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INVESTING IN

Insights into Terrorism Music Impresario INSIDE Medal of Honor


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Janice Murphy of SU's Grounds and Landscaping Department says the university is a veritable haven for a variety of birds, from the common robin (pictured) to the extremely rare Northern Saw-whet Owl. She credits the grounds and plentiful gardens, which provide the elements for good bird habitat. Best places for bird watching: Union Green, the Ethnobotanical garden and behind the Loyola and Administration buildings.

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Learn more about the birds at SU at www.seattleu.edu/grounds/bird-haven/.

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Volume 38 • Issue Number 1 • Winter 2014 STA F F

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Senior Art Director Terry Lundmark, ’82

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Editorial Assistant Emily Downing

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Contributing Photographers Eric Badeau, Sy Bean, John Lok, Doug Ogle, Zack Ponce, Chris Joseph Taylor

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Editor Tina Potterf

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Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Mollie Hanke, Caitlin King, Mike Thee

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Vice President/University Communications Scott McClellan Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden, ’10

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Assistant Vice President/Alumni Relations Susan Vosper, ’90, ’10

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Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published in fall, winter and spring by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Redhawk pride is alive and well in Rio. Alums Andy Giron, Matt Salazar and Michael Alcantara express themselves in the crowd of World Youth Day pilgrims.

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Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

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DEPARTMENTS

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Faculty News

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The Last Word

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The Seattle University Youth Initiative is making a significant impact on improving access to education and to a better future for young people.

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SU Magazine Winter 2 014 / 1

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Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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ON THE COVER Second grader Sadia Weligo raises her hand during the Q&A portion of a storytelling session at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School as part of a summer program in partnership with the Seattle University Youth Initiative.


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A compilation of fun facts, news, events and more connecting you to SU. B

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PHOTO BY MEREDITH TIBBETTS, USED WITH PERMISSION © 2013 STARS AND STRIPES

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Former Capt. William D. Swenson, a 2001 Seattle University political science graduate, received the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama at a White House ceremony on Oct. 15. The SU alumnus received the medal for risking his life above and beyond the call of duty during a 2009 battle with Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan. He is the first Army officer since the Vietnam War to receive the nation's highest award for valor and joins just six other living recipients of this medal. One of those six is (Ret.) Major Gen. Patrick H. Brady, a 1959 SU graduate and Board of Regent Emeritus.

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IN ACADEMICS AND SERVICE, SU AMONG TOP REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES

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Seattle University once again ranks among top regional universities in the West, according to U.S. News & World Report America’s Best Colleges 2014. SU ranks 6th among 120 regional universities in the West that provide a full range of comprehensive undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The university has maintained a spot in the top 10 consistently for more than a decade. “We are honored to be recognized as one of the nation’s top master’s universities,” says Provost Isiaah Crawford. “It is a testament to the teaching and scholarship of our accomplished faculty and the personalized, transformative experience they offer our students.” U.S. News also ranks SU as a national leader for service learning or community. volunteer work. Nationally, only 25 colleges and universities made the list, which highlights schools with outstanding examples of programs that education experts, including staff members of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, agree are key components for student success.

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At the 30th anniversary of the Gala, Ginny and John Meisenbach were the recipients of the St. Ignatius Medal, the university's highest honor. Pictured (l-r) Betty Woods, ’74, chair of Trustees, John Meisenbach, Ginny Meisenbach and President Stephen Sundborg, S.J.

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John and Ginny Meisenbach, longtime supporters of Seattle University, are the 2013 recipients of the St. Ignatius Medal, the highest honor awarded by the university. The medal is given to individuals who exhibit outstanding leadership and service, a commitment to others and a generosity of spirit. John, an alumnus, Trustee Emeritus and Regent Emeritus, and Ginny received the award at the 30th anniversary Gala in late October. “Ginny and John have made a profound and lasting impact at Seattle University and at organizations across our region,” says President Stephen Sundborg, S.J. “They have done so much to give hope and opportunity to those in need and have created a remarkable legacy.” The couple supports multiple organizations and programs including Seattle Children’s, College Success Foundation, Stolen Youth and the Costco Scholarship Fund.

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PHOTO BY KERRY DAHLEN

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The number of pounds of fresh produce harvested at Seattle University’s Urban Farm and delivered to area food banks in 2012–13.

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Pictured (l-r): President Sundborg, Costco co-founder and Chairman Jeff Brotman, SU student/ emcee Ramón Penaranda '14, UW student Ruben Reyes, SU alumni/speaker Dylan Munn '10, UW President Michael Young and Trustee and Costco President and CEO Craig Jelinek.

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This year’s 14th annual Costco Scholars Breakfast raised more than $3.39 million for scholarships to benefit underrepresented undergraduate students at Seattle University and the University of Washington. Gov. Jay Inslee, Costco Co-founder and Chairman Jeff Brotman, President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., UW President Michael Young, current students and alumni of the program were among those in attenance for the event at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue.

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COSTCO SCHOLARS SUCCESS


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To learn more about these events, visit www.seattleu.edu/events. B

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Featuring Ray Conner, executive vice president, the Boeing Company and President and CEO, Boeing Commercial Airplanes

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February 1

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ALUMNI PRE-GAME RALLY (COLLEGE OF NURSING) Noon: nursing alumni; 1 p.m.: all alums, Rolfe Room (A&A Building)

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ALBERS EXECUTIVE SPEAKER SERIES 5:30 p.m., Pigott Auditorium

March 5 ALBERS EXECUTIVE SPEAKER SERIES 5:30 p.m., Pigott Auditorium Featuring John Williams, president and CEO, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

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ALUMNI DAY OF PRAYER 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Campion Ecumenical Chapel

SU ADVANTAGE NETWORK EVENT 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sorrento Hotel (Seattle)

March 25 “SU SOARING TO THE SUN” Palm Springs, Calif.

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ALUMNI PRE-GAME RALLY (SCHOOL OF LAW) 5 p.m.: Law alumni; 6 p.m.: all alums, KeyArena at Seattle Center

For alumni 50+

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ALBERS CRAB FEED Campion Ballroom

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ALUMNI PRE-GAME RALLY (COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING) 5 p.m.: Science & Engineering alumni 6 p.m.: All alums, KeyArena at Seattle Center

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STUDENT ALL-BEETHOVEN CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT Pigott Auditorium

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Featuring Roy Whitehead, chairman, president and CEO of Washington Federal, Inc.

HALL OF FAME LUNCHEON (ATHLETICS) 12:15 p.m., Campion Ballroom

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HOMECOMING ALUMNI MASS 11 a.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius

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HOMECOMING ALUMNI PRE-GAME RALLY AND MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. IDAHO Rally: 5 to 7 p.m.; game: 7:10 p.m., KeyArena at Seattle Center Half-time celebration and alumni after party

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WASHINGTON, D.C., ALUMNI CHAPTER RECEPTION 5 to 8 p.m.

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A benefit for SU Athletics

April 26 NATIONAL JESUIT ALUMNI DAY OF SERVICE 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wyckoff Auditorium (Engineering Building)

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May 31 RED TIE CELEBRATION Grand Hyatt Seattle

SCHOLARSHIP AND LEGACY SOCIETY APPRECIATION LUNCH 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.

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April 22 29TH ANNUAL ALUMNI AWARDS Campion Ballroom

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Leverage the Redhawk Network difference today.

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Save the date for our SU | Advantage networking event, February 25, 2014.

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Join our Redhawk Network to access a select group of qualified candidates, to find ways to stay on top of networking get togethers, and to mentor the next generation.

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www.seattleu.edu/careerservices

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JOIN TODAY


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PERSPECTIVES B

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Going for Gold | By Caitlin King

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Former SU soccer player turned boxer has sights set on Olympics

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“I force myself to do really uncomfortable things so it makes me better in the ring.”

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than most girls; she competes in the 125 lbs. weight class, but walks around, a commonly used phrase for “everyday weight,” at 130 lbs. The pressure is high for women boxers, who only have three weight classes—none of which Hamann is currently fighting in. Adding another degree of difficulty—she will need to move up to 132 lbs. by 2016. “I fight at 125 [pounds] for a reason. My body and boxing are at their best at this weight class,” says Hamann. “When people make weight, it’s an awesome accomplishment. There’s two wins in boxing: making weight and then the fight.” As part of her training, Hamann will participate in future USA Boxing National events and training camps at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo., where her parents live and Hamann attended high school. Hamann’s training regimen is well crafted and intense. She spends at least four hours a day at the gym, with her time split into a pair of two-hour blocks where she’ll work on anything from shadow boxing and heavy bag punching to aerobic and anaerobic conditioning. The majority of her time is at her home gym, Arcaro Boxing Gym. Occasionally she spars at Azteca Boxing Gym in Renton, where she can spar with male fighters that she matches up with size-wise. In the evenings, she blogs as a way to JENNIFER HAMANN, ’09 escape the daily rigors of training and to share her journey in boxing. It’s a good stress relief after such time and dedication to an For Hamann, the road from playing comfortable in the ring.” intense sport. soccer at SU—she played all four years While women’s boxing has gained inter“At Nationals next year, when everyone tries while an undergraduate philosophy national recognition, the sport only joined to beat me, I’m just going to go in knowing I student—to setting sights on the Olympics the Olympic Games in 2012. For Hamann have nothing to lose and just have fun.” started with taking up boxing, post-college, to qualify in a few years, she’ll need to win Follow Jennifer’s progress on her blog in an effort to stay fit. “I’ve been athletic, a series of titles in her weight class. at hamannroadtogold.org/blog. but I was surprised at how quickly I With her style and height, she’s taller

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picked it up,” says Hamann, who also ran track her senior year. Flash forward a few years and Hamann is razor-sharp focused on the task ahead. With her coach Tricia Turton, Hamann is training hard while balancing graduate school. Turton is a former boxer and is working with Hamann on what she calls “discomfort training,” which can range from non-physical skills like public speaking to breaking down boxing techniques that the fighter can improve on. “I practice other forms of discomfort in my everyday life so that I get more comfortable being uncomfortable in front of others,”Hamann says. “I like to remember that Muhammad Ali would always practice things he wasn’t good at during media workouts and people would question his ability before fights. …He spent a lot of time being uncomfortable so that he could be

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“I remember being so mad that I only got 15 seconds of fight time for all that training,” says Hamann. “But I was hooked.” Countless rounds and wins later—her record is 27-2—Hamann, a 2009 alum and current graduate student in the College of Arts and Sciences master’s program in Psychology in Existential-Phenomenological Therapeutic Counseling, is now vying to make it to the Olympics. And not just make it, but medal. “I want to be a great boxer, not merely an Olympic hopeful,” she says. And she’s inching her way closer to realizing this goal, coming off a dominant performance at the Women’s 2013 USA Boxing National Championship in Spokane this past spring. She brought home the national title. To qualify for the Olympic trials, she has to hold her position throughout the year of the Olympics, set for 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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In 2009, when boxer Jennifer Hamann first stepped in the ring for a fight at a high school in White Center, her opponent came out swinging. She ducked to the left and threw a 1-2. Although she was victorious in this initial bout—a nearly flawless effort, a technical knockout—Hamann wasn’t wholly satisfied with her performance.


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Boxer Jennifer Hamann is eyeing a bout in the ring at the Olympics.


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Music Impresario in the Making | By Tina Potterf

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Hollis Wong-Wear is a driving force in Seattle’s music scene

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“Seattle has something really special going for it and artfulness is driving the scene.”

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driven by a fierce independence and a DIY mentality that has served them well. “We design our live shows, do all the branding, I manage public relations and communications, we write our own songs,” she explains. “We are like minds, all hands on deck.” She became a collaborator to Haggerty on the song “Wing$,” writing the chorus and helping produce the video. “We worked for almost a year on that

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as an undergrad)—particularly as a spoken word artist with proven prowess. As a slam poet Wong-Wear cut her teeth with a community of like-minded artists in the Bay Area where she grew up. When she came to Seattle she got involved with Youth Speaks Seattle, a spoken word poetry and music group. “Four days after I started at SU I was walking from Campion [Hall] to the Langston Hughes Cultural Center to be

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HOLLIS WONG-WEAR, ’09

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song,” she says. “[The video] was a very large and dynamic project and through the creative process we became very close. The collaboration solidified the bond for all of us.” When it came time to write material for Macklemore’s debut full-length recording, The Heist, the artist once again called on his friend when he needed a reliable—and more importantly, inspiring—writing partner. “Without Hollis, our creative output the last couple of years wouldn’t be what it has turned into,” Haggerty wrote on a recent blog post on his website. “She’s the kind of person that when I’m spending time with her, she makes me better at my job.” On the success of her collaboration with Haggerty, Lewis and other artists, Wong-Wear says, “We all kind of have the same scrappy approach to making art and making things meaningful to us.” An example of this DIY-approach: the making of the video for “White Walls.” Wong-Wear was in front of the camera and behind the scenes over several

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part of a writing circle,” she says. She performed in various slam competitions, which landed her on many local stages and a slot at a national competition with the Seattle Slam team. With Canary Sing, Wong-Wear exhibited her abilities as a lyricist with depth, not content with spitting out rhymes void of meaning. Rather, the group, as Wong-Wear describes, was about strong lyricism, political awareness and youth empowerment. By way of Canary Sing and her rising presence among Seattle’s music and art circles—she has been involved with One Reel and served on the Bumbershoot board—Wong-Wear met more singersongwriters and rap and hip-hop artists. Through her associations she came to know Ben Haggerty, aka Macklemore. In 2008, her group opened for him at Seattle nightclub Chop Suey. They became friends through shared commonalities when it came to how they control their art. Rather than aspiring to sign to a major label or compromise artistic integrity, they are

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If you aren’t familiar with Wong-Wear’s music through her group The Flavr Blue or her ability to turn a phrase in a piece of poetry and amp up the impact via the delivery, you may know her from her collaboration with one of Seattle’s most popular and chart-topping acts of the moment: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. The homegrown hip-hop duo that made popping tags at the “Thrift Shop” a part of popular culture have Wong-Wear to thank, in large part, for the song’s fun and slightly kitschy music video, which she produced. That infectiously catchy hook on “White Walls,” Macklemore’s recent single, was penned by Wong-Wear and elevated by her vocals. Wong-Wear may rub elbows with veritable artists and tastemakers—she being one—but she remains as humble as can be. In addition to her work with Macklemore, she has carved out a nice music career of her own as a member of synth-pop trio The Flavr Blue. Others know her for her work as operations director for local hip-hop duo the Blue Scholars. Before all of this she was lighting up stages with rhymes as one-half of the rap-infused Canary Sing. She started Canary Sing in 2006, while a student at SU, with friend Madeleine Clifford. The 26-year-old Seattleite, by way of California, is a 2009 SU graduate and Sullivan Scholar. A University Honors Program student, Wong-Wear was drawn to the university’s location, academic offerings and small class sizes. “I thought Seattle was a really rad, creative city,” says Wong-Wear, who majored in history and minored in philosophy and Global African Studies. “I really saw myself here.” At SU, she quickly became known for her writing (she was a featured student diarist, who documented her experiences

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Hollis Wong-Wear is what you might call a “quadruple threat,” singer-songwriter, musician, producer and poet.


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sense that she is proud to be part of a city with a creative scene that is more a movement than a singular musical genre. “It is not just about music but also visual arts and theater arts,” she says. “Seattle has something really special going for it and artfulness is driving the scene.”

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on music video sets, Wong-Wear does freelance work and performs regularly with The Flavr Blue, which is on an upward trajectory. The trio performed at last summer’s Bumbershoot and Capitol Hill Block Party. In October the group released its EP, Bright Vices. Talking with Wong-Wear you get the

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days of shooting at various locations. There were some unforgettable scenes at Dick’s on Broadway. Then it was down to Los Angeles for additional shots, which include her part in the video that has her driving down a deserted road singing that hook. When she’s not managing bands or

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Hollis Wong-Wear, ’09, performs with her group The Flavr Blue, a Seattle synth-pop trio.


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World Youth Day Transformational | By Matthew Pyrc, S.J.

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PHOTOS BY MATTHEW PYRC, S.J.

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“One night my Magis small group celebrated Festa Junina with others staying in São Paulo. Some of the group left the party early to relax in the chapel nearby. After hours of dancing with my new friends I, now exhausted, went to find my group. When I found them I was greeted with the gleeful smile of my usually reserved new friend Marie. Together we stayed there until the party was done. The next day Marie told me that my coming to find them had made her night, it had felt like we were all family.” Student An Le shared how her relationship with her sister improved because of the pilgrimage. “My sister and I both went on the trip and there was not only a personal transformation, but also a change in our relationship. We have different types of conversations. There's a different tone when we are discussing religion and spirituality.” After the 10 days of MAG+S, the various experience groups reconvened in Rio for World Youth Day celebrations with Pope Francis and the final Mass on Copacabana beach. In his homily Pope Francis asked, “What is the Lord saying to us?“ Three simple ideas: Go, do not be afraid and serve. He said, “… Do not be afraid to go and to bring Christ into every area of life, to the fringes of society, even to those who seem farthest away, most indifferent. The Lord seeks all; he wants everyone to feel the warmth of his mercy and his love.” I believe we will be reaping the fruit of this pilgrimage for years to come. It is a wondrous thing that in such a large gathering of people, we can experience very personal encounters and transformations. Matthew Pyrc, S.J., is a campus minister in SU Campus Ministry.

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Adolfo Nicolás, S.J., General Superior of the Jesuits, preached at a Mass before sending the delegates into experience groups for an immersion. In his homily he told the story of a Diocese choosing a giraffe as its symbol—an animal with one of the biggest hearts because it needs a big heart to pump blood all the way to its brain. Because of its long neck it has a high point of view. He also spoke of humanity. “Humanity is more than any one of us has experienced in our own Matthew Pyrc, S.J., and Maria Ochoa, SU delegation group leaders, in front of Corcovado Christ the Redeemer in Rio. countries,” he stated. Approaching the people It was a time of wonder. Picture this: of Brazil and their fellow pilgrims with 2,500 people on immersion, three a big heart and a broad view can change million people at the Papal mass on their lives. He reminded us that our faith Copacabana beach. The joy and exciteresides in our hearts. He challenged us to ment of bringing strangers together from not get caught up in seeing the sights and across the globe instills hope of the great miss the people. Our experience groups accomplishments people can achieve were comprised of various nationalities when they unite. and multiple languages and sent all over The pilgrim experience this past summer the country for an immersion. Some reminded us of the Gospel message that went on a spiritual pilgrimage, some had all of humanity and creation is created a cultural immersion, some did service. by God, loved by God and worthy to be All were transformed. loved. The 2,500 pilgrims, mostly Jesuit MAG+S and World Youth Day was an University students, gathered in Salvador experience of community. People took de Bahia, Brazil, to begin a 10-day pretime to sit with each other, find ways to World Youth day event. To kick off communicate and to share in whatever MAG+S 2013 there was the “Welcoming way they could. Participants quickly of Nations” celebration. Delegates from bonded and formed community with various countries danced and sang, many their group. in full cultural costumes to celebrate our SU student Delaney Piper reflected on diversity in the body of Christ. the experience.

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A collective of Seattle University students, alumni and staffers made the journey from Seattle to Brazil for MAG+S 2013, an event culminating with World Youth Day in Rio de Janeiro with an appearance from Pope Francis.


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Christ the Redeemer reflected in the sunglasses of student Raina Taitingfong.

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MAG+S and World Youth Day was an experience of community. People took time to sit with each other, find ways to communicate and to share in whatever way they could.


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To learn more about how you can support Seattle University with your tax-deductible donation, visit www.seattleu.edu/giving or contact Leigh Ann Gilmer at (206) 296-6140.

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Individual gifts have a great impact at Seattle University. Donor support enables SU to provide financial aid, enhance academic programs and improve facilities. Whether directed to the Annual Scholarship Fund, any school or college or to one of SU’s standout programs, gifts from alumni and friends truly make a difference for today’s students. SU’s national rankings in publications like U.S. News & World Report are directly related to alumni participation and SU has been ranked in the U.S. News Top 10 regional universities in the West for the past decade.

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How You Can Make a Difference

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A Calling to Make a Difference | By Mike Thee A significant gift for the School of Theology and Ministry

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SU Magazine Winter 2 014 / 13

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as much as I am able."

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“I strongly believe [the school] is a very worthy organization, one that we certainly need in the community, so I decided I would help them

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course of his working years he became a principal owner of two local pharmacies. After selling these pharmacies in the late 1980s, he worked for Payless Drugs and later Rite-Aid Pharmacy, retiring in 2010 at age 80. This wasn't the only major milestone in Bleese's life that year. He got married—for the first time. "That added a whole new dimension to my life," he says with a laugh, offering these words of wisdom for those still seeking that special someone: "Don't give up hope— there's somebody out there somewhere. I met my [wife] Diane in church." At 83, Bleese is enjoying retirement and married life. VERLE BLEESE He is involved with Sand Point Community United Methodist Church, of which Born and raised in Fargo, ND, Bleese’s he is a member, as well as numerous family moved to Seattle where he comservice and fraternal organizations. pleted his senior year at Roosevelt As to why he chose to contribute so High School. Following high school generously to the School of Theology and he went to the School of Pharmacy at Ministry, Bleese points to Seattle as one of the University of Washington, where the most un-churched cities in the United he graduated in 1952. Having received States as a factor. He also recognizes his commission through the ROTC the growing number of adults who are program he was off to active duty in the seeking second careers as ministers and U.S. Army for 21 months; most of that priests. And while there are other schools time was spent in Korea with the 45th of theology in the area, he says the Infantry Division. After returning he was manner in which SU’s school goes about released from active duty and entered the its work resonates most with him. He Army Reserves, ultimately retiring as a recalls a hymn written and composed by colonel. H. Ernest Nichol, "We've a Story to Tell to Following his service Bleese went to the Nations.” work in the pharmacy industry. Over the For Bleese, that says it all.

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also provide resources for faculty, who are charged with keeping their knowledge and skills as sharp as possible so we can continue to provide students a cutting-edge education for a rapidly changing world.”

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“Because I wanted to," he says. “No light came on, I did not have a vision. It was just a feeling that I was doing something that will make a difference for good in this world.” It was about six years ago that Bleese first became involved with the School of Theology and Ministry by way of an introduction by his former pastor at First United Methodist Church, David Aasen. Realizing the importance of the school, “I started to make monetary contributions and gradually got deeper and deeper with my involvement,” he says. “I strongly believe [the school] is a very worthy organization, one that we certainly need in the community, so I decided I would help them as much as I am able." Understated as he is about the gift, Bleese's impact will surely be felt. The endowment will generate $45,000 annually to be split between the Verle Bleese Dean's Scholars' Fund and the Verle Bleese Dean's Faculty Development Fund. He is leaving it up to Dean Mark Markuly to decide how to use his bequest. “Verle has given a profoundly generous gift to the School of Theology and Ministry,” says Markuly. “We are humbled and moved deeply by his thoughtfulness. His gift will allow the school to support ministry students in their educational costs. But it will

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Asked why he decided to make a $1 million bequest to the School of Theology and Ministry, Verle Bleese of Seattle has a simple answer.


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ILLUSTRATION BY PUSHART

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Spotlight on the CORE

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A look at undergraduate courses in the new Core curriculum offers a better appreciation for how Seattle University inspires insightful and creative thinkers. The new Core kicked into full gear this fall.

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Walking and Talking About City Life | By Annie Beckmann

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Core course explores urban vs. downtown

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urban renewal.

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CLASS MAKEUP | Mostly juniors and seniors, with about 10 from Matteo Ricci, the rest from the College of Arts and Sciences

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TAUGHT BY | Emily Lieb, assistant professor, Matteo Ricci College

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to the suburbs and

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and movie theaters

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COURSE TITLE | The Livable City

Students lead class

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as whether displacing the culture of a Puerto Rican neighborhood was good or bad for New York City when Lincoln Center became its replacement. During a recent class discussion, Lieb asked her students if they agreed with an assessment by historian Robert Fogelson in his book, Downtown: Its Rise and Fall: “To many Americans, downtown…is neither inevitable nor desirable. Rather it is obsolete, a late 19th-century creation that has no role in the late 20th.” Students argued that a downtown area in the early 21st century still has elements that distinguish it. Among those factors: Skyscrapers, distinctive architecture, tourists, public transportation, shopping, population density, crime, social services and public spaces. Yet a downtown experience is typically one you come from elsewhere to absorb and frequently has nothing to do with living there, Lieb says. Then she offered the next big question: Is it livable? “You have to drive to get groceries or gas,” said one student. “Downtown today is more nostalgic,” offered another. One class member remarked on the diversity of people in a downtown area. “That’s what’s important,” he said. “All the people you see when you go downtown.”

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“It’s really a very Jesuit notion to think about how you’re experiencing your own learning,” says Assistant Professor Lieb. She retooled what was originally a Matteo Ricci urban policy course into a Core offering that gives students a better opportunity to follow their passions. Instead of a final exam, students now give presentations that involve identifying a contemporary urban problem, examining how it was expressed in the past and posing a solution. The course is designed to help students develop skills and analytical tools to think critically and creatively about urban problems on a national and international scale, according to Lieb. As they make use of historical sources and methods, they’re better able to create smart arguments to address global challenges. The course also examines livability in other parts of the world and addresses thorny questions such as growth and development. For the local perspective, Lieb takes students on walking tours of Volunteer Park, Seattle Center, Yesler Terrace, the Pike Place Market and the surrounding Seattle University neighborhood. Select students lead class discussions based on reading about the history of everything from shopping malls and movie theaters to the suburbs and urban renewal. They might address such topics

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Jumping from theory and intellectual exercise to how one actually lives in the world can be a challenge. Yet thinking of themselves as part of a living landscape is what lures many students to Emily Lieb’s Core course, The Livable City.


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to cover every possible topic” he says. “To depict concepts easily and, logically, you have to teach students not just the subject and rote memorization, but also how to communicate with someone who doesn’t know about the subject.” Green says he and other Albers faculty changed their approach to teaching to improve the way students grasped the central concepts and to ensure that when they leave the classroom and the university they are well equipped professionally. Students learn more than just stats and data; it’s how they can use the stats and data in problem solving and in the dayto-day that sets them apart. “My epiphany: bad research papers come from bad assignments,” says Green. To make good assignments, “We look at current issues being discussed in the news, such as targeting government spending to spur economic growth, energy pricing and tax policy, not just problems from a textbook that don’t seem real.” The goal is to raise students’ interest and curiosity, which leads to their personal and professional growth, adds Green.

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says Green, who has been with Albers since 2000, when he started as a visiting professor. This dedication to assessment shows in the consistently high rankings across many Albers programs. So what’s this business about macroeconomics and how does it differ from microeconomics? First, Green likes to point out that both programs in microand macroeconomics have been ranked in the top 25 since Bloomberg began the specialty rankings in 2010. Most are likely familiar with macroeconomics, which looks at economics on a large scale. However, most actually use microeconomics, which looks at individual, business and industry-level economic issues. For example, a macroeconomist would look at the impact of rising energy prices based on a national or global scale; a microeconomist examines the impact at a local, regional or industry level. In his classes Green creates assignments built around real issues business owners may face, with students tasked to devise solutions. “Our goal is to have students understand what is taught deeper, rather than

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“Research is formalized curiosity,” a quote by writer Zora Neale Hurston, is tacked to the door outside the office of Gareth Green of the Albers School of Business and Economics. When asked about the quote, Gareth says, “research is learning and learning is fueled by curiosity, which I think is a critical trait to nurture in students.” Makes sense, since Associate Professor Green happens to chair the economics department that oversees a program with national acclaim. In June, Bloomberg BusinessWeek named Albers’ macroeconomics program #1 in the country. The ranking, notes Green, reflects the commitment of economics and Albers as a whole in the design of its programs, relevant applications and opportunities for student engagement with employers and members of the business community. Additionally, such rankings can serve as an assessment of how students grasp concepts and how what happens in the classroom takes hold in the real world. “We put a lot of effort in our assessment, how you determine if students are learning what you are teaching,”

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Albers Home to #1 Macroeconomics Program | By Tina Potterf

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16 / Faculty News

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Visiting Associate Professor SVEN ARVIDSON (Arts and Sciences), director of liberal studies, published a chapter “E-portfolios in a Liberal Studies Program: An Experiment in Sustainability” in Teaching Sustainability/

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Professor AL ANSARI and Professor Emeritus DIANE LOCKWOOD (Albers) had their article, “Emiratization: From Policy to Implementation,” published in the International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management. The article is co-authored with Batoul Modarress.

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KEN ALLAN, associate professor of art history and CHARLES TUNG, associate professor of English (Arts and Sciences), both presented at the Association for

the Study of the Arts of the Present conference at Wayne State University in Detroit. The theme was "The Arts of the City."

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Associate Professor SAHEED ADEJUMOBI, director of Global African Studies (Arts and Sciences), published, “Empire and Utopia: ‘Resurrecting’ Post-colonial Visions and Beyond” in the book, Son of Man: An African Jesus Film. The book, edited by Richard Walsh, Jeffrey L. Staley and Adele Reinhartz, is a collection of essays that address ethical, theological and hermeneutical questions involving post-colonial Africa.

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The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation selected STEVEN PALAZZO, assistant professor in the College of Nursing, as a Nurse Faculty Scholar. Palazzo, PhD, MN, RN, will receive a three-year, $350,000 award to promote his academic career and support his research. According to the RWJF, “the Nurse Faculty Scholar award is given to junior faculty who show outstanding promise as future leaders in academic nursing.” Learn more about Palazzo and the award at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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FACULTY / news and notes


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GARETH GREEN ALBERS CHAIR / ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, ECONOMICS

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“We put a lot of effort in our assessment, how you determine if students are learning what you are teaching.”

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PHOTO BY SY BEAN

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Submit news of achievements, awards and more to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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Assistant Professor KATYA EMM and Professor VINAY DATAR (Albers) had their paper, “Demystifying Free Cash Flow Valuation,” accepted for publication in the Journal of Economics and Finance Education.

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PETER ELY, S.J., associate professor of theology and religious studies and vice president for Mission and Ministry, presented a paper, "Albert Camus and Marcel Proust," at the Western Regional Meeting of the Conference on Christianity and Literature and "Development of the Notion of Original Sin in Augustine" at the 17th Biennial Conference of the URAM Society at University College, University of Toronto, Canada.

YANCY DOMINICK, Core lecturer of philosophy (Arts and Sciences), presented the paper, “No Small Risk: Images in the Cratylus” at the West Coast Plato Workshop at Stanford University.

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BONNIE BUCHANAN, associate professor of finance and director of the Professional MBA program (Albers), received the Fondation Paris-Dauphine Research Award for her paper, “Securitization: Situation and Outlook.” In her paper, Buchanan reviews the 400-year history of asset securitization. She

received the award after presenting the paper in Paris.

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Teaching Sustainably. The liberal studies e-portfolio project at SU is infused in the curriculum from the introductory course through senior synthesis. This chapter reports and reflects on the first two years of implementing e-portfolios in the program, with limited budget and no campus examples to emulate.


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AT H L E T I C S B

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History Made With NCAA Tournament Win Men’s soccer add WAC champs to list of season achievements

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PHOTO BY MARK KUHLMANN

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18 / Athletics

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Learn more about these and other teams at www.GoSeattleu.com.

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PETE FEWING

SU’s men traveled across town for the second round matchup with the University of Washington on Nov. 24. The men lost to UW 4-2 but held them scoreless through the first 28 minutes of a hard fought match. "This … is what you want out of a collegiate soccer game between crosstown rivals," says Fewing. "I'm proud of our guys for never giving up. The Huskies are a very good team and it's fun to play in a game like this."

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Coach of the Year

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Seattle University men’s soccer (11-8-4) found themselves down early but recorded their second straight come-from-behind win, fifth of the season, to top Creighton, 2-1, in the first round of the NCAA Tournament on Nov. 21. This historic win marked the first SU win in an NCAA Division I Tournament since March 14, 1964, when SU men’s basketball defeated Utah State, 88-78. The win also snapped a two-year streak for Creighton in which they advanced to the Final Four and extended a 12-game unbeaten streak for SU. “I’m thrilled,” said WAC Coach of the Year Pete Fewing. “Creighton is a fantastic team. They’ve been to the Final Four two years in a row so to come here and play a team with that kind of history and our [Division I] history, which is just starting, is a big thrill. I’m proud of the team because it’s not easy to come into this kind of situation and get this result, so we’re happy for our guys.”

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The men’s team beat Creighton to advance to the NCAA tournament match, where they lost 4-2 to the #2 seed the University of Washigton.


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WAC Champs First women’s soccer team to advance to NCAA tournament

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They entered the match with a 15-game winning streak during which they allowed just five goals dating back to Sept. 20. The performance of the players off the field is as impressive as their prowess in competition. Women’s soccer earned the National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA) Team Academic Award for the 2012–13 academic year. This is the third consecutive year they have earned this national award. “I believe their commitment to academics sets a great foundation for what we want to achieve on the field,” says Coach Woodward. “Our team was extremely committed and disciplined and I am so impressed with each and every individual and how hard they work to represent our program.” The team combined for a 3.35 grade point average in 2012-13, one of 593 women’s soccer programs across all division throughout the country to earn this award for posting a team GPA of 3.0 or higher.

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Women’s soccer capped a winning season with the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) championship, besting Kansas City 3-0. With the title the team advanced to the NCAA tournament. The team as also the regular season WAC champs. Says 2013 WAC Coach of the Year Julie Woodward, “I’m really proud of my team and everything they’ve done this year.” With the win, women’s soccer became SU’s first overall team to qualify for the NCAA tournament since reclassifying back to Division I and SU’s first ever women’s soccer team to advance to the NCAA Tournament. Extending their current winning streak to 15 games, the win against Kansas City marked the Redhawks’ 11th shutout of 2013. Players Julie Besagno and Stephanie Verdoia were named to the all-star tournament team and Monique Escalera was named tournament MVP. Women’s soccer lost to Portland in the first round of the NCAA Tournament.

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The women's soccer team, led by Coach Julie Woodward, bested Kansas City 3-0 to take the WAC championship title and earn a trip to the NCAA tournament.


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Worldwide, more than 20 universities consider the Seattle University Youth Initiative a successful prototype

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INVESTING IN OUR YOUTH By Annie Beckmann | Photos by Chris Joseph Taylor

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The lure of the Seattle University Youth Initiative is compelling —so much so that an increasing number of incoming students say it’s a top reason they choose to come here.

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“The Youth Initiative represents what I believe will be one of the most significant efforts in the history of our university and expands on the mission of a Jesuit Catholic university,” Father Sundborg says. Since its official launch in early 2011, the Youth Initiative has been lauded as visionary, collaborative and empowering for this Central District neighborhood. In 2011–12, Gatzert Elementary had the highest academic growth rate of any school in Seattle, a testament to the initiative’s impact. The idea for the initiative began when a member of SU’s Board of Trustees spoke with and inspired President Sundborg to develop an action plan to improve possibilities and outcomes for underserved children in public schools. That was 2007. The hope was that it would expand and deepen campus engagement in the neighborhood. Start small, build a shared vision with the community and plan measurable objectives. That’s how Kent Koth, the Youth Initiative’s driving force, framed its development between 2008 and 2010. Koth, the even-keeled and downto-earth pragmatist who leads both the Seattle University Youth Initiative and SU’s Center for Service and Community Engagement, knew he didn’t want this to grow too big too fast. There were compelling reasons to start with the neighborhood a few blocks south of SU. At Gatzert, 94 percent of students receive subsidized lunches, the highest percentage in the Seattle School District and an indicator that families here are at or near poverty level. For many, English isn’t their first language, which can intensify learning and parenting challenges. At Gatzert alone, 30 different languages and 71 dialects are spoken by students and their

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Meghan Kennedy, ’15, did a heap of research on colleges as a high school student in Sacramento, Calif. She knew she wanted a Jesuit education, yet when she checked out websites to see how each university stacked up, SU was the clear frontrunner. Kennedy was particularly inspired by the Center for Service and Community Engagement and the Youth Initiative, which was just starting to take shape at the time. “Seattle University was the standout, not just for its mission but for having a well thought out program in the Youth Initiative to carry out that mission,” says Kennedy. Rachel Williams, ’15, from Reno, Nev., says she, too, was drawn to SU because of the Youth Initiative—now in its third year—a long-term commitment to create a pipeline of support for neighborhood children and their families. Says Williams, “After seeing so many schools boast about new gyms, popular sports teams and acceptance rates, seeing a school that was bragging about a welldesigned, student-powered plan to make good on the promise of social justice and service made me think hard about SU.” This is the university’s largest-ever community engagement project focused on improving academic achievement for youth in the square-mile neighborhood that includes Bailey Gatzert Elementary School. Gatzert is the first focal point of the Youth Initiative, which also encompasses Washington Middle School and Garfield High School. Those who shape and propel the Youth Initiative underscore that it’s a fitting reflection of the university’s Jesuit values and mission. Just ask President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., what excites him most about his presidency in this decade. Without hesitation, he’ll say the Youth Initiative.


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Again in 2013, the Youth Initiative made the President’s Higher Education Honor Roll with Distinction for community service. The accolade acknowledges the university’s overall commitment to service and its significant work to implement the initiative.

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In 2012, the White House honored Seattle University with the Presidential Award for community service, the highest recognition by the federal government to a college or university for its civic engagement, service learning and volunteerism.

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National Honor for SUYI

scores is one sign of the achievements these collaborations accomplish. As part of the initiative, SU’s Redhawk Academic Mentors offer one-on-one tutoring and learning support to sixth graders at Washington Middle School, where Principal Jon Halfaker says SU students serve as role models. “College students can have a huge impact on middle schoolers. And getting our students to college is one of our goals, not just here but district-wide,” says Halfaker. “To make that happen, our students need to be able to see what that looks like.” SU students who participate in service learning also find many rewards. Chris Caculitan, ’13, himself a graduate of Washington Middle School, coordinates the Redhawk mentors there. He’s quick to say it was service learning at SU that opened his mind to new ways to develop and make use of his leadership skills. Current student Kennedy suggests service learning enriches one’s spirituality. “SU taps into how college students today want to experience spirituality. With the Youth Initiative, SU does that in a very progressive way,” she says. Faculty members play a vital role in the development and progress of the Youth Initiative. With the new Core curriculum, a goal of enriching and expanding service learning is beginning to draw more faculty to add service components and connect their course

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families. Neighborhood residents are 43 percent white, 25 percent Asian or Asian American, 22 percent African or African American and 10 percent Latino. Greg Imel, Gatzert’s principal, points to the Youth Initiative’s influence and impact within just a couple of years. “In a very short period of time, Gatzert Elementary School’s staff and children have been able to experience the benefits of having coordinated efforts from students, staff and programs of Seattle University’s Youth Initiative,” Imel says. “We continue to be excited about the collective impact we will have on the lives of the children and their families through our stellar partnerships.” Proof points of the initiative’s success already are evident. For instance, SU, in collaboration with five local nonprofits, extended the school day at Gatzert by two hours for 180 students. That’s almost 20 percent more time per student per year. The fact that an after-school science program for fifth graders has had a positive impact on science test


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Men’s basketball player Clarence Trent works on a math problem with a student at Bailey Gatzert.

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47 distinctive campus community projects to help children succeed in school and in life. The Youth Initiative and its partners continue to expand services such as health education, financial literacy, citizenship tutoring, tax assistance, employment opportunities, parent engagement workshops and more. Another gauge of achievement: SU is a respected model for how higher education can approach community

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development with Youth Initiative partners. And in 2011– 12, a Youth Initiative faculty community-based research fellowship program began. An ever-growing number of community organizations are enthusiastic about becoming Youth Initiative partners. In addition to SU students, faculty, staff and alumni, the Seattle School District, the City of Seattle, foundations, faith communities and families, the initiative has 70 partners and


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JON HALFAKER, PRINCIPAL, WASHINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL

engagement. High-level delegations from universities in the U.S. and around the world—20 and counting—have clamored to know more and look to SU’s initiative as a successful prototype. The notion of SU as a community-based university with a mission not detached from its own neighborhood is what captivates the imagination of Michael McCarthy, S.J., a current member of SU’s Board of Trustees. Father McCarthy is among numerous leaders from universities—including Pacific Lutheran, Ohio State, University of San Francisco, Santa Clara and others as far flung as England, Germany, Canada, China and Nicaragua—who see merit in creating similar initiatives. He says he shares insights gained from SU with Santa Clara, where he is both Edmund Campion University Professor and executive director of the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education. “I developed a strategic plan that included a priority engaging a neighbor whose inspiration was what I saw SU

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“College students can have a huge impact on middle schoolers. They can talk about similar things. And getting our students to go to college is one of our goals, not just here but district-wide.”

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Teaching and technology: SU students volunteer in the computer lab at Bailey Gatzert Elementary, where the computers came through the SU-Gatzert partnership.


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BY THE NUMBERS

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500 The number of youth who live in public housing in Yesler Terrace

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37 Percentage of neighborhood residents who live at or below the federal poverty level

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doing. We are calling this the Thriving Neighbors Initiative and are in the process of looking for a place where we can have a center of engagement called Comunidad Arrupe,” Father McCarthy says. In Tacoma, Pacific Lutheran University’s long-range planning committee sees PLU’s role and connection in the local community as a cornerstone to PLU’s future. According to Joel Zylstra, PLU’s director of community engagement and service, his university is especially interested in how SU approached the development of the Youth Initiative. “Seattle University is on to something big,” says Zylstra. “The Youth Initiative underscores the original role of higher education in America as the university informs and is informed by the concerns and opportunities of society.” The Youth Initiative continues to collect prestigious awards and recognitions as well. In 2012 and again last year, the White House honored SU with presidential accolades for community service, calling out the initiative’s long-term commitment to build a better future for young people starting with pre-kindergarten and continuing through college. For both 2013 and 2014, U.S. News and World Report ranked SU a leader for service learning. Washington Monthly, in its 2013 College Guide, assesses how well universities serve their communities and the country and ranked SU in the top 10 among master’s universities on a national scale. What is it about this commitment to Seattle youth and families that is so compelling? The answers are in the

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The people who live in the Bailey Gatzert neighborhood


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Over the summer, at-risk youth typically lose two months or more of knowledge than what’s retained by middle or higher income children, according to Cicily Nordness, an SU alumna who directs youth services for Catholic Community Services, the largest social service organization in Washington. “Reading loss, especially, is really high. So we continue to enhance our summer programming to target this area,” says Nordness, who earned her Master’s in Nonprofit Leadership in 2009. Summer programming has doubled the number of hours and the number of children served in the past year. Organizations that play roles in the Youth Initiative draw on each other’s strengths and fill gaps rather than just provide more services, according to Nordness. “We strengthen our shared vision, which allows us to have more individuals to plug into this in exciting ways we haven’t even imagined yet,” she says. Today, Koth is pleased with the growth and successes of the Youth Initiative. “We are seeing very positive results,” Koth says, “but there is much more to be done. In the next few years we will continue to expand our academic and co-curricular

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dedicated participants, be they third graders at Gatzert who boldly call themselves “The Incredibles” or a tutor from SU who listens well and energizes students. Julie Thornton, a single mom whose daughter Aidyn has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, can’t say enough about how the Youth Initiative’s after-school programs at Gatzert make a difference in Aidyn’s self-esteem and her focus. “She’s always treated with respect and a strong set of consistent boundaries. With that routine and structure, it’s up to her to do what’s required of her. Her tutor really understood her and the way her brain moved,” says Thornton, adding that the lack of homework meltdowns has improved the quality of their home life immeasurably. Parents aren’t always aware of some of the challenges facing child educators. Summer learning programs, for example, are essential to a young person’s academic and social development. In 2013, SU partnered with eight local organizations to involve nearly 300 neighborhood children and youth in summer learning, including kindergarten orientation, reading and math skills, middle school and high school transitions, media arts and college readiness.

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Students Meeting 5th Grade Science Standard 80%

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Science scores among Gatzert fifth graders continue to rise from 10.4 percent passing in 2010–11 to 30.8 percent passing in 2011–12 to 55.4 percent passing in 2012–13.

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Volunteers are making a difference in the lives of students at Bailey Gatzert Elementary.

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“The Youth Initiative represents what I believe will be one of the most significant efforts in the history of our university and expands on the mission of a Jesuit Catholic university.”

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STEPHEN SUNDBORG, S.J., PRESIDENT

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partnerships. We will particularly focus on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education, summer learning and support for families, nonprofits and small businesses that are the fabric of the neighborhood.” You know Koth takes pride in how the initiative continues to flourish when he describes one of his favorite ways to find inspiration. He’ll hop on his bike, breeze the few blocks south from his office to Gatzert Elementary and drop in on an SU student who’s tutoring a kindergartner. He’ll recall how his own career began—as a tutor. He’ll think of his family and how the opportunities of his children contrast with those of Gatzert students. Then he’ll smile when he realizes it’s quite late in the afternoon, yet the pair in front of him remains resilient, energetic and completely tuned in to learning as a way to achieve success in life. “That’s the real magic,” Koth says.


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Frank Shih, associate professor, College of Science and Engineering

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“I just want to see these kids do well, develop a strong sense of self-worth and be better equipped to face the challenges that surely will be in their future.”

When it comes to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education, Seattle University’s Frank Shih, associate professor of mechanical engineering, ignites students’ passions. The students might be Bannan Scholars, whose academic achievement in STEM and commitment to service qualifies them for these prestigious scholarships. Or they could be fifth graders at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School. Better yet, Shih had the idea to bring together the two with successful results. Those who lead the Seattle University Youth Initiative say one of its clearest gains is in fifth grade science at Gatzert. The way SUYI Director Kent Koth sees it, “This relates directly to Frank Shih’s work... and also to SU’s involvement in areas of math, reading, computer literacy—all elements that contribute to a mastery of science.” Koth shares the Measurements of Student Progress test results. Science scores among Gatzert fifth graders continue to rise from 10.4 percent passing in 2010–11 to 30.8 percent passing in 2011– 12 to 55.4 percent passing in 2012–13. The fact that Gatzert proficiency in science had been poor—the lowest in the Seattle School District—was a major motivating factor for Shih to develop a strong science curriculum. “It’s perfect for us,” says Shih, who routinely makes the weekly trek to Gatzert to oversee the after-school STEM program staffed by Bannan Scholars and other SU volunteers and service learners. When he was a staff member at the Center for Excellence in Engineering and Diversity at UCLA, Shih worked with high schoolers, summer programs and disadvantaged groups and gained extensive experience in K–12 STEM education. As someone who learned English as a second language during his teen years, he says he has a personal understanding of the academic struggles some Gatzert students face. “We try to teach science with fun projects while slowly building up their language skills since many of the students are struggling and can be discouraged by too much reading,” he says. He continues to improve the after-school program, now in its third year, which gives students a variety of learning projects. “The experiment, data collection and interpreting results are all parts of the scientific process for them,” he says. What keeps Shih going? “I just want to see these kids do well, develop a strong sense of self-worth and be better equipped to face the challenges that surely will be in their future,” he says.

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CURIOSITY CAN LEAD TO LIFE CHANGING MOMENTS SU student an emerging leader for social change

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“The Youth Initiative empowers students and gives them the incentive to be involved in their own education.” Senait Gebregiorgis, ’14

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Senait Gebregiorgis always has been curious about human behavior. “I’m interested in how people’s actions reveal their preferences,” she says. Gebregiorgis, who lives in Yesler Terrace, is an emerging leader for social change who just completed her bachelor’s degree in economics at Seattle University. She’s also on the advisory board for the Seattle University Youth Initiative. When she developed serious health problems, she had to take a big step back and think about where she could be the most effective. She chose to become an advocate for change in public policy. Recognizing she wanted to offer some of the support she lacked, as early as her middle school and high school years she volunteered at Yesler Community Center. “I had nobody to look up to during those years and felt emotionally disconnected,” she says. “I wanted to help students who struggled with that.” Growing up in an immigrant family with few resources means you only get one shot at it, according to Gebregiorgis. She says she doesn’t remember much about how her family fled to Kassala, Sudan, from war-torn Eritrea, bound for the United States. It was 1993 and she was just 3 years old. With three older brothers and three younger sisters, Gebregiorgis is the first in her family to attend college. She also is the leading reason higher education is the norm for her younger sisters. In 2011, she heard about SU’s Center for Service and Community Engagement and the Youth Initiative from Director Kent Koth. After two years at Seattle Central, Gebregiorgis entered SU and received a Youth Initiative scholarship for 2011–12. Each week during that school year, she volunteered two mornings as a teacher’s aide at Washington Middle School and two afternoons at Garfield High School with Urban League Scholars. From her perspective, the Youth Initiative is a godsend. “It’s amazing what the university is doing for the people in Yesler Terrace. Not very many universities knock on your door with a Youth Initiative that offers cradle-to-college academic support,” Gebregiorgis says. “The Youth Initiative empowers students and gives them the incentive to be involved in their own education.”


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Chris Caculitan, ’13

You want to be in third grade all over again when you look around the classroom of Bonivi Caculitan Sanchez, ’07, MIT ’12, a teacher at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School. Imagine a colorful and cozy room filled with children’s books, fun posters and activity stations, a “Star of the Week” contest and a playful rug up front that’s a world map with faces of youngsters circling it to make it easy to remember where you’re supposed to sit cross-legged for group chats. There’s even a big reminder sign on the wall that this is the class of 2023, the year these third graders will graduate from college. “It’s to help them understand they’re shooting for something,” says “Mrs. Bonivi,” the name she embraced after arriving at Gatzert in 2012. She’s so much in the groove here it’s tough to imagine she’s only in her second year as a teacher. Her third graders proudly call themselves “The Incredibles” and have a classroom poster from the computer-animated movie of the same name with its family of superheroes that saves the world. Bonivi’s playful and compelling approach builds team spirit, high aspirations and a love for learning among her students. Her brother Chris Caculitan, ’13, says that growing up in a lowincome family, he and Bonivi saw firsthand the challenges facing those who are underprivileged. “There were a lot of obstacles that could have gotten in my way, but I was lucky enough to have the support I did. That is what drove me to do the work I do,” he says. Chris is nearing the midway point of a 10-month AmeriCorps stint as coordinator of the Redhawk Academic Mentoring Program, which connects students at nearby Washington Middle School with Seattle University volunteers who help them navigate the rough spots of learning. As part of the daytime program, he recruits, trains and matches SU undergraduates with sixth graders in the Yesler Terrace area. “I know the culture and population there. I wanted to be where I’d be the most effective and give back to the school that helped get me to where I am today,” says Chris, himself a graduate of Washington Middle School.

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“There were a lot of obstacles that could have gotten in my way, but I was lucky enough to have the support I did. That is what drove me to do the work I do.”

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One is a teacher at Bailey Gatzert, the other a Youth Initiative leader

Chris Caculitan, ’13

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PERSONAL EXPERIENCES INSPIRE BROTHER-SISTER DUO

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Bonivi Caculitan Sanchez, ’07, MIT ’12

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“I had one student from Ethiopia last year who was really low in everything. She benefited a lot from one-on-one with an SU tutor and the after-school program.” Bonivi Caculitan Sanchez, ’07, MIT ’12

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There’s something about this dynamic brother and sister duo that tells you they’ve done their share of soul searching to get them where they are today, closely connected to the Seattle University Youth Initiative. In the early ’90s, when Bonivi was age 10 and her brother age 3, their parents emigrated from Villasis, a farming town in the province of Pangasinan, Philippines. With encouragement from their parents, both started out at SU as business majors. She graduated with an accounting degree and started crunching numbers for a living. Bonivi couldn’t shake a way-back memory from her freshman orientation. “I attended a speech by Father Steve where he talked about what I can do for the world. That really stuck with me. In my four years at SU, I learned a lot about social justice and corporate responsibility, but I realized I wanted to do more to save the world. So I spent a year thinking about what I wanted to do before I entered the [College of Education] MIT program,” she says. Her younger brother came to a similar realization. He started out as a marketing major before switching to social work. “It was service learning that opened up my mind,” says Chris. Now he talks about graduate school and becoming a counselor. As immigrants themselves, both brother and sister say that serving immigrant populations is part of their mission. With 30 different languages spoken by Gatzert students, Bonivi describes how valuable Youth Initiative volunteers are—at least one volunteer for every subject available in her classroom daily. “I had one student from Ethiopia last year who was really low in everything. She benefited a lot from one-on-one with an SU tutor and the after-school program,” she says. “She passed math and her reading score came up, too, which says a lot because she only came to this country two years ago.”


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ALUMNI VOICE B

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From Susan Vosper, ’90, ’10 LEMBA, Assistant VP/Alumni Relations

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These are just a few of the many ways you can get involved with your alma mater. Check out the monthly SU Voice e-newsletter and our alumni website. Join us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to get involved and stay connected.

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I invite you to come home to your alma mater the weekend of February 28–March 2 to celebrate Homecoming at SU! Be part of this well-loved tradition. More information to come and check out Homecoming events at www.seattleu.edu/alumni/events.

Thanks to the hard work of our Alumni Board of Governors, we have a legislative bill in the Senate Transportation Committee to create a Seattle University license plate for the state of Washington. Proceeds from sales of the plates will fund student scholarships. At each step as we move the bill through the legislature, we need your continued support. Visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/ SUplates regularly for news and to get updates on social media.

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This May, when the city and campus are at their most beautiful, we are

RETURN OF HOMECOMING

LET’S GET SU LICENSE PLATES ON THE ROAD

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CALLING THE CLASSES OF 1964 AND 2004

kicking off the new reunion weekend for 50th and 10th reunions for the classes of 1964 and 2004 and for all Sullivan and Costco Scholars. For more information visit www.seattleu.edu/ alumni/ReunionsWeekend2014. Additionally, we need reunion volunteers from these classes to help invite your classmates, share information via social media and send pictures from your time here. Share your feedback, photos, memories and more at alumnireunions@seattleu.edu.

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It’s an exciting time for alumni at Seattle University. We are truly a university on the rise and I want you to join us on this ride. Over the past two years, I’ve talked to thousands of you. You told me that you want to be engaged, come back to the university and share your pride in your alma mater. In response, we are introducing new traditions and reviving others. In the fall, classmates from 2003 and 1963 came together for their reunions during Alumni & Family Weekend. We also celebrated SU legacy families with the introduction of our Seattle University Legacy Reception that included a special pinning ceremony for students of legacy families.

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Reunions and Homecoming Make a Comeback

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We appreciate your support as we work to get the SU license plate bill to Olympia. Visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/SUplates to learn more about how you can help.

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GET CONNECTED

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Recently engaged or married? Landed a job promotion? We want to hear from you. Send your updates for Class Notes to sumagazine@seattleu.edu or www.seattleu.edu/magazine.

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BEING SCENE

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This year's Gala, celebrating its 30th anniversary, provided an enchanting evening for guests who included alumni, friends and community partners. More than $855,000 was raised for student scholarships. Alumnus John Meisenbach and his wife Ginny were presented the St. Ignatius Medal, the university's highest honor, for their vision, service and investment in SU and in the lives of students.

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SU Magazine Winter 2 014 / 33

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The Gala is a celebration of friends, family and future generations. (Above) Gala co-chairs Bob Ratliffe (and wife Lisa, not shown) and Bill and Lyanne Monkman opened the evening with student speaker Chelsah Ratkowski, '14, and emcee Kayti Barnett, ’12. Gala-goers were treated to the music of the Company Men who performed a mash-up of popular songs.


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Insights on Terror | By Mike Thee

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Christopher Harmon a leading scholar on domestic and international terrorism

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He elaborates on the third point by sharing a chart of terrorist groups that have ceased to exist, a project that he says was a year in the making. He points out a historical oddity—how a lawsuit against the Aryan Nation following a shooting at Hayden Lake, Idaho, effectively ended that group's operation in 2000— before turning to the more common avenues by which terrorist groups include the use of force by the military or police, decapitation (taking out the leader) or a multifaceted approach he calls a “grand strategy.” The United States has deployed a grand strategy, including force, intelligence, economic tools, diplomacy and policy since the 9/11 terrorist attacks and, in Harmon's estimation, the approach is working. To be sure, there are areas to improve and strengthen, he says. "We could be reaching over other governments and talking directly to populations.” He also would like to see the government be more proactive in countering terrorism, rather than just playing defense. “Terrorism is disturbingly effective when it is managed well with other political strategies,” he says. Case in point: Hezbollah, which is 30 years old and led by the same man who founded it. Hezbollah has been “fantastically successful,” Harmon explains, because it has pursued a number of strategies to complement its terrorist activities, including governing and influencing those who govern. Although there's a perception that terrorism is on the rise, historical analysis proves otherwise, says Harmon. Still, the myth persists, along with others such as terrorism being mindless, or a male-driven enterprise. Or terrorists being disenfranchised and poor. Harmon debunks each of these misperceptions, explaining that terrorism is a most often a very intentionally used instrument in service of a political agenda; that women play a significant role in terrorist organizations; and that many in terrorist groups are well educated, some with advanced degrees. “The people sent to do a suicide bombing may not have master's degrees,” says Harmon, “but the leader often does.”

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Earlier this year Harmon returned to Seattle to give a talk about his career as a scholar and expert on terrorism to the Boeing Management Association. He also spent some time visiting his alma mater. After graduating summa cum laude from SU with a double major in history and French language, Harmon earned a master’s in government and PhD in international relations and government, both from Claremont Graduate School. His research on terrorism could not have come at a more opportune time. He joined the staff of U.S. Rep. Jim Courter (R-NJ) in 1985. “Terrorist attacks became a big issue on Capitol Hill right around the time I arrived,” says Harmon, mentioning as one example the June 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847. He shared his expertise widely, writing policy reviews that appeared in publications including Christian Science Monitor. After his time in D.C., Harmon returned to academia, taking on a number of faculty posts in the United States and Germany. In 1993, he joined the Marine Corps University where he currently serves as the Major General Matthew C. Horner Distinguished Chair of Military History. A prolific scholar, Harmon has worked extensively on issues around war and terrorism. Highly sought for his expertise on terrorism, Harmon has spoken to numerous groups across the country and internationally and testified before Congress. In 2001, he received the Distinguished Public Service Award from the U.S. Department of State. Asked what he considers the most important contributions he has made to the study of terrorism, Harmon lists three. He first alludes to a journal contribution in 1992, in which he characterized terrorism as “a special kind of immorality and a vicious form of political activity that needed attention and study.” Second, he points to the argument he has consistently made that terrorism should be regarded as a strategy rather than dismissed as just a tactic. And third, while much research has been done on the causes and origins of terrorist groups, Harmon’s public lectures and publications helped pioneer study of how and why such organizations end.

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Christopher Harmon, ’77, one of the nation's foremost scholars on terrorism, says Seattle University played a pivotal role in sparking his interest in the field. While studying abroad, as part of the French in France program led by Associate Professor Paul Milan, Harmon became intrigued by the subject matter. As several European countries grappled with terrorism, Harmon had a front-row seat.

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“The people sent to do a suicide bombing may not have master's degrees but the leader often does.” CHRISTOPHER HARMON, ’77

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Alum Christopher Harmon has been a leading scholarly expert in domestic and international terrorism and has written extensively on the subject.


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Bonivi Casem Caculitan, 07, ’12 MIT, married Austin Cordova-Sanchez in front of family and friends, many of whom are alumni of Seattle University. The couple, married at Immaculate Conception Church, resides in the Seattle area. Pictured (l-r from top row): Gerd Casem Padilla, ’09, Michael Casem, ’96, ’98 MIT, Chris Casem Caculitan, ’13, Lawrence Casem Caculitan, ’03, Noel Casem Padilla, ’14, Dorothy Cordova (regent 1980-91) ’98 Doctor of Humane Letters, Fred Cordova, ’53, ’98 Doctor of Humane Letters, Thomas Sanchez, Jr. ’13, Jennifer Ramelb Casem, ’98, Veronica Smith-Casem, ’96, ’02 JD, Mervin Casem, ’94, Austin Cordova-Sanchez, Bonivi Casem Caculitan Sanchez, ’07, ’12 MIT, Cecilia Cordova, ’86, ’99, Bea Casem, ’11, Bianca Casem, ’15, and Rene Laigo, ’80.

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Photo by Nicole Baum, ZipZip Studio

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Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

Lydia Kumasaka, ’84, MS, RN, APRN, has been named director of nursing at The Queen’s Medical Center in West Oahu, Hawaii. Kumasaka will be responsible for directing nursing and patient care operations to ensure the delivery of high-quality and effective patient care services. She has nearly 30 years of experience in health care.

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Stuart Rolfe, ’78 JD, alum and SU trustee (right), was honored for his generosity and service to the university. Recently, the university recognized Rolfe with the naming of the Stuart T. Rolfe Community Room in the Admissions and Alumni Building.

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Within the past year these four couples each celebrated their 50th wedding anniversaries. The couples came together for the occasion. They are (l-r): Judy Schaecher (Kramer) ’61 and Jim (James) Schaecher, ’63, Bob (Robert) Smith, ’61 and Doris Smith (Cejka), ’61, Ian Larson, ’61 and Evelyn Larson (Racelo), ’62 and Marilyn Brown (Cejka), ’64 and Bob (Robert) Brown, ’64.


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1993

Jack Fitterer is president and CEO of local firm The Pacific Institute. The Pacific Institute, founded in Seattle more than 40 years ago, is a global consultancy organization that works with Fortune 1,000 companies, governments, educational institutions and professional sports teams.

Patricia (Patti) Sipes Hedges, ’96, MBA, ’06 JD, was sworn in as a Peace Corps volunteer June 14, 2013, in Azerbaijan. For the next two years she will work as a community and economic development volunteer. The swearing-in ceremony also celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Peace Corps in Azerbaijan.

Eric Tobiason, MBA, was selected for promotion to Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve. Tobiason works at the University of Washington and was recently promoted to director of finance and administration for the Department of Family Medicine.

Jean Bessette received her PhD from the University of Pittsburgh in June and joined the University of Vermont as an assistant professor. She recently married Thomas Pashby in Bury St. Edmunds, England.

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Curt Cutting, JD, an attorney with Horvitz & Levy LLP, was recognized among The Best Lawyers in America.

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Timothy Willette graduated from Oklahoma City University School of Law and earned his Juris Doctor last May. He received special recognition and wore honor cords at the commencement and hooding ceremony for accumulating more than 150 hours of pro bono and/or community service during his law school career.

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Natalie Bold received the first place prize in the 2013 Undergraduate Statistical Research Project Competition, sponsored by the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistical Education. Bold’s paper was on the impact of teacher training on student achievements and looked at data from 50 countries.

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Robert M. Benett was elected Deputy Grand Knight of the West Seattle Council 12175 of the Knights of Columbus. 1999 Benett has been an honorable Knight Louisa Holmes graduated in 2013 from the University of Southern for more than 10 years. California with a PhD in geography. 1991 She accepted a three-year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Amber Henningsen Post, MBA, California San Francisco to work in has been named managing director 1980 demography and public health. James Lyons, ’95 MPA, is the new vice of J.R. Simplot Co.’s operations in China. In her role Post will oversee president for University Relations at global communication across busi2002 Santa Clara University. Lyons, who ness lines and will build and mainCameron Wright, ’08 MSN, received previously worked at the University tain strategic business relationships the Nurse of the Year award from the of Portland, served in the past as

2007

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Gary Haakenson continues to serve with the Snohomish County Executive Office as executive director, focusing on public safety issues. Haakenson, a Northwest native and former mayor of Edmonds, Wash., was hired by the county in 2012 to serve in this role.

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Department of Surgery Residents at the University of Washington Medical Center. The award is given each year to one nurse from the University of Washington teaching hospitals for their exemplary service.

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in China and throughout the world. Post has been with the company since 2005 as vice president and treasurer at the corporate office in Boise. Before joining Simplot, Post served as treasurer for Alaska Airlines.

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interim dean of admissions at SU. At Portland, Lyons led the school’s $175 million fundraising campaign and from 2005–08 was senior associate vice president of University Relations.

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Father Steve Bossi, CSP, has been appointed associate pastor of Santa Susanna Parish in Rome, Italy. Fr. Bossi’s new parish serves American and other English-speaking diplomats and permanent residents of Rome, as well as American tourists.

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Eva (Wolff) Hortsch, ’02, and her husband Gary welcomed their second child last December. Coral Elizabeth was born Dec. 28 and is “stunningly beautiful,” says mom Eva.

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Jimmy Brown, '10 and Rachel Johnson, '10, both graduates of the College of Nursing, were married Sept. 7, 2013 at Rachel's parents home in Bremerton. Several alumni friends of the couple—from the class of 2010 and 2011—were in attendance. (l-r) Elise Nguyen, Michelle (Vo) Rastelli, Tess (AbrahamsonRichards) Kyker, Natalie Chan, Adam Toth, Lindsey Dvorak, Henry Garcia, Micaela Shorrock, Laura Deloach, Kipp Gallagher, Czarina Franco, Jake Wild, Kathleen Hyslop, Marilyn Nash and Sonia Glennie.

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Elizabeth Fountain, ’87, ’89 MA, recently had her first novel published. An Alien’s Guide to World Domination is described by Fountain as: “…a lighthearted tale of incompetent aliens and long-lost twins and a blind dog who saves humanity (twice). I like to say it’s dedicated to anyone who has ever looked at your boss and thought, ‘You must be from another planet.’” Fountain calls Ellensburg, Wash., home.


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The 11th Annual Albers Alumni Golf Tournament at Glendale Country Club was another great success. More than 120 golfers, including alumni, SU faculty and staff and friends of the university, turned out for tee time for a good cause: $7,000 was raised for scholarships to bebefit business students.

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Members of the College of Nursing’s 1963 graduating class gathered in August for their 50th reunion in Westport, Wash. Alumni traveled from Hawaii, southern California, Utah and Oregon and are already talking about a second reunion next year. (Pictured, second row l-r): Bev Anderson Leinbach, Suzanne Merlino Lund, Kathleen Cannon, Lois Serres, Kathy Semon Reichlin and Karen Laughnan Gilmore. (First row l-r): Liz Desimone, Sr. Mary Grondin, SP, (Sr. Terrance), Joyce Legaz, Jeanne Henry Giese, Elsie Hosokawa Hirae and Judy Maire.

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NURSES REUNITE


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Boy Singing to Cattle | Reviewed by Chelan David

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EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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Among the collection are works that speak of Hart’s familial relationships, notably his complicated one with his father—underscored by a heartfelt appreciation for his elder’s sacrifices,

By merging themes of loss and redemption, Boy Singing to Cattle serves as one man’s journey from boyhood to adulthood. It is a voyage from the undulating hills of the Palouse as a youngster to the fertile fields of New England as a father.

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unathletic, quick to tears, girled on the schoolyard, teased for a temper I could not contain

I am but a clearing between thick woods, a brief opening where the sun enters, of little consequence but unspeakable worth, happy to be fodder for the continuance of things.

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Hart’s words are as definitive as they are descriptive, as he captures in a few words what it’s like to be surrounded by natural beauty yet struggling to fit in:

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Like stepping away from a campfire, a chill meets you, and with it the sweet, fertile smell of wheat straw growing damp, erotic in the folds of the hills slipping into darkness.

as detailed in the collection’s opening poem, “Burying My Father.” The final poem, “The Clearing,” about rural life in New England brings the author’s life full circle as he comes to terms with his past. Hart describes laboring as he clears overgrown vegetation from a pasture for his daughter’s new horse:

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Hart delves into the past, constructing poems full of longing and eloquence. In “Dusk in the Palouse” he writes:

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Everyone has a story to tell. Mark Hart’s story is about growing up in the Palouse in Eastern Washington, raised by his father, a tough wheat farmer and World War II veteran. His story is told through verse in Boy Singing to Cattle, a moving collection of poetry that paints a tribute to the landscape and people of Hart’s formative years and serves as an elegy for his reconciliation with the past. Now in his mid-50s, Hart resides in Amherst, Mass., where he has a psychotherapy practice, teaches meditation, serves as an adviser to Buddhist students at Amherst College and writes. In many ways the striking photo on the book’s cover—a crumbling yet resolute wooden barn situated between Colfax and Pullman, ensconced on a wheat field draped by hues of lush gold and crowned with dark threatening clouds—embodies the author’s journey. Through the landscape of memory,

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By Mark D. Hart, ’78, ’91 MA

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Author Mark D. Hart

By merging themes of loss and redemption, Boy Singing to Cattle serves as one man’s journey from boyhood to adulthood.


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IN MEMORIAM B

A

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Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community we’ve lost.

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Born in St. Louis, Rita attended and graduated from Seattle University’s nursing school. She worked as a registered nurse throughout her life including at St. Elizabeth’s, James Hospital, Sacred Heart Hospital and Kadlee. Rita was known for her kindness and patience, her gentle and caring spirit and welcoming presence.

Born in Yakima, Patricia worked in medical records in Seattle and then became a stay-at-home mom for her three sons. She continued to work at Holy Rosary School and Kennedy High School libraries and was an active volunteer for many events in the parish and at the school.

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Dr. Peter Clary (May 25, 2013; age 78)

A resident of Portland, Ore., most of his life, Eugene graduated from Central Catholic High School in 1949 and served stateside as an Army Military Policeman during the Korean conflict. In the 1970s, he began a career as a commercial real estate appraiser and later became officer and director of Rogue Disposal & Recycling in Medford. He enjoyed spending time with his family and hunting, fishing, camping and skiing.

James Edward Wilds (April 15, 2013; age 75)

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1962

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50

Jerome Thomas Antush (March 23, 2013)

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Jerome graduated from Bellarmine Preparatory in 1952, and served in the U.S. Marine Corps before coming to SU. After a long career he retired from the Boeing Company to spend time with his family and travel with his wife Elizabeth.

40 / In Memoriam

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After graduating from SU, James enjoyed a long and rewarding career in retail. He began his career at Jay Jacobs, then The Bon Marche, and Liberty House Hawaii. He retired from Nordstrom. James was a kind, generous and gentle man who cherished his friends, work and family.

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CORRECTION In the fall obituary of George Krsak, the photo was misidentified. George was pictured with daughter Rosemary (Mimi) Krsak during the 2004 Ignatian pilgrimage in Spain. We apologize for the error.

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Read more obituaries online at www.seattleu. edu/magazine/. Obituaries are edited for space and clarity.

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THINKING OF YOU

We ask readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@seattleu.edu or send via mail to: Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122–1090.

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Following graduation from Dowling High School, Richard served in the Army. He earned a degree in education and taught in the Bakersfield Public School system for 30 years.

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Eugene Blodget Gambee (March 12, 2013; age 81)

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Richard “Dick” Arthur Woolway (March 22, 2013; age 86)

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Born in Rhode Island to Harold and Hazel Clary, Peter graduated from Kennewick High School and earned a bachelor’s degree from SU before attaining his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Washington State University. He worked at Battelle in Richland, Wash., and later at the Ohio State University Lab Animal Center.

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George graduated from O’Dea High School and SU and worked as a chemist for the Seattle Gas Company and as a toxicologist for the King County Coroner’s Office. He became director of the Seattle Crime Laboratory. George was recognized internationally as a pioneer in forensic criminology.

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George Gunzo Ishii (March 16, 2013; age 84)

1957

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Patricia Anne Kindall (April 4, 2013; age 81)

1954

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Rita Mary Chott Plachta (April 22, 2013; age 97)

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Educated at St. Mary’s and the Cathedral School in Portland, Cecilia was program manager for Refugee Resettlement at the Catholic Charities office of the Diocese of Portland. She was a lifelong resident of Portland and a member of the choir of St. Mary’s Cathedral for 60 years.

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Born and raised in Tacoma, Virginia graduated valedictorian from Aquinas Academy, earned a degree in social work from SU and a master’s from the UW. She met her husband of 61 years, Michael, at SU. For 32 years Virginia worked for the Shoreline School District and taught graduate classes in social work at the UW.

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Cecilia Mary Baricevic (March 26, 2013; age 81)

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1953

Virginia A. Marinoff Hardiman (April 17, 2013)

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1942

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B

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1955

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Leonard Daniel Sullivan, Jr. (March 19, 2013)

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After graduating from high school Douglas joined the U.S. Army, where he received training as an air traffic controller and also obtained his pilot's license. He continued that line of work until the 1981 controller's strike. Later he worked for Boeing as a scheduler/planner.

Born in Osaka, Japan, Yuko worked as an English teacher in Japan then studied abroad at Seattle University to earn a master’s in education. In 2001, she graduated from the TESOL program.

Anna Maria Tianello (May 12, 2013; age 79)

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SU Magazine Winter 2 014 / 41

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Professor Emerita Helon Hewitt received her education in nursing from Emmanuel Hospital in Portland, Ore., and earned a master’s in psychiatric nursing from the University of Washington. She began her teaching career at Seattle University in 1965 in the College of Nursing and was a very active member of the university community. She retired from SU in 1987.

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Helon Hewitt (March 27, 2013)

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Gary graduated from the University of Alabama in 1969 and served in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War. After 20 years of service he retired as a Major from the Air Force. During his service Gary moved to Seattle and later worked as an electrical engineer while flying for the Air Force reserves. He retired as a commercial airline captain after 27 years with Hughes Airwest, Republic Airlines and Northwest Airlines.

After a successful teaching career Beverly received her master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Washington and became a professor in the Doctoral Program of Educational Leadership at Seattle University. She was a nationally recognized theorist and speaker in the area of women and leadership and known for her service to others, deep connection to family, enduring friendships, a love of animals, her spirituality and a commitment to the Unitarian faith.

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Gary Michael Bentley, MBA (March 24, 2013; age 66)

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1983

Beverly Anderson Forbes (April 2, 2013)

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While in the U.S. Coast Guard, Arlie earned a 1st class radiotelephone license. He attended Dillon Teacher’s College and graduated with a degree in elementary education. Arlie’s teaching career spanned 38 years. Summers were spent as a VISTA volunteer, a tutor for blind children and an actor for Seattle Children’s Theatre. Among Arlie's broad interests were archaeology, covered bridges, snow apples and music by the Celtic Women singers.

Father Emmett, a Seattle native and graduate of Seattle Prep, taught in SU’s English department from 1973–2005. From 1956–59 he taught English and Latin at Gonzaga Prep before moving to Rome to study theology at the Gregorian University. In 1962, he was ordained as a Catholic priest. In 2005, he became pastor at St. Cecilia’s Parish on Bainbridge Island.

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Arlie Wirth Albeck, MEd (Feb. 11, 2013; age 81)

Emmett Carroll, S.J. (July 23, 2013)

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1978

FACULTY 100 40

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Anna Maria attended Le Moyne College and majored in social work. Later, she joined the convent of the Missionary Sisters of Sacred Heart Mother Cabrini Order. After graduating as a registered nurse from Columbus Hospital School of Nursing, she was assigned to Cabrini Westpark, New York and then Chicago. Eventually she was assigned to Cabrini Hospital in Seattle. After 17 years, she left the covenant and earned a degree at SU. She worked at Group Health, Swedish Hospital and Providence.

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1972

Yuko Morita, MEd (Feb. 13, 2013; age 63)

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2001

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Peller was a point guard for the Seattle University basketball team in the mid-1960s. After graduating from SU, he became a local businessman, teacher and coach.

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Peller Phillips, Jr. (Feb. 19, 2013; age 71)

Douglas Glenn Helton, MBA (May 19, 2013; age 61)

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1989

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A graduate of Seattle Prep and SU, Stephen worked in real estate and with his father in the fur business. In his 20s he entered the Dominican community and was ordained a Roman Catholic priest in Seattle. He took the name of Stephen and ministered in Tacoma and Sedro Woolley, Wash., impacting the lives of many.

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Salvatore (Stephen) Joseph Trippy (March 9, 2013; age 70)

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Leonard was a graduate of O’Dea High School and following graduation from SU went to dental school at Creighton University. For 37 years he practiced dentistry in Burien.

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Beverly grew up on her parents’ Yakima farm and later moved west to attend SU where she graduated with a medical technology degree. At SU she met her husband, Gerald “Jerry” Baldwin. The couple raised three sons and Beverly volunteered actively with the Association for Catholic Childhood and St. Louise School. She enjoyed bridge and pinochle, playing the slots at casinos and traveling.

1964

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Beverly Jean Baldwin (March 23, 2013; age 79)


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THE LAST WORD B

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Hey Mr. DJ | By Annie Beckmann

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University Librarian moonlights at SU radio station KSUB

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On its website, Seattle University’s student radio station KSUB-89.1 FM makes the bold claim to “sonically kick your teeth in” with “pirates riding waves of sound” who are “rebels in a music revolution.” Enter Seattle University Librarian John Popko, known on the KSUB airwaves as Nigel, Your Favorite Child of the Sixties, host of The Finn Hill Sessions Tuesdays from 7 to 8 p.m. This volunteer DJ might be a rebel who carries a briefcase, yet his keen memory for music is not unlike an online database you might find in a university library. So how did the university’s head librarian start DJing on the side? He has been a bit of a closet DJ most of his life—a passionate music collector and listener who likes to delve into its history. One day in fall 2012, he responded to the station’s call for volunteer DJs. The Nigel moniker came to Popko courtesy of a friend during his high school and college days and it stuck. When he told his family he was bent on becoming a KSUB DJ, all agreed: “You can be Nigel again!” Nigel introduces his show each week by explaining its title, which also happens to be where he lives: “The Finn Hill Sessions is named for the mythical recording studio perched high atop Finn Hill in Kirkland, Wash., where generations of songwriters, composers, musicians and performers have paused in the midst of their worldwide travels to lay down a few tracks for posterity.” Every show opens with a slice of “Hey Mr. DJ” by Van Morrison and ends with Nigel’s signoff: “Paraphrasing my mom and Red Skelton, ‘Good night and God bless,’” followed by enough of “Happy Trails” for old timers to recognize the harmonies of Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. The set list from each of Nigel’s shows spans about 50 years and includes music from multiple genres. Themes have included “sunny days,” “taverns and roadhouses,” “sad and lonely” and “luck and fortune.” When he first started out, his earliest one-hour shows took him five to seven hours of prep time. He whittled that down to three hours—OK, sometimes four— more recently. He drafts a complete script for each show. He’s challenged but not thwarted by minor technical gaffes. For example, he might start talking without turning on his microphone or start a song he just played. “Those weeks when I have only three people listening, it really doesn’t matter,” he says with a laugh. Who would have guessed that one of SU’s top administrators would hunker down in the basement of Campion Hall and play an eclectic assortment of tunes each week? “Nigel” shrugs and sums it up this way. “The bastard cousin of being a musician is being a DJ.” 42 / The Last Word

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PHOTO BY DOUG OGLE

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“I make time [to DJ] because it’s fun plus I need the creative outlet.” JOHN POPKO, AKA KSUB DJ “NIGEL”

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Stream KSUB at www.ksubseattle.org and check out a behind the scenes video at the station at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.


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Seattle, WA Permit No. 2783

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PAID

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Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

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SAVE THE DATE

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presents 100 40

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MAY 9 –11

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WWW.SEATTLEU.EDU/ALUMNI

www.seattleu.edu/searchformeaning

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Book festival featuring keynotes from national and international authors, book signings and more. Alumni, join us at this signature event.

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THE SEARCH FOR MEANING

Register today. We can't wait to see you!

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8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Seattle University campus

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Also honoring Sullivan and Costco Scholars

FEBRUARY 15

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Classes of 1964 and 2004

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Spring Reunion Weekend


Winter magazine 2014