshman girl; and Mike considers punishing Brick for his rudeness.

Pawn Stars Episode: Stalled Deals / 30 mins. A 1918 Buick Touring Car is driven to the shop; Rick and Chumlee encounter a tennis racket signed by tennis legend Arthur Ashe; a guy brings in a set of fake books used to smuggle guns out of Germany after WWII.

American Restoration Episode: Tyler’s Promotion / 30 mins. A customer brings in a gramophone for restoration. Later, a museum curator brings in an early 20th-century cement gun for repair.

Megacities Episode: Sao Paulo / 30 mins. It’s the second largest city on earth ­— and the most important city in Brazil. More than 10 million people live in Sao Paulo. But fitting people isn’t a problem. The challenge is the city’s trash.

selamtamagazine.com

classic movies

Gulliver’s Travels Jack Black stars in the adaptation of Gulliver’s Travels with this fantasy-filled comedic production. This take on the timeless tale revolves around a shipwrecked mailroom clerk (Black) who discovers an island in the heart of the Bermuda Triangle, where he is the biggest occupant in comparison to its tiny inhabitants. PG / 85 minutes / Jack Black, Jason Segel, Emily Blunt

july-august TV

New Girl Episode: Re-Launch / 30 mins. Jess is laid off from her teaching job and volunteers to be a shot girl at Schmidt’s “rebranding” party.

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august Movies

Touch Episode: Safety in Numbers / 60 mins. Jake is still in the custody of Child and Family Services. Despite Martin knowing that Jake is now communicating with him via numbers, Martin is still concerned that the review will find him an unfit parent as he chases these numbers.


Non-Boeing 777/787 / Regional Flights |

Addis Ababa to Africa (Outbound) july Movies

Scooby-Doo! Big Top Scooby-Doo! Scooby-Doo and the gang investigate the mystery of a chain of jewel robberies, thought to be undertaken by werewolves. The team decides to go undercover as circus performers in order to catch those responsible. PG / 90 minutes / Frank Welker, Mindy Cohn, Grey DeLisle

nigerian MOVIES Miss Queen (part 1) Devoted Christian parents rarely get a chance to spend time alone, and so crave personal time without their children. The timing appears perfect for a getaway when the new teacher in their children’s school suggests a camping trip for her students. Engrossed in the anticipation of their approaching liberty, they fail to notice the strange aura the new and attractive teacher exhibits. PG / 75 minutes / Tonto Dikeh, Muna Obiekwe, Oge Okoye

Africa to Addis Ababa (Inbound) august Movies

The Reef 2: High Tide When a shark named Troy kidnaps Cordelia, Pi and Junior rally their friends for a rescue mission. Pi and Cordelia have just become the proud parents of a fry named Junior when Troy returns to the reef. But just as Pi begins training his friends for battle, a newcomer shows up claiming that his ideas can save everyone. PG / 80 minutes / Drake Bell, Andy Dick, Fran Drescher nigerian MOVIES Miss Queen (part 2) Devoted Christian parents rarely get a chance to spend time alone, and so crave personal time without their children. The timing appears perfect for a getaway when the new teacher in their children’s school suggests a camping trip for her students. Engrossed in the anticipation of their approaching liberty, they fail to notice the strange aura the new and attractive teacher exhibits. PG / 85 minutes / Tonto Dikeh, Muna Obiekwe, Oge Okoye

july-august TV

A Day in the Life Episode: Will.i.am / 30 mins. An exclusive look into the lives of fascinating people. In this episode, we get an insight to the life of sensational artist and music producer Will.i.am.

entertainment

july Movies

The Endless Summer They call it “The Endless Summer,” the ultimate surfing adventure, crossing the globe in search of the perfect wave. From West Africa to Australia, Tahiti and beyond, two California surfers, Robert August and Michael Hynson, accomplish in a few months what most people never do in a lifetime — they live their dream. PG / 95 minutes / Robert August, Bruce Brown, Wayne Miyata nigerian MOVIES Gbolahan Gbolahan is the black sheep of his family. He is the son of a rich and influential couple, but his unruly behavior is a major source of anxiety for his family. Various attempts to restrain his wild ways encourage deeper investigation into his predicament. His parents and the grave decisions they made when they were poor are called into question. PG / 70 minutes / Yinka Quadri, Funke Etti, Toyin Afolayan

august Movies

mud Two boys, Ellis and Neckbone, find a man named Mud hiding out on the Mississippi. Mud describes fantastic scenarios — he killed a man and bounty hunters are coming to get him. He is planning to meet and escape with the love of his life who is waiting for him. Intrigued, they agree to help him. It isn’t long until Mud’s visions come true. PG-13 / 130 minutes / Matthew McConaughey, Tye Sheridan, Jacob Lofland nigerian MOVIES Crazy Prince An African prince is sent to study abroad, leaving his sweetheart behind with only a day’s notice. She waits 8 years for him to return, only to give up when she finds out that his parents have paid the bride price for him to be married to another woman. On his return, he expects to rekindle the love they once shared but is confronted with a sight that sends him fleeing from her compound. PG-13 / 125 minutes / Paul Sambo, Mercy Johnson, Juliet Mgburukwe

july-august TV

Homes of Brazil Episode: Sao Paulo / 30 mins. Sao Paulo is a megalopolis that is often considered soulless, but it’s a city where intense creative freedom reigns. This concrete landscape has inspired many artists and great architects.

The Mentalist Episode: Cherry Picked / 60 mins. While CBI tackles an unusual kidnapping case, Patrick tries to figure out which prison guard allowed Lorelei to escape.

How I Met Your Mother Episode: The Magician’s Code Part Two / 30 mins. Ted makes a fateful phone call to his old girlfriend Victoria, Barney’s magic trick gets him in trouble with airport security just as he’s about to leave on a trip with Quinn, and Robin tries to take the perfect birth announcement photo.

Food Lovers Guide to the Planet Episode: Ancient Traditions / 30 mins. Around the world, different artisans keep the traditional ways of cooking. In this episode, we will explore their culinary and cultural heritage.

Doting Fathers of the Atlas Mountains Episode: Caring Fathers / 60 mins. Settled in the Moroccan Atlas Mountains, the Barbary Macaque is the only monkey species north of the Sahara. He is remarkable for the intensely caring relationship fathers develop with youngsters.

july/august 2013

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entertainment

| Audio for All Flights

july-august Broadcast Channels Music From Ethiopia Enjoy a channel alive with only the best songs from Ethiopia. Artists such as Haile Roots, Nati Haile and Reshad Kedir perform a collection of satisfying sounds epitomizing the harmonious talents of Ethiopia today.

july-august Album Compilations Ethiopian African Enjoy a selection of albums brimming with sounds from the heart of Africa. Listen to collections from Yabba Funk, Victor Deme, Angelique Kidjo and many more.

Ethiopian Traditional Music (Music From Ethiopia)

Ethiopian Instrumental Ethiopian Instrumental is an elaborate and expressive collection of instrumental pieces. Theodros Mitiku, Tilaye Gebre and The Express Band, among others, will soothe you completely through a mixture of their delicate and energetic sounds.

All That Jazz All That Jazz is a concoction of every character within jazz. A handful of artists, such as Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole and Donald Byrd, give warming performances in this mix. From old classics to smooth contemporary, All That Jazz is sure to cover all corners of this nonchalant musical style. Easy Listening Easy Listening allows you to switch off and recline, as a very laid-back medley of tunes sing you into total serenity. Coldplay, Ed Sheeran and Lisa Hannigan perform their most soothing songs to help you completely repose.

Enjoy collections from some of the greatest artists in Ethiopia today. Artist like Jamboo Joote, Tikue Weldu and Mohammed Tawil. Sit back and appreciate.

Ethiopian Classic Here, enjoy albums full of world-renowned performers, orchestras and soloists, performing major works from some of history’s greatest composers: Bach, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven and many more.

Ethiopian Country Here, a fusion of Country albums for you to enjoy. A range of artists, from Buddy Miller to Sara Evans, are here to share a collection of their hits with you.

Ethiopian Hip Hop/R&B A melodic mix of Hip-Hop tunes and R&B hits, with a large selection of albums for you to listen to. This includes artists such as Snoop Dogg, Tinie Tempah and Jennifer Hudson.

Chart Hits Chart Hits is a channel solely dedicated to the latest chart-toppers in pop and rock. If you want to be up-to-speed with the most current hits in music today, then tune into Chart Hits, where Gotye, Lana Del Rey and Beyoncé will definitely activate your musical taste buds. Country This channel offers a blend of cooling Country sounds. With hits from both classic and modern artists, you are sure to experience the refreshing flavors of authentic country music. Jeff Bridges, Emmylou Harris and Lady Antebellum perform some of their best works for you today.

Ethiopian Instrumental Here, we offer an expressive and inspiring collection of Instrumental albums for you to enjoy.

Ethiopian Jazz From old classics to smooth contemporary, here you will find an excellent collection of Jazz albums. You’ll find every great Jazz musician, from Miles Davis to Billie Holiday to Louis Armstrong.

Ethiopian Kids World Hits World Hits is an eclectic collection of music from all over the globe. This channel allows you to experience all ranges of talent in all ranges of music. Artists such as Salah Al Zadjali, Destra and Axelle Red take this opportunity to introduce you to their own personal worlds, through the medium of music. Classical Collection Classical Collection showcases world-renowned performers, orchestras and soloists, performing major works from some of the best composers in history. The London Symphony Orchestra with Josef Krips, Walter Klien and the Württemberg Chamber Orchestra provide a classical assortment. Classic Rock Rife with roaring riffs and smooth bass lines, Classic Rock is a channel wholly dedicated to true rock n’ roll. Here, Pink Floyd, T. Rex and Jimi Hendrix play a handful of the greatest rock songs in history.

Here, a cheerful compilation of albums, full of upbeat songs for all your little ones to enjoy.

Ethiopian Oldies Enjoy taking a trip down memory lane through this extensive collection of nostalgic albums. This includes some of the greats, such as Al Green, Elvis Presley and Fleetwood Mac.

Ethiopian Pop If you’re looking for the latest hits, then enjoy this medley of the most current Pop albums out now. This includes albums from Beyonce, Lady Gaga and David Guetta.

Ethiopian Rock Relish in a sea of Rock, with albums from legendary rock n’ rollers to the latest stars of 2012 — Bob Dylan, The Strokes and The Black Keys.

Golden Oldies Take a walk down memory lane with a compilation of nostalgic hits. Golden Oldies presents R.E.M., Tina Turner and Duran Duran, who lead the way with a string of classics, taking you right back to when they were No. 1.

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Ethiopian World Here, enjoy a diverse collection of hit albums from all over the globe! Amplify your cultural consciousness through sounds from Ely Guerra, Ocean Hai and Oliver Haidt.


EVA Air has joined Star Alliance. Giving you an award winning service to Taiwan and a whole new way of connecting to Asia. In my business it’s all about connectivity. I’ve earned it.

Jackie Hsu, ASUS Corporate Vice President and Star Alliance Gold Status.

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| Crossword

15 16 17 12 13 14 8 9 10 11 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 1 Four six-packs 5 ____out a living 22 21 20 19 18 8 Commedia dell’____ s 12 Devotee 26 27 23 24 25 Four six-packs 15 Referee ___ out a living 18 Gulf port 32 30 31 29 28 Commedia dell’___ 19 NJ fort Devotee20 Cry like a baby 37 38 35 36 33 34 Referee21 First-rate 22 Carnival city Gulf port 44 45 46 47 43 42 39 40 41 NJ fort 23 Drill parts and cake slices? 52 51 48 49 50 Cry like a baby 26 The whole ____! First-rate 28 Boozer 57 55 56 54 53 Carnival29 Inert city gas Drill parts and cake 30 Compose 64 65 60 61 62 63 58 59 slices? 32 Assortment 33 A few The whole ___! 69 67 68 66 Boozer 35 Razor sharpener 37 Stationed 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 Inert gas 39 Unique person Compose 42 Aussie hopper, 80 79 78 Assortment for short A few 43 ____vivant 85 84 81 82 83 44 Pancake topper Razor sharpener 48 Tam and tutu? 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7/13 Very Easy Sudoku | Sudoku

Selamta Magazine To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box must contain the numbers 1 to 9. Solutions on page 96.

must contain the numbers 1 to 9.

7/13 Medium Sudoku

PuzzleJunction.com

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Selamta Magazine 7/13 Hard Sudoku

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Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com

entertainment

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july/august 2013

95


Puzzle Answers |

Selamta Magazine 7/13 Very Easy Sudoku

Selamta Magazine July/Aug. 2013 Crossword

EV A A i r , h as j oine d t he S ta r Alli ance ne t wo r k EVA Air has joined the Star Alliance network, Selamta the world’s leading global airline alliance with Magazine 28 member airlines. The addition of EVA Air to the network, will not only give you a high quality service to and from Taiwan but a whole new way of connecting to Asia. It will also provide benefits and status recognition for all our frequent travellers. Selamta Magazine In fact, together with our newest member EVA Air, you can now seamlessly connect to over 1300 destinations worldwide and earn and redeem miles across all member airlines, all on one card.

You’ve earned it. Visit staralliance.com to find out more.

Jackie Hsu, ASUS Corporate Vice President and Star Alliance Gold Status.

To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box must contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Answers to puzzle from page 92. 6 Solution 2

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Selamta July–August 2013