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SCSU_RealWorld_NH_Mag_8.5x5_Layout 1 3/19/15 12:08 PM Page 1

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EDITOR’S L E TTER

p Less Money For More Juice

INTE L NORTH BRANFORD’S PALMIERI RELEASES THIRD WITCH

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LETT E R S

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Snakes Slithering To The Surface

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No Hungry Kids This Summer

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ATHO M E OF NOTES households. Connecticut does have some poisonous Timber Rattlesnakes and Northern Copperheads but they are not common.

DEEP says all snakes will move away from humans if given the chance. In other words don’t kill the snakes.

CT Docs Not Keen On Pot Medical marijuana may have a growing number of Advocate’s in the state, but Connecticut’s physicians apparently are not quite ready to join the “pot party”. Only 220 of the states 7,000 doctors belonging to the Connecticut State Medical Society will prescribe marijuana for their patients.

Divorce Attorney Writes Children’s Book To Soften The Blow Attorney Rene C. Bauer of Hamden has a specialty in family law and divorce, the inspiration behind her new children’s book

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arcade is coming to New Haven. Before you start fantasizing about wasting your summer away drinking craft beer and playing arcade games at the new Barcade location opening in 9th Square, you should know that the opening date is set for the fall, as long as zoning meetings in July go favorably. The proposed location is the corner of Church and Crown, formerly Gotham Citi nightclub. Barcade, a chain of arcade bars founded in Brooklyn, will offer craft brew, some even made in Connecticut, as well as up to 45 classic video games like Donkey Kong and Contra. It’s unclear whether Barcade will overpower what everyone already knows about Contra: that if you want 30 lives, at the title screen press Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Start............................................

EBI BL I OF I L ES

versource Energy and United Illuminating both expect to see a significant drop in the kilowatt-hour rate beginning July 1.

orth Branford’s very own Suzanne Palmieri, author of The Witch of Belladonna Bay and The Witch of Little Italy has released her third book titled The Witch of Bourbon Street, which is on shelves now. Set amidst the colorful charm of The French Quarter and remote bayous of Tivoli Parish, Louisiana, the book is a story of family, redemption and forgiveness. The book is published under the St. Martin’s Press trade paperback label and sells for $15.99. You can meet Suzanne and get your copy signed this summer at Madison’s R.J. Julia Booksellers at 768 Boston Post Road on July 1.

arm weather brings out snakes and so the Department of Energy and The Environment [DEEP ] says keep an eye out during hikes, yard work and driving. they add, don’t be scared most Connecticut Snakes are harmless and want to keep out of your way. Poisonous snakes are not typically found in and around

New Haven Becomes The Latest Site of a Totally Cool Adult Arcade

Percy’s Imperfectly Perfect Family. Percy the perky penguin’s world is turned upside down when he learns his parents are no longer going to live together. The book is to help parents start the conversation about divorce with their children and is published by Archway Publishing, available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble website.

Eversource Energy currently charges 12.629 cents and will drop to 8.228 cents while United Illuminating’s rate will drop from 13.3108 cents to 9.1241 per kilowatt-hour. These new rates are only for generation — the prices suppliers charge Eversource and UI. They don’t reflect how the companies make their money. There is a fixed charge customers pay regardless of how much electricity they use. Those charges are now $19.25 for Eversource and $17.25 for UI, far higher than they have ever been, though not as high as the companies have requested.

ree and reduced school lunches in schools feed approximately 150,000 Connecticut children. During the summer months, End Hunger Connecticut! is getting the word out to ensure that everyone knows where summer meals are available to kids 18 years and under. A listing of summer meal sites has been compiled and is available on the CT Summer Food website, www.ctsummerfood.org, or text 877877 for meal sites near you

BODY & S OUL ONS CR EEN MAC ATTACK John McEnroe will join James Blake, Andy Roddick and Jim Courier for the Legends Event at the 2015 Connecticut Open. McEnroe will match up against Courier on Friday August 28th.

One a crazy youth, now a “Legend.”

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NEW HAVEN

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June / July 2015 Editor & Publisher: Mitchell Young Design Consultant Terry Wells Editorial Assistant Rachel Bergman Publisher’s Assistant Amy Kulikowski Graphics Manager Matthew Ford Contributing Writers Rachel Bergman Steven Culpepper Jamie DeChesser Bruce Ditman Jessica Giannone Amy Kulikowski Lesley Roy Priscilla Searles Derek Torellas Photographers Steve Blazo Lesley Roy Derek Torellas Chris Volpe Publisher’s Representative Robin Kroopnick Robin Ungaro New Haven is published 8 times annually by Second Wind Media Ltd., which also publishes Business New Haven, with offices at 458 Grand Avenue, New Haven, CT 06513. 203-781-3480 (voice), 203-781-3482 (fax). Subscriptions $24.95/year, $39.95/two years. Send name, address & zip code with payment. Second Wind Media Ltd. d/b/a New Haven shall not be held liable for failure to publish an advertisement or for typographical errors or errors in publication. For more information NewHaven@Conntact.com. Please send CALENDAR information to CALENDAR@conntact.com no later than six weeks preceding calendar month of event. Please include date, time, location, event description, cost and contact information. Photographs must be at least 300 dpi resolution and are published at discretion of NEW HAVEN magazine.

6 June/July 2015

The Hamden High School art teacher is also the maven behind The Haven. . . Collective, a vintage boutique at 938 State Street that hosts craft DIY events, pop-up vendor space for local artisans and support in a fashion emergency. The Haven Collective, opened at the end of last October came after years of Gonzales operating a traveling vintage shop at fairs and festivals. Meeting creative designers and people making handmade products inspired the pop-up vendor space in the store.

Julius Stone Event and volunteer coordinator at Neighborhood Music School, House Manager for both New Haven Symphony and Arts & Ideas, and the Founder of Stash & Ariston, which has been setting up dance parties around New Haven since 2011, Stone is busy. This summer, look for “Warm

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B.Y.O. SUNBLOCK

The kids are out of school, it’s too hot to start that ambitious new project at work, and the surf and sand are calling. In most coastal Connecticut cities, public beaches require a parking pass or a daily parking fee, easily obtainable from local parks and rec departments or on-site.

Weather Behavior,” a series of outdoor adult gatherings not on the beaten path because he believes in every New Haven neighborhood, especially the ones you don’t normally hang out in. Trust him, there were over 100 guests at his recent Briq birthday party.

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DREAMERS & DOERS

NEWBIE WANTS TO

KNOW

TWINKLE TWINKLE

Ethan Rodriguez-Torrent & Max Sutter Last year, the duo developed a prototype puzzle room at home and invited their friends—who quickly invited their friends and so on until the condo association intervened. By February of this year, Escape New Haven was open for business on 111 Whitney Ave. and has already seen more than 3,000 visitors. The site offers three puzzle rooms to solve with a group—find the codes, figure out where the keys are hiding, unlock the combination, push the correct button, until you’ve solved your way out or time’s up in 60 minutes. New puzzle room unveiled in June! and even a shower area. Hammonasset was once opened as a testing ground for the Winchester Rifle Company in 1898, but later to the public for the first time in 1920 as a recreational beach. During WWII, it closed to the public again for military use, but now it’s open and only charges a measley $9 during the week and $13 on weekends to park. You and your kids can have a shell-casings fight in the sand!

Hammonasset State Park, Madison is the state’s largest public beach and offers plenty of amenities like concessions, nature center, boardwalk, camping, swimming, fishing, boating, picnicking

Silver Sands, Milford is a State park, but there are no parking or entry fees. Charles Island, connected to Silver Sands by a sandbar that is submerged during high tide, is purported to be the hiding place of Captain Kidd’s pirate treasure. The booty was never recovered, but the

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ant to seem cool on date night without spending a dime? The Leitner Family Observatory and Planetarium at Yale twinkles with majestic views of the solar system. Free and open to the public every Tuesday (and special celestial occasions like comets and eclipses) except during Yale’s winter break, the Observatory houses a sci-dome HD to simulate the universe. Leitner also houses two permanently mounted telescopes, one of which was purchased by Yale in 1882 to study Venus. The other telescope is a computer-controlled .4 meter reflecting telescope (it’s pretty big). On clear Tuesday nights, the telescopes are set up for visitors. Maybe you’ll discover a new planet or constellation? Or remnants of the Death Star? island is now a protected bird sanctuary, so you aren’t allowed to go digging. You can go fishing, boating, swimming, crabbing, bird watching and picnicking on the beach, though.

West Haven boasts 4 miles of public coastline with lifeguards on duty daily beginning June 22. Bradley Point, best known as the spot where British troops landed in 1779, offers panoramic views of Long Island Sound. A beach volleyball league takes up residence on the sand this time of year, there are three playgrounds and a bird sanctuary. Reports of Sammy the Harp Seal sightings abound here, but it’s never been proven that Sammy isn’t just a fat townie out for a swim. Parking is $10 for non-residents. NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM


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THE WOMAN OF THE HOUSE Themis Klarides, a native of Seymour is the Republican representative of Connecticut’s District 114, was elected to her ninth term in 2014 serving parts of Derby, Orange and Woodbridge with more than 62% of the vote. She is a graduate of Trinity College in Hartford and Quinnipiac Law School in Hamden. Klarides was appointed in 2015 by house Republicans as their State House Minority Leader. Presiding over an enlarged Republican Caucus fresh off the addition of eleven Representatives, she has shown no rookie restraint in taking her message to the Democratic majority and Governor Dannel Malloy. Mitchell Young publisher of New Haven magazine interviewed Klarides for One to One. So where did it all start for you? My grandparents came over from Greece and they started their own little business. It became pretty big? It did, but it started out as a little ice cream parlor and grocery store in Seymour. My grandfather and his brother opened a little market as little as you can imagine. Then as families do, they had a fight and they decided to split up, one brother was going to take the grocery part and one the ice cream. For some odd reason they both wanted the ice cream part. They fought about it and my grandfather ended up with the grocery part.

My dad and his two brothers worked there when they were very young and they took it over when my grandfather passed and developed it. We sold the grocery, but we still have all the real estate that we manage, my cousins and I. Was there much political discussion growing up – often that’s a staple in immigrant families? No, both of my grandfathers died in their late fifties, so I didn’t know either one. My grandmothers worked in the stores. They were particular that you don’t speak Greek in the stores. My dad speaks no Greek, he knows five words and until my sister and I were in my twenties, we didn’t. They were all mispronounced. My mom spoke Greek at home with her family, but hasn’t for years. There weren’t political conversations, it was just about the business and family, working for what you want and trying to give back as much as possible in whatever way you want to do it.


IN T E L BI BLI OF I LE S My uncle who passed away was on the local Board of Finance in Seymour and Oxford. He was the only political person in the family. It wasn’t a big interest.

As a young person you were a Republican, did that make you odd woman out?

LE T T E R S

Where did it become an interest for you? I really don’t know except to say, when I was in high school, the Connecticut Bar Association young lawyers group had this mock trial competition throughout the state. I was a sophomore and one of my teachers got involved and they wanted to enter us in the competition. No one knew what we were doing; we were fifteen years old.

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I never thought that way about being a Republican until I got here – oddly enough. Seymour is a pretty Republican town, but the reality is that my family, we were always Republicans. My mom was a Democrat because she grew up in West Haven, but when she married, my dad made her switch.

FÊTES

It wasn’t because they were political in my family, it was just about treating people the right way and supporting people you trusted and saw doing the right thing. People would ask me to come outside the supermarket to campaign, and it was Republicans and Democrats.

AT HOM E

New Canaan and Darien, they had won it several years in a row, they had like a courthouse in their school. We ending up making it to the quarter finals the first year, which was a big deal, the second and third year we won the state championship. I was one of the lawyers. You roleplayed, there were people that played lawyers, people that played witnesses. I became interested in the law at that point, and then I ran for student council president, that was my big political interest. Did you need a platform or was it just popularity? I couldn’t even say that, because I was very, very introverted, believe it or not, at the time. I then went to Trinity College, as a political science major. Towards the end of my college career and the beginning of law school, I was involved in a local state representative race. I got involved in my Republican Town Committee in Seymour and I ran for the local Board of Finance. I was in law school, I never campaigned, they kind of just put you on the ticket and everyone ran together. I had very minimal experience, but I knew I was interested.

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So did you know going in that you wanted to go to law school? What did your folks think about that? My parents were always open to whatever we wanted to do.

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I have a sister, they [would say] we should never rely on a man for anything, we should always be selfsufficient and do what made you happy. My sister is an athletic trainer. We were just discussing this the other night. We have this very good friend whose daughter is in high school and she’s looking at colleges and my friend said I tried to explain to her, she doesn’t have to go to college if she doesn’t want to. There are other things. And I’m like What do you mean you told her that? Next my sister says well my parents always said “go and give it a try, do your best…” I said when did they ever say that to you, they never said that to me! My parents never told us to go to college; that was just what you were

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going to do. I was always the nerd, focused on school, good grades all the time to the detriment of everything else. And my sister was always the cheerleader and the popular one and she was not always as focused on it [school] as she should have been. So with her, “just go, see what you do.” But you got into athletics, too? I was a competitive athlete since I was five, but she was into the social aspect of things. I was very shy. It was just this past Saturday night I said they didn’t tell you that – and then I said yeah they really knew how you were going to do [laughs]. So do you get along well with your sister? Yes we’re very close, I talked to her four times today already. So does she give you political or just personal advice? Seriously. Well she doesn’t give me any advice. She would never give me political advice, but I forced her to run for the Board of Selectmen in Seymour and now she’s the Deputy First Selectman, so I give her political advice. She tries to talk me off the ledge periodically. Well, that’s political advice. No that’s, I don’t want you to die [jump off the ledge] or kill anyone. So does that mean you get emotional about politics? I get emotional about everything. I told a reporter on the radio this morning, I’m Greek that’s just how we are. I’m very passionate about whatever I feel strongly about. Was law school [at Quinnipiac] a good experience for you?

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There are people who go to law school because they don’t know what to do with themselves after college. Then you have people who really want to be lawyers. To me, the benefit of law school is that it teaches you how to think in a different way. But you can’t be shy and be in law? I remember my first year when we had to do our oral arguments in [mock] court, I had never had this experience before. When they say your knees are shaking—I never understood that, I mean how could your knees be shaking, but they were shaking, my hands were sweating and my knees were shaking. Not any more? No I’m pretty much over that. At one point you took your sports really far, you were a body builder and a model. Fitness [not body builder]. That was another accidental thing, I had just graduated from law school and I was getting ready to take the bar exam. I had always worked out and was a personal trainer and taught aerobics, I did all that kind of stuff, I like to do it. There was this women’s body builder thing, but women were starting to get too big, so they started a new category called fitness. There were friends of mine at the gym and they would say, “you should try and do one of these contests. That’s what you look like.” I just did it for fun, and I ended up winning a contest. There were agents and photographers and I ended up for four years all over the country doing fitness modeling. So why did you get out? Enough was enough at a certain point. I was studying for the Bar and

I just did it for fun, and I ended up winning a contest. There were agents and photographers and I ended up for four years all over the country doing fitness modeling.

10 June/July 2015

Klarides: Women across the aisle have shown support.

eventually I took that. I got out of it a year or two before I decided to run for office. I did it four years solidly. At that point there weren’t many women in politics in Connecticut? [Interrupts] I’m not sure there are many more now, we lost women in the last election. What is it, thirty percent? We still have several in state office: Nancy Wyman, Denise Nappier, Denise Merrill? But when you think about twenty five percent of the House, when you look at the Senate Republican caucus, there is one woman. Even among the Senate Democrats [there aren’t that many, 7 of 23].

So did you have trouble initially getting people to take you seriously? You were a woman, young, pretty and a model? Yes and that didn’t stop, but I have to be honest with you, it still happens to a certain extent. Obviously, I’ve proven myself and continue to do that, but, I’m the only woman leader in this building, and I’m the first House Republican leader ever. I have great relationships with the rest of the ladies and we have a mutual respect. You still have people that make comments that they would never make to a man. Like what? There’s a State Senator who made a comment because I didn’t agree with NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM


him on a bill, although we agreed that the bill should go through, but we didn’t agree on the language. He actually said I was immature, insecure and some other [insult]. Well you’re not a kid anymore, you may look younger than your age, the bio I saw said you were fifty. 49! My bio does not say I’m fifty. [it was an article in the CT Post]. What I didn’t realize until the past few months, even though my colleagues and my fellow leaders are all very respectful, you have people who still feel threatened and they don’t like a woman telling them they’re wrong. And you don’t know who those people are until it happens. This particular Senator, who I had a perfectly good relationship with for many years, did something that he said he wasn’t going to do and I called him out, and dragged him out of the Senate Chamber [he wasn’t in the Republican caucus] and we had an hour discussion. He apparently had his ego bruised. We all disagree on a regular basis, that’s what we do. I have to make sure I’m not insulting to any of my colleagues, they don’t want to be insulted jut because they don’t agree. When you use words like immature, insecure, that kind of thing, if you didn’t know what kind of article you were reading, you would think I was some ten year old being admonished. If I were a man that would never happen. Often we hear about women being tougher and more difficult with other women managers, what is the relationship among women in the chambers? I have had an unbelievable amount of support from the women on the other side of the aisle. People that I wouldn’t agree with on three quarters of the issues have made a point to [support me personally]. We had a women’s caucus of the House and Senate Republicans and Democrats and they gave me an award this year, they have been very supportive. In a world that is so male-dominated it is almost as if the women bind together because it is a force against the male establishment kind of thing. Connecticut would seem the perfect place for more women in politics, why don’t we see more running? I really don’t know why, it is hard for me to figure it out. They had, at the University of New Haven a few months ago, a women’s panel [on this topic]. Someone said if a woman is told she should run for this office, she might say “I don’t know if I know the issues or how am I going to raise the money,” there are always doubts.


The man, no matter how ill-prepared for the office, he’ll just look in the mirror and say, “I’m good.”

years, second in command. I was able to watch and build that and wanted to make sure that continued.

Do you see this as being the same for younger women?

I’ve always wondered when were the Republicans going to get it together in this state, why aren’t they more successful in the legislature, in particular. It seems like a fifty –fifty state. If you listened to the state’s NPR you might not think that way, but voting wise it seems that way.

Every generation is going to change incrementally, but it still comes back to how did you grow up, your parents and the role models in your life. Did your father like the fact that your sister ran for office? He likes anything either one of us do. When I was doing all the fitness modeling, there was one magazine, each page there was a different girl. And the girl next to me didn’t have a top on but her hands were over her. She might as well have had a bathing suit on, my mother was like [oh no], my father has the magazine and is taking it everywhere he goes to show to all his friends. My father is weird in that he was just as proud of me doing that as doing this. My mother’s the same, but she differentiates what we’re doing. When she saw the magazine she said – “you went to law school and I raised you so you could be in a magazine next to a girl with no top on.” Normally, it would be the father that would think like that [laughing]. How did you get the leadership job in the Republican House? That’s a good question. There are elected officials who know they don’t want to do anything else. Then there is the group that thinks are you going to run for something else? Is there something else you’re interested in? Most everybody else just sees how it goes, you’re open, its not the end all and be all. When Larry Cafero decided he wasn’t going to run again, I felt really strongly that he had changed this caucus, and had brought it to a place it had never been before. It was very much a team effort. We call ourselves family. We act as a family, we certainly disagree on many things, but we operate as a group and support each other. Usually in this building, everybody is a free agent. I served as his deputy for eight

12 June/July 2015

We have more members in the House Republicans than we’ve had for twenty years. We beat eleven Democrats last November and we’re twelve votes away from a majority. That’s why the budget was 73 to 70 after forty-eight hours straight of arm-twisting. I’ve never seen that in seventeen years [here].

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finger spread]. The second time he had name ID, which is the shame of it.

questioned myself whether I’m too aggressive.

You had a sitting governor who was the least popular governor in the United States and a personality of the devil and Foley was less likeable. I have to tell you it’s offensive to me – he even said yesterday he might run again. No, the fact is, but for him, we wouldn’t have Dan Malloy for one day.

So have you gotten feedback that as a woman you shouldn’t be that way?

Tom Foley is a smart man, he’s a great businessman and he’s a decent person, but he’s not a candidate. We’re all good at certain things, but he doesn’t connect with people. In politics it is more important to connect than anything else. But your party picked him? You’re right, but I still don’t understand it. It’s a nomination, there are people that believe. He ran last time and it was so close, [people

Have you not read all the press for the past four months? To the point where I questioned myself whether I’m too aggressive.

It happened for a couple of reasons, first every ten years when the Census is done we do redistricting. All four caucuses have representatives and it’s a negotiation. I really believe that the message that Larry Cafero put together in the past eight years about common sense, what you do in your household and how government needs to run more like that, really started to resonate. We had someone at the top of the ticket that lost and we still beat eleven Democrats. Can you imagine if the top of the ticket ran even moderately strong? Was Tom Foley a good choice for the Republicans? Why did he get picked twice? No, I cannot figure that out. The first time, he was a new face no one really knew him. He’s a business guy. Then he loses by this much [showing small

thought] he could learn from his mistakes. And that would put him over the top. That would be a natural way to think- except he’s not a good taker of advice. The first time you didn’t have any expectations, the second time you expected a new improved Tom Foley 2.0 and you got none of it. His point that Republicans can’t win in Connecticut, which was the comment he made the day after the election, no, certain Republicans can’t win; we beat eleven Democrats without any help up there. So that is the wave that is moving and after this budget vote, I’m telling you it’s going to be a big year. Larry Cafero I put in the bulldog category – can you do that too? Are you kidding me? Have you not read all the press for the past four months? To the point where I

No, everybody loves it, Democrats love it too. Democrats just in general love it, they see me as somebody who fights for it no matter what it means. It’s one thing to get into political arguments, but when you stand up to somebody, like the Governor who’s a bully and who likes to call people racist. When was the last time you saw a Republican minority leader and the house speaker and the house majority leader do a joint statement against their sitting Governor? Never. I guess with the “Second Chance” concept there is a lot of room for this kind of rhetoric? I get their issue. We have been negotiating for the past three weeks and we came to compromise language, which I will support. The point is the Governor does what he does, he calls it second chances, but more accurately, it’s like eighth or ninth chances. I agree if you have Percocet in your pocket you shouldn’t be charged with a felony and have it on your record for the rest of your life. But we don’t do that now, no prosecutor charges with mandatory minimums in a school zone. No one is in jail for possession with less than an intent to sell for the first, second or third. If you’re in jail on any of those, it’s because you did something else. Did you ever smoke Marijuana? No, I just never did anything like that. Medical marijuana is different for me because that’s purely emotion. Everybody knows somebody that has been in that situation, if here’s anything that can ease the pain, that I would support it. The problem was there were doctors and experts and it was fifty, fifty [on Medical Marijuana effectiveness]. You have your medical experts saying yes, or no to the pill instead of smoking. Where are they NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM

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going to grow it and its federally illegal. It was one of those of those awkward and clumsy things to do. On your website you describe yourself as a moderate? I hate those terms, what does that mean, I’m neither here nor there? I’m fiscally conservative, but I am socially more libertarian. If you look at fiscal issues, it is how you’re going to be responsible with our money. Everything else, is voting obviously for my district but what I feel is right and staying out of people’s lives. What would it take to turn spending around in state government, is it the public or the elected officials that are the problem? It’s the people that are elected. We had a $3.5 billion deficit four years ago for two years, now we have a $3 billion deficit for two years. We clearly have a fiscal problem. We [the Republicans] put together a budget that did not raise taxes. I said “we need to put a no tax budget together, but not just for the sake of doing it, not if we have to cut everything and not make any policy statements and philosophical changes.” We made sure we took care of the neediest part of our population. We gave non-profit providers a COLA [Cost of Living Increase]. The state is poaching them left and right and they do such a great job in our communities. We took people off the DDS [Department of Developmental Services] wait list, we added more money for Medicaid provider rates, we put billions of dollars into a transportation plan over thirty years. I think it was thirty-six billion dollars. We made [proposed] an investment in transportation. We, meaning the state. We put together a responsible budget, we helped people with pensions, when you retire and you pay taxes on that, we helped single filers, people starting out. I was the most proud of this budget than any we’ve done in eight years. It can be done.

So how do you see your personal goals? I am proud of what we’ve done this session. It is a shame for the state, that over forty percent of the population is not involved in this budget after the governor asked five million times to put our suggestions on a piece of paper. I want to lead this caucus as best as I can for the time being. Do you think we’ll see a woman governor again – do you think that will be a Republican and do women govern differently?

An Innovative Transition Program for 18 – 21-Year Old Students

I certainly hope so, I certainly hope so. There are great [Republican] women that are running their towns and doing a great job. I think women are different decision makers, they are more consensus makers. We always joke with the Republicans and Democrats in leadership that the women, whether they are committee chairmen and they come to me as a woman leader, we know if it was totally up to us, things would be done in a more efficient way. It’s not about egos being bruised, it’s not about pounding your chest. We all have egos or we wouldn’t be in this business. It’s just a question of how big they are and if it goes over the line. If you come out screaming everyday, at a certain point no one is going to listen to you – you have to choose when to say I’m not going to take this crap anymore. Your mother cared about which picture was in the magazine, what does she say about things today? She loves it, if I love it. If I said tomorrow I really don’t love this anymore, I’m not running anymore, she wouldn’t even try to talk me out of it. She worries all the time “you’re tired and running yourself ragged, and I can’t believe people say these things.” I say mom, it’s been sixteen years, you could be used to it by now.

Creating Opportunities for Success 203-281-3577 | www.aces.org/create new haven

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A DAY IN THE LIFE Connecticut’s Sea-To-Table Oyster “Farmers”

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Story and Photos by Derek Torellas

hey arrive at work early, often before daybreak. They start a long day tending to their “crops” as the morning sun begins its climb to the east. But they aren’t farmers – at least not in the traditional sense. Instead, their land lies below the waters of Long Island Sound, and these “farmers of the sea” are part of the continuing legacy of clam and oyster fishermen of New Haven. Long before the arrival of Europeans to the shores of Connecticut, harvesting shellfish was an important facet of life for the native peoples. The Quinnipiac, inhabiting the greater New Haven area, fished abundant coastal waters in dugout canoes. Shellfish were not only an important source of food, the discarded shells were used to create the beaded currency: wampum. Canoes gave way to the sailing ships of the colonists, which filled the Quinnipiac River and New Haven Harbor by the 1800s. Diesel engines eventually replaced sail and steam power. Like the oyster boat Mary Colman. Pat O’Neill steered the vessel from its Quinnipiac River dock, underaneath the Pearl Harbor Memorial (I-95) and Tomlinson (Route 1) briadges that stand as the gateway to the New Haven Harbor. The boat is much older than its captain, built in Philadelphia in 1924, yet still goes out on the Sound nearly every day, although

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its sailing mast is long gone since a more modern engine was installed, and the dredges are now driven by hydraulics, as opposed to deck hands. The Mary Colman is one of five boats older than all the employees working for Norm Bloom and Son, a shellfish business based in Norwalk that operates out of several docks, including one in New Haven on the Quinnipiac. O’Neill has been captain of the Mary Colman for eight years, having worked many more years as both a deckhand and on his own personal boat prior to that. He grew up watching fishing boats off the Milford shoreline, and said working on one is all he ever wanted to do. The day’s work for O’Neill and deckhand Javier Ambrosio was to catch oysters from one plot and move them to another for further growth. It might seem counterintuitive, but most of the Norm Bloom and Son oyster boats don’t actually bring oysters back to shore. Instead, these boats farm plots on the seafloor. Oysters require attention, they aren’t a ‘let it grow and catch when ready’ creature. Aside from spreading out oyster populations to alternate plots, another farming requirement is to drop dried, used shell on the seafloor just before the oysters spawn around July. Landing on a silt and mud-free shell increases a spawns chance of survival. Company owner Norman Bloom calls oysters a “three year product.”

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James Namnoum bags a lot of 125 cherrystone size clams after sorting the clams by market sizes. Cherrystone clams are larger than littleneck and topneck clams, and are typically used for stuffed clams and chowders.

“What he [O’Neill] does today, affects us two or three years on,” Bloom said. “He’s out here cleaning ground where it looks like you’re just wasting time, but then the following year when you come back, and the stuff is all grown, your dredges come up full of oysters – that’s when you feel an almost high or excitement.” Returning to the farm analogy, the Mary Colman is in essence a tractor, and the oyster dredge is the rake to sow the land. The farming boats don’t make any money for the company. What they are doing, though, is making the “marketing” boats profitable, the ones that go out and collect the oysters for processing. Over the course of a single oyster’s lifetime, O’Neill said they can be on two or three different boats before they’re harvested for the market. “When I first started, I didn’t really understand,” O’Neill said about all the steps before the oysters wind up on a plate. “A lot of it seems thankless, but it’s very rewarding.” Bloom has plans for expansion in New Haven. He said the intent is to build a processing facility for oysters, like the one at the Norwalk site, on the property of the company pier on the Quinnipiac River. With that facility, Bloom said that the oysters harvested from the New Haven-based ships wouldn’t have to be transported west to Norwalk anymore.

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Across the harbor, Patty King was leading her own crew on the Robert Marie. King operates the boat for Dolan Brothers Shellfish Company, which has always worked closely as a sister company to Norm Bloom and Son. Instead of oysters, King sets out every day to catch clams. The clam harvesting process works differently, and the farming required for clams is significantly less than for oysters. Clams live in mud under the seafloor, as opposed to the surface dwelling oysters. The clam dredge, dropped from the rear of the boat, shoots a jet of water as it rakes along the bottom of the Sound. The deckhands wrestle the dredge over a large stainless steel table on the stern and release its contents to be sorted. Much of it is old shell and rocks, and the deckhands have to pick through the mass and find the clams at a hurried pace, before

The 90-year-old oyster boat Mary Colman returns to the Quinnipiac River after a day’s work, passing under the nearly completed Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge.

WOMAN OF THE SEA “I

g r e w u p r i g ht o n t h e w ate r f r o nt i n B r a n f o r d ,” Pa t t y K i n g , C a p t a i n o f t h e R o b e r t M a r i e s a i d . “ M y f at h e r u s e d to t a ke m e f is h i n g when I was four and five years old.”

King is the only female captain that she is aware of fishing on the Connecticut side of Long Island Sound. The difficulty for women is establishing that they belong there among old salts and even new fisherman. “You have to prove yourself, probably more than a man would have to,” she said. “I mean, everybody has to prove themselves, but because you’re a woman, you’re smaller, they think that you can’t handle things as well.” There aren’t many women boat captains, King surmises, because one first has to work as a deckhand before running a boat. And that can be hard and heavy work. “Especially when I was younger, I happened to be stronger than most women,” King said. With a check in the box for physical ability, she said her success is based on one other quality: “I don’t give up easily and I don’t easily back down.” Working the Sound takes a certain type of character for not only women, but men, too. “In the summer it’s fun, but the winter is terrible. It’s rough, it’s cold. Some guys don’t even make it through the winter.” One worker last year was a “one and done.” He spent one day on deck and didn’t return the following morning. That happened in the fall, not even the more grueling winter. Growing up, King’s father had a lobster boat as a hobby. She learned how to do different jobs around the boat without the pressure of catching lobsters being their income. King also credits her mother with teaching her how to prepare shellfish as “delicious clam and oyster dishes.” Despite the time on her father’s lobster boat, King did not plan a career as a sea captain. “I went to school to be a veterinary assistant, and that’s what I was doing before I had my family. I love animals, and that really was my passion.” But with the arrival of four daughters, King decided to stay home to raise her kids. At first, she was able to take some part-time work on the weekends, filling in as a deckhand on her brother’s lobster boat in 1992. When her kids were old

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Patty King steers her clam boat Robert Marie into the open waters of Long Island Sound past Branford Point, May 20, 2015.

enough to go to school, King could work on weekdays -- as long as she made it home before the school bus. “My brother let me off on rocks, and I’d walk back to my car with all my gear on, so I could be home with my kids.” King worked on several more boats over the years, building up experience running a few of them along the way. She came to work on her current vessel, the Robert Marie out of Branford, in 2000. Within about four months she became the boat’s captain for Dolan Brothers Shellfish Company. On average, six days of the week are spent working the waters of the Sound in rain, shine, or snow. Except during this past frigid winter, when the ice was bad enough to leave her land bound for a whole week. To spend that much time on a boat, one really has to have a passion for it. “I like to be able to get along with the crew. At least, to understand how hard that job is. I think the best captains are usually former deckhands, because you have to push them. It can be a dangerous job. The dredge is heavy [up to about 700 pounds when loaded]. On a rough day it swings like a pendulum.” Even though King didn’t plan on a sea captain’s life, initially pursuing animal healthcare, she admits that looking back on it all, it was almost destiny. The child that spent hours in a rowboat in a lagoon behind her house learning how to row now pilots a 39 and ½-foot boat into Long Island Sound daily. King said: “It must have been in my blood.”

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Javier Ambrosio stands below the wheelhouse on the Mary Colman as it nears the Quinnipiac River dock. An oyster boat set up like the Mary Colman only requires one deckhand, though they perform a constant cycle of unloading the two dredges one after the other.

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The massive shell pile at the Quinnipiac River dock is checked by company owner Norman Bloom, left, and JP Vellotti, sales and business development. “What people don’t understand is that it smells but it’s necessary,” said Jay Fairty, one of the captains from the dock. “Without them [the shell], there would be no oysters,” and without oysters, Jay added, Long Island Sound would be a lot dirtier. Bivalves like clams and oysters can pump up to 100 gallons of seawater through themselves a day, acting as a sort of natural water filter.

the next dredge-load is ready to be dumped on the table. James Namnoum has been working on the clam boat for 7 years, his hands a blur of motion as he tossed clams into a nearby basket without taking his eyes off the pile of shells. Sorting through the pile next to him was Casey Marklinsky, grandson of the late Art Dolan, who hired King to work for his company more than 15 years prior.

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The clams and oysters harvested that week wound up sitting in a cooler under a tent with a white board marked “fresh seafood” at the Saturday farmers’ market near Wooster Square. The City Seed Farmers’ Market has been operating since 2004, and the cooperative deals only in Connecticutgrown products. King sells the Dolan Brothers/Bloom shellfish, along with her brother’s lobsters and the occasional surprise

seafood guest, like that day’s scallops and sea bass. “When we started at the farmers’ market, about 10 years ago,” King said, “there was only five or six vendors.” She took a look around. Now, tents lined both sides of the concrete sidewalk across the street from Wooster Square. The hint of brine from the seafood mixed with the scents of fresh pastries and produce.

arrived at King’s tent to buy seafood, large cooler in hand. She is a regular customer of Dolan Brothers and Bloom branded shellfish. “Every week we do dollar oysters at the bar,” Curran said. “They sell out quick.” Those oysters are picked from the Sound not more than a few miles from the restaurant.

Donna Curran, owner of New Haven’s Zinc and Kitchen Zinc restaurants, NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM


WHO HARVESTS SHELLFISH? The commercial shellfish company that provided the access for the story, Norm Bloom and Son, isn’t the sole operation in the state. However, it is one of the 10 larger companies that, combined, own or lease about 90% of Connecticut’s shellfish beds. Norm Bloom and Son and Hillard Bloom Shellfish Inc. own 47.4% of state-owned shellfish beds, with the acreage fairly evenly split between them. Both companies share a past history as Tallmadge Brothers Inc., an oyster business established in 1875. The remaining 10% of owned and leased shellfish beds are run by a few dozen smaller outfits, some operating a single boat. Shellfish beds owned outright by businesses are a leftover of the past. Most were passed down over the generations as there haven’t been any privately owned beds available to purchase for a long time. Instead, the state or shoreline towns lease their beds to the shellfish industry for three to ten years. For the majority of coastal-dwelling Connecticut, any exposure to shellfishing would be through recreational means.The municipalities of Branford, Darien, East Lyme, Fairfield, Greenwich, Groton, Guilford, Madison, Milford, Norwalk, Stamford, Stonington Waterford, and Westport allow recreational shellfishing in designated areas.There are many caveats, once a permit or license is obtained, such as only fishing during daylight hours, the type of equipment one can use, and minimum catchable size. It is important to note that recreational harvesters are not allowed to sell or trade anything they catch, since it would be turning recreation into business. Species available for recreational catching are: eastern oysters, hard clams (also called quahogs), soft-shelled clams, razor clams, blue mussels, scallops and conches/whelks/ winkles.

CONNECTICUT OYSTER FESTIVALS If you’d like to sample some of the shellfish from local waters, including some product from professionals featured in this very article, then head over to one of the three oyster festivals taking place this summer. Milford Oyster Festival. Saturday, August 15, 2015. 10am to 6pm. Milford Harbor area. www. milfordoysterfestival.org The annual festival, now in its 41st year, goes beyond just shucking oysters. Milford will play host to live bands (Gin Blossoms, Fastball, and The Rembrandts), 200 vendors, a car show, amusement rides, and of course, oysters from the East Coast Shellfish Growers Association. There’s even a pre-festival “Oyster Eve” the night before from 6 to 10pm with food, drinks, and live music. Shuttle buses will transport to and from the festival at the following locations: - Jonathan Law High School, 20 Landsdale Ave. ,  Milford, CT 06460 - Westfield Connecticut Post Mall - Rear Lot,   1201 Boston Post Road,   Milford, CT 06460 Norwalk Oyster Festival. Friday, September 11 through Sunday, September 13, 2015. 11th: 6pm to 11pm, 12th: 11am to 11pm, 13th: 11am to 8pm. Veteran’s Park, East Norwalk. www. seaport.org Norwalk hosts a three day weekend celebrating a connection to the seafaring way of life and the town history in the oyster business. The headline entertainers for the 38th annual oyster festival are John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band on Friday, The music of STYX with Dennis DeYoung on Saturday, and Smashmouth taking to the main stage on Sunday. Attractions include an arts and crafts show, “Kids’ Cove” with performances, storytelling and games for younger festivalgoers, and an international food court. Mystic Oyster Fest. Sunday, August 16, 2015. 11am to 2pm. Mystic Arts Center, Mystic. www. nessf.org/donate/Mystic-Oyster-Fest The $65 entry (tickets sold in advance) is pricier than Norwalk and Milford, which are free to enter, but the purpose of the fest is different: it is a charity fundraiser. The New England Science and Sailing Foundation organizes the event, and offers both students and adults a chance to learn and build other skills in oceanfocused programs. Participants can partake in food and drinks at a setting on the Mystic River.

Patty King, left, hands over a bag of oysters to customer Donna Curran, owner of Zinc and Kitchen Zinc restaurants, at the City Seed Farmers’ Market at Wooster Square, May 23, 2015.

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GROW YOUR OWN PICK YOUR OWN BY AMY KULIKOWSKI

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SELECTED COMMUNITY GARDENS

Chapelseed Garden In the West River Neighborhood, the community garden lot was once an apartment building. The garden took over 17 years ago and is going stronga. Starting with a mere 10 members, the garden has grown to 30-40 every season. It is located at 1592 Chapel St., New Haven. Coordinator: Eileen O’Donnella

ommunity gardens not only make a place beautiful, they can bring people together in the neighborhood to create a better living environment (not to mention the great food that can be grown). If you’re interested in being a part of a community garden, some of them are currently accepting gardeners. Take a look:

The New Haven Land Trust manages nearly 50 community gardens. The garden coordinators and members are responsible for labor and organization of workdays. Top soil, compost, water, seedlings and seeds are provided by the Trust. For garden members, there is an asked fee to share and offset costs and supplies. Instruction, assistance and materials are also provided. Below are just a few gardens operated by the Trust in New Haven. To check out their list of gardens, head to newhavenlandtrust.org.

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Davenport Children’s Garden In the Hill neighborhood, this garden is all about the children. It revolves around children’s programs, is used by the community as a park and is a safe drug-free area. The garden was designed and built by children who keep it vibrant and alive. It is located at 145 Davenport Ave., New Haven. Coordinator: Chris Prokop

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Field of Greens In the Hill neighborhood, this transformed garden was once a vacant lot filled with trash. The generous gardeners will go door to door to give out extra produce when possible, and the community learns the purpose of the garden. It is currently accepting gardeners. It is located at 8 Arthur St., New Haven. Coordinator: Jamilah Rasheed.

Grand Acres In the Fair Haven neighborhood, this community garden is located in the urban area of Grand Acres, New Haven. It is currently accepting gardeners. Coordinator: Nathalie Bonafe

Truman Street Greenspace and Garden In the Hill neighborhood, this community garden started in 2012 due to beautification efforts in the neighborhood. It is currently accepting gardeners. It is located at 60 Truman St., New Haven. Coordinator: Leslie Radcliffe On the New Haven Land Trust website, users may request a place to garden and to start a garden. To request a place to garden, go to newhavenlandtrust. org/garden/plot-request To start a garden, go to newhavenlandtrust.org/ webform/community-garden-application Phone: 203-562-6655 Email: info@newhavenlandtrust.org Address: 458 Grand Ave., Suite 111, New Haven

FARMERS MARKETS In addition to gardening, farmers markets provide the healthy food that is locally grown. Below is a list of current farmers markets operating in the Greater New Haven area:

Ansonia Ansonia Farmers Market, by the train station, West Main St., Ansonia. Thursdays 2p.m.-6p.m. and Saturdays 10a.m.-2p.m. July 16-Oct. 29. Produce from: Grassy Hill Farm and Marcucio Gardens.

Bethany Bethany Farmers Market, Bethany Old Airport Rte 63, 711 Amity Rd., Bethany. Saturdays 9a.m.-1p.m. July 18-Oct. 24. Produce from: Bodhichitta Farms, Chaplin Farms and Eagle Wood Farms.

Branford Alps Farmers Market, 17 Alps Rd., base of Branford Hill, Branford. Thursdays 4p.m.-7p.m. June 11-Oct.29.

Durham Durham Farmers Market, town green, Main St. at Pickett Ln., Durham. Thursdays 3p.m.- 6:30p.m. April 30-Sept. 3. Produce from: Cecarelli Farm, Dondero

Orchards, Naples Farm, Deerfield Farm, Hometown Bakery and Starlight Gardens.

Bridgeport Bridgeport/Downtown Farmers Market, McLevy Green, Main St. & State St., Bridgeport. Thursdays 11a.m.4p.m. July 9-Oct. 29. Produce from: Killam & Bassette Farmstead. Bridgeport/UCC Farmers Market, United Congregational Church, 877 Park Ave., Bridgeport. Thursdays 2p.m.-6p.m. July 23-Oct. 22. Produce from: Mitchell Farm and Plasko’s Farm.

East Haven East Haven Farmers Market, East Haven Town Hall, 250 Main St., East Haven. Sundays 9a.m.-12p.m. July 5-Oct. 4.

Hamden Hamden/Spring Glen Farmers Market, Spring Glen Church, 1825 Whitney Ave., Hamden. Tuesdays from 3p.m.-6p.m. June 16-Oct. 20. Produce from: Hindinger Farm, Killam & Bassette Farmstead, Rose’s Berry Farm and Three Sisters Farm. Hamden/Downtown Farmers Market, Town Center Park next to Miller Library, 2663 Dixwell Ave., Hamden. Fridays 11a.m.-3p.m. June 26-Oct. 2. Produce from: DeMatteo Farms, Three Sisters Farm and Two Guys From Woodbridge.

Madison Madison Farmers Market, Madison Historic Town Green, 26 Meeting House Rd., Madison. Fridays 3p.m.-6p.m. May 1-Oct. 2. Produce from: Barberry Hill Farm, Four Mile River Farm, Wave Hill Breads, Beaver Brook Farm, Dondero Orchards, Simply Connecticut, Windham Gardens and Sunflower Farm of Orange.

Meriden Meriden Farmers Market, The Hub, Across from the Amtrak Station, Intersection of State St. and East Main St., Meriden. Saturdays 9a.m.-1p.m. July 25-Nov. 7. Produce from: Beckett Farm, Gotta’s Farm and Working Bees Family Garden.

Milford Milford/Woodmont Farmers Market, Robert Treat Farm, 1339 New Haven Ave., Milford. Wednesdays, 3:30p.m.6:30 p.m. June 17-Aug. 26. Produce from: Beltane Farm, Robert Treat Farm, Three Sisters Farms, Chaplin Farms, Roby’s Organic, Hidden Brook Gardens and Rose’s Berry Farm. Milford/Downtown Farmers Market, Downtown, 56 River St., Milford. Saturdays 9a.m.-1p.m. July 4-Oct. 31. Produce from: Beckett Farm, Griffin Farmstead, The White Horse Country Pub, Beltane Pub, Rose’s Berry Farm, Grande Marquis Farm and Sunflower Farm of Orange. Village of Devon Farmers Market, across from Pete’s Deli, 120 Bridgeport Ave., Milford. Sundays 9a.m.-2p.m. July 5-Oct. 25. Produce from: Country Farm ll, Pepe’s Cream of The Crop and Waterview Farm.

Monroe Monroe Farmers Market, Monroe Town Green, Fan Hill Rd. at Rte. 111, Monroe. Fridays 3p.m.-6p.m. June 19Oct. 23. Produce from: Beldotti’s Bakery, Mitchell Farm, Gazy Brothers Farm, Pepe’s Cream of The Crop, Guy’s Eco-Garden, Sugar Maple Farms, Killam & Bassette Farmstead, These Things Take Thyme, Truelove Farms, Waterview Farm and Webb Ridge Farm.

Naugatuck Naugatuck Farmers Market, on the green, Church St. At Maple St., Naugatuck. Sundays 9a.m.-1p.m. and Wednesdays 10a.m.-2p.m. June 28-Oct. 18. Produce from: Gazy Brothers Farm, George Hall Farm and Ogre Farm/ George Hall Farm.

New Haven New Haven/Edgewood Park Farmers Market, Edgewood Park, West Rock and Whalley Ave., New Haven. Sundays 10a.m.-2p.m. May 3-Dec. 13. They also offer a winter farmers market from Jan.-April, the second and fourth Sundays from 10a.m.-2p.m. Produce From: Barberry Hill Farm, Riverbank Farm, Starlight Gardens, Stone Gardens Farm, Bodhichitta Farms, Rose’s Berry Farm, Colton’s Corner Farm, Smyth’s Trinity Dairy Farm, Four Mile River Farm and SoNo Baking Co.

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New Haven/ Upper State Farmers Market, The parking lot of Mechanic St. & State St., New Haven. Saturdays 10a.m.-1p.m. June 20-Oct. 24. Produce from: Chestnut Fine Foods, Eagle Wood Farms, Gresczyk Farm and Killiam & Bassette Farmstead. New Haven/Downtown Farmers Market, City Hall, 165 Church St., New Haven. Wednesdays 11a.m.-3p.m. June 17-Nov. 18. Produce from: Barberry Hill Farm, Borelli Farm, Colton’s Corner Farm, Northfordy Farm, Rose’s Berry Farm, SoNo Baking Co, Stone Gardens Farm, Two Guys From Woodbridge and Waldingfield Farm. New Haven/The Hill Farmers Market, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Park St. at South St., New Haven. 11:30a.m.-3:30p.m. July 10-Oct. 23. Produce from: Cecarelli Farm, George Hall Farm, Hindinger Farm and Whole German Breads.

Brooksvale Park Set aside from the busy streets in Hamden is a quiet, farm-inspired park. It is part of the Arts, Recreation and Culture (ARC) department and Hamden Parks and Recreation, but much of the park is donated from a non-profit organization called Friends of Brooksvale. It is located on 524 Brooksvale Avenue off of Whitney Avenue and is open from 8a.m. to sunset. Vincent Lavorgna is the resident park ranger and Mimsi Coleman is the director of ARC. In addition to the park-like atmosphere of a big field with two baseball/ softball fields and a basketball hoop, there is a picnic pavilion within the woods surrounding the area. While I’m working outside with the animals, many stop to ask what the park is, where the animals came from, and how the park is operated. There are mini horses, sheep, pygmy goats, chickens and rabbits in the animal barn that were born at the park or brought there as rescues. During the late winter months, the Sugar Shack is open and ready to be used to make maple syrup. The sugar maple trees on the property are tapped and waited to be collected, and once finished, are given out to the public upon request. Besides enjoying the sweet smell coming from the shack, the many miles of trails showcase the beauty of winter in New England. The animal barn is still open to the public, where visitors can see the two mini horses, Tina and Lightning, in their full, furry winter coats. Spring and summer are a good time to visit the manmade pond in the 22 June/July 2015

New Haven/Wooster Square Farmers Market, Russo Park, DePalma Ct., and Chapel St., New Haven. 9a.m.1p.m. May 23-Jan. 2. Produce from: Barberry Farm, Beaver Brook Farm, Beltane Farm, Blue Slope Farm, Colton’s Corner Farm, Eagle Wood Farms, Four Mile River Farm, George Hall Farm, Northfordy Farm, Rose’s Berry Farm, Smyth’s Trinity Dairy Farm, SoNo Baking Co, Starlight Gardens, Stone Gardens Farm, Sugar Maple Farms, Sun One Organic Farm, Truelove Farms, Two Guys From Woodbridge and Waldingfield Farm. New Haven/Fair Haven Farmers Market, Quinnipiac River Park, Front St., and Grand Ave., New Haven. Thursdays 3p.m.-7p.m. July 9-Oct. 22. Produce from: Chaplin Farms, Hindinger Farm, Northfordy Farm and Stone Gardens Farm.

park, which is filled with aquatic life. The garden next to the animal barn is usually occupied by a member of Friends of Brooksvale or a town gardener, like the one featured here, planting all different kinds of fruits and vegetables that get donated to the Hamden Food Bank. The very old and historic barn in the center of the park was owned by Enos Brooks in 1856. He leased his farm to the town of Hamden to be used as a “poor farm.” Four years later, Brooks passed away and left the farm to his wife, who died in 1880. The barn was renovated in 1901 and the property later became known as Brooksvale Park in 1947, but it wasn’t until 1958 that it was officially part of the town’s Parks and Recreation Department. Up the hill is the Veterans’ Memorial Building, which was built with WWII memorial funds in 1956. Guests are able to rent this center for events, and it includes a full room with views of the animal barn below and a separate kitchen facility. The restoration of the Farmington Canal that runs approximately 84 miles from New Haven to Massachusetts began in 1978, and became open to

Spencer

Newtown The Farmers Market at Fairfield Hills, Fairfield Hills Campus, Wasserman Way, Newtown. Tuesdays 2p.m.6p.m. June 16- Oct. 20. Produce from: Middlebrook Farm & Orchard, Stoneledge Hollow Farm, Shortt’s Farm & Garden Center and Waldingfield Farm.

Seymour Seymour Farmers Market, Community/Senior Center Front Parking Lot, 20 Pine St., Seymour. Tuesdays 12p.m.-6p.m. May 19-Oct. 27. Produce from: Gazy Brothers Farm and Goatboy Soaps.

the public in 1995. To this day, people ride bikes, roller blade, walk or run on the canal that runs through the park. Once autumn rolls around, Brooksvale hosts their annual Fall Festival, going on its 16th year, which includes horse drawn hay rides, tractor drawn wagon rides, pony rides, The Reptile House, children’s activities, environmental

education booths, music, food and more. The Fall Festival will be on Saturday, September 26 from 11a.m.4p.m. 203-287-2669 524 Brooksvale Avenue, Hamden brooksvale park.com

Kay and Ella

Mini Horse Lightning

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Shelton

Stratford

Waterbury

Shelton Farmers Market, Farmers Market Pavilion, Cornell St. and Canal St. E, Shelton. Wednesdays 3p.m.6p.m. and Saturdays 9a.m.-1p.m. year round. Produce from: Guy’s Eco-Garden, Harmony Harvest, Killam & Bassette Farmstead, Pepe’s Cream Of The Crop and Plasko’s Farm.

Stratford Farmers Market, Paradise Green, 50 Paradise Green Pl., Stratford. Mondays 2p.m.- 6p.m. June 22Oct. 26. Produce from: Gazy Brothers Farm, Pepe’s Cream of The Crop, Moorefield Herb Farm and Plasko’s Farm.

Waterbury/South End Farmers Market, Washington Park House, Washington St. At Sylvan Ave., Waterbury. Tuesdays 2p.m.-5p.m. July 7-Oct. 27.

Southbury Southbury Farmers Market, Southbury Town Hall, 501 Main St. S., Southbury. Thursdays 3p.m.-6p.m. June 18-Oct. 8. Produce from: Middlebrook Farm & Orchard, Stoneledge Hollow Farm, Mitchell Farm, Sun Rise Sun Set Farm, Aradia Farm and Daffodil Hill Growers.

Southington Southington/Plantsville Farmers Market, the town green, 1003 South Main St., Southington. Fridays 3p.m.-6p.m. July 3-Oct. 23. Produce from: Maple View Farm.

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Trumbull Trumbull Farmers Market, Long Hill Green, 6500 Main St., Trumbull. Thursdays 2p.m.-6p.m. June 11-Oct. 15. Produce from: Moorefield Herb Farm and Plasko’s Farm.

Waterbury/Mall Farmers Market, Brass City Mall West Parking Lot, Mill St. and Union St., Waterbury. Thursdays 2p.m.-5p.m. July 9-Oct. 22. Town Green Farmers Market, Downtown Green, 156 West Main St., Waterbury. Thursdays 10a.m.-2p.m. July 2-Oct. 29. Produce from: Dondero Orchards.

Wallingford Wallingford Farmers Market, Railroad Station Green, Routes 5 at Rt 150, Wallingford. Saturdays 9a.m.-12p.m. Aug. 1-Oct. 3. Produce from: Farmer Joe’s Gardens, Little Acres Farm and Nature’s Mirror Farm.

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Watertown Watertown Farmers Market, Watertown Library Parking Lot, 470 Main St., Watertown. Saturdays 9a.m.-1p.m. July 25-Oct. 17. Produce from: Farm All Farm.

West Haven West Haven Farmers Market, West Haven Green, Campbell St. At Main St., West Haven. Thursdays & Saturdays 10a.m.-a2p.m. July 2-Oct. 29. For a list of farmers markets in other areas, visit farmfresh.org. and cityseed.org.

PICK YOUR OWN Similar to Farmers Markets, picking your own fruits and vegetables gives a hands-on experience and can be fun for the family. Below is a list of some farms nearby where you can pick your own: Bishop’s Orchards Market & Winery, 1355 Boston Post Rd., Guilford. 203-453-2338. Fruit: Apples, blueberries, peaches, pears, raspberries and strawberries. Vegetables: Asparagus and pumpkins. Herbs: Basil. Pell Farms/North Haven, 700 Middletown Ave., North Haven. 203-234-0204. Fruit: Strawberries.

Hamden’s Green Lady

I

f I ever need gardening advice, I don’t have to look far—my mom has the green thumb. Lyn Baumgartner’s ability to keep gardens lively and peaceful led her to the role of town gardener for Hamden. Her journey to her dream job began when she volunteered at a garden in the middle of Putnam Ave., Dixwell Ave. and Circular Ave. in Hamden. That garden is now called the Karma Garden, and my mother still attends to it. The efforts she put into the Karma Garden caught the attention of the town, which hired her to design others in the area. “I think gardens are important because it makes people feel good about the place that they live, about themselves, and the beauty that surrounds them,” said Baumgartner. Baumgartner works on nearly 20

24 June/July 2015

Treat Farm, 361 Old Tavern Rd., Orange. 203-799-2453. Vegetables: Chili peppers, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, gourds, green beans, peppers, pumpkins, summer squash, tomatillos, tomatoes, tomatoes (cherry), winter squash and zucchini. Herbs: Basil, cilantro, dill, mint and parsley. Blue Hills Orchard, 141 Blue Hills Rd., Wallingford. 203-269-3189. Fruit: Apples, blackberries, nectarines, peaches, pears and plumbs. Farmer Joe’s Gardens, 109 Leigus Rd., Wallingford. 203-265-0696. Fruit: Apples, blueberries, cantaloupe, grapes (eating), melons, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, raspberries, strawberries and watermelons. Vegetables: Arugula, beets, bok choi, broccoli, broccoli rabe, brussel sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, chili peppers, collards, corn, cucumbers, edible flowers, eggplant, fennel, garlic, gourds, green beans, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard greens, okra, onions, peas (snap), peppers, potatoes, pumpkins, radishes, rhubarb, salad greens, scallions, spinach, summer squash, sweet potatoes, swiss chard, tomatillos, tomatoes, tomatoes (cherry), winter squash and zucchini. Herbs: Basil, chives, cilantro, dill, lavender, lemon verbena, marjoram, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, tarragon and thyme.

Hickory Hill Orchard, 351 South Meriden Rd., Cheshire. 203- 272-3824. Fruit: Apples, nectarines, peaches and pears. Vegetables: Gourds and pumpkins. High Hill Orchard, 170 Fleming Rd., Meriden. 203-294-0276. Fruit: Apples, blueberries, cantaloupe, peaches and pears. Vegetables: Corn, eggplant, garlic, green beans, onions, peppers, pumpkins, summer squash, swiss chard, tomatoes and winter squash. Beardsley’s Cider Mill, 278 Leavenworth Rd., Shelton. 203-926-1098. Fruit: Apples. Jones Family Farm, 606 Walnut Tree Hill Rd., Shelton. 203-929-8425. Fruit: Blueberries, grapes (wine) and strawberries. Vegetables: Gourds, pumpkins and winter squash. Lyman Orchards, Rt. 147 & Rt. 157, Middlefield. 860349-1793. Fruit: Apples, blueberries, jostaberries, nectarines, peaches, pears, raspberries and strawberries. Vegetables: Pumpkins. For a full list of pick your own in other locations, visit farmfresh.org and buyctgrown.com

Drazen Orchards, 215 Wallingford Rd., Cheshire. 203272-7985. Fruits: Apples, nectarines, peaches, pears and plums.

gardens in Hamden, including the Rosa Jones Garden, Karma Garden, Ernest Borgnine Park, Bassett Field, Brooksvale Park, all gardens along the Farmington Canal, and gardens at the Hamden Town Center Park. The Town Center Park also has a community garden by the farmers market, where Baumgartner owns two plots. The community garden is all organic, and Baumgartner says that it’s all about beneficial insects. “Some flowers, like perennials, attract beneficial insects which go into organic vegetable gardens and eat the bad bugs.” Essentially, it’s her alternative to using pesticides. Her knowledge, determination and passion about gardening has earned her the Orchid Award in the past, which are given in honor of those that have committed to help the town’s physical appearance and character. It has been three years since Baumgartner was originally hired to beautify the town of

In the middle of State St. and Ridge Rd. in Hamden, the Rosa Jones garden was rebuilt by Baumgartner (below) and the town after years of being unattended.

Hamden, and she now has her own municipal truck with gravity fed water barrels for the gardens she works. A lot of love can go a long way, and benefit others in the process.

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No Airplane Tickets Required SUMMER GUIDE BY RACHEL BERGMAN & AMY KULIKOWSKI

C

onnecticut’s tourism industry brings approximately $1 billion in annual revenue to the state, but in particular, a New England summer is quite an experience. While it’s only a few months of the year, there is so much fun, sun, opportunity and activity packed into that time that we couldn’t stop ourselves from highlighting a few of the best around the state to help you plan your vacations, staycations, or just some adventurous Saturday afternoons.

26 June/July 2015

SELECTED CONNECTICUT’S ATTRACTIONS The Connecticut Dino Trail While Connecticut’s paleontologists have yet to extract the DNA of a Tyrannosaurus Rex to

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rebirth the creature as an amusement attraction, the State Dino Trail is still pretty neat. The “trail” is comprised of 5 sites for dino exploration: The Peabody Museum (New Haven), Dinosaur State Park (Rocky Hill), Connecticut Science Center (Hartford), The Dinosaur Place at Nature’s Art Village (Oakdale), and the Dino Expedition at Lake Compounce Amusement Park (New Britain). www.ctdinotrail.com

Escape New Haven Bring your friends, or enter one of the three puzzle rooms with a group of strangers to solve your way out. What does this switch do? What’s over here? What happens if I push this and unwrap that? Why won’t everyone just do what I tell them? Maybe you don’t get along as well with others as you thought. Go test yourself. They have air conditioning. 111 Whitney Avenue, New Haven $22-26 escape-industries.ninja

place Tom Thumb carved his initials, a retreat for the affluent in the Victorian era, and even still somewhat of a retreat outside of hurricane season. Tour companies mostly take walk-ons at the pier located at the end of Indian Point Road. Take boat tours up the Connecticut River from Old Saybrook or various points along the river. Lady Katharine Cruises offers many options along the river, and also offers meals on board. Or, a 100+ year old schooner called the Mary E. leaves from Old Saybrook daily at Steamboat Dock, as part of the Connecticut River Museum, and then there is always The Riverquest, a catamaran traveling up the Connecticut River, if you prefer that modern feel.

GET MOVING WITH SUMMER SPORTS, ACTIVITIES, AND EQUIPMENT RENTALS Nutmeg State Games The Nutmeg State Games, held in New Britain, is the largest amateur multi-sporting event in Connecticut, celebrating 25 years this summer. Games include hockey, baseball, shooting, archery, gymnastics and participants range in age. Sporting events continue throughout the summer and into the fall, check the schedule at https://nutmegstategames. org/schedule/.

Beach Volleyball Clambakes at Sheffield Island Lighthouse Every summer, the Seaport Ferry in South Norwalk carries hundreds to the historic 1868 Sheffield Island Lighthouse for the Norwalk Seaport Association’s Thursday Clambakes. The evening allows participants to dine in the festive tented pavilion on the lighthouse lawn, with tours of the lighthouse itself included in the cost. Advance registration only. Thursday night cruises depart at 6 p.m. from the Sheffield Island Dock at the corner of Washington and Water Streets.

Adult co-ed beach volleyball teams are a great way to burn some competitive energy, meet other people, make-up for winter’s Vitamin D deficiency and get some exercise. Many towns offer co-ed beach sports. The West Haven Volleyball League offers registration through the Parks & Rec department. The league is co-ed. The Stratford Beach Volleyball league is also co-ed.

West Haven Volleyball League – adult co-ed https://www.whparkrec.com/info/activities/ program_details.aspx?ProgramID=22878 Stratford beach volleyball league www.quickscores.com/Orgs/index. php?OrgDir=stratford

Water Sports Rent a kayak, or if you have your own, get it in the water and work on that upper body strength. Public docks can be found at Stony Creek beach in Branford, Silver Sands Park in Milford and many other places. If you don’t own one of these awesome pieces of equipment, rentals are available here: Stratford – speed boat and jet skis www.boardwalkmarinact.com/boat_rental.htm Westbrook – jet ski rental www.westbrookpowersports.com/index-2.html Candle Wood Lake (New Milford) – boats and jet ski and water ski rentals, pontoons, kayak www.gerardswatersedge.com/ gerardswatersedgerentals.cfm Milford – canoe and kayak rental at Scoot & Paddle scootandpaddle.com Rentals of canoe and kayaks at State parks www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view. asp?a=2716&q=325288&deepNav_GID=1650

Brownstone Park Brownstone Park in Portland offers thrill-seekers an outlet for their adrenaline needs. Brownstone offers rock climbing, zip lining, cliff jumping, wake boarding and even some tamer activities like snorkeling and kayaking. The park is affiliated with the Powder Ridge Ski area, as well. Depending on the level of adventure you seek, prices range from $22 to $42. 161 Brownstone Avenue, Portland. www. brownstonepark.com

203-838-9444, Sheffield Island, Norwalk, CT Price Range: $65-79 for ferry, meal, drink, tax, tip

Cruises and Boats Thimble Island boat tours - this two-hour boat tour won’t require a suitcase, no matter what lessons you’ve learned from Gilligan. Explore the history of this archipelago of almost 300 islands (depending on the tide) off the coast of Stony Creek in Branford that served as not only a pirate cove, but also the new haven

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STATE HISTORY HOTSPOTS Nathan Hale Homestead, Coventry Homestead of one of one of Connecticut’s most well-known revolutionary heroes, the Nathan Hale Homestead hosts the Coventry Farmer’s Market on Sundays from 10-2, and a museum in the family’s former home, which was built in 1776. Much of the acreage is now the Nathan Hale State Forest. The farmer’s market is worth the drive: you can bring your dog and shopw for excellent local seafood, fish, crops, baked goods, juices, teas and moonshine— and musicians performing while you browse, dance and eat. A must try? Faddy’s Donuts. www. ctlandmarks.org/content/nathan-hale-homestead or coventryfarmersmarket.com

Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven

Yale, maybe? The facility offers tours on Saturday mornings. www.grovestreetcemetery.org Charles W. Morgan, Mystic Seaport America’s only surviving wooden whaling ship, the Charles W. Morgan was built in 1841 and is parked in Mystic Seaport. Maritime history, an important part of Connecticut’s economic story, is captured well at Mystic Seaport. www.mysticseaport.org

Summer Colonial Camp, Suffield & Coventry Summer Colonial Camps offered Monday, July 20th through Friday, July 24th, at either the PhelpsHatheway House & Garden in Suffield or the Nathan Hale Homestead in Coventry for children ages 8 to 12. Campers will don period costumes and participate in the activities that took place at the homes. The camps are sponsored by the Connecticut Landmarks organization. www.ctlandmarks.org

What summer would be complete without a séance in a spooky old graveyard? As the final resting place of notables like Noah Webster and Roger Sherman, the Grove Street Cemetery is also home to the remains of Bart Giamatti, former commissioner of baseball, America’s favorite summer pastime. He was also President of one of the local universities—

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CT Wine Fest, Goshen, Goshen Fairgrounds, 7/25 & 7/26 Grab your Connecticut Winery Passport and head to the festival to sample the state’s impressive wine offerings. Local food, handicrafts and musicians will also be a part of this year’s wine festival. The Connecticut Wine Trail is comprised of 25 wineries in all. www.ctwine.com/wine-festival/

Fish Tales, Tugs & Sales, New London, 7/25 The U.S. Coast Guard, headquartered in New London, will celebrate its 225th birthday this year. On July 25, at the downtown New London Waterfront, the USCG will celebrate in the community with sea critter touch tanks, activities, music, entertainment, and Tug Boats. The next day, the USCG Guardians will perform their Big Band Concert at New London City Pier. www.coastguardsummer.com/events1/

Gathering of the Vibes, Bridgeport 7/30 thru 8/2

SUMMER FESTIVALS EXPERIENCE CONNECTICUT’S SPECIALTIES IN FOOD, ARTS, MUSIC AND HISTORY AND FUN...........

Sailfest, New London 7/10-7/12 A free three-day street festival featuring artists and crafters, two stages for performances, and one of the largest fireworks displays in the region to celebrate the waterfront, tall ships, and the summer, basically. In its 38th year, Sailfest expects about 300,000 visitors over three days of amusement and entertainment. Water Street in New London is closed to accommodate the festival. Additional weekend trains operate on the shoreline east route, or park in one of the pay-to-park garages downtown. Sailfest.org

Guilford Craft Expo, Guilford, 7/17 thru 7/19 58 years strong, the Guilford Craft Expo will take place on the Guilford Green and will draw thousands of visitors for the juried show and exhibits from more than 150 artists. As one of the longest-running craft shows in New England, the Guilford Craft Expo incorporates special features like auctions, craft demos, local food trucks and musical entertainment. Tickets are $9. guilfordartcenter.org/expo

Midsummer Festival, Old Lyme, 7/24 & 7/25 Celebrating the quaint town’s artistic heritage, the Old Lyme Midsummer Festival features artists, concerts, sculpture gardens, kids activities and animals. Located at the mouth of the Connecticut River, Old Lyme sports picturesque sea views attracting artists with a penchant for the sea life on canvas. The festival will take place in the town’s historic district. www.oldlymemidsummerfestival. com/

The Vibes’ 20th anniversary will be marked by performances by Wilco, Ben Harper, Weezer, Gregg Allman, and dozens of others. The festival has morphed into one of the largest camping music festivals in the region and has played host to big name acts for years, springing from a Grateful Dead legacy. The four day event takes place at Seaside Park in Bridgeport. www.gatheringofthevibes.com

Shoreline Wine Festival, Guilford at Bishops Orchards, 8/15 & 8/16 Featuring Connecticut wines, local handicrafts, entertainment, food and food trucks, the Shoreline Wine Festival is a smaller wine festival to taste from the Connecticut Wine Trail. Bishops participates, although they offer a non-traditional wine menu: exclusively fruit wines other than grapes, since the orchard does not produce grapes at all. www. shorelinewinefestival.com/

Milford Oyster Festival, Milford Aug 14-15th This free festival features a top music headliner every year, like this year’s performances by The Rembrandts and the Gin Blossoms. Food, drinks, entertainment, amusement rides, craft shows and oyster eating contests not to be missed in Milford’s downtown. www.milfordoysterfestival.org new haven

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PULL UP OR POP UP A CHAIR

S

Local Towns Offer Outdoor Summer Concerts

Jazz Series on the Branford Green, Branford, www.branfordjazz.com Thursday night is jazz night on the Branford Green this summer.

ummer traditions run strong in Connecticut: homemade seasonal ice cream shops, clambakes, and outdoor summer concerts. Maybe camp chairs are more your style than a blanket on the grass, or maybe it doesn’t matter because you’ll spend the entire concert showing off your pop and lock moves down by the stage. Well, it’s time to hoard rosé and the fancy crackers for your evenings on the grass, enjoying some tunes, and watching your community come together to groove. The key to enjoying outdoor concerts is to find your spot early—your parking spot, that is. Many towns choose locations that offer access to ample free parking, like Hamden’s Art Commission’s Summer Concerts and Branford’s Jazz Series, and then there are other cities, like New Haven, that may offer ample parking but all of the best spots will fill up quick and you might have to feed the meter. “One good thing about music, is when it hits you, you feel no pain,” according to Bob Marley. There are some very important reasons to find your perfect outdoor music scene this summer. Listening to music has proven health benefits: it reduces stress, decreases pain, improves immune functioning, aids memory, and helps us exercise all according to the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley. Science. Pack up your snacks and bug spray and try out some of these local favorites:

Music on the Green, New Haven, www.infonewhaven.com Funk and R&B – Friday nights, don’t miss it. Tony Toni Toné. Need we say more? Music under the Stars, North Haven, kofc3733.org/1937/council-3733/musicunder-the-stars-2015/ Hamden Summer Concert Series, Hamden

Tuesdays on the town green in North Haven, enjoy some tunes at twilight.

/www.hamdenartscommission.org/ concerts.html Acts will include Taylor Dane and Kansas this year. The stage is set up at Town Center Park at Meadowbrook on Friday nights.

Summer Nights by Harbor Lights Summer Concert Series, Milford, www.milfordct.com Friday nights at Fowler Field, enjoy funk or rock or even 80s party style tunes.

Concerts on the Green, Madison, madisonct.org/i3/notices/concerts.html Acts will include The Taxmen and a Beatles tribute band called Number 9. The state is set up on the town green. Guilford Concerts on the Green, Guilford www.guilfordparkrec.com/pdfs/ SpringSummer2015.pdf Summer concerts on Sundays will include a Beach Boys tribute and a Rod Stewart tribute band.

West Haven Summer Concerts, West Haven www.cityofwesthaven.com/news-summerconcerts.htm Friday nights on the West Haven green. Woodbridge Summer Concert Series, Woodbridge www.woodbridgect.org/ content/6591/6673/6709.aspx Tuesday nights on the Woodbridge green at the gazebo. Funk, rock, country and dance music are part of the summer line-up.


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No Legislators Step Up In Support $3.95 |M A RC H/A PR I L | 2015

By Christine Stuart Connecticut was one of the first states to pass a Family and Medical Leave Act in the 1990s, and a coalition is hoping it maintains its edge by passing a bill to ensure that it’s paid leave.

THE FINE ART OF FINGER PAINTING

Currently, most large employers offer some type of paid leave for employees who need to take care of a sick loved one, are sick themselves, or just had a baby, but at least 40 percent of the workplace is not even covered by the federal legislation championed by former U.S. Sen. Chris Dodd. The bill would give employees, including those making minimum wage, an option to contribute as little as a $1 per week to a trust fund that would provide them with their full salary for up to 12 weeks of leave.

Better, Crisper, Smarter, Stronger

Catherine Bailey, public policy director for the Connecticut Women’s Education and Legal Fund, said even those who have access to unpaid leave are scared they will get fired if they take it or they simply can’t afford to take it. Continued on page 10

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A Hunt For Pawson Point

Ed & Lori Francis’ home sits on .75 acres of land on Spring Cove Road, overlooking the mouth of the Branford River. With wind resistant windows and highly durable plastic construction materials, the house provides great views—regardless of the weather.

By Rachel Bergman, Photos by Lesley Roy Photos Anthony DeCarlo


AT HOME O F NOT E S

T

en years ago, Ed & Lori Francis of Branford purchased a .75 acres of land in the Pawson Point neighborhood at the mouth of the Branford River, just across the water from Branford Point. After spending a year scouring the shoreline region, they discovered the “right” spot to call home. On one of his many neighborhood drive-bys combing shoreline neighborhoods for a place to call home, Ed Francis spotted a parcel from the opposite side of the Branford River and thought he caught a glimpse of a tiny sign staked into the ground—for sale? Francis spent an hour navigating his way over to the waterfront plot on Spring Cove Road, owned at the time by Ed & Carol Gesner of Gesner Machine Company (Hamden) and after examining the old cabin and three crumbling garages on the property, Francis knew he found what he wanted. He had the time to hunt, having recently retired from United Technologies Corp. (UTC). Since Lori was still a kindergarten teacher with the Orange School District, Ed was flying solo on this mission. The Branford Fire Department helped raze the existing structures in a controlled burn as part of a training exercise, which significantly reduced demolition costs. Francis says when they finished, they left a dummy propped up near the ash and he can remember the sheer panic he felt at the sight, thinking it was a casualty of the exercise. Still, he was impressed with the Fire Department and appreciates their help. With nothing but ash left, and plans for their Plastic, wind-resistant, corrosion-resistant sea home from architect Ted Dombroski of Guilford, construction of the Francis’ three-bedroom, four-bathroom 6,000 square foot home with a one-bedroom one-bathroom in-law suite above the 3-car garage was quickly underway. The only wood in the structure can be found at the front door, but the entire house is built of tough plastic materials, materials chosen to withstand more than 120 knots of wind—what Francis calls the third little piggy’s house. They worked with an interior decorator, Margo Estrada in Branford, and a lighting specialist, Peggy Benanto with Valley Lighting, to choose the more than 200 lights installed throughout the home.


When construction was complete and the Francis’ moved in, a visitor from the property’s past came bearing gifts and tales: he had summered on the grounds as a child. In the 1920s and 30s, New Haven families moved to the shoreline in droves to avoid the sorts of diseases that picked up speed and volatility in cities like New Haven in the warmer months. To protect their children from things like TB and Polio, families came to Spring Cove Road and set up tent camps centered around a main cabin where the families would take meals together. Breadwinners rode the trolley back into the city each day for work while children and remaining family members vacationed in the temporary shoreline community where the Francis home now stands. The visitor, a retired architect in his late 80s, passed on some old photos from his childhood summers. Families fished, swam, and held cook-outs on the shore for four months out of the year. Later, when the neighborhood became a year-round home for those who built houses, the Francis property was a “shared” project amongst the homeowners on the street to circumvent zoning laws. Limits on building garages or parking cars on properties led to the construction of garages on the property, alongside the former “main cabin” from camping days. Each of the neighboring homeowners used the plot to park their cars in one of the three garages. Ed Francis says one of the garages was so dilapidated by the time they took possession, that he was able to push it over with his bare hands.

The view from the second floor balcony, overlooking the main living area, and a wall of windows showcasing the beautiful water views.

Lori admits that she tried to be a good sport at first, and swam in the water at the edge of their backyard, but there was so much muck and mud and she lost too many flip flops, that two years ago, the family installed a salt water swimming pool in the backyard. They still enjoy the


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203 781-0000 Gena Lockery

Southington - Beautiful, completely updated Ranch with 2 full baths and 4 bedrooms, new dishwasher and shed, everything is new, new, new; hot water heater, roof, siding, electrical, walls, windows, hardwood floors and fire place. Opportunity for in law. 211,900. Neile x 212

East Haven- Ledgeview, 2 bedroom, 1.1 bath townhouse condo with central air and pool, new stainless steel appliances, breakfast bar, new roof and patio, ceiling fans, spacious unit with beautiful hummingbird and butterfly gardens, needs paint, carpet and some TLC. Priced to sell. 85,000. Gena x 203

New Haven- Wooster Court condominium, 1 bedroom unit with new hardwood, new bathroom, new hwh, newly painted, updated kitchen with dishwasher, walk in closet, great outdoor patio with garden, located on historic Wooster Street. Walk to Yale, train and downtown. 110,000. Gena x 203

New Haven- Wooster Villa’s is a 9 unit complex redone in 2006. Convenience of townhouse style living in the heart of Historic Wooster Street. 2 bedroom 1.1 bath condo with Stainless steel appliances, hardwood and carpet flooring, washer and dryer in unit, slider to stone patio, and off street parking. Walk to train, pizza, coffee, farmers market, Yale and downtown. 189,900. Gena x 203

Bethany- Custom built builders home just under 5000 sq ft, grand stone and brick Colonial offers 4 plus bedrooms and 5 baths, grand foyer entry with hardwood throughout, formal living and dining rooms, large custom kitchen with stainless appliances, granite, center island with cooktop, granite fire place and sliders to deck, two staircases, master bedroom suite with 19x15 closet, master bath with Jacuzzi, marble shower and bidet, 3 car garage set proudly on 2.2 acres at the end of the cul de sac. 637,000. Gena x 203

New Haven- Fountainwoods, beautifully renovated complex with new siding, roof, windows and decks. Tucked away in Westville, complex offers pool, tennis and clubhouse. Unit is spectacular! Large rooms, open floor plan, updated kitchen, living room with fireplace, new window treatments, loft with spiral staircase, large bedrooms, laundry, updated baths, attached garage and storage. Minutes to downtown, Yale and hospitals. 169,900. Gena x203

Hamden - Pristine Craftsman Cape in Spring Glen. Spacious home featuring four bedrooms, 2 full baths plus an office, a finished side room and a wonderful breezeway. Open floor plan, fire place, gleaming hardwood floors and surprising closet space. Eat in kitchen, gorgeous gardens, 2 car detached garage. 329,500. Katherine x 219

New Haven- Edwards Abbey, 3 story, 2 bedroom, 3 bath condo with fantastic views of East rock, located on the Orange line of the Yale shuttle, this newly remodeled unit boasts a high end kitchen with Corian counters, under cabinet lighting, gas stove, built in micro,new lighting fixtures, new hardwood floors, new bathroom vanities, new windows, new recessed lighting, full unfinished basement with laundry and off street parking. 394,900. Gena x 203

New Haven - Wooster Square, two family home directly on a Wooster Square, updated and remodeled and currently being used as a 1 family home. Brand new French Country kitchen with granite counters, stainless steel appliance, recess lighting, exposed beams, 3 full baths, laundry on second level with master bedroom suite, fantastic back yard with patio and grape arbor, hardwood floors, central air and more. 549,900. Gena x 203

East Haven- Morgan Point, step back in time in this old world, charming Cape Cod home with views of the Long Island sound, live in a beach community and experience the sound breezes and beautiful sunsets, kayak, walk to beach and swim. 3/4 bedroom home with 1st floor master, wood burning fire place, open sunlit sun room, detached garage and loads of potential. 262,900. Neile x 212

Hamden- Spring Glen Colonial with fantastic 20x20 addition, 4 bedrooms, 3 full plus 1 half bath, updated kitchen with pantry, living room with fire place, dining room, enclosed sun room, laundry on upper level, 20x20 master bedroom with full bath, central air, hardwood floors, newly painted, partially finished lower level, sliders to deck, fenced in yard, detached garage. 369,900. Gena x203

Hamden- Westwoods, 4 bedroom , 2.1 bath Colonial, completely renovated kitchen, new cabinets and hardwood floors, dining room, living room, new bay window, added 26x16 addition family room with gas stove and master bedroom suit with walk in closet, full bath and office, new gas furnace and central air, new roof and repointing, new vinyl siding, new garage door, new windows, additional insulation, new deck, connected garage to home, completely renovated bathrooms. Many gardens and plantings. 289,900. Gena x 203

New Haven/Hamden- Grand remastered Georgian Colonial, 2005, tucked away privately at the end of a cul de sac in Prospect Hill, which abuts Albetus/ Yale campus. Luxury home boasts over 5500 square feet with 4 bedrooms , 6 baths, extra large aupair suite, 4 fire places, formal dining and living rooms, family room, den, office and billiard room, slate roof, high end moldings, gas heat and central air with 2 car attached garage and finished lower level. 1,500,000. Gena x 203

New Haven - Fair Haven Heights, sprawling Ranch sits proudly on 1.38 acres with magnificent views of the city and the New Haven sky line. One floor living at its finest, 3 bedrooms, 3 full baths, open floor plan, living room with fire place, remodeled kitchen with SS appliance, island, wine frig, sliders to deck. Finished lower level game room with movie theater room, bar, kitchen, 4th bedroom, attached garage. 298,000. Jeff x 210

New Haven- A freshly painted exterior welcomes you into the spacious three family home located in the Westville part of town with separate meters, three gas furnaces, three water heaters, each unit has two bedrooms, a two car, income producing garage, many new windows and beautiful hardwood floors throughout. 389.900. Neile x 212

New Haven - City Point area, 10 Room Colonial on 3 levels, 5 bedrooms with 1.1 baths, living room with fire place opens to formal dining room, den on first floor, eat in kitchen, master bedroom on 3 rd level with cathedral ceiling, walk to park and water, Yale home buyers program, needs handy person to make home shine again. 129,900. Jeff x 210

East Haven - Morgan Point, .10 acre lot, direct waterfront sandy beach, own one of the few beach lots available to build your dream home. This is your opportunity to make every day vacation and live on the water. 259,900 Neile x 212

East Haven - Open, bright Bungalo across from the beach, water views from almost every room. 3 bedrooms, 1.1 baths, New kitchen with granite opens to formal dining room lots of windows, enclosed front porch, large master bedroom, second floor with Wayne coated walls and ceilings, atrium door from living room to rear deck and patio with wisteria trellis and nice plantings lots of charm of the New England summer home at the beach. 228,000. Jeff x 210

East Haven - Direct waterfront, three level home boasts open, bright living on Long Island sound. Open living / dining room with fire place and sliders to a huge wrap around deck on the beach, custom kitchen, 1st floor office/ den with sliders to the water, 3 bedrooms on the second level, master bedroom suite on the 3rd level with French doors to open porch overlooking the sound. Very special home on unique spot on the water. 825,000. Jeff x 210

East Haven - Raised Ranch, built 1989, 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths in beach community. Kitchen with Cherry cabinets, stainless steel appliances, breakfast bar, dining room with sliders to deck, master bedroom with balcony. Private lot with spacious deck, one car garage, on over half an acre. 329,900. Diana x 208

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ul ng a sunny e family ngs and large two-�ered deck.”

Nancy Andersen, Realtor What I like about this lis ng: “The se�ng of this beau�ful home

is very private and peaceful and I love that is walking distance to town library and hiking trails! Built with quality construc�on by the Garceau Brothers, it has all of the moldings and architectural details throughout that are the hallmark of what Garceau is noted for.”

Background: “Connec�cut na�ve� graduated from Milford High School, Connec�cut College and Providence College. I live in Woodbridge with my husband, two children and goldendoodle, Pippa.” Favorite Charity: “Blackhorse for Heroes which helps Disabled Veterans through equine therapy.” Passion: “Providing premier customer service!.”

Kitchens By Gedney, Inc.

Our signs are everywhere!

Fine Cabinetry for the Home www.gedneykitchens.com

Madison • 203.245.2172 • 36 June/July 2015

Real Estate

www.RLWD.com

New Haven Milford Woodbridge NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM


Betsy Grauer Realty, Inc.

WE SELL THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOUSES!

SOUGHT AFTER LOCATION. Sunny, graceful East Rock 6 BR col. on super friendly block. Large, open spaces, huge windows, HW floors, gracious staircase, veranda + great yard. Lots of style. $795,000.

C. 1860 EAST ROCK FEDERAL on one of New Haven’s most desired streets. Perfect combination of old world charm + today’s conveniences. Great LR + DR, extraordinary library + large master suite. $794,000.

WATERFRONT w/ 3 BRs + study with walls of glass + sweeping views. Separate fantastic quest house + access to private dock. Fully rebuilt w/ great style by architect owner. It’s glorious. $2,250,000.

COUNTRY FEELING yet close to town. 3 BR home in Orange abuts water co. land. Great house w/ interesting floor plan and feeling of space. Not your cookie cutter house! $279,000.

GUILFORD breathtaking water views from every room. Exquisitely remodeled 4 BR, 4 full baths + 2 half baths + studio. Great cook’s kit, LR, DR +sun room. Tasteful.$1,395,000.

CLOSE TO YALE. Wonderful East Rock Victorian. Close to Yale and Town. 6 BRs, 3.5 baths, leaded glass, ballroom size LR, window seat, first floor library. Perfect in-town residence. $649,000.

SUPER COUNTRY COLONIAL on private 2.9 acre cul-de-sac wooded lot. 4 BRs, 3.5 baths, spacious rooms with excellent floor plan. 3 car garage, perfect in-law/au pair space. Meticulously maintained. $559,900.

THE MOST EXTRAORDINARY MULTI. Large, exquisitely renovated 2 family w/ 5 room rental flat plus two story owner’s unit. Great kits. And baths, lovely yard + 2 car garage. You’ll be amazed.$395,000.

BRANFORD WATERFRONT is a secret paradise in quiet gated community. Magnificent craftsmanship combined with panoramic views make this one of the shoreline’s finest homes. $1,995,000.

FOUR STORY BRICK TOWN HOUSE. Close to Yale campus and the business district. Great opportunity for investment. Fenced yard, nice flats. Walk to everything! $580,000.

EAST ROCK colonial close to Hooker, neighborhood shops, parks, and restaurants. Super cool kitchen w/ exposed brick and lots of pizzazz. 3 BRs, garage, and front porch. $399,500.

WESTVILLE HAPPY + FRIENDLY col w/ Leaded glass, FP, HW floors, renovated open kit., 4 BRs + study, finished LL. Quiet tree-line block. Lovely deck and yard. Walk to park + shops. $349,000.

IT’S A TEN! 2 family has been carefully restored w/ natural woodwork, gracious FPs, good work space kits, and superb 3rd floor with cathedral ceiling and lots of oomph. $499,900.

SUPER CHARMING East Rock multi. Large, bright flats w/wood flrs, tall ceilings, bulls eye moldings, pocket doors. Upper 2 flrs combine nicely for duplex unit or works as private, in-law space. Large yard w/room to develop off street parking. Walk to shops, East Rock Park, Yale. $499,500.

MAGNIFICENT PARK LIKE SETTING. Wonderful 3 BR col. with extra deep yard. Enclosed porch, HW floors, FP, and loads of charm and character. Lovingly maintained. $342,000

ONE OF A KIND East Rock Victorian filled with classic period details. Tall ceilings, French doors, HW floors, charming rocking chair front porch + super location just off Orange St. $399,500.

WOOSTER SQUARE Greek Revival w/ lots of light, antique features, stained glass, newer mechanicals. Great yard + garden. Walk to everything. Yale HB plan area. $309,500.

SUPER WESTVILLE location backing up to water company land. Modern, updated col. with 3 BRs, 2.1 baths. Fantastic kit.+ baths, cathedral ceiling FR w/ FP, HW floors, 2 car garage. Great buy!$239,000

SPECTACULAR ORANGE CONTEMPORARY tucked away on 6+ beautiful acres. 5 BRs, 3 baths + large open floor plan w/ walls of glass, renovated kit., guest/in-law space, huge library/ office. $575,000

SLEEPING BEAUTY multi family in East Rock. 3 fabulous units, tall ceilings, south light floods apts. FP and HW floors. Take a walk through Edgerton Park or jog around the reservoir, on bus line. $649,500

Betsy Grauer Realty 203-787-3434 www.betsygrauerrealty.com new haven

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waters of the Branford River on their boat, and have successfully caught lobsters every summer since moving in. The home is a refuge for their three sons and their families as well, with the in-law suite bearing two cribs and a host of pacifiers for Ed & Lori’s three grandchildren. Ed recently put the finishing touches on a playscape in the backyard. On weekends, the house is often full. Just across from the back of the property is the hotspot for the annual Branford fireworks display that launch from 1 Harbor Street, the edge of Branford Point. The Francis home affords a perfect unobstructed view of the action and each year, they play host to friends and extended family members to celebrate the summer. Lori’s favorite thing about her home? It feels like I’m on the Cape or Nantucket when I’m looking out at the water. Ed’s favorite thing about his home? Even in bad weather, it’s a cool place. It feels very remote, even if it’s only a mile from things. View of the Branford Point Hotel from the Francis property before it was the Francis property, c. 1900 and before Branford Point was just a public beach. The photo was a gift from an elderly visitor who once summered on the Spring Cove Property as a child .

View of the house and property from the edge of the Francis’ boat dock.

Ed & Lori Francis sit on their enclosed sunroom where the family spends a lot of time, particularly when birds feed on the feeders just outside the windows.


203-288-1900

Years of Experience and Local Expertise

www.presscuozzo.com

NO. HAVEN-Architect designed modern-style 5 BR brick home w/slate roof, courtyard w/ pond, LR w/FP, DR, game rm. & wine cellar, heat. 4-car gar. Terrace, screen porch, pool. $575,000. John x124

HAMDEN-Dramatic, like new, light-filled 4 BR contemp. cape on 2.45 acres boasts gourmet kit. opening to great rm. w/FP & DR. First flr. MBR suite. Bonus rm. w/custom BIs. Fin. above grade LL w/half bath. $695,000. John x124

WOODBRIDGE-Elegant estate on over 6 acres of manicured grounds! 5 BRs, 7.5 baths, indoor heated pool rm. & guest house/cabana. Paddle tennis court, heated Gunite pool, Jacuzzi waterfall, much more. $1,195,000. Susan S. x126

WALLINGFORD-Dramatic 2 BR, 2.5 bath contemp.ranch-style det. condo w/golf course views. Fab sunken LR w/cath. ceil., gas FP. Bright kit. w/bkfst. bar, DR, MBR suite. First flr. FR/den/office opens to deck. 2 car gar. Full bsmt. $429,000. Roberta x136

HAMDEN-Meticulous 3 BR, 3 full & 2 half bath col. w/custom in-law apt. Gourmet kit., LR/ library, MBR w/clawfoot tub & WI shower. LL w/media/game/gym areas & full bath. Much more! $525,000. Debbie x197

NO. HAVEN-A 5 BR 1930s brick exterior, slate roof estate tucked away on 14 priv. acres. Gracious 6,000 s/f home w/28’ foyer, 6 FPs. First flr. guest suite, lib. w/barrel ceil., FR, updated kit. French drs. to porch & Gunite pool. $1,295,000. John x124

WOODBRIDGE-Classic 4 BR, 3.5 bath Garceaubuilt col. LR w/FP, DR, FR w/FP, sun rm., study, sit. rm., laundry rm. & powder rm. on 1st flr. Kit. w/high end appls. & French drs. to patio. Front & back staircases. More! $935,000. John x124

WOODBRIDGE-Exquisite reno. 5 BR landmark estate. Gracious foyer, LR w/wide plank random width flrs. & FP, 3-season sunrm. w/FP. EIK w/pantry & high end appls. Two 1st flr. studies, MBR suite. Much more! $1,195,000. Ellen x125/ Elise x193

HAMDEN-Gracious 4 BR col. offers designer kit. w/bkfst. area opening to FR w/FP. DR& LR w/French drs., MBR suite w/den, luxury bath. Deck, wooded lot w/stream. LL bonus rm w/ slider, 3rd flr. walkup. $425,000. Marilyn x142

CHESHIRE-Magnificent 15 rm., 6 BR mini estate. Stone rotunda, circular foyer. FR w/FP, solarium. Heated, filtered salt water Gunite pool, guest house. Garages for 6, updated mechs., generator, more. $999,000. Susan S. x126/Debbie x197

WOODBRIDGE-Dramatic 4/5 BR contemp. cape. 1st flr. MBR suite. Skylit vault. ceil. Gourmet EIK w/maple cabs., FP. French drs. to FR w/walls of glass. WI pantry, laundry rm., OS 2-car gar. Bonus loft space, LL rec rm. Patio. $639,000. John x124

WOODBRIDGE-Fab remod. contemp. cape. LR/DR combo, remod. EIK w/granite, SS appls. & atrium-style EA. Lg. 1st flr. FR w/FP & BIs, 1st flr. MBR suite. Loft style 2nd flr. w/3 BRs, bonus rm. Fin. LL w/WO. $399,000. Jill x191/ Susan S. x126

CHESHIRE-Custom 4 BR, 3.5 bath col. boasts magnificent cherry kit. w/granite & top-ofthe-line appls. Stunning formal DR, LR, 1st flr. FR & library. MBR suite w/gym. Fin. LL. Gunite pool. Irrig. system. $879,900. Susan S. x126

NO. HAVEN-Dramatic 3 BR, 2.5 bath contemp. Updated EIK w/granite & SS appls. Open flr. plan, skylights, cath. ceils., FP in LR & FR. C/A, new roof, new ext. paint. Poss. 4th BR. $399,900. Mary Jo x133/Cheryl x190

NO. HAVEN-Millbrook! Reno. 4 BR, 3 bath contemp. split w/cook’s kit., LR/DR w/FP & BIs. Patio, fenced yard w/brook. MBR w/FP, cath. ceils., deck. LL FR. Two car gar. Priv. study w/ BIs. Much more! $439,000. Ellen x125

HAMDEN-Stunning 3 BR, 3.5 bath cape on over 2.5 acres. DR, custom kit. w/granite, great rm., screen porch. DR, lib. & sit. rm. MBR suite w/French drs. IG pool, outdoor shower. LL playrm., BR/gym, workshop. $475,000. Susan S. x126

NO. HAVEN-Smashing 3 BR contemp. split boasts LR w/stained-glass win., 13’ ceils., marble FP & slider to patio. Remod. kit., DA w/marble flrs., den/office w/bookcases. MBR suite. LL w/FR, BR, bath. More! $438,000. Elise x193

BRANFORD-Gorgeous direct water views! Completely reno. 2/3 BR, 2 bath home! LR w/FP, DR, custom EIK w/granite & SS. Spacious rear yard overlooks marsh. Enjoy beaches, playgrounds, so much more. Owner-agent. $539,900. Susan T. x198

HAMDEN-Spectacular Spring Glen reno. col. boasts LR w/FP & BI bookshelves w/attach. glass porch. Fenced yard, bluestone patio. Dream kit. opens to DR. MBR w/OS glass shower. Fin. 3rd flr. & fin. LL. $449,000. Wendy x195

HAMDEN-Spring Glen! Quality 3 BR, 2.5 bath col. LR & 1st flr. FR w/FPs. DR, lg. kit. w/sunfilled eating area overlooking priv. yard. C/A. Two-car att. gar. Gas heat. Mins. to Merritt & I-91. $424,900. Judy x147/Sarah x122

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The eat-in kitchen offers a breakfast bar as well as a dining area.

The cozy dining area opens out onto an enclosed sunroom adjacent to the deck.


SEABURY-HILL REALTORS

SUMMER AT LAST!

Cathy Hill Conlin Jack Hill 203.675.3942 203.843.1561

seaburyhill.com •

203.562.1220 •

seaburyhillrentals.com

556 CHAPEL ST #1, WOOSTER SQ, NH – w w w Overlook Wooster Ne Ne Ne Square park in this 2 level fabulously renovated 1400 sq. ft. condo. Terra cotta and HW floors, 1.5 BTHs. A gardener’s delight w/beautiful 7A WOOSTER PLACE, NH - Nicely main1190 QUINNIPIAC AVE, NH - Beautifully rosebushes, patio tained 2 BR townhouse condo on quiet street renovated 3140 sq. ft. 4 BR Victorian home & paths in your in Wooster Square. Hardwood flrs. Laundry. w/ detail and character throughout. HW flrs, Parking. Central air. You’ll love the convenience gourmet kitchen,open floor plan, huge backyard private yard. Offered at $380,000. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328.203-675-3942. to everything New Haven! Offered at $315,000. & deck. This property also features an entire, Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328. separate 1 BR in-law apt. The perfect space for relatives or an income opportunity. $524,900. Call Sarah Beth Luce-Del Prete 203-887-2295. g

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2065 SHEPARD AVE, HAMDEN – Charming home w/circular driveway and stunning gardens. Cathedral ceilings w/clearstory beams & spiral stairs leading to a loft overlooking the living room. Comfortable BRs w/ great closet space. Original wood floors, exposed brick chimney & rafters complement many updates: newer roof, thermal windows, centralvac system, & potting shed. $200,000. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328.

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Jennifer D’Amato 203.605.7865

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12 ACADEMY ST #2A, WOOSTER SQ, NH – Great views of the cherry trees from this 2 BR/2 BTH ranch style condo on Wooster Square. The unit features many details of this historic home including 2 decorative FPs & lovely wood floors. 2 off street parking spaces, private entry, laundry & storage. Offered at $344,900. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328.

86 AUTUMN ST, NH – Custom built in 2000, with cherry wood flrs,high ceilings, exposed beams & glorious natural light. Spectacular Kit. w/ vaulted ceilings, 6 top gas burner & Sub Zero fridge. MBR suite w/open BTH w/ huge marble & glass shower & sep. soaking tub. 2nd fl has 2 more BRs w/1 remodeled BTH. Large backyard w/patio. 2 car garage w/breezeway. $1,200,000. Call Jack Hill 203-675-3942.

149 NICOLL ST, NH – East Rock legal 3 family w/bonus storefront & 3rd floor renovated owners unit. Large MBR w/ WIC & new tile BTH w/Jacuzzi tub.The 2nd fl has 5 rooms, 2 BRs & 81 CHURCH ST #5S, DOWNTOWN, NH – 35 HORSLEY AVE, NH – Move right in to this 15 ORANGE ST #407, DOWNTOWN, NH 1 BTH w/ original Exciting NYC style luxury loft. Open LR/DR w/ charming home with lots of personality. LR w/ – Stylish 2 story townhouse condo in sought HW flrs & great huge arch window, exposed brick, high ceilings wood burning FP & bay windows. Remodeled after Trader’s Block condo complex. Large LR/ light. The 2nd fl & dark engineered wood floors. Private eleva- kitchen w/ granite counters, breakfast bar & SS DR w/ original refinished wood floors, exposed has a 4 room apt w/large EIK. The home has tor w direct access to unit. Huge MBR & BTH appls. 2nd fl has 2 BRs, bonus room & updated brick, wood beams & large skylight. Remodeled newer vinyl siding & replacement windows. w/Jacuzzi tub, double European sink & large BTH. Private yard & large deck overlooking kitchen. The condo has 1.5 baths and 2 spaAll separate furnaces and electrical. $549,000. tiled shower. Large bonus room & 2nd BR w/ gardens. Walk to Fort Wooster and East Shore cious BRs w/HW flrs. Condo has a newer gas Call Jack Hill 203-675-3942. full BTH. High energy efficient gas heating Parks. $245,000. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996- furnace and central air. $319,000. Call Jack Hill system and central air. $549,000. Call Jack Hill 8328. 203-675-3942. 203-675-3942. !

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87 OLIVE ST #T, WOOSTER SQ, NH – Unique 3 BR, 2.5 BTH condo in one of Wooster Square’s historic brownstones. Gas FP, exposed brick, built-ins and HW flrs throughout. Brick archways lead to sun room w/ sliders to private patio & gardens. Bonus room for another small bedroom or a cozy office space. In Yale home buyers program for qualified Yale employees. $469,900. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328. !

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84 PLATT ST, MILFORD – Point Beach Milford! Nantucket Cedar Shake Custom Home steps to the beach! This 2831 sq. ft. custom home has the perfect floor plan for modern day living. Designer kitchen, family room w/ slider out to patio, formal DR & LR, 3 large BRs including a MBR suite, office, laundry room, huge attic and unfinished basement. Beach rights! $649,900. Call Jack Hill 203-675-3942.

Cheryl Szczarba 203.996.8328

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266 C COSEY BEACH AVE, EAST HAVEN Direct waterfront, 4 BR, 2 BTH Col w/panoramic views of LI Sound + sandy beach.$450K in recent improvements. Complies w/current bldg codes for elevation & storm resistant windows, making it virtually hurricane proof! $625,000. Call Cathy Conlin 203-843-1561.

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135 TROLLEY RD, GUILFORD - This classic 3 BR, 2 BA ranch offers water views of LI Sound and panoramic marsh views. Enjoy the sandy beach outside your front door and mooring rights for boaters. In addition to having premier views of the Sound, one can enjoy bird watching and kayaking from the small dock right in your own back yard! $490,000. Call Cathy Conlin 203-843-1561.

195 DEVONSHIRE LANE, MADISON - Spacious Colonial w/over 2 private acres set atop Brian’s Knoll. HW flrs, formal LR & DR, open kitchen, sliders to deck. 2nd flr has MBR, 2 other BRs & laundry room. Unfinished 3rd level. Lovely patio and landscaped grounds. 3 car attached garage. $549,900. Call Sarah Beth Luce-Del Prete 203-887-2295.

32 GIRARD AVE, NH- Wonderfully maintained home in East Shore section of New Haven Updated w/new windows, doors, deck, mechanicals, appliances & new paint. HW flrs, updated baths & plenty of storage. Fitted with storm shutters. Just 10 mins from downtown NH & walking distance to Pardee Seawall & Fort Hale park. $250,000. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328.

245 WEST PARK AVE, NH - Bright, cheerful home w/ fresh paint & updated lighting fixtures. Great yard w/private views of Edgewood Park. LR w/wood burning FP. MBR suite w/WIC. 2 car garage & covered patio. In Yale home buyers program for qualified Yale employees. $324,900. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328.

SUMMER ON AN ISLAND!

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15 PAWSON RD, BRANFORD - Linden Shores. 5 BRS, 2 Bath wood shingle 1920’s Cape w/access to 3 priv. beaches. Charming LR w/stone FP. Screen in porch leads to deck, hot tub & yd. $565,000. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328

89 BEACON AVE, MORRIS COVE, NHRenovated home in Morris Cove! Open floor plan w/ breakfast bar in kitchen, spacious LR & central gas fireplace. HW flrs throughout, renovated bathrooms, lovely yard. Great flow for entertaining! New roof and water heater in 2013. $189,000. Call Jennifer D’Amato 03-605-7865.

5 CLAM ISLAND, LINDEN SHORE, BRANFORD - Summer in your own Victorian island cottage! Just a 5 minute boat ride from shore in your own Whaler (included in sale). Wrap around porch faces west for fabulous sunsets. 3 bedrooms, new roof. Comes w/most furnishings. Included in sale is 1/6th interest of lot on mainland for parking. $495,000. Call Cheryl Szczarba 203-996-8328.

RESIDENTIAL SALES

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Call Our Agents For All Your Real Estate Needs! RESIDENTIAL SALES RESIDENTIAL SALES INVESTMENT PROPERTIES INVESTMENT INVESTMENT PROPERTIES BARBARA HILL, BROKERPROPERTIES 203-675-3216 JENNIFER D’AMATO 203-605-7865 SARAH BETH LUCE-DEL PRETE 203-887-2295 BUYER REPRESENTATION BUYER REPRESENTATION BUYER ROSEANN REPRESENTATION JACK HILL 203-675-3942 DAVID ROSSI 203-314-7905 IUVONE 203-710-3135 CATHY HILL CONLIN 203-843-1561 JASON FREDRICKSEN 203-215-8735 RENTALS SARA SCHLACHTER 860-514-0147 RENTALS RENTALS CHERYL SZCZARBA 203-996-8328

ARLENE SZCZARBA 203-996-3727

MELANIE GUNN 203-430-2622

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An independent, family owned and operated real estate company serving the An independent, family owned and operated real estate company serving the The Shoreline since 1926 needs of Greater New Haven, Yale & An independent, family operated the haven 41 new Greaterand New Haven,real Yaleestate & Thecompany Shorelineserving since 1926 needs of owned 203.562.1220

Greater New Haven, Yale TheStreet Shoreline since 1926 203.562.1220 233& Wooster New Haven, CT 06511

233 Wooster Street needsNew of Haven, CT 06511


Jacqueline Jones, surrounded by her own paintings for sale in her Erector Square Classroom studio in New Haven. Large scale works cover the walls of the New Haven studio with bold, colorful modern figure & landscape paintings that Jones refers to as, “Magic Realism.” She explains, “magic realism differs from Photorealism, Hyperrealism and Surrealism.” Jones prefers to incorporate a bit of Magic Realism into her work, that she interprets as, “a suggestion of a dream in the painting, but where it holds to reality with a dream like quality that’s not real.”

The Magic Realism of Jacqueline Jones Photos and Story by Lesley Roy

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he art of painting is an everyday practice for Jacqueline Jones, who prefers to be called Jackie by friends, family and the many people for whom she provides art lessons in her Erector Square studio in New Haven, or outdoors in the field — painting “en Plein Air.” The wide world is her studio and as a passionate artist, she lives life fully immersed in observing and translating experience onto canvas.

Painting Plein Air scenic landscapes of cities and countryside, Jones captures the essence of New England: church greens and street scenes, park benches and salt marshes, rolling surf and rustic barns. Framed with billowing clouds and colored with lively brushwork, Jones uses light and warmth, breezes and subtle hues to instill a sense of magic into her paintings.

Seeing budding talent, her mom immediately enrolled her in art classes with local artist Joseph Gionfriddo (1907-1978), former student of Guy Wiggins and James Goodwin McManus, both noted American impressionist artists. At the time, Gionfriddo only taught adults but made an exception and took Jones under his tutelage — instilling in her a love of traditional Impressionist oil painting.

After graduating high school, Jones began thinking of college— “at the time, traditional art wasn’t being taught, Looking back over her life, Jones traces the moments that led her down a creative and spiritual path —her only abstract and expressionist art.” Because of this focus journey through art, using oil as a primary choice of medium. on abstract art in the curriculum, Jones opted instead Born in Hartford and raised in Colchester with four brothers, the fifty-one year old Jones grew up a self- for a degree in Graphics with a minor in Illustration at the Art Institute of Ft. Lauderdale. The early years as a proclaimed, “tom-girl,” running around non-stop enjoying sports, skating and riding bikes until dark. Smiling with fond reflection, “as kids, we practically lived in the woods, building tree forts and camps —I budding artist were a struggle, selling commissions on the side supplemented a living as a graphic designer, which loved being out in the woods.” Naturally, this love of the woods emerged when Jones started sketching she laughs, “came in handy later to make brochures and trees at an early age. These images, along with her favorite at the time, floating roses, sold for $20 each. 42 June/July 2015

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An example of the Magic Realism style is vividly depicted in the painting, “Carpe Diem” inspired by her experiences growing up near the Salmon River in East Hampton, CT. The subject speaks to fishing and hunting, “its my dad and his hunting dog Finley— as I got older, I went away from unnecessary killing.” Jones explains, “the Carp flying through the air is an example of how Magic Realism is used for drama, composition, story, movement and narrative.”

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laughs, “came in handy later to make brochures and marketing material for teaching and exhibiting art.” It wasn’t until Jones was forty that she was able to return to study the traditional style of Impressionist painting she so loved, at Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts. With small, individualized classes and an embracing attitude toward adults, Jones blossomed. A deeper understanding of figurative painting, art history and sculpture resulted in a fresh perspective and numerous awards including, “1st Prize for Outstanding Work” at the prestigious Salmagundi Club in NYC, an arts organization dating back to 1871 that hosted honorary members such as Winston Churchill and Buckminster Fuller. Jackie Jones chose New Haven as her artistic home, setting up shop in an Erector Square studio loft, with plenty of space for a classroom to provide art lessons. Teaching painting for the past ten years and hosting small adult classes or individual training oneon-one in the studio or in the field; Jones admits, “teaching comes naturally.” Being headquartered out of Erector Square is a great benefit, “I love it here for all these reasons —it’s a great environment, the people are so friendly, you’re in a community of great artists, there’s everything you need from a framer, a printmaker, a gallery, diverse styles of other artists, and we even have our own diner here. Plus, there’s a ladies painting group, Art Eclectic, that hosts a weekly life-drawing, no-instruction class with a waiting list, and occasionally, I get to sit in on one and keep fresh with my drawing skills.” Explaining that, “drawing from nature gives a lot of freedom, allowing an artist to make it up—change things for the sake of composition, move this tree over there, change that shape.” That’s why Jones considers figure drawing a core skill, “it is important —it provides the understanding of proportion.” Jones points out, “in a landscape painting, people don’t notice if a tree is off, but with a figure, they know instantly if the proportion is incorrect.”

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Her expansive Erector Square studio provides much more than physical space. It also provides mental room to expand and play with other facets of creative style beyond the very-portable Plein Air paintings. Large-scale works cover the walls of the studio with bold, colorful modern figure & landscape paintings that Jones refers to as, “Magic Realism.” She explains, “Magic Realism” differs from Photorealism, Hyperrealism and Surrealism with Daliesque dripping clocks in the sky.” Jones prefers to incorporate a bit of Magic Realism into her work, which she interprets as, “a suggestion of a dream in the painting, but where it holds to reality with a dream-like quality that’s not real.” With a favorite “Poshad Box”—the traditional Plein Air way to carry paints and supplies into the field, that quickly transforms into an easel. Jacqueline Jones adds an umbrella and is ready for a day of painting scenic landscapes of New England cities and countrysides: church greens and street scenes, park benches and salt marshes, rolling surf and rustic barns.

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An example of this style is vividly depicted in the painting, “Carpe Diem,” inspired by her experiences

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Jacqueline Jones’s expansive Erector Square studio provides her much more than physical space, it also provides mental room to expand and play with other facets of creative style beyond the very-portable Plein Air paintings she is known for. In the painting, “Sound View Swarm”, a Seagull flying directly toward the viewer combined with the overall dream-like nature, is a vivid use of Magic Realism. Jones prefers to incorporate a bit of Magic Realism into her studio work, which she interprets as, “a suggestion of a dream in the painting, but where it holds to reality with a dream like quality that’s not real.”

growing up near the Salmon River in East Hampton, CT. The subject speaks to fishing and hunting, “it’s my dad and his hunting dog, Finley— as I got older, I went away from unnecessary killing.” Jones explains, “the Carp flying wildly through the air is an example of how Magic Realism is used for drama, composition, story, movement and narrative.” However, Jones invites the viewer to interpret meaning. Another painting, «Sound View Swarm,» with a Seagull flying directly toward the viewer, combined with the overall dream-like nature of two men shaking hands amid a swarm of activity, provides a vivid use of Magic Realism to punctuate a spontaneous moment of dialogue. When asked why art is important? Jones: I absolutely love painting, and the creative process. Art evolves you. Art provides me a deeper connection to nature in a spiritual way — it works through me. You feel like you are alive in that moment. You remember the sights and sounds and smells you are spontaneously responding to in the moment.

When asked why Plein Air painting? Jones: There’s also the sense that people you meet along the way can fit into your painting —in that way, the people become part of the painting, opening doors to new connections and the spirit that connects us all. Painting slows you down —time slows down and you are present. I feel a great sense of freedom! You have to make decisions about composition, color, what you’re seeing — it makes your whole body pay full attention to what you’re seeing, smelling, feeling and hearing. In other words Jacqueline Jones is truly an, “en plein air” artist. Plein Air encourages people to approach, peek over your shoulder, share a story about a place, and strike up a conversation. Painting does much impressionist artists. At the time, Gionfriddo only taught adults but made an exception and took Jones under his tutelage — instilling in her a love of traditional Impressionist oil painting.

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Jaqueline Jones loves to paint, en Plein Air, a French expression for, outside in the open air and she has perfected her own unique style and technique for painting trees. Strong, double ended Sumi-e Bamboo sketch pens made from natural bamboo are excellent for applying an oil mixture that Jones calls, “top secret”. The large scale painting, “Pinchot Sycamore” uses her proprietary diluted oil paint mixture applied with the bamboo to create distinctive and bold strokes on the canvas and honor not only the oldest tree in Connecticut, but the namesake who was an influential CT resident, pioneering conservationist and founder of the Yale School of Forestry, Gifford Pinchot.

After graduating high school, Jones began thinking of college— “at the time, traditional art wasn’t being taught, only abstract and expressionist art.” Because of this focus on abstract art in the curriculum, Jones opted instead for a degree in Graphics with a minor in Illustration at the Art Institute of Ft. Lauderdale. The early years as a budding artist were a struggle, selling commissions on the side supplemented a living as a graphic designer, which she laughs, “came in handy later to make brochures and marketing material for teaching and exhibiting art.” It wasn’t until Jones was forty that she was able to return to study the traditional style of Impressionist painting she so loved, at Lyme

Academy College of Fine Arts. With small, individualized classes and an embracing attitude toward adults, Jones blossomed. A deeper understanding of figurative painting, art history and sculpture resulted in a fresh perspective and numerous awards including, “1st Prize for Outstanding Work” at the prestigious Salmagundi Club in NYC, an arts organization dating back to 1871 that hosted honorary members such as Winston Churchill and Buckminster Fuller. Jackie Jones chose New Haven as her artistic home, setting up shop in an Erector Square studio loft, with plenty of space for a classroom to provide art lessons. Teaching painting for the past ten years and hosting small

adult classes or individual training one-on-one in the studio or in the field; Jones admits, “teaching comes naturally.” Being headquartered out of Erector Square is a great benefit, “I love it here for all these reasons —it’s a great environment, the people are so friendly, you’re in a community of great artists, there’s everything you need from a framer, a printmaker, a gallery, diverse styles of other artists, and we even have our own diner here. Plus, there’s a ladies painting group, Art Eclectic, that hosts a weekly lifedrawing, no-instruction class with a waiting list, and occasionally, I get to sit in on one and keep fresh with my drawing skills.” Explaining that, “drawing from nature gives a lot of freedom, allowing an artist to make

it up—change things for the sake of composition, move this tree over there, change that shape.” That’s why Jones considers figure drawing a core skill, “it is important —it provides the understanding of proportion.” Jones points out, “in a landscape painting, people don’t notice if a tree is off, but with a figure, they know instantly if the proportion is incorrect.” Her expansive Erector Square studio provides much more than physical space. It also provides mental room to expand and play with other facets of creative style beyond the very-portable Plein Air paintings. Large-scale works cover the walls of the studio with bold, colorful modern figure & landscape paintings that Jones refers to as, “Magic Realism.” She explains, “Magic


Realism” differs from Photorealism, Hyperrealism and Surrealism with Daliesque dripping clocks in the sky.” Jones prefers to incorporate a bit of Magic Realism into her work, which she interprets as, “a suggestion of a dream in the painting, but where it holds to reality with a dream-like quality that’s not real.”

Another painting, «Sound View Swarm,» with a Seagull flying directly toward the viewer, combined with the overall dream-like nature of two men shaking hands amid a swarm of activity, provides a vivid use of Magic Realism to punctuate a spontaneous moment of dialogue.

An example of this style is vividly depicted in the painting, “Carpe Diem,” inspired by her experiences growing up near the Salmon River in East Hampton, CT. The subject speaks to fishing and hunting, “it’s my dad and his hunting dog, Finley— as I got older, I went away from unnecessary killing.” Jones explains, “the Carp flying wildly through the air is an example of how Magic Realism is used for drama, composition, story, movement and narrative.” However, Jones invites the viewer to interpret meaning.

Jones: I absolutely love painting, and the creative process. Art evolves you. Art provides me a deeper connection to nature in a spiritual way — it works through me. You feel like you are alive in that moment. You remember the sights and sounds and smells you are spontaneously responding to in the moment.

When asked why art is important?

opening doors to new connections and the spirit that connects us all. Painting slows you down —time slows down and you are present. I feel a great sense of freedom! You have to make decisions about composition, color, what you’re seeing — it makes your whole body pay full attention to what you’re seeing, smelling, feeling and hearing. In other words Jacqueline Jones is truly an, “en plein air” artist.

When asked why Plein Air painting?

Plein Air encourages people to approach, peek over your shoulder, share a story about a place, and strike up a conversation. Painting does much more than help us remember a place - it is absorbing a place and recording the mood of life.

Jones: There’s also the sense that people you meet along the way can fit into your painting —in that way, the people become part of the painting,

Since landing at Erector Square with a huge space to conduct classes and teach, Jones cites one of the only drawbacks: lack of adequate heat in

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the winter months, so Jones loads up her van packed to the roof with artwork, canvasses and supplies, and travels to warmer air down south where she is invited to do Plein Air demos, sell her work at large art fairs, visit clients and friends along the way, paint everyday scenes of the countryside, and live the very happy life of doing what is loved —painting and sharing art. Back in New Haven when the sun is shining, she is out painting and inviting you to brush up on painting, whether you’re a beginner or intermediate and wish to take lessons or a class, check out the website for more info, but do get out and get your creative hat on. www.jacquelinejones.


were housed with local families struggling to make ends meet during the depression. However, few historical records and documents remain detailing the intent of many of the more mysterious works. Stern culled construction documents, stonecutter records, Gamble’s personal papers, and Yale archives for answers to basic questions like: Why is there a donkey in a suit installed on that law school building? While Yale graduated its first African American student in 1857, no African American personas made the cut of Rogers’ sculptures, and only two: the Virgin Mary and a naked and suggestive figure of Aphrodite, women (to be fair, Yale didn’t admit women to the old campus until 1969, although women graduated from other schools beginning in 1869). Neither of those women in Gamble’s sculptures went to Yale, unfortunately. At least now, we can see all of those figures up close with Stern’s collection. To explore the sculptures detailed in Stern’s book, start with Harkness Tower at 74 High Street. Look up. See those bulbs sticking out of the building? Those are carved heads. When you’ve had your fill, walk through library walk next to John Edwards College, or down High Street to Chapel, turn left and then right onto York Street to Davenport College, the next marvel. Look up. Make your way down York Street to Sterling Memorial Library next. The library building sports many sculptures of Rogers’ design. The final destination is the Yale Law School Building, featuring various farm animals dressed for court. The building sits on the corner of York and Wall, just past the library. Did you take your own pictures? Share at rbergman@conntact.com

Client as Donkey In the same grouping as the wolf lawyer, is his client—the ass. What could it all mean?

Yale’s Hidden Treasures – Up Close A Walking Tour Guide To Yale’s Sculptures BY RACHEL BERGMAN

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ot so much hidden as so high up and inaccessible, that certain sculptures and stone carvings embedded into the architecture around the Yale campus are barely noticeable with the naked eye from the sidewalk—until Michael Stern’s book of photography, Yale’s Hidden Treasures, exposed the works for mostly what they are—symbols of irony and satire. Grab a camera with a good zoom lens, and go take a look for yourself.

The sculptures examined in the book were installed during the period from 1917-1935 by James Gamble Rogers, an 1889 Yale graduate and the architect charged with beautifying the newly built gothic style campus buildings. He employed many sculptors and artisans to complete the projects, like European stonecutters who 48 June/July 2015

Lawyer as Wolf Rogers produced a handful of courtroom “characters” to adorn the law building. At the top of the gable ends of the auditorium near the corner of High and Grove Streets, a lawyer is represented as a wolf.

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The Socialite

James Gamble Rogers Architect and Yale Graduate (Class of 1889) James Gamble Rogers designed the stone carvings for Yale’s new gothic buildings from 1917-1935. He hired artisans, sculptures, and stonecutters to install often satirical works around the campus.

Horizontal carvings at the top of Harkness Tower represent the type of “top” students: the Scholar, the Athlete, the Literary Man, and pictured here, the Socialite. These carvings protrude out four feet from the tower and are partially secured by support wires.

Sterling Memorial Library is adorned with “The Ancients,” including this carving of the Goddess of Love and Beauty, Aphrodite, found on both sides of the Art Gallery Bridge facing Harkness Tower.

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CALENDAR houses for the kids. 11a.m.-7p.m. Aug. 22-23 at Rentschler Field Stadium, 615 Silver Ln., East Hartford. $5.

BELLES LETTRES R.J. Julia Booksellers, Summer Store Events include author talks with writers like from Connecticut, Suzanne Palmieri, author of The Witch of Bourbon Street (July 1), of North Branford, and international bestsellers like Candace Bushnell, author of Sex In The City (July 8), at R.J. Julia, 768 Boston Post Road, Madison, events happening weekly, details at http://www. rjjulia.com/event

New London Food Truck Festival. 5p.m.-9p.m. Aug. 15 at Downtown New London Historic Waterfront, 147 State St., New London. Free. 860-444-2489, downtownnewlondonassociation. com. 37th Annual Lobsterfest and chicken BBQ. 10a.m.-5p.m. July 4, 10a.m.-4p.m. July 5 at the East Lyme Town Hall grounds, 108 Pennsylvania Ave., Niantic. Free. 860-739-2805, nianticlions.org/ lobsterfest.

CT Authors Trail Opening Night, E.J. Simon, author of Death Logs In and Death Never Sleeps. 6:30 p.m. July 7 at Janet Carlson Calvert Library, 5 Tyler Drive, Franklin. Free. 860-642-6207, events happening weekly throughout the state, details at connecticutauthorstrail.org.

41st Annual Milford Oyster Festival. 10a.m.-6p.m. Aug. 15 at Milford Harbor. Free. 203-878-5363, milfordoysterfestival.org.

CT Authors Trail, Ted E. Dubay, author of Three Knots to Nowhere-A Cold War Submariner on the Undersea Frontline. 7p.m. Aug. 18 at East Lyme Public Library, 39 Society Rd., Niantic. Free. 860-739-6926, connecticutauthorstrail.org.

FAMILY EVENTS

CT Authors Trail, Lurrae Lupone, author of “Designing a Happier Life- Feng Shui with Lurrae.” 5:30p.m. Aug. 4 at the Public Library of New London, 63 Huntington St., New London. Free. 860-447-1411, connecticutauthorstrail.org.

Bees! Stonewall Apiary Visit. Meet Beekeeper Stu from Stonewall Apiary in Hanover. He’ll conduct lessons about bees, bee keeping and more. Try some of his honey and a child-sized bee keeper suit. 4p.m. July 16 at Ives Main Library, New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm St., New Haven. Free. Nhfpl.org.

Connecticut Open at Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale, 45 Yale Ave., New Haven. Aug.21-29. 203-776-7331 x5820, ctopen.org.

CT Authors Trail, Robert Landolphi, author of “GlutenFree Baking.” Landolphi is a graduate of Johnson & Wales University with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Culinary Arts and Food Service Management. He also completed a Certified Culinary Arts Instructor program at Central Connecticut State University. 6:15p.m.-9p.m. Sept. 10 at Mohegan Sun Cabaret Theatre, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. Free. 888-226-7711, connecticutauthorstrail.org. The Girl Who Ignored Ghosts by K.C. Tansley. Selling and signing copies and giving out promo goodies. 12p.m.-2p.m. Aug. 13 at the John Bale Book Company, 158 Grand St., Waterbury. Free. 203-757-2279, johnbalebook.com

CINEMAS Win-Win-- Paul Giamatti headlines writer/director Tom McCarthy’s comedy drama centering on a beleaguered attorney and part-time wrestling coach who schemes to keep his practice from going under by acting as the legal caretaker of an elderly client. Mike Flaherty (Giamatti) thinks he has discovered the perfect loophole to keep his practice in business. But his brilliant plan hits an unexpected hitch when his client’s troubled grandson shows up looking for a place to stay. With his home life in turmoil and both of his careers in jeopardy, Mike quickly realizes that he’ll have to get creative in order to find a way out of his current predicament. 7p.m. July 2 at The Bijou Theatre, 275 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport. $12. 203-3323228, thebijoutheatre.com. Music Box-- Jessica Lange plays an attorney whose affable Hungarian-immigrant father Armin Mueller-Stahl is arrested. He is threatened with deportation for lying about his activities during World War II; part of the charge is that Mueller-Stahl was a Nazi collaborationist, guilty of wartime atrocities. Absolutely convinced that her father is being railroaded by a revenge-seeking Hungarian communist government, Lange handles Mueller-Stahl’s defense, expertly blowing huge holes in prosecuting attorney Frederic Forrest’s case. But in doing her own research, Lange discovers that her father has spent a lifetime paying off a blackmailer. Why? 7p.m. Aug. 13 at The Bijou Theatre, 275 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport. $12. 203-332-3228, thebijoutheatre.com. Kramer vs. Kramer-- In this film, Joanna Kramer walks out on her advertising-art-director husband Michael. Also left behind is the Kramers’ 6-year-old son Billy. At first, both father and son resent each other’s company but soon form a strong bond. Suddenly, Joanna reenters his life, announcing that she wants full custody of Billy. 7p.m. Sept.10 at The Bijou Theatre, 275 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport. $12. 203-332-3228, thebijoutheatre. com.

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Aetna Kids Day-- Join WTA pros for a fun filled day of tennis clinics, giveaways and autograph sessions. First 1,000 kids receive an Aetna goody bag. 10a.m. Aug. 17 at Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale, 45 Yale Ave., New Haven. 203-776-7331 x5820, ctopen.org.

Candace Bushnell, author of Sex In The City talks July 8th, at R.J. Julia in Madison,

COMEDY Paula Poundstone, 32 years ago Poundstone climbed on a Greyhound bus and traveled across the country -- stopping in at open mic nights at comedy clubs as she went. A high school drop-out, she went on to become one of the great humorists of our time. 8p.m. July 31 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Sayrbook. $75-$80. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Vic DiBitetto and special comedy guests Simon Zais and Darren Rivera. 9p.m. July 25 at Sports Haven, 600 Long Wharf Dr., New Haven. $20. 203-268-5857, treehousecomedy.com. Joe Matarese’s completely autobiographical act pokes fun at his subtly dysfunctional Italian family, his own neuroses, life with a four year old and his marriage to a psychologist (his perfect match). 8p.m. July 31 & Aug. 1 at Joker’s Wild Comedy Club, 232 Wooster St., New Haven. $15. 203-773-0733, jokerswildclub.com. Andy Sandford is a comedian who got funny in Atlanta, GA and is now based out of New York City. He can be seen playing himself on Adult Swim’s “Aqua Teen Hunger Force.” 8p.m. Aug. 7-8 at Joker’s Wild Comedy Club, 232 Wooster St., New Haven. $15. 203-773-0733, jokerswildclub.com.

Aetna Family Night-- First 1,000 fans receive a special gift at the gate. Aug. 26 (time TBA) at Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale, 45 Yale Ave., New Haven. 203-776-7331 x5820, ctopen.org. Connecticut ComiCon 2015-- The annual event has been drawing thousands of fans of comic books, sci-fi and fantasy films, memorabilia and cosplay (fans dressing up as their favorite heroes and villains) for years. 2:30p.m. Aug. 14, 10a.m. Aug. 15-16 at Convention Center And Uncas Ballroom, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $30 at door. 888-226-7711, mohegansun. com. Superhero Cartooning Program. Debi Hamuka-Falkenham’s cartooning program teaches kids that no matter what type of disability or sickness a person has they are still a superhero inside. In this 90-minute session the children, working along with Debi, will create and draw their own cartoon Superhero Poster that will have a short description of what their character’s disability or sickness is, how they overcame it, and also what type of super powers they now have. 1p.m. Aug. 2 at Ives Main Library, New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm St., New Haven. Free. Nhfpl.org. Annual Pickin’ and Fiddlin’ Contest. Forty years ago, the Roxbury Volunteer Fire Department in conjunction with its annual “Old Roxbury Days” sponsored a contest to display the skills of musicians playing country and bluegrass music. Musical categories are: Old Time Fiddle; Old Time Banjo; Mandolin; Trick and Fancy Fiddle; Finger Picking and Flat Picking Guitar; Bluegrass Banjo and Band Playoff. 2p.m.-9p.m. July 11 at Hurlburt Park, 18 Apple Ln., Roxbury. $10. 860-354-5921, roxburyct.com.

CULINARY

Riverfest Food Truck Festival. This three-day event will feature some of the best mobile culinary cuisine in the region accompanied by live entertainment, family fun, and of course spectacular fireworks! 11a.m.-8p.m. July 9-11 at Mortensen Riverfront Plaza, 300 Columbus Blvd., Hartford. Free. 860-7133131, riverfront.org. Second Annual Connecticut Food Truck Festival will consist of fan favorites, new businesses and a retail section with over 100 vendors from health and beauty to crafts. Local bands playing all weekend and free face painting, activities and bounce

MIND BODY SOUL

Early Risers, Open your body, mind and soul to the world around you, doing sun salutations along with the rising sun. Getting up and moving can help increase circulation, help you find balance both physically and mentally and you might just find that your morning practice energizes you more than that first cup of coffee. All levels welcome. 6:30a.m.-7:30a.m. July 14 at Balanced Yoga Studio, 1079 Whalley Ave., New Haven. Drop Ins are $18 regular, and $15 for students. 203-980-1356, balancedyoga.us. For a full list of Early Risers classes head to the website.

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BY Power, BY Power is for the student looking for that extra challenge with a longer practice. This class will work your body, building endurance and strength. Proper alignment will also be a key part of this class, all levels welcome with modifications for new students. 12p.m.-1p.m. July 25 at Balanced Yoga Studio, 1079 Whalley Ave., New Haven. Drop Ins are $18 regular, and $15 for students. 203-980-1356, balancedyoga.us. For a full list of BY Power classes head to the website. Kripalu Yoga by Smiling Spirit Yoga. For Your Body: stretches and tones muscles, releases chronic tension, improves circulation and energizes and refreshes. For Your Mind: calms restless thoughts, cultivates concentration, supports mental clarity and confidence and promotes self-awareness. For Your Spirit: connects you to yourself, encourages self-acceptance, honors inner wisdom, invites deep stillness. 9a.m. & 7p.m. Mon., 6 p.m. Tues., 6p.m. Thurs., 9a.m. Sat., at 606 New Haven Ave., Milford. Drop Ins $18. 203-882-0801, smilingspirityoga.com.

NATURAL HISTORY Dr. Living Sound. Humor, drama and surprise will introduce you to Long Island Sound, the animals that live in it and the problems they face. Dr. Living Sound, the aquarium’s own costumed character, will have hands-on demonstrations explaining the watershed, the water cycle, and how use of water affects the health of the marine habitat. 2p.m. July 30 at Ives Main Library, New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm St., New Haven. Free. Nhfpl.org. Summer Art Immersion at the Lyman Allyn Art Museum. The Museum is offering 5 weeks of hands-on art camps packed with exciting art projects, gallery tours, and other activities. The art camps are designed for children ages 5-15. In addition to completing special themed projects, participants will also paint outside in the museum’s garden, develop a portfolio and tour the special summer exhibitions: The Gaze Returned: Portrait Studio, Lost Gardens of New England and Launchpad of the American Theater. $150 members/$170 non-members. All camps meet Monday-Friday from 9:30am-12:30pm at the Lyman Allyn Art Museum, 625 Williams St., New London. Session #1: July 6-10 Bumblebees, Butterflies & Blossoms (ages 5-7) After daily animal eye-spy tours of the collections, participants will explore the garden as they design insect collages, sculpt creatures out of clay and paint with acrylics. Session #2: July 13-17 Nature & Art: Painting, Printing & Pastels (ages 8-11) After a daily animal drawing lesson, participants will paint with brushes, rollers, pipettes and even toothbrushes to create nature-based artwork. A variety of pastel and printing projects will also be completed outdoors in the museum’s garden. Session #3: July 20-24 Knights and Princesses of the Roundtable (ages 5-7) After daily eye-spy tours of the galleries, participants will be transformed into kids in King Arthur’s court as they build 3-D castles, design shields and crowns, paint stained glass windows and create dragon puppets. Session #4: August 3-7 Advanced Art Salon (ages 12-15) Participants will explore shading and perspective through charcoal and pastel drawing, learn about painting composition and master positive/negative space through sculpture construction. Session #5: Aug. 10-14 Faces & Places: Exploring Portraits and Landscapes (ages 8-11) Participants will design and create a variety of 2-d and 3-d portraits and learn how to develop landscape compositions from both memory and en plein air (outdoors). 860-443-2545 ex.112, lymanallyn.org. Shubert Summer Theater & Arts Camp. The Shubert Summer Theater & Arts Camp, for rising 5th through 8th graders, runs in two sessions. Classes offered include acting, poetry, ceramics, modern dance, choir, steel pan, digital photography and other activities. Children will have three arts classes per day, daily snack and district lunch (optional), field trips to New Haven Arts Organizations, weekly raffle prizes, all class materials are included in tuition price, free tickets to end of session showcase performance (based on availability), free DVD of showcase performance. Session 1: July 6-17, Session 2: July 20-31 at Co-op

High School, 177 College St., New Haven, Mon.-Fri. 9a.m.-3p.m. 203-624-1825, shubertcamp.com. Colonial Camp. Travel back to the 18th century for a week of summer fun. Experience a week living as the Hale children did over two hundred years ago. Learn to spin, weave & dip candles. Spend a day in a one room school house where quill pens & slates are the writing implements of the day. Act out the chores & past times of the ten Hale children. For children 8-12. 10a.m.-3p.m. July 20-July 24 at Nathan Hale Homestead, 2299 South St., Coventry. $150. 860-247-8996, ctlandmarks.org. Space Astronomy. Celebrate over 400 years of telescopic astronomy by building your own small telescope and learning what’s to be seen in the night sky. Participants also track planets, a comet and one of the largest asteroids, make and test sundials and a moondial, explore Mars using the latest NASA software, and make an iMovie of you flying around a planet of your choice. In addition to activities in UConn’s Planetarium and astronomy labs, participants will use a telescope at the night observing sessions, and observe sunspots if available. 9a.m.-12 noon July 6-10 at Uconn Storrs, 2019 Hillside Rd., Storrs. $200. 860-486-4460, cac.uconn.edu.

CYCLING Coffee Pedaler Ride. 9a.m.-12p.m. Aug. 1 at Coffee Pedaler, 605 East St., New Haven. Free. 203-773-9288, elmcitycycling.org. New Haven Critical Mass- Part of the worldwide Critical Mass movement, New Haven’s ‘Kinder and Less-Critical Mass’ is a monthly celebration of bicycling. The ride is generally slow; length may vary. The size of the group can reach 200 in the summer months and there is sometimes a community gathering or party afterwards. 5:30p.m.-7:30p.m. July 31 at New Haven Green. Free. 203-773-9288, elmcitycycling.org. CT Bike Challenge, empowering cancer survivors. Up to 2,000 riders ride a 10, 25, 50, 75 or 100-mile*route starting and finishing at the Fairfield County Hunt Club in Westport, CT. Twoday riders begin on Friday at Bear Mountain State Park in New York and finish at the Hunt Club. For the second day of their ride, two-day riders choose from one of the Saturday distances. The bike ride is a required fundraising event. Everyone who registers to ride has a required minimum amount to raise before September 25, 2015. 8a.m. July 24-25 at Fairfield County Hunt Club, 174 Long Lots Rd., Westport. 203-292-8105, bike. ctchallange.org.

ROAD RACES Independence Day 5000- The new course (designed in 1999) is spectator friendly. Spectators can see runners at the start, mile 2, & finish, and not have to walk more than 100 feet. There will be entertainment & products for sale. 9a.m. July 4 at Foran High School, 80 Foran Rd., Milford. $20 pre-reg, $25 day of race. Milfordrr.com. Neon Nightrun, a 5k run/walk for literacy under the stars. 8p.m. July 11 at Milford Rotary Pavilion, 57 New Haven Ave., Milford. $30 race fee, $2.50 sign up fee. 203-906-0558, literacycenterofmilford. com. 6th Annual Caroline’s Miracle Foundation, 5K and Kid’s K. The 6th and final road race to support Caroline’s Miracle Foundation to celebrate the life and legacy of Caroline O’Brien, the founder of CMF. Caroline, who died from Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), an inoperable brain tumor, just weeks before the first CMF 5K, set out to create the foundation with a goal in mind...to help other kids with DIPG do extraordinary things. 8a.m. July 25 at Lyme’s Youth Services Bureau, 59 Lyme St., Old Lyme. Free. 860-227-4052, carolinesmiraclefoundation.org. Fairfield County 5k- Starting about 100 yards across from Gallaher Mansion inside of Cranbury Park, the newly created 5k course is an out and back through the surrounding neighborhood. It’s mostly flat with a few rolling hills. Finish with one loop around the park. 5p.m.-9:30p.m. July 30 at Cranbury Park, 300 Grumman Ave., Norwalk. $38. Corporatefunrun.org.

HISTORY 1st Saturday Attic Tours. On the first Saturday of each month, Jack Cown will lead guests on a rare, behind-the-scenes look

of the Phelps’ servant & attic spaces. View objects & collections from the 18th-early 20th century. 1:30p.m.-3:30p.m. Aug. 1 at Phelps Hatheway House & Garden, 55 South Main St., Suffield. $10. 860-247-8996, ctlandmarks.org. Exhibit: This is my Story, This is my Song: Writers, Musicians, and the Black Freedom Struggle, Frederick Douglass’s “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave”. William Wells Brown’s “Clotelle”. Harriet Jacobs’s “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl”. James Weldon Johnson’s “Black Manhattan”. With books and images from The Amistad Center for Art & Culture’s collections and partner institutions, This is My Story, This is My Song: Writers, Musicians, and the Black Freedom Struggle follows the history of a literary tradition emphasizing African American historical timelines, the evolution of the author-activist as public intellectual, and the significance of memoir, essay, novel, and music to the Civil Rights Movement. Until Dec. 31 at the Amistad Center at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, 600 Main St., Hartford. Open 11a.m.-5p.m. Wed., Thurs., & Fri. 10a.m.-5p.m. Sat. & Sun., 11a.m.-8p.m. First Thursdays. $10. 860-838-4133, amistadcenter.org. Farmington’s Freedom Trail: The Amistad Story and the Underground Railroad, The Farmington Historical Society offers an introductory lecture followed by a guided walking tour to the various sites throughout the village which were part of the Mendis stay in Farmington, as well as several sites which were part of the Underground Railroad. 10a.m. July 25 at First Church of Christ, Congregational, 75 Main St., Farmington. $5 adults, $1 children. 860-678-1645, farmingtonhistoricalsociety-ct. org.

SPORTS AT MOHEGAN Connecticut Sun vs. Indiana Fever. 7p.m. June 30 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-2267711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. Chicago Sky. 7p.m. July 2 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. Minnesota Lynx. 7p.m. July 14 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. Indiana Fever. 7p.m. July 18 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-2267711, mohegansun.com. WNBA All-Star Game. 3:30p.m. July 25 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. Seattle Storm. 7p.m. July 31 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-2267711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. San Antonio Stars. 7p.m. Aug. 4 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. Washington Mystics. 7p.m. Aug. 7 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. Tulsa Shock. 7p.m. Aug. 12 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-2267711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. New York Liberty. 7p.m. Aug. 14 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. Atlanta Dream. 6p.m. Aug. 23 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-2267711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. Phoenix Mercury. 7p.m. Aug. 27 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Connecticut Sun vs. New York Liberty. 7p.m. Aug. 29 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $14-$206. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com.

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STAGE 42nd Street-- Based on a novel by Bradford Ropes and Busby Berkeley’s 1933 movie, 42nd Street tells the story of a starryeyed young dancer named Peggy Sawyer, who leaves her Allentown home and comes to New York to audition for the new Broadway musical Pretty Lady. When the lead breaks her ankle, Peggy takes over and becomes a star. 8p.m. Oct. 9, 2p.m. Oct.10, 8p.m. Oct 10 at the Palace Theater, 100 East Main St., Waterbury. 203-346-2000, palacetheaterct.org. South Pacific-- Based upon two short stories by James A. Michener from his book Tales of the South Pacific, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1948. For their adaptation, Rodgers and Hammerstein, along with co-writer Joshua Logan, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1950. South Pacific is also a deeply felt drama. Its portrayal of Americans stationed in an alien culture in wartime is as relevant today as when it first thrilled audiences back in 1949. June 1-July 26 at Ivoryton Playhouse, 103 Main St., Ivoryton. 2p.m. Wed. and Sun., 2p.m. Thurs. July 16, Sat. July 18 and Sat. July 25, 7:30p.m. Wed. and Thurs., 8p.m. Fri. and Sat. 8p.m. There is no performance on Sat., July 4. $42. 860-767-7318, ivorytonplayhouse.org. Memphis is set in the places where rock and roll was born in the 1950s: the seedy nightclubs, radio stations and recording studios of Memphis, TN. With an original score, it tells the fictional story of DJ Huey Calhoun, a good ole’ local boy with a passion for R&B music and Felicia Farrell, an up-and-coming black singer that he meets one fateful night on Beale Street. Aug. 5-30 at Ivoryton Playhouse, 103 Main St., Ivoryton. 7:30p.m. Wed. and Thurs., 8p.m. Fri. and Sat., 2p.m. Wed. and Sun. $42. 860767-7318, ivorytonplayhouse.org. Little Shop of Horrors-- The charming, tongue in cheek musical comedy of Seymour who stumbles across a new breed of plant he names “Audrey II” – after his coworker crush, has been devouring audiences for over 30 years. The music, in the style of early 1960s rock and roll, doo-wop and early Motown, includes several well-known tunes, including the title song, “Skid Row (Downtown)”, and “Suddenly, Seymour”. Sep. 23-Oct. 11 at Ivoryton Playhouse, 103 Main St., Ivoryton. 7:30p.m. Wed. and Thurs., 8p.m. Fri. and Sat., 2p.m. Wed. and Sun. $42. 860-7677318, ivorytonplayhouse.org.

Arabella from Salzburg Festival-- A highlight of the 2014 Salzburg Easter Festival, this production of Arabella marks the first time Renée Fleming and Thomas Hampson have performed the opera together in its entirety. Ms. Fleming’s performance in the title role has garnered enthusiastic acclaim, as the New York Times praises, she sings “with the plush sound, sublime lyricism, and dramatic subtlety that have endeared her to opera lovers”. Strauss’s opera captures the fleeting reverie of youth and Vienna’s Golden Age through the romantic entanglements of two sisters. As Arabella finds the man of her dreams in Mandryka, this marriage is complicated by a case of mistaken identity and confused lovers. A comedy of errors in the pursuit of true love, Arabella is one of Strauss’s most charming comedic operas. 11a.m. July 11 at The Bijou Theatre, 275 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport. $20. 203-332-3228, thebijoutheatre. com.

La Cage aux Folles this summer at the Goodspeed.

Moon Over Buffalo, the Saybrook Stage Company returns to The Kate with their summer production “Moon Over Buffalo” - a comedy set in the early 1950’s in Buffalo, New York. The play centers on an older married couple given one last shot at real stardom - a big movie director is coming to town to see their matinee performance and if he likes what he sees they could be cast in an upcoming major motion picture. And anything that could go wrong does go wrong. July 16-19, 8p.m. Thurs.Sat., 3p.m. Sun. at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $20 adults, $15 students. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. La Fille Du Regimet, Natalie Dessay is the title tomboy in Donizetti’s comedy, with Juan Diego Flórez as Tonio, the soldier who is willing to go to great lengths—and sing 9 high C’s—to win her love. The sparkling supporting cast includes Felicity Palmer as the Marquise of Berkenfield, Alessandro Corbelli as Sulpice, and the late Tony Award-winning actress Marian Seldes, in her Met debut, as the Duchess of Krakenthorp. 1p.m. July 18 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $15. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Everyman, BAFTA winner and Academy Award nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave) takes the title role in this dramatic new production of one of English drama’s oldest plays,

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directed by National Theatre’s new Director Rufus Norris. One of the great primal, spiritual myths, Everyman asks whether it’s only in death that we can understand our lives. 7p.m. July 22 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $20. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org.

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The Corn is Green, this 1979 made for television drama finds Kate as a schoolteacher determined to bring education to a Welsh coal mining town, despite some pretty heavy opposition. Kate earned an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Lead Actress for her work on this flick which originally aired on CBS. 2p.m.,4p.m.,7p.m. July 23 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $8. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Cinderella, New children’s musical adaptation of the classic Cinderella story featuring Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother guides audiences through Cinderella’s journey of kindness, courage, and self-confidence. This musical features lively songs, magic, audience participation and some new characters, produced by The Summer Theatre of New Canaan. 2p.m. July 30 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $20 adults, $12 children 12 & under. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Letters from Home: America’s Bombshell Duo. Heading to the Kate from North Carolina, this dynamite Duo brings some of the most icon music of the 1940’s to life in their fast paced, high energy, and patriotic performance. 4p.m. Aug. 2 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $35-$38. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Aida, an opera that sets a heartbreaking love triangle against the backdrop of an empire at war. Ukrainian soprano Liudmyla Monastyrska made a Met debut as Aida, opposite two major stars: tenor Roberto Alagna as the war hero Radamès and Olga Borodina as the pharaoh’s daughter Amneris. Met Principal Conductor Fabio Luisi conducts. 1p.m. Aug. 8 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $15. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org.

La Traviata, Natalie Dessay stars as the tragic courtesan Violetta Valéry in Willy Decker’s innovative modern-dress staging of La Traviata, which “delivers style, sparkle, and stirring drama” (Los Angeles Times). Met Principal Conductor Fabio Luisi leads the tragic love story, which also stars Matthew Polenzani as the lovesick Alfredo and Dmitri Hvorostovsky as his disapproving father, Giorgio Germont. 1p.m. Aug. 12 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $15. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Pinocchio, Kaleidoscope Children’s Theater returns to the Kate. A series of adventures awaits Pinocchio in his quest to become a real boy. Will he take the Blue Fairy’s advice and listen to the smart little cricket? Or will he end up as a donkey on the Isle of Joy? Come and find out! It’s a show the whole family will enjoy, no strings attached. 1p.m. Aug. 15 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $16 Adults/$10 Children 12 & Under. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. The Man Upstairs, Starring Katharine Hepburn and Ryan O’Neal, this 1992 movie was one of Kate’s later movies. Kate plays an old woman who shelters an escaped convict played by O’Neill. The pair becomes unlikely friends given the extreme circumstances. Kate was nominated for a Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film, Golden Globe Award. 2p.m., 4p.m., 7p.m. Aug. 18 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $8. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. La Cage aux Folles. Jerry Herman’s show tunes overflow in the tale of a family of cabaret performers led by partners Georges and Albin. When their son brings home his fiancée and the future in-laws, the limits of love, parenthood and mascara are put to the test. Tender romance and wild laughter are center stage as the Riviera’s most delicious drag nightclub bursts to life in its Goodspeed debut. 2p.m.-6:30p.m. Sun., 2p.m.-7:30p.m.

BROADWAY AT THE GARDE SERIES

Wed., 2p.m.-7:30p.m. Thurs., 8p.m. Fri., 3p.m.-8p.m. Sat., June 26-Sept. 6 at Goodspeed Opera House, 6 Main St., East Haddam. $73.50. 860-873-8668, goodspeed.org. My Paris. A new musical about the life and times of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, the artist who captured the gaiety, color and heartbreak of Montmartre, Le Can-Can, and the world of Le Moulin Rouge. Inhabited by the colorful people he painted, it’s the story of a great artist who loved a world that never quite loved him back. Music and lyrics are by French performer Charles Aznavour. The book is by Oscar, Tony and Pulitzer Prize winner, Alfred Uhry, with English lyrics by three time Tony winner, Jason Robert Brown. Tony winning director/ choreographer, Kathleen Marshall, brings it all to whirling, spinning and sassy life. C’est magnifique! 2p.m.-6:30p.m. Sun., 2p.m.-7:30p.m. Wed., 7:30p.m. Thurs., 8p.m. Fri., 3p.m.-8p.m. Sat. July 23- Aug. 16 at Goodspeed Opera House, 6 Main St., East Haddam. $50.50. 860-873-8668, goodspeed.org. The Sixties Show, “The Greatest 1960’s Re Creation Show in The World.” In addition to the concert experience, the show is also powerfully dramatized by a combination of narration and 60’s archival audio and newsreel footage. The Sixties Show is a high energy trip back in time, that reminds the audience how uniquely inspirational, entertaining, and historically significant the music of the 1960’s was and continues to be. 8p.m. Aug. 29 at Seven Angels Theatre, 1 Plank Rd., Waterbury. $37.50. 203-7574676, sevenangelstheatre.org. I Loved, I Lost, I Made Spaghetti. The show returns for two weekends. Enjoy summer theatre starring Waterbury’s own Maria Baratta. 8p.m. July 10-11, 17-18, 2p.m. July 12 & 19 at Seven Angels Theatre, 1 Plank Rd., Waterbury. $38.50. 203-757-4676, sevenangelstheatre.org.

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MUSIC The Beach Boys with the Hartford Symphony Orchestra. 8 p.m. Aug. 12 at Simsbury Meadows, 22 Iron Horse Blvd., Simsbury. $20-$60, manicproductions.com Willie Nelson & Family Old Crow Medicine Show. 7 p.m. Aug. 22 at Simsbury Meadows, 22 Iron Horse Blvd., Simsbury. $38-$98, manicproductions.com Elle King, young singer/songwriter/guitarist/ banjoist who recorded with producers such as Jeff Bhasker (Fun., Kanye West), Eg White (Adele, Sam Smith), and Jacknife Lee (R.E.M., U2), and guest musicians including Mark Ronson and Patrick Carney of the Black Keys.

9 p.m. July 17 at The Space, 295 Treadwell St., Hamden. $15. 203-288-6400, thespacect.com

Estate, 20 Litchfield Rd., Norfolk. Free. 860-5423000, Norfolk.yale.edu

20 Litchfield Rd., Norfolk. $30-$500. 860-5423000, Norfolk.yale.edu.

Young Artists’ Performance Series: New Music. Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano. 7:30 p.m. July 3 at Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, Ellen Battell Stoeckel

Norfolk Presents: Music of Mozart and Franck. 8 p.m. July 10 at Norfolk Festival Music Shed, Ellen Battell Steockel Estate, 20 Litchfield Rd., Norfolk. Free. 860-542-3000, Norfolk.yale.edu.

Norfolk Presents: Music Of Three Centuries. 8 p.m. Aug. 7 at Norfolk Festival Music Shed, Ellen Battell Steockel Estate, 20 Litchfield Rd., Norfolk. Free. 860-542-3000, Norfolk.yale.edu.

Norfolk Presents: Thomson, Argento and Copland 8 p.m. July 31 at Norfolk Festival Music Shed, Ellen Battell Steockel Estate, 20 Litchfield Rd., Norfolk. Free. 860-542-3000, Norfolk.yale.edu.

Roxy Coss: Summer Jazz Series-- New York City based saxophonist, composer and educator Roxy Coss has become one of the most unique and innovative voices of her generation. The 2014 Downbeat Critics Poll named her a “Rising Star” on Soprano Saxophone, and she has performed across the globe with such greats as Clark Terry, Louis Hayes, Claudio Roditi, Gerald Cannon, Jeremy Pelt, and Willie Jones III. 8p.m. July 31 at the Palace Theater, 100 East Main St., Waterbury. $22. 203-346-2000, palacetheaterct.org.

EMANUEL AX in concert in honor of Claude Frank, a gala event. 2 p.m. Aug. 16 at Norfolk Festival Music Shed, Ellen Battell Steockel Estate,

Y institute of sacred music

Performances · Lectures and more Presenting

Great Organ Music at Yale · Yale Camerata Yale Schola Cantorum · Yale Literature and Spirituality Series and more

Trevor McQueen: Summer Jazz Series-- A recent graduate of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Trevor McQueen made his Broadway debut as “Little Jake” in the revival of Annie Get Your Gun. He had the privilege of experiencing Pittsburgh’s tremendous music scene while studying at his university and playing with some of the city’s most talented emerging and established musicians. 8p.m. Aug. 21 at the Palace Theater, 100 East Main St., Waterbury. $20. 203-346-2000, palacetheaterct.org. Idina Menzel Live-- Hot on the heels of a remarkable year that included performing the smash hit “Let It Go” from Disney’s Frozen at the 86th annual Academy Awards, a triumphant return to Broadway in the musical If/Then, a Best Actress Tony Award nomination and the release of this season’s must-have Christmas album Holiday Wishes, superstar Idina Menzel will head out on a global tour in 2015. 8pm. July 11 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $45. 888-2267711, mohegansun.com Kelly Clarkson with Pentatonix and Eric Hutchinson. 7p.m. July 23 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $79-$99. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Ariana Grande with Prince Royce. 7:30p.m. Aug. 2 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $29.50-$79.50. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Boston. 7:30p.m. Aug. 13 at Mohegan Sun Arena, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $49.50. 888-226-7711, mohegansun.com. Bliss Hippy, folk duo. 7p.m. July 11 at the Funky Monkey Café & Gallery, 130 Elm St., Cheshire. $7. 203-439-9161, thefunkymonkeycafe.com. Up on the Roof, Funk. 7p.m. July 17 at the Funky Monkey Café & Gallery, 130 Elm St., Cheshire. $7. 203-439-9161, thefunkymonkeycafe.com. Cleopatra Degher, indie folk. 7p.m. July 10 at the Funky Monkey Café & Gallery, 130 Elm St., Cheshire. $7. 203-439-9161, thefunkymonkeycafe.com.

For latest calendar information call 203.432.5062 or visit ism.yale.edu 54 June/July 2015

Lynn Tracey Trio, feat. Vocalist Fernanda Franco. 7p.m. July 24 at the Funky Monkey Café & Gallery, 130 Elm St., Cheshire. $10. 203-4399161, thefunkymonkeycafe.com. NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM


Old Crow Medicine Show

Neon Trees, Fictionist, Ian Biggs. 8p.m. July 25 at College Street Music Hall, 238 College St., New Haven. $25. Collegestreetmusichall.com. The Decemberists, Lady Lamb. 7p.m. July 27 at College Street Music Hall, 238 College St., New Haven. $46. Collegestreetmusichall.com. Whitesnake, Bridge to Grace. 6:30p.m. July 28 at College Street Music Hall, 238 College St., New Haven. $42-$145. Collegestreetmusicalhall.com. Changes in Latitudes: Jimmy Buffett Tribute. 7:30p.m. July 2 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $35. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org.

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Smalltown Concert Series: Diggin Dylan. This Diggin’ Dylan crew will pay tribute to Bob Dylan with an intergenerational group of male and female musicians featuring local Jack Rollins, Arlene Wow, Rempe Ferreira Kooij, Lauren Agnelli, and Dana Takaki. 8p.m. July 11 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $25. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Howie Day. 7p.m. July 12 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $25. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org.

The Stepkids, Tanooki Suit. 7p.m. July 3 at The Outer Space, 295 Treadwell St., Hamden. $15. 203-288-6400, theouterspace.net.

Marshall Tucker Band. 8p.m. July 17 at the Infinity Norfolk, 20 Greenwoods Rd., Norfolk. $65-$85. 860-542-5331, infinityhall.com.

The Little Roy & Lizzy Show. 7p.m. July 23 at The Outer Space, 295 Treadwell St., Hamden. $20. 203-288-6400, theouterspace.net.

Voyage, “Journey” tribute band. 8p.m. July 18 at the Infinity Norfolk, 20 Greenwoods Rd., Norfolk. $35-$50. 860-542-5331, infinityhall.com.

John R. Forcinelli Jr. “15 Years New Haven to Nashville” ft. Special Guest: Annika. 7p.m. July 25 at The Outer Space, 295 Treadwell St., Hamden. $15. 203-288-6400, theouterspace.net.

Seven Bridges, an Eagles tribute. 8p.m. July 24 at the Infinity Norfolk, 20 Greenwoods Rd., Norfolk. $35-$50. 860-542-5331, infinityhall.com.

A Very Jerry Jam #4. 7p.m. Aug. 8 at The Outer Space, 295 Treadwell St., Hamden. $10. 203-2886400, theouterspace.net.

Kashmir, the Led Zeppelin tribute band. 8p.m. Aug. 22 at the Infinity Norfolk, 20 Greenwoods Rd., Norfolk. $35-$50. 860-542-5331, infinityhall.com.

Shipla Ray. 9p.m. July 11 at Café Nine, 250 State St., New Haven. $8-$10. 203-789-8281, cafenine.com.

Moondance, the Van Morrison tribute show. 8p.m. Aug. 29 at the Infinity Norfolk, 20 Greenwoods Rd., Norfolk. $25-$35. 860-5425331, infinityhall.com.

The Wooden Sky. 8p.m. July 14 at Café Nine, 250 State St., New Haven. $8-$10. 203-789-8281, cafenine.com.

Jill Scott. 7:30p.m. July 16 at the Oakdale Theatre, 95 S. Turnpike Rd., Wallingford. $39.50$95. 203-265-1501, oakdale.com.

Grammy Award Winner Redd Volkaert with Robbie Fulks. 9p.m. July 18 at Café Nine, 250 State St., New Haven. $15. 203-789-8281, cafenine.com.

The Australian Pink Floyd Show. 8p.m. Aug.7 at the Oakdale Theatre, 95 S. Turnpike Rd., Wallingford. $25-$39.50. 203-265-1501, oakdale.com.

Red, White, and Blues BBQ with Mighty Soul Drivers, Blues in the Dark (feat. Ryan Hartt & Mike Law) & The Winner of the CTBS Challenge. Celebrate your Freedom by doing what we as Americans do best: eating BBQ and dancing the night away! Executive Chef David Gilmore will be serving up a mouthwatering, All-You-Can-Eat spread on the patio. 5p.m. July 5 at the Infinity Norfolk, 20 Greenwoods Rd., Norfolk. $19-$35. 860-5425331, infinityhall.com. “Satisfaction” Rolling Stones tribute band. 8p.m. July 11 at the Infinity Norfolk, 20 Greenwoods Rd., Norfolk. $30-$45. 860-5425331, infinityhall.com.

O.A.R. 7:30p.m. Aug. 11 at the Oakdale Theatre, 95 S. Turnpike Rd., Wallingford. $35. 203-2651501, oakdale.com. Celebrating 50 Years of the Grateful Dead, 3-day pass. College Street Music Hall will be hosting a simulcast of “Fare Thee Well” in high-definition and full-concert-sound in a concert setting on July 3rd, July 4th, and July 5th. To celebrate Grateful Dead’s 50-year career, the four original members, Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh, and Bob Weir will reunite this summer to play five final shows. Joined by Phish’s Trey Anastasio, as well as Jeff Chimenti and Bruce Hornsby. 7p.m. July 3-5 at College Street Music Hall, 238 College St., New Haven. $42. Collegestreetmusichall.com.

La Fille Du Regimet, Natalie Dessay is the title tomboy in Donizetti’s comedy, with Juan Diego Flórez as Tonio, the soldier who is willing to go to great lengths—and sing 9 high C’s—to win her love. The supporting cast includes Felicity Palmer as the Marquise of Berkenfield, Alessandro Corbelli as Sulpice, and the late Tony Award-winning actress Marian Seldes, in her Met debut, as the Duchess of Krakenthorp. 1p.m. July 18 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $15. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. The Gathering, Presented by Will Ackerman, Founder of Windham Hill Records. Join Will along with Vin Downes, Dana Cunningham, and Rebecca Harrold as they showcase some of their acoustic, new age and folk music from many years of musicianship. 8p.m. July 24 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $28. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Cash is King: Johnny Cash Tribute. 8p.m. July 25 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $30-$32. 860-5100473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Chestnut Hill Concerts: Chamber Music by Beethoven, Prokofiev, and Schumann. The first concert in the 2015 series includes three works in the key of D: Beethoven’s Serenade for Flute, Violin, and Viola in D major, Prokofiev’s Flute Sonata in D major, and Schumann’s Piano Trio No. 1 in D minor. Artistic director and cellist Ronald Thomas will be joined by internationally-renowned artists, including flutist Catherine Gregory, violinist Jesse Mills, violist Tien-Hsin Cindy Wu, and Rieko Aizawa, piano. 8p.m. Aug. 7 Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. $30-$35. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Hotel California: The Original Eagles Tribute Band. 8p.m. Aug 15 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main

St., Old Saybrook. $45. 860-510-0473, katharinehepburntheater.org. Thomas Murray, organ. 7:30p.m. July 1 at Woolsey Hall, 500 College St., New Haven. Free. 203-432-5062, ism.yale.edu. The Sixties Show, “The Greatest 1960’s Re Creation Show in The World.” In addition to the concert experience, the show is also dramatized by a combination of narration and 60’s archival audio and newsreel footage. The Sixties Show is a high energy trip back in time, that reminds the audience how uniquely inspirational, entertaining, and historically significant the music of the 1960’s was and continues to be. 8p.m. Aug. 29 at Seven Angels Theatre, 1 Plank Rd., Waterbury. $37.50. 203-7574676, sevenangelstheatre.org. Kansas. 7:30p.m. July 24 at Town Center Park at Meadowbrook, 2761 Dixwell Ave., Hamden. Free. 203-287-2546, hamdenartscommission.org. The Family Stone. 7:30 July 31 at Town Center Park at Meadowbrook, 2761 Dixwell Ave., Hamden. Free. 203-287-2546, hamdenartscommission.org. This summer, Chestnut Hill Concerts will present four programs of chamber music arranged in a rather unusual way. Artistic director and cellist Ronald Thomas has organized each concert around a single key as the starting point for answering the question, “What’s in a Key?” Classical composers knew that the key of a piece of music affects its mood and spirit, and even its “color.” Each concert this season -- along with performances of masterworks played by world-class artists--will feature Mr. Thomas’s commentary on the characteristics of various keys to guide the audience in the exploration this aspect of classical music. Key of D: Beethoven: Serenade for Flute, Violin, and Viola in D major, Prokofiev: Flute Sonata in D major, Schumann: Piano Trio No. 1 in D minor, Catherine Gregory, flute, Jesse Mills, violin, Tien-Hsin Cindy Wu, viola, Ronald Thomas, cello, Rieko Aizawa, piano. 8 p.m. Aug. 7. Key of E: Beethoven: Clarinet Trio in E flat major, Brahms: Clarinet Sonata in E flat major, Beethoven: Trio in E flat major, Tien-Hsin Cindy Wu, violin, Romie de Guise-Langlois, clarinet, Ronald Thomas, cello, Randall Hodgkinson, piano. 8p.m. Aug. 14. Key of A: Ravel: Trio in A minor, Schubert: Viola Sonata in A minor, Elgar: Quintet in A minor, Todd Phillips, violin, Catherine Cho, violin, Cynthia Phelps, viola, Ronald Thomas, cello, Mihae Lee, piano. 8p.m. Aug. 21. Key of C: Bach: Cello Suite No. 5 in C minor, Brahms: Piano Trio No. 2 in C major, Faure: Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Steven Copes, violin, Mark Holloway, viola, Ronald Thomas, cello, Mihae Lee, piano. 8p.m. Aug. 28 at Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St., Old Saybrook. Subscriptions to four concerts are $120 (orchestra) and $100 (balcony) or $35 single ticket for orchestra and $30 for the balcony. 860-510-0453, thekate.org.


ART OPENING “Voicings”: a multi-media show with works by Meg Bloom, Phyllis Crowley, Kathy Kane, and Karen Wheeler. July 9-Aug 2 at City Gallery, 994 State St., New Haven. Open Thurs-Sunday 12-4 p.m. Free. 203-782-2489, city-gallery.org. P.T. Barnum’s “Brother from Another Mother” featuring Art Young. The event is in celebration of the humor and poignancy of the late Bethel, Connecticut illustrator, Art Young. Young was the best known illustrator in the country from 1900 to 1940 and did his work from his home on four acres of farmland in Bethel where he built a public art gallery. His art ranged from Americana folkishness to political cartoons. The program will explore Young’s images and stories from Types of the Old Home Town, and will feature a discussion of Art Young’s admiration and connection to P.T. Barnum. 2 p.m. July 9 at The Barnum Museum, 820 Main St., Bridgeport. $5 donation. 203-331-1104, barnum-museum.org. 42nd Meet the Artists and Artisans Show Fine artists paint, sculpt, carve, solder, weld and weave on site with a great variety of original work. Up beat contemporary, flamboyant, and expressionistic styles; Animal, caricature, pet, portraits, impressionistic landscapes, New England lighthouse and coastal scenes in acrylic, water colors, and oil paints, wood sculptures, jewelry, porcelain and clayware. 10a.m.-6p.m. Aug. 1-2 at Olde Mistick Village, 27 Coogan Blvd., Mystic. Free. 203-8745672, meettheartistsandartisans.com By Night-- By day, museum/gallery professionals work amongst distinguished art. For some, a rigorous studio practice is born by night. By Night is an exhibition featuring practicing artists working in significant institutions. June 6-July 6 at Six Summit Gallery, 6 Summit St., Ivoryton. Open Wed., 11a.m.-5p.m., Thu., 11a.m.-6:20p.m., Fri., 10a.m.-6:30p.m., Sat.,12p.m.,-4p.m., Sun., 12p.m,-4p.m. Free. 860-581-8332, sixsummitgallery.com. From The Garden. An exhibition of paintings by Patricia Kitchings. June 6-July 11 at The Cooley Gallery, 25 Lyme St., Old Lyme. Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Free. 860-4340-8807, cooleygallery.com. Susan Powell Gallery presents Realistically Speaking, by artist Peter Bergeron, Sandy Garvin, Vincent Giarrano and Dennis Sheehan. June 20-July 6 at Susan Powell Fine Art, 679 Boston Post Rd., Madison. Open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Free. 203-318-0616, susanpowellfineart.com. Susan Powell Gallery presents Summer Along the Shore, by artists Del-Bouree Bach, James Magner, Leonard Mizerek and Cora Odgen. July 10- Aug. 31 at Susan Powell Fine Art, 679 Boston Post Rd., Madison. Open 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. Wed-Sat. Free. 203-3180616, susanpowellfineart.com. Summer on the Water: A Marine Art Exhibition. An exhibition of work by the country’s premier maritime artists. June 12- July 31 at Lyme Art Association, 90 Lyme St., Lyme. Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 1-5p.m. Sun. Free. 860-434-7802, lymeartassociation.org. Summer Days, Starry Nights & Connecticut Pastel Society. Portraits, landscapes, still life paintings and sculpture abound in this annual juried exhibition of work. Aug. 7-Sep. 18 at Lyme Art Association, 90 Lyme St., Lyme. Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues-Fri., 1-5p.m. Sun. Free. 860-434-7802, lymeartassociation.org. New Works in Felt by Carol Ingram. Aug. 19- Sept. 27 at Wesleyan Potters, 350 S. South Main St., Middletown. Open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Wed., Thurs., & Fr., 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. noon-4p.m. Sun. Free. 860-344-0039, wesleyanpotters.com. Momentary Landscapes by Liz Antle-Odonnell. This exhibit investigates the conversation between natural and manmade landscapes, using telephone polls, electrical towers, and street lights as the primary subjects. Through a series of linoleum block prints and various forms of collage, Liz Antle-O’Donnell reveals how our created landscapes are becoming more natural than nature itself. June 4-July 5 at Kehler Liddell Gallery, 873

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Reynolds Fine Art will host a collaboration between Barry Svigals and Robert Reynolds hrough July, 31 Whalley Ave., New Haven. Open 11a.m.-4p.m. Thurs.-Fri., 10-4p.m. Sat.-Sun. Free. 203-389-9555, kehlerliddell.com. Hello, I Must Be Going: American Pastoral by Hank Paper. In this collection of contemporary pastoral photographs, Hank Paper depicts the effect of pristine landscapes on behavior and society. Featuring such locales as the Hudson River Valley, Pennsylvania Amish farmlands, the Catskills, the Adirondacks, New England, and the American West, Paper presents an interplay between human (or non-human) stories against a strange and beautiful background. June 4-July 5 at Kehler Liddell Gallery, 873 Whalley Ave., New Haven. Open 11a.m.-4p.m. Thurs.-Fri., 104p.m. Sat.-Sun. Free. 203-389-9555, kehlerliddell.com. Reynolds Fine Art will host a collaboration between Barry Svigals and Robert Reynolds, a series of mixed-media abstract works to be reproduced onto metal and canvas. Svigals, FAIA, artist and architect, is the founder and Managing Partner of Svigals + Partners, an architectural design firm in New Haven. His explorations in drawing, painting, and sculpture are part of the continuum of creative endeavors that inform and animate the architecture of the firm. Reynolds is an artist and the owner of Reynolds Fine Art gallery in New Haven. He is primarily selftaught and has been drawing and painting all his life. Primarily an oil painter, Reynolds also has an ongoing love affair with printmaking. He has painted and worked all over the world. Through July 31 at Reynolds Fine Art, 96 Orange St., New Haven. Open 11a.m.-5p.m. Tues.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-6p.m. Fri., 11a.m.-5p.m. Sat. Free. 203-498-2200, reynoldsfineart.com. All the Sea Knows, an exhibition of approximately 40 highlights from the Museum of the City of New York’s renowned marine art collection, reveals the diverse ways the sea has been depicted in American art. Pieces by James Bard, James Edwards Buttersworth, Thomas Chambers, Fitz Henry Lane, and Edward Moran capture the excitement of the age of sail and steam in works that range from folk art gems, to Hudson River School panoramas, to moody Tonalist contemplations of man and sea. Through Sep.20 at Florence Griswold Museum, 96 Lyme St., Old Lyme. Open 10a.m.-5p.m. Tues.-Sat., 1p.m.-5p.m. Sun. $10. 860-434-5542, florencegriswoldmuseum.org. Donald Blumberg Photographs: Selections from the Master Sets. This exhibition features a selection of approximately

160 photographs by Donald Blumberg made over the last six decades. In the 1960s, Blumberg began to focus his attention-as both an artist and a citizen-on the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, and other political and cultural issues that remain relevant today. He scrutinized the manner in which this subject matter was being conveyed to mass audiences via media outlets such as newspapers and television, photographing not the events themselves but the media’s coverage of them. Aug. 21-Nov. 22 at Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven. Open 10a.m.-5p.m. daily except Mon. (until 8p.m. Thurs.) 1p.m.-6p.m. Sun. Free. 203-432-0600, artgallery.yale.edu. Katja Loher: How can we cool down the gilded sun beams? Through her wall-mounted video portals and hand-blown glass bubbles, the viewer enters a parallel universe in which Loher displays costumed dancers in choreographed routines filmed by the artist herself. June 6-Oct.12 at New Britain Museum of American Art, 56 Lexington St., New Britain. Open 11a.m.-5p.m. Mon.-Wed., Fri. 11a.m.-8p.m. Thurs., 10a.m.-5p.m. Sat., noon-5p.m. Sun. $12. 860-229-0257, nbmaa.org. The Shakers: Focus on: Enfield, Connecticut. The exhibition features many rare and authentic items from that community— furniture, small crafts, textiles, and works on paper. There are significant gifts of objects from several generous donors including nine objects from the widow of a direct descendant of the Enfield Shakers; all these initially came from Eldress Caroline Tate, the last leader of the community. June 14-Nov.20 at New Britain Museum of American Art, 56 Lexington St., New Britain. Open 11a.m.-5p.m. Mon.-Wed., Fri. 11a.m.-8p.m. Thurs., 10a.m.-5p.m. Sat., noon-5p.m. Sun. $12. 860-229-0257, nbmaa. org. Joe Wardwell “Down from Day One” & Jeremy Chandler “Scout’s Interlude” with works by Jana Paleckova. June 20-July 16 at Fred Giampietro Gallery, 1064 Chapel St., New Haven. Open 11a.m.-6p.m. Mon.-Sat. Free. 203-777-7760, giampietrogallery. com. Richard Lytle & Bernard Chaet at Fred Giampietro Gallery, 1064 Chapel St., New Haven. July 24-Sept. 4. Open 11a.m.-6p.m. Mon.Sat. Free. 203-777-7760, giampietrogallery.com.

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The Shoe Fits: Handmade Shoes by American Artists. This exhibition will present the latest in contemporary handmade shoes by American artisans devoted to what might be considered a “lost art,” creating handmade objects designed to be functional as well as beautiful, and reflective of both their own aesthetic and a wearer’s chosen style. June 26-Aug. 2 at Guilford Art Center, 411 Church St., Guilford. Open 10a.m.-4p.m. Mon.-Sat. noon-4p.m. Sun. Free. 203-453-5947, guilfordartcenter. org. Arresting Patterns: Race and the Criminal Justice System. This exhibition considers how artworks might visualize indicators of structural racism in America. As defined by theorist Sally Haslanger in “Oppressions: Racial and Other,” structural racism is an act of oppression or social/political wrongdoing against one or more races that is made possible by our collective arrangements. These arrangements routinely provide advantages for one or more races, while producing cumulative and chronic adverse outcomes for the others. This concept makes a clear distinction between individual oppressors (singular agents) and collective oppressors (groups). To offer a few concrete examples, collective arrangements run the gamut from institutions and public polices to cultural norms and cultural practices. Areas of focus have included the economy, the legal system, the prison system, the educational system, transportation systems, religion, family, etiquette, the media, the arts, and language. July 17-Sept. 12 at Artspace, 50 Orange St., New Haven. Open noon-6p.m. Wed. & Thurs., noon8p.m. Fri. & Sat. Free. 203-772-2709, artspacenh.org. Guilford Art Center’s Annual Craft Expo. The latest in handmade crafts will be represented in a variety of media, including clay, glass, leather, metal and non-metal jewelry, wearable and non-wearable fiber, metal, mixed media, paper, painting, photography, printmaking, soap and wood. Special features include a Silent Auction of exhibitor-donated crafts, live craft demos by Guilford Art Center faculty and staff, food trucks including New Haven Pizza Truck, Cheesy Street Grill, Perk on Wheels, iThai, Ashley’s Ice Cream, Cannolis on the Run, and musical entertainment every day. 12p.m.-9p.m. July 17, 10a.m.-7p.m. July 18, 12p.m.-5p.m. July 19 at Guilford Green, Guilford. $9. 203-453-5947, guilfordartcenter.org/expo.

ONGOING From Clocks to Lollipops: Made in New Haven. More than one hundred objects, advertisements, trade cards, photographs and other items from the Museum’s collections are featured in this fascinating look at the production of consumer goods in New Haven, both handmade and factory made, over the past three hundred plus years. Through Dec. 31 at New Haven Museum, 114 Whitney Ave., New Haven. Open 10a.m.-5p.m. Tues.Fri., noon-5p.m. Sat., Free. 203-562-4183, newhavenmuseum.org. Reynolds Fine Art displays paintings by Zbigniew Grzyb and photographs by Grant Frost. Through July 12 at 360 State St., New Haven. Open 9a.m.-6p.m. Mon., 8a.m.-6p.m. Tues. & Thurs., 9a.m.-7p.m. Wed., 9a.m-5p.m. Fri., 10a.m.-5p.m. Sat., 12p.m.-5p.m. Sun. Free. 203-498-2200, reynoldsfineart.com.

drawings, prints, and photographs by such iconic artists as William Blake, Théodore Géricault, Francisco de Goya, and Joseph Mallord William Turner. The broad range of work selected challenges the traditional notion of the Romantic artist as a brooding genius given to introversion and fantasy. Through July 26 at Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven. Open 10a.m.-5p.m. daily except Mon. (until 8p.m. Thurs.) 1p.m.-6p.m. Sun. Free. 203-432-0600, artgallery.yale.edu. Tom Yost: A Modern Realist. This exhibit of 25 beautifully conceived and executed oil paintings highlights Tom Yost’s work created over the last 15 years. The subjects he chooses are from his beloved Litchfield Hills. Through Sept. 27 at New Britain Museum of American Art, 56 Lexington St., New Britain. Open 11a.m.-5p.m. Mon.-Wed., Fri. 11a.m.-8p.m. Thurs., 10a.m.-5p.m. Sat., noon -5p.m. Sun. $12. 860-229-0257, nbmaa.org. The Enchanting Jewels of Elizabeth Gage. The exhibition will showcase approximately 250 pieces of fine jewelry, spanning the 50 years of Elizabeth Gage’s superb craftsmanship and bold design. Through July 26 at New Britain Museum of American Art, 56 Lexington St., New Britain. Open 11a.m.-5p.m. Mon.-Wed., Fri. 11a.m.-8p.m. Thurs., 10a.m.-5p.m. Sat., noon-5p.m. Sun. $12. 860229-0257, nbmaa.org. Gollum: Monsters of Ruin and the Techno-Sublime. In the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Hollywood reimagines the ancient Jewish depiction of Golem as a formless being that represents Adam before his final creation by God, to a degenerate hobbit known as Gollum. The first Golem was made of the earth’s crust, while the Hollywood Gollum was composed of computergenerated imagery (CGI). This depiction is articulated by film theorist Tom Gunning, in his essay “Gollum and Golem: Special Effects and the Technology of Artificial Bodies,” in part, to argue the ways in which post-production special effects increasingly shape what a viewer deems to be “real” or believable motion. Explore how artists working in photography, paint, sculpture and video similarly grapple with creating “real” depictions of the human body. But rather than strive for believability, these artists expose the plastic and digital underbellies of

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their mediums. As a result, the illusions of the “real” give way to monstrous depictions of Technicolor beings. May 15-July 3 at Artspace, 50 Orange St., New Haven. Open noon-6p.m. Wed. & Thurs., noon-8p.m. Fri. & Sat. Free. 203-772-2709, artspacenh.org. The Answer is Dark considers the tragic and worrying aspects of the Golem story. A golem is a creature of Jewish mythology that was created through incantations and the placement of magical words upon its clay forehead. Although hubristically created to serve, a golem is clumsy and dangerous. Unlike humans, he is incapable of wisdom. We see examples of more modern golems in the characters of Frankenstein and the even more recent Incredible Hulk. Today, society grows increasingly dependent on technologies that like golem, are aimed to bring more ease into our daily lives. This exhibit examines the potential danger of humanity’s ever growing reliance on mechanization. The palette of this show is somber and the mood somewhat melancholy as this show confronts the golem that we live with and explores how this legend addresses issues that challenge us today. May 15-July 3 at Artspace, 50 Orange St., New Haven. Open noon-6p.m. Wed. & Thurs., noon-8p.m. Fri. & Sat. Free. 203-772-2709, artspacenh.org. Spectrum Gallery and Artisans Store presents Natural Science Illustrators and Painters & Other Surprises. The seven-week show presents the work of tri-state area artists in a variety of mediums including paintings in oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache and pastel, colored pencil, photography and sculpture in wood and bronze. May 22-July 12 at Spectrum Gallery, 61 Main St., Centerbrook. Open 11a.m.-6p.m. Wed.-Sat., 11a.m.-5p.m. Sun. Free. 860-663-5593, spectrumartgallery.org. Soul Searching, Drawing for Contemplation by Tom Edwards. Tues.-Fri. 11a.m.-2p.m. June 5-July 31 at Trinity Church on The Green, the corner of Temple St. and Chapel St., New Haven. Free. 203-624-3101, trinitynewhaven.org.

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An American Place: The Art Colony at Old Lyme, an ongoing exhibition on the second floor gallery at Florence Griswold Museum, 96 Lyme St., Old Lyme. No closing date. Open 10a.m.-5p.m. Tues.-Sat., 1-5p.m. Sun. $10. 860-434-5542, florencegriswoldmuseum.org. Permanent Collection, an ongoing exhibition that spans three buildings, the greatly expanded spaces now feature more than 4,000 objects, including many favorites, new acquisitions, and works long off view. Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven. No closing date. Open 10a.m.-5p.m. daily except Mon. (until 8p.m. Thurs.) 1p.m.-6p.m. Sun. Free. 203-432-0600, artgallery.yale.edu. Whistler in Paris, London and Venice. This exhibition-the first at the Gallery dedicated to James Abbott McNeill Whistlerexamines one of the most celebrated artists of the 19th century through the lens of three of his earliest and most innovative sets of etchings, the so-called French, Thames, and Venice Sets. Through July 19 at Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven. Open 10a.m.-5p.m. daily except Mon. (until 8p.m. Thurs.) 1p.m.-6p.m. Sun. Free. 203-432-0600, artgallery.yale.edu. The Critique of Reason: Romantic Art, 1760-1860. This exhibition comprises paintings, sculptures, medals, watercolors,

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B IB L I O FI L E S WORDS of MOUTH FÊTES IN S T Y L E

Where Can You Get An Excellent Pile of Lobster Meat On A Buttered Hotdog Bun?

S

ummer brings lots of great activities, festivals, and food. In Connecticut, a good lobster roll is worth a bit of effort. If you’re not into hearing the squeal of air (or is it screaming?) leaking out of the shell as that red, clampy little fella gets into his bath, try these excellent lobster rolls made by other folks whose hearts have hardened against the process and can make you a buttery, memorable lobster roll at a fair price.

O U T D O OR S From Machu Pichu to Grand Avenue BODY & SOUL

LO N S C R E E N

a Molienda Peruvian Cuisine’s chef Raul Vasquez brings the flavors of Peru’s unique culinary arts to New Haven in Grand Avenue style. Be patient with service, the food is authentically prepared, delicious and fresh. Peru is known for ceviche and pisco sours, so be sure to get both, unless you’re on the wagon—and in that case, you can have a refreshing chicha morada, a sweet drink made from blue corn. Next? How about Lomo Saltado, a basic Peruvian stir-fry. 113 Grand Avenue, New Haven (203) 562-0675

Lobster Shack, 7 Indian Neck Rd Branford: Outdoor seating only, picnic table style. What has the lobster roll been missing? Tobasco. Lobstershackct.com The Lobster Hut, 826 Bridgeport Ave. Milford: If by hut you mean truck parked in a parking lot, then this is the place you’re looking for. They sell until they run out, don’t wait!

Stowe’s Seafood, 347 Beach Street, West Haven: Stowe’s is a West Haven institution and they sell fresh fish and prepared seafood that totally hits the spot. If you have a seafood allergy, don’t go.

ummels Hotdogs is a family owned and operated business, currently in the 3rd generation, with four Hummels at the helm and about 80 employees. The family began selling out of the original plant on Congress Ave in New Haven, when there were 5 hotdog producers in the city. With the addition of “new” products like corned beef and Daisy hams almost twenty years ago, Hummels ceased to be a summer enterprise and became a year-long producer of hotdogs and deli meats. The plant never uses liquid smoke, still relying on hickory wood to smoke their meats—which Eric Hummel admits to eating almost every single day. His favorite hotdog recipe is just a little bit of mustard, but also admits that nothing beats a good chili cheese dog.

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he start of Overshores Brewing Co. pre-dates the brew-pub culture, so you may have seen them on the shelves for years before you could go in and park yourself in front of a tap. Don’t let that stop you now, that tap is finally open and ready to serve. They also offer tours of their facility, the first dedicated Belgian style brewery in Connecticut. Recognize the name? Overshores is a beach in Madison where the owner/operator, Christian Amport grew up. Drink local, not just because it’s responsible, but because it’s delicious.

The Lobster Pound, 505 Old Whitfield Street, Guilford: Freshcaught daily by the guy who is usually behind the counter. Buttery, smooth, hotdog bun goodness right there.

A Local Dog Since 1933

H

Belgian Style in S’Taven

Death In The Afternoon

I

t sounds unpleasant, but it isn’t—Death in the Afternoon is a cocktail at Oak Haven Bar flavored with cherry rosemary syrup mixed with rum and other tangy flavors like lime and ginger. You may not find it on their happy hour specials list, but it’s with the extra change to sip a little Death. Oak Haven Table and Bar has a wide-range of inventive cocktails—a little heavy on the bourbon, and even offers a few outdoor tables in the East Rock section of New Haven. NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM


Local Pastry Shop On World Rankings

L

ucibello’s Italian Pastry Shop is excellent, sure, and has hundreds of loyal customers, of course, and is well known in the region, obviously—but recently, the food & travel writers at the Italian e-zine Swide ranked Lucibello’s on Grand Avenue in New Haven as one of the top 10 Italian pastry shops in the world to visit—at number 1. Owned and operated by the Faggio family since 1929, Lucibello’s does not disappoint, even by Italian standards.

ORANGE IS THE NEW ELI’S Opening July 2015

From the Kitchen to the Backyard John Ginetti, owner of 116 Crown and Meat & Co., both on Crown Street in New Haven, believes the best idea for any recipe in the summer is to include watermelon. With a little creativity, watermelon can find itself at home in all sorts of unexpected places. If you Ginetti & Son..... find yourself invited to a party or barbecue - all you need do is ask the host what they’re looking for on the way home with a watermelon under your arm. Watermelon can be added to drinks, grilled and salted for an appetizer, and even stands up to the heaviest salad dressing - it’s quite delicious with chevre or blue cheese. Pickled Watermelon rind is also a delicious treat, and a great addition to sandwiches and salads. Below is a recipe for a quick summer salad with watermelon as the star and best of all, requires no heat.

Summer Salad 1/4 Large Watermelon - cubed 1/2 Red Onion Crumbled Chevre - to taste 1 bag spinach or mixed greens Toss all ingredients with your favorite vinaigrette, salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

Eat. Drink. Enjoy. • Open for Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a Week serving all of your Favorite Eli’s Dishes • Late Night Menu, served til Close • Happy Hour: Monday - Friday 4-6pm in the Bar • Eli’s Signature Horseshoe Bar • 24 Draft Lines • 18 Wines by the Glass • 15 - 55" HDTVs to watch all your Favorite Games

OFF PREMISE CATERING AVAILABLE Please call (203) 287-2837 or visit our website

285 Boston Post Road, Orange

Conveniently located between I-95 and the Merritt Parkway

ElisOrange.com new haven

59


Perfect For Sharing On A Summer Night Bistro Mediterranean and Tapas Bar Boasts Variety

M

ain Street in East Haven is an unlikely location for this lively upscale bistro that frequently features Galician Octopus as a daily special. The small plates menu at Bistro Mediterranean and Tapas Bar is perfect for getting a feel for the style of chef Gabriel Carreno. The food prep and presentation is always on point— no sloppy dollops of sauce drowning a plate or over-sized baskets of bread killing the appetite, but rather, a young man with a basket and tongs to grant you one slice of bread at a time. If you really want bread, however, you may need to wave him down. Much of the food at Bistro Mediterranean is perfect for sharing: the more plates you can order, the happier you’ll be. The Tartar de Lomo de Buey, a tartar of filet mignon

seasoned with black truffles and shallots, served with a quail egg and parmesan crostini is rich, flavorful and manages to incorporate all of those strong flavors with subtlety. The Empanadas are light and crispy with a flavorful dough and smooth guacamole for dipping. The Gambas a la Plancha—shrimp over a bed of chickpea purée, is plate-licking delicious. Larger plates are also on offer. The traditional paella, a la valenciana style, is filled with chunks of fish, bay scallops (the little ones), shrimp, mussels and clams mixed in with the occasional bits of chicken and pork. The Chuletas de Cordero, say you like a dry lamb chops with mashed rosé, they will find potatoes, are a true treat. The one immediately lamb is tender, the sauce is and bring it to you. light and not overwhelming, Prices are very but don’t plan on getting a reasonable: $6-10 Filet tartare and shrimp successful tally of how many salad for small plates, weight watchers points it entrées ranging from consumes. The wine list is medium$15-22 and cocktails in the $7-10 range sized and don’t be afraid to ask for a as well. recommendation. The servers know The dining room is comfortable, the what they’re talking about and if you bar is bright, the patio is well-shielded

Voted Best Seafood Market 10 Years in a Row

from the street with high walls and strategically placed topiaries. The bar plays host to live music on weekends and happy hour specials during the week from 4-6 with drink and appetizer specials. Live music can be anything from jazz and Spanish guitar to Flamenco and Salsa nights on Saturdays. – By Rachel Bergman 383 Main Street. East Haven, 203.467.2500 bistromediterraneanandtapasbar.com

Inducted into the CT Restaurant Association’s RESTAURANT HALL OF FAME

Indian Head Inn

Since 1968

Seafood at its Best!

Enjoy the Best Seafood on the Shoreline Legendary Lobsters, Steaks & Seafood

Thursday Ladies Night! $6 Martini’s in the Bar plus bar specials

Enjoy Lenny’s Famous Shore Dinner

includes: cup of chowder, two cherrystones, sweet corn, lobster, steamers, coffee, watermelon

Tura McNeil, Robert McNeil & Joe Lucchese Come by and say Hello to our new General Manager Joe formerly of Balducci’s & Citarella. Sample a full line of Joe’s new prepared items.

Hours: Mon-Sat 7am-6pm 2239 State Street, Hamden 203-624-6171 | NumberOneFish.com 60 June/July 2015

Deck & Famous Boat Bar Open!

LIVE MUSIC!! Along Scenic Route 146 Worth the drive from anywhere!

205 So. Montowese St. Branford Only 15 Minutes from Yale

203-488-1500 All Prices Subject to Change OPEN DAILY•LUNCH & DINNER 7 DAYS•LennysNow.com NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM


How Old Does This Taste? Dining out at historic locations is easy in a place like Connecticut, where old buildings are cherished, preserved and upcycled. The older the pizza oven, the better the pizza. The longer a fine wine is aged, hopefully the better it tastes and smells. These restaurants shape their excellent cuisine in historic buildings that have either been serving food for over a century, or have been repurposed as a favorite neighborhood restaurant.

Union League Café www.unionleaguecafe.com (203) 562-4299 1032 Chapel St., New Haven The former site of the homestead of Roger Sherman, former Mayor of New Haven and signer of the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Association, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, has been an award winning French restaurant since 1993. The current building, built in 1860, boasts a beautifully restored interior in which to enjoy excellent French delicacies like Foie Gras Au Torchon.

The Twisted Vine www.twistedvinerestaurant.com (203) 734-2462 285 Main Street, Derby Built in 1892 as the Old Birmingham Bank, many of the original accouterments remain, like the original vault. Serving lunch and dinner with

Arriving Spring 2015

many Italian and Asian favorites, The Twisted Vine has some hardcore ambience going with stained glass windows and massive chandeliers. They offer live music and an extensive wine list.

The Victorian House (203) 272-5743 226 Maple Avenue, Cheshire The Vic, built in 1871 as a private residence, is one of Cheshire’s favorite taverns, possibly because you can throw peanut shells on the floor. Winter months keep diners and drinkers warm with a stone fireplace, and the patio proves to be an excellent spot to enjoy fresh lobster.

Rainbow Gardens www.rainbowgardens.org (203) 878-2500 117 North Broad Street, Milford

Victorian homes on the Milford green, in that it’s not a funeral home. The house, built in 1855, was renovated and opened to the public in 1996 for lunch, brunch, and dinner with an extensive menu of sandwiches, salads and mains—but also one of the best dessert selections one could hope for, like a spectacular 7-layer bar.

Guilford Mooring www.guilfordmooring.com (203) 458-2921 505 Whitfield Street, Guilford Built in 1836, the views are marvelous and the food is probably better than you remember, with recent upgrades to both the space, and the menu. This will prove to be an excellent summer hangout starting immediately. Happy hour specials are available MondayFriday starting at 4p.m.

This multi-story Victorian home is unlike most other multi-storied

Book an Event for Summer at Stony Creek Brewery

In keeping with our reputation of discovering and promoting new wines from around the world, we present our latest selection from Navarra, Spain. Exclusively available at The Wine Thief and select restaurants. Changing the world of wine one bottle at a time.

181 CROWN STREET - NEW HAVEN (203) 772-1944 378 WHITNEY AVENUE - NEW HAVEN (203) 865-4845 Wine Tasting – Every Friday Night on Crown St. • 5–8 pm

TheWineThief.com

Fine Wines • Specialty Beers • Premium Liquors

For more information contact nina@stonycreekbeer.com

203-889-7463 new haven

61


M y N ew Ha v e n By Bruce Ditman

My New Haven Summer Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language. - H. James   

I

t’s been many summers since I got out of school, but I’d be lying if I denied the excitement I still get at the coming of the month of June. And while life as a grown up no longer offers sunny respites from rulers and books and, for sure, dirty looks still seem to come my way, the long days and warm nights still thrill me. New Haven is a wonderful place to live in the summertime. One’s close enough to the ocean to hear gulls almost everywhere in the city, but never far from the cool, dark green woods for camping, hikes or even the illicit dunk in a hidden, freshwater swimming hole (I’ll never tell). And at its heart, on the City’s green and in its nooks and corners, the arts blossom, even in the shade. What shall we do tonight? A free concert with thousands of your neighbors, maybe? A recital in a cool, dark theater with a trip to Ashley’s to follow, or maybe to your favorite bar for cold beer and loud talk well past any decent hour. What ever you choose, you’ve chosen right. In our early summer evenings in New Haven, powered by a cocktail of cut grass, warm air, free music, community, and a sense of undeniably sexy crepuscular expectation, we staid nutmeggers get legitimately loose. Like nuns on spring break, we strip off our steady habits and let it all hang out. Just try openly drinking a bottle of wine on the green in

62 June/July 2015

October - instead of July - as you sit nearly on top of a total stranger and your kids run wild and dance together. Hope you like bracelets because you’d get a fresh pair courtesy of the city. But not in summer. Yes, in summertime, New Haven’s libertine spirit rules. The International Arts and Ideas festival is the biggie, but the exhibits and exhibitionism never really stops. Not until enough leaves have fallen, enough students have returned, do we put our ivy back on and remember our Yankee modesty. This summer’s bliss, however, is tempered by sadness. Maybe all summers are. As children we left classmates behind for green lawns and cool lakes, for summer friends and new romances only to return in the fall to a world slightly different than the one we left behind. People changed and so did you. Nothing stays the same. Maybe that’s why summer is so great - to soften the blow of fall to come. I always hate it when good people leave our city, which is happening even as I write this. I hate it doubly so when they are dear friends of mine. But, it is inevitable, and I am confident that even as people leave, the center will hold here and what we lose at home we gain as evangelists in the field. Missionaries for our fair city, the greatest small city in the world. And I’ll think fondly and with no small satisfaction as I sit on a blanket on the green, amongst friends and strangers, drinking wine and likely chasing my children, that none of this is possible without all of our people, here now and gone, as well. See you on the green some summer afternoon, soon. And until the Fall, enjoy our ample parking.

NEWHAVENMAGAZINE.COM


2015 - 2016 Season

Classical Music at Woolsey Hall and Shubert Theater The Season Begins 10.1.15

NewHavenSymphony.org


target cancer’s dna and

you paint a much

brighter future.

Personalized medicine is more than a method of treatment. For thousands with cancer, it’s a new lease on life. By mapping cancer’s DNA and targeting specific cells, something remarkable is happening. People with even the most difficult to treat forms of the disease are seeing cancer go into remission. At Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven, personalized medicine is changing lives. Like the renewed life of Neva, a lymphoma survivor, and one of the many cancer survivors who came together to send the world a message: today, we are all closer to free.

Now with locations in New Haven and Greenwich; and Cancer Care Centers across Connecticut.

YNHH-2014 CTFNeva9x11.indd 1

1/31/14 2:34 PM

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New Haven magazine June/ July 2015  
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