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Seattl attle University THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

SPRING 2011

Spirit!

Now That’s the

Efforts underway to reignite school pride and tradition at SU

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Seattle University Volume 35 • Issue Number 1 • Spring 2011 S TA F F

from the editor

Editor Tina Potterf Art Director/Senior Designer Terry Lundmark, ’82 Strategic Communications Director Casey Corr Brand Director Mary Olson Assistant Vice President for Marketing Communications Soon Beng Yeap Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor Editorial Assistant Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Christopher Canlas, ’01, Diana Chamorro, ’11, Maura Beth Pagano, ’12, and Kelly Stone, ’09 Copy Editor Sherri Schultz Proofreader Geri Gale

Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published quarterly in fall, winter, spring and summer by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

Change Is a Good Thing Consider it a head-to-toe makeover. As you thumb through the pages of this issue of Seattle University Magazine you’ll immediately see a dramatic change and feel to your alumni magazine. With this new look we strive for a more contemporary and fresh feel, with a bolder display of photos and type and more entry points into each section. We asked many of our readers for input and many of these ideas helped guide us in this new direction. Our editorial team pored over many magazines—both alumni publications and national mainstream magazines—for inspiration. We tested our design concepts with members of the campus community and a sampling of alumni. Part of this overhaul includes introducing new features and changing existing ones. You’ll see more faculty and students in the magazine, and a more prominent call out of events. New features will appear in the summer issue as well, so stay tuned. Some sections have been renamed and retooled such as People (now Perspectives), Campus Observer (now On Campus) and Class Notes (information is easier to access by grad year). Another significant change is our In Memoriam section. In an effort to respectfully honor the lives of those we have lost, full-length obituaries will now run online. Doing so will allow us to more fully tell the stories of alumni and friends who have died and allow readers to share memories. I want to hear from readers if this works or if there are challenges with the new format. What do you think of the new look and design overall? Do some parts work and others, not so much? I want to know. Drop me a line via e-mail at tinap@seattleu.edu or comment on the Seattle University Magazine website (watch for dramatic changes to the online version in the coming months). We also want to track who’s reading the magazine. If your mailing address has changed or you receive the magazine but prefer to read it online only, please let us know. As always, thanks for reading. Tina Potterf, editor

2 / In Memoriam

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Seattle University THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

DEPARTMENTS 2

Letters

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Did You Know?

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Perspectives

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On Campus Come Join Us / 11

FEATURES

14 Be Proud What does Seattle University pride and spirit mean to you? Efforts are underway to rekindle the Seattle University spirit of glory years.

Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Faculty/Staff News & Notes / 12

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Alumni Voice Class Notes / 24

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In Memoriam

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Bookmarks

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The Last Word

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ON THE COVER Students are energized—and pumped up with pride—as they show some love to the SU men’s basketball team during the team’s recent game against UW. PHOTO BY JOHN LOK

SU Magazine Spring 2011 / 1

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LETTERS

The View from Here Looks Good Thank you very much for the review you did on View from the Tent [Bookmarks, Winter 2010]. It came as a great surprise as I concluded that [there] might not be any interest on your/SU Magazine’s part. I love that it’s in a love edition! M. Barrett Miller, ’68 Seattle

‘Making Herstory’ Revisited FROM THE EDITOR

Earlier in the fall, I was visited by Mike Brown, who had uncovered a letter to the editor written by his mother, Mary Miniter, but never sent. Going through his mother’s belongings following her death last year, Brown came across the letter tucked inside the Fall 2004 issue of Seattle University Magazine. The cover story, “Making Herstory”—which focused on the maverick women who shaped Seattle University—was of particular interest to Mary, who was among the first women to attend

WINTER 2010

Connecting Seattle University Alumni and Friends

SU when it began to admit women in the early 1930s. Below is that letter. —Tina Potterf

It is great fun to read the Seattle University Magazine and follow the changes that have occurred since I first came to the old Seattle College in 1933. I read with great interest [the article on] Jane Prouty in the Fall 2004 issue about women, “Making Herstory,” at Seattle U. Jane and I went through Holy Names together. We were friends and I was happy to see her name. I thought I would fill in some of the missing pieces. Seattle College had always been a men’s college. The only women were the off-campus nursing students at Providence Hospital and they were mostly nuns. The college decided to admit women as regular students for the fall quarter of 1933. Five women were admitted. They included me (Mary Brandmeir), Betty McConnell and Mary McMullen. I don’t know which of us registered

Cupid Strikes Again Our winter cover story on love found at Seattle University had special meaning for a number of readers, who shared their own stories at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/. Here are some of those comments:

♥ ,

SU STYLE

It’s happily ever after for couples whose love blossomed at SU

2 / Letters

Jeremy Corwin, ’93, and Laurie (Roshak) Corwin, ’93, met their freshman year on the first day in Winnie Guy’s calculus class and married six days after graduation. Nine children later, Laurie says Jeremy “is still my best friend. It was the best thing that ever happened to me at SU!” Butch, ’69, and Marilyn Hrnicek, ’68, met at a sock-hop in the gymnasium in November 1965, and married June 1968.

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first, but there were five of us that first quarter. The second quarter there were eight. And by the third quarter, there were 25 women. There was some controversy about admitting women. At first the 96 men at Seattle College were not pleased that we had invaded their territory, but that soon changed. By spring quarter, we were all getting along fine. I had planned to attend the University of Washington, but Father John Prange met with my mother and explained how that might not be the place for a young graduate of Holy Names Academy. So my plans were changed. As a result, I helped make history at Seattle University. Being in the first group of women at Seattle College was quite an experience. Truth be known, the ratio of men to women was very much in our favor and we had a pretty good time that year. Mary B. Miniter

Michael Lowenstein, ’64, and Lonnie Veeder, ’65, married May 15, 1965. The couple met in the Chieftain in 1961 and, according to Lonnie, was inseparable thereafter. Mike worked as an underwriter in insurance for 10 years, went back to SU to get a degree in psychology and then became a social worker/supervisor for DSHS. Lonnie became a teacher for the Northshore School District. The couple raised two daughters. Unfortunately, Mike, died in 1997, while waiting for a lung transplant. Lonnie’s marital advice: “Cherish the moments and fill the moments with love. Time passes quickly and your life as a couple will end before you are ready.” Lonnie would love to hear from anyone who knew her and Mike during their days at SU.

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We received quite a few comments online about our Fall 2010 cover story on the new Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons. Here’s a sampling:

Library a Shrine, Not a Warehouse Yes, a 1966 library would justify a serious upgrade to support contemporary learning methods and tools; yet referring to the original library as a mere “warehouse for books” I find ingratiating of its stature. The original library, as ancestor to the new one, played no less of a role in defining the quality educational experience that SU stands for. It set the stage and precedent for the new library’s architectural design and redefined function. It was a place where students, faculty and others could gather and not just study, but also be surrounded by the magic and glory of learning and knowledge of all the bound volumes contained and protected within it. The old library does not deserve to be dismissed as a “warehouse for books,” connoted with a lifeless, chunky shell with no

Andrea Albenesius, ’92, and Rookie Gleich, ’93, met at SU while playing basketball for the Chieftains. Says Andrea, “We became best friends after graduation, and that friendship blossomed into true love so we decided to become teammates for life.” They married at the Chapel of St. Ignatius in August 2001, with many of their SU friends and teammates cheering them on. “God has blessed us with two beautiful boys, Treyson and Ryan. And, if they are fortunate to get their mom’s basketball talent, they may one day play for the Redhawks,” Andrea says.

potential for spiritual and social edification. It has every right to be revered as a shrine to the power and mystery of learning and thought that all libraries, no matter how humble, rural, disheveled or foreign, deserve our respect and deference.

basement storage in a building between the libraries. We had no assistance moving the boxes, although several people were involved in packing and unpacking the boxes. The gorgeous new modern library was not quite complete by the time we finished in September.

Lonner F. Holden (father of a current SU sophomore)

Jim Klinefelter, ’68

Historical Fact Check I don’t remember the “bucket brigade” move to the new library back in 1966. What I do remember clearly is that myself and one other student were hired at $1.45 per hour to move all of the books from the old library to the new A.A. Lemieux Library following summer quarter in August 1966. The move took us six weeks working full-time and was tough manual labor involving loading the boxed books about four or five boxes high onto hand trucks and then down three flights of stairs and up to the new library. Some of the books were down an additional stairway to a

Juliana, ’00, and Brian Stachurski, ’00, were married at the Chapel of St. Ignatius June 17, 2000, by Father Stephen Sundborg and with Juliana’s parents and grandparents [Jeannie and Dayton Balinbin, ’78, and George and Rita Krsak, ’47] in attendance to receive a special blessing honoring the three generations of SU marriages. Derek Dunn, ’67, and Kathie Fennell Dunn (attended through 1965) met and married while at Seattle University and have been married 45 years. The couple, now retired, lives in Portland, Ore.



Seattle University Magazine welcomes letters to the editor on subjects raised within the magazine. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Please include a name, address and daytime telephone number with all correspondence. Send to: Letters Editor, Seattle University Magazine Seattle University 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090 E-mail: sumagazine@seattleu.edu

Daniel Bootz, ’03, and Jeanne Ryan, ’03, ’06 MIT, met during orientation and dated all four years of college. They were married in the Chapel of St. Ignatius the weekend after graduation, on June 21, 2003, and now live in Madison, Wis., with their daughter, Esme. Another baby is due in July. “I am so grateful that SU brought my husband and me together,” says Jeanne. Elizabeth (Cox), ’98, and Daniel Murray, ’98, met at SU in 1994, and married in 1998. They have two children, Ryan and Julia, and live in the Washington, D.C., metro area.

SU Magazine Spring 2011 / 3

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DID YOU KNOW?

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A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU. ILLUSTRATION / GETTY IMAGES

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HEAR THEM ROAR SU Athletics and The Spectator team up to honor women athletes By Diana Chamorro, ’11 MSAL

Names such as Elgin Baylor, Eddie and Johnnie nnie O’Brien and Tom Workman often come to eattle mind when talk turns to the glory days of Seattle o University athletics and student athletes who helped put SU on the map. But what aboutt the women who were pioneers in athletics? This year the Athletics Department is partnering with the student newspaper The Spectator to sponsor the Year of the Woman series that recognizes integral women who helped make strides in the development of sports programs at SU. The Spectator is highlighting accomplished women in school history such as Ingrid wna Gunnestad, Sue Stimac, Sue Turina, LaShawna eries White and Julie (Holmes) Woodward. The series will culminate with a tribute dinner for Pat Lesser and Janet (Hopps) Adkinson, May 1 at the Space Needle. In the 1950s, while students at SU, Lesser, who played golf and Adkinson, a tennis player, earned national ms. They were championships playing on the all-men’s teams. e university. the first national champs in any sport for the

Visit www.goseattleu.com for tickets and more information on the dinner.

THE GOOD WORD

SPRING AWAKENING Here is an excerpt from the latest the Good Word column, penned by Mike Bayard, S.J., director of Campus Ministry:

“As new life blossoms all around us in this springtime, we might ask ourselves this question: How do we cultivate the spirit within so that each one of us might be most authentic and faithful to what God calls us to, to our greater purpose?” Read the Good Word column in its entirety online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

4 / Did You Know?

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PHOTO BY LINDSEY WASSON

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Tariq Ramadan signs his latest book at the STM Book Fest.

STM B BOOK FEST

BOOK FEST DRAWS BIG CROWDS, BIG NAMES BOO Seattle University attracts notable and noteworthy speakers to campus. Case in point: Writer and schola scholar Tariq Ramadan, who was a keynote speaker at the School of Theology and Ministry's Search for Meaning Me Pacific Northwest Spirituality Book Festival in February. Ramadan is a professor of Conte Contemporary Islamic Studies at Oxford University and a noted author on issues of Muslims in the West and a Islamic revival in the Muslim world. This is the third year of the literary festival. For more about STM and its offerings, visit www.seattleu.edu/stm/.

SU C CAPS BOTTLED WATER SALES Stude Students lead effort to ban plastic water bottle sales on campus By Seattle University Magazine staff

If you are looking to purchase a bottle of water at Seattle University, you won’t find d one in vending machines or at the SU Bookstore. At the start of the academic year this past fall, the university banned the availability and sale of bottled water in response to a ion in campaign initiated by students. The university is the first higher education institution Washington state to end the sale of plastic bottled water campus-wide. The move began more than three years ago when students were inspired by Professor Gary Chamberlain and his crusade against what he calls “the bottled water phenomenon.” Support for the effort also came from SU staff members and dents’ academic departments. Last June, the Academic Assembly approved the students’ proposal, and the university leadership team followed. Sustainability Manager Karen Price was proactive in preparing the university as a water bottle-free campus; there are 31 water fountains across campus with bottle fillers. She also worked with SU Bookstore Manager Bob Spencer to make it possible for the campus community to purchase a reusable stainless steel water bottle at a discount. Read the full story on the plastic water bottle ban at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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SU Magazine Spring 2011 / 5

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PERSPECTIVES

Student of Fashion

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By Annie Beckmann

Andrew Hoge has designs on a career melding social media and couture If fashion tells a story, Andrew Hoge sure has one to tell. The senior and onetime biochemistry major who wanted to be a doctor describes what he calls the thunderbolt effect of his decision to switch his major to business administration and strategic communications. Another pivotal point came his freshman year when he joined the SU Fashion Club. Before long, he would organize the first of what has become an annual fashion show and fundraiser for the club. Hoge trained models, found designers and boutiques to feature, and discovered his previously unknown talent as an event organizer. The spring benefit show, now in its fourth year, raises money for Dress for Success, which provides interview attire and career development tools for women in need. Working for designers now comes naturally for Hoge, who has interned at the fashion house of Oscar de la Renta in New York City and is currently interning with Seattle designer Luly Yang.

“Luly Yang is a legend in Seattle and I fell in love with her designs and her business model,” says Hoge, who on a recent day was busy at the designer’s couture showroom at Seattle’s Fairmont Olympic Hotel. As Hoge stands alongside a mannequin and gently fluffs the silk taffeta skirt on a $34,000 monarch butterfly dress studded with Swarovski crystals, he talks of what it took to land internships with prestigious designers. “The one big thing I learned as an intern for Oscar de la Renta is that social media is huge,” says Hoge, who is now Yang’s public relations manager. How he found his way to the world of high fashion speaks to his upbringing. “My parents gave me a strong work ethic and values and told me never to be superficial,” he says. His dad, an urban planner, met his mom in her homeland of Guyana while he was working for the United Nations. While Hoge credits his strong foundation, his goals and grit are his own. When he was initially turned

down for an unpaid internship in Yang’s showroom, he followed up with an e-mail offering to help her any way he could. She agreed, and by 2009 Hoge was hired on as a part-time paid intern. As an intern, Hoge has organized a model call to add fresh talent and created look books featuring photos of Yang’s designs. His internship last summer in public relations at Oscar de la Renta provided another level of experience in fashion and brought his future into sharper focus. Hoge maintains a detailed journal to keep tabs on lessons learned, questions that arise, his ever-changing goals and life’s epiphanies. Ultimately, he aspires to work in public relations or as an editor at a fashion magazine such as Vogue. Hoge has a realistic sense about the role of fashion in one’s life. “Unless you already have selfconfidence, you can be put off by fashion,” he says. “It’s all about personal style, personal expression and wearing what makes you feel good.”

SPRING FASHION 101 / ACCORDING TO ANDREW HOGE • No-nonsense bright whites and shades of camel are in for spring. • Don’t shy away from color. Juxtapose a muted shade with a bright, bold and uplifting color. • Fashion designer Marc Jacobs makes a return to disco-era ’70s chic.

Andrew Hoge is busy with couture pieces and social media in Luly Yang’s downtown Seattle showroom.

• Watch for a Spanish flair and bright colors in Oscar de la Renta’s creations. Read more on Andrew at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

6 / Perspectives

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SU Magazine Spring 2011 / 7

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ON CAMPUS

Justice in Reel Time

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By Tina Potterf

School of Law Professor Marilyn Berger turns filmmaker for latest work on 9/11 Marilyn Berger is known for a long and distinguished career as a law professor. With the release of the new documentary film, Out of the Ashes: 9/11, she is increasingly getting a name for herself as a filmmaker. Berger, who has taught law for 31 years, is the writer, co-director and executive producer of Out of the Ashes: 9/11, which examines the legal, moral and ethical

series on 9/11 victims. “The thing that united them before 9/11 was that on Sept. 11, 2001, they all got up that morning, said their goodbyes and we never saw them again,” Berger says. There’s Felicia Dunn Jones, a civil rights lawyer whose office was a block from the World Trade Center. When the Twin Towers crumbled she ingested ramifications of the September 11 resistant—it took a year, and many the dust that hailed down on New Victim Compensation Fund. The e-mails and phone calls later, before he York City. Five months later, she died Fund was established 11 days after the came on board. The support of friends, from sarcoidosis, an inflammation terrorist attacks to compensate victims family and colleagues was integral in of the lungs believed to be caused by and their families. getting the film made, says Berger, who inhalation of dust. She was 42 years Out of the Ashes is the latest film also was helped along the way by nearly old. Another is that of Melodie Homer, by Berger, who is director of the two dozen law students, and former who lost her husband LeRoy, who was School of Law’s Films for Justice deans and current faculty of the School a co-pilot on United Flight 93. The Institute, which she created in 1995. of Law. documentary also includes the challenges Her other cinematic works include Nothing could have prepared her families and partners faced. One such the educational documentaries Lessons for the filmmaking process ahead. case is that of Margaret Cruz, who lost from Woburn: The Untold Stories with “It consumed my life for seven her domestic partner of 18 years, Pat Henry Wigglesworth, The Rules of years…,” says Berger. “A roller coaster McAneney, an accountant working in Procedure and Conduct and Settlement. ride, indeed, but a journey that has one of the towers. Cruz had to plead her Out of the Ashes tackles issues around constituted an incredibly momentous case to Feinberg because the couple was the Fund, including interviews with seven years.” not registered as domestic partners and affected families and individuals, The team behind the scenes working McAneney died without a will. lawyers and legal experts, and Kenneth with Berger includes two Emmy “There was a huge responsibility Feinberg, the Special Master for the Award winners, co-director Sarah Holt that we weren’t going to exploit them,” Fund. The documentary was recently and cinematographer Erich Roland, Berger says. “For a lot of them it was the finished and released earlier this year. along with narrator Charles Ogletree, first time they opened up and agreed to Its genesis began two years after the composer and sound specialist Dan do [a project] like this.” terrorist attacks when Berger visited Ring and video editor/graphic designer The film will be screened and made Ground Zero while in New York City Pamela Taylor Waldman. available for future use at law schools for a conference. The keynote speaker The documentary showcases seven and conferences throughout the United at the conference was Feinberg. As families and individuals whose lives States. The director’s take on the final Berger recalls, he “told haunting stories were directly affected by 9/11 and the cut of the film: “Out of the Ashes: 9/11 about 9/11 families, the impact of the Victim Compensation Fund. Those is an objective piece of documentary Fund on their lives and its uniqueness who are featured came after more than work,” says Berger, and a documentary in 9/11 history.” Moved by what she a year and a half of combing through that allows viewers to come to their heard, Berger approached Feinberg names and contacts, plus countless own conclusions about the Victim about documenting the program and interviews. Many of the stories Berger Compensation Fund and if justice his work on film. Initially, he was first read about in a New York Times was served.

To view a trailer for Out of the Ashes: 9/11 visit www.outoftheashes911.com/

Marilyn Berger dedicated seven years to the making of the documentary, Out of the Ashes: 9/11.

8 / On Campus

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“...On Sept. 11, 2001, they all got up that morning, said their goodbyes and we never saw them again.” MARILYN BERGER, PROFESSOR, SCHOOL OF LAW

SU Magazine Spring 2011 / 9

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ON CAMPUS

Rachel Klein, ’12 and Adrian Kirn, ’12, are taking swing dancing to the masses.

In the Swing of It When it comes to having a good time, most college students wouldn’t think of a pastime once popular with their grandparents. But Adrian Kirn, ’12, and Rachel Klein, ’12, aren’t most college students. Co-presidents of Seattle University’s recently revived Swing Dance Club, Kirn and Klein are eager to get their peers involved in swing, a style of dance many of them may have never tried before. “We know that swing dancing isn’t exactly the popular dance of our generation,” says Klein, who majors in photography and French at SU. “People are intimidated by it because they don’t know what to expect.”

By Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

Kirn and Klein got their start in swing dancing as freshmen at SU. “I didn’t know much about any kind of dance before I got into swing dancing,” says Kirn, a physics and chemical engineering major. “But once I got into it, I loved it.” He invited Klein to go dancing with him at Seattle’s Century Ballroom, a popular destination for local swing dancers. It didn’t take long before Klein was hooked. The pair was inspired to resurrect SU’s Swing Club, which disbanded a few years ago due to a lack of interest. A top priority for Klein and Kirn is raising the profile of the club around campus. It seems to be

working. So far, they’ve assembled a mailing list of 185 people and have begun hosting meetings and open dances. While they are satisfied with where the club is headed, they would like to see a larger turnout—especially among SU’s male population. “I know it’s hard for guys to overcome the fear of making a fool of themselves,” says Kirn. But he and Klein guarantee that anyone, male or female, can have a good time swing dancing. “If you can walk, you can dance,” says Kirn. “Or better yet, if you can walk, we can teach you how to dance.”

10 / On Campus

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april

CATHOLIC HERITAGE LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS ILIA DELIO

Thursday, April 14 7 to 9 p.m., Pigott Auditorium Noted scholar Ilia Delio will discuss the topic “Theology After Darwin: Towards a New Religious Future.” Delio is senior research fellow at Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University. Information: www.seattleu.edu/missionministry/. BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION TRADE SHOW Friday, April 15 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Student Center 160 Support students and alumni in their business ventures, and get inspired to participate in next year’s business plan competition of the Albers Entrepreneurship Center. Information: (206) 296-5715.

COME JOIN US SCHOLARSHIP APPRECIATION LUNCHEON Thursday, May 12 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., Campion Ballroom In gratitude for supporting scholarships, generous alumni, friends and community partners are invited to this lunch with SU scholarship recipients. Information: (206) 296-6100 or e-mail uaevents@seattleu.edu.

SCHOOL OF LAW SPRING COMMENCEMENT Sunday, May 15 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., KeyArena at Seattle Center The School of Law celebrates the Class of 2011. Tickets: (206) 398-4000.

ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS EXECUTIVE SPEAKER SERIES Wednesday, April 20 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Pigott Auditorium Join us for a discussion with Kim Harris, CEO of Puget Sound Energy, featured guest of the Albers Executive Speaker Series. Information: (206) 296-5700.

SERVICE IN ACTION: LEVERAGING VOLUNTEERS— AN OLD IDEA FOR THE NEW ECONOMY Friday, April 22 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tacoma Goodwill Industries, Tacoma The Master of Public Administration and Executive Master of Nonprofit Leadership programs invite alumni to the next Service in Action seminar. The seminar is geared toward executive leaders, fundraising professionals and nonprofit board members. Information: (206) 296-6143 or e-mail potterd@seattleu.edu.

TRANSITIONS RETREAT Friday–Saturday, April 29–30 All day, Camp Burton, Vashon Island, Wash. Alumni and friends are invited to participate in a retreat reflecting on one’s own transitions in life. Information: (206) 296-2637 or e-mail magis@seattleu.edu.

may

HUI O NANI HAWAII’S 49TH ANNUAL LUAU

Saturday, May 7 5:30 p.m., Campion Ballroom The Seattle University community is invited to Hui O Nani’s annual celebration of Hawaiian culture and heritage, featuring authentic Hawaiian cuisine, entertainment and cultural dances. Hui O Nani is SU’s oldest student club. Information: huiofficers@seattleu.edu.

27TH ANNUAL QUADSTOCK Saturday, May 21 All day, SU Quad Alumni are invited to Quadstock, the university’s largest outdoor music concert and carnival-like festival of the academic year. A limited number of tickets are available for alumni. Cost: $20, available at the Campus Assistance Center on the first floor of the Student Center. Information: (206) 296-6047.

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PRESIDENT’S COMMENCEMENT BRUNCH

Saturday, June 11 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Connolly Center Rejoice with the newest set of alumni on their latest achievement—graduating. The commencement brunch, the day before the commencement ceremony, is open to graduates and their families. Reservations are required. Information: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail alumni@seattleu.edu.

For more information on alumni events, contact Alumni Relations at (206) 296-6127 or visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/.

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ON CAMPUS

Faculty Snapshot / Eric Watson, S.J.

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By Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

Meet faculty member Eric Watson, S.J., who teaches chemistry in the College of Science and Engineering What’s your specialty within the general field of chemistry? Professor Watson: Synthetic organometallic chemistry. There are two main divisions in chemistry: inorganic chemistry, which concerns metals, and organic chemistry, which deals with carbon molecules. Synthetic organometallic chemistry is a hybrid of these two divisions. What can you tell me about the research you are working on or have worked on? Watson: As part of my research at Seattle University this past summer, two undergraduate chemistry students and I synthesized an interesting new compound possessing two iron atoms linked by a carbon ring. My postdoctoral research [at the University of Washington] involved the oxidation of methane to methanol. This project is called a “holy grail” of organometallic chemistry, because its realization would be of great scientific and economic value. While we found some

interesting results, the controlled oxidation of methane chemistry remains a goal of many scientists. What brought you to Seattle University and the College of Science and Engineering? Watson: In June 2009, I was ordained to the priesthood in Spokane. As a Jesuit of the Oregon Province, I was asked to apply to both Jesuit universities in the Northwest—Seattle University and Gonzaga University. After interviewing with both schools, the Provincial of the Oregon Jesuits discerned that I could best serve at Seattle University. What’s most rewarding about your line of work? Watson: As a priest and a chemist, I have two rewarding lines of work at Seattle University. My most frequent sacramental ministry at Seattle University involves presiding at Masses at the Chapel of St. Ignatius.

I find this service to the university community profoundly moving and meaningful. As a chemistry teacher, I love the opportunity to interact with students and to help them understand chemistry better—and, hopefully, to enjoy it as well. Moreover, my opportunity to combine religious and scientific ministries in my daily work enriches and informs both lines of work. What is your favorite pastime? Watson: This year, my favorite pastime is walking around Seattle. I usually begin without a destination in mind and always discover some new and interesting area or neighborhood. What is one “fun fact” your students might be surprised to know about you? Watson: Before becoming a Jesuit, I lived in Sitka, Alaska, for three years and lived aboard a 29-foot sailboat.

news & notes FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS Dan Dombrowski, professor of philosophy, gave a lecture on “Hartshorne, Plato and the Concept of God” at the University of Münster in Germany. Terry Foster, assistant professor of business law in the Albers School of Business and Economics, and Eric Farquharson, chair of the military science department, co-authored an article titled, “Assessment Procedures for Skills-Based MBA Courses Adapted from the US Army ROTC Leadership

Development Program,” which has been accepted for publication by Negotiation Journal. Ki Gottberg, professor of theater arts, gave the keynote speech at the Young Playwrights Program’s celebration event at A Contemporary Theatre (ACT) in Seattle. The Young Playwrights Program connects professional playwrights with students in area middle and high schools. Gottberg has taught the program many times.

David Green, associate director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, was the opening keynote speaker at the 15th annual conference of SEDA, the United Kingdom's professional organization for educational and faculty developers. Green’s talk, “Constructive Re-alignment? U.K. Educational Development from the Outside,” focused on areas where U.K. and U.S. faculty

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Eric Watson, S.J., teaches synthetic organometallic chemistry at the College of Science and Engineering.

can learn from each other and ways in which U.K. developers might reconfigure their work in a difficult political climate. While in the U.K., Green also ran sessions for faculty at Roehampton University (London) and Birmingham City University on classroom incivility and millennial learners. Kate Kelly, assistant director of Conference and Event Services, wrote an article that appears in the online

publication of the Association of Collegiate Conferences and Events Directors-International (ACCED-I). In her article, “Modern Fountain of Youth: Positive Impacts of Student Employees,” Kelly writes about the benefits of student employees in the collegiate events industry. Kelly serves as director of ACCED-I Region 1. Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs will be the featured American poet at the

2011 International Festival of Poetry in Nagpur, India. The festival, known as Kritya 2011, will include 60 poets from around the world. Mark Niles, dean of the School of Law, wrote a piece, “Diversity and the Law: Supporting Inclusiveness at Seattle U and in the Law,” which appeared in the December issue of the Washington State Bar Association’s Bar News.

More faculty and staff achievements online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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BE PRO

Whether a Redhawk or a Chieftain, stand to

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OUD

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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together and

By Tina Potterf

Morgan Mushlitz, ‘13, is a leader in building Redhawk spirit on campus, clearly winning over Dee Zimmerman. Dee’s husband, Tony Zimmerman, ‘60, is a Chieftain through and through, so for him, this Redhawk thing might take a little more time.

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SU red was in full effect as a record crowd turned out for the SU vs. UW basketball game Feb. 22.

Tony Zimmerman, '60, is a Chieftain through and through. As season ticket holders, Tony and his wife, Dee, are often seen in the crowd at SU men’s basketball games, cheering on the team, flanked by other Chieftains and Redhawks. For Zimmerman, a lifelong basketball fan, the games capture a bit of the glory days he experienced during the program’s successful run in the 1950s, with the prowess of the famed O’Brien twins, Ed and John, and the 1958 NCAA championship game with Elgin Baylor and the SU team taking on Kentucky. In those days, SU basketball captured the attention of a city with fewer entertainment choices, and students held membership in something that set them apart. “It was standing room only,” Zimmerman says. “The atmosphere was great.” With the shift back to Division I, Zimmerman believes that school support and spirit is on the uptick. But returning to the epicenter of student life will take time. “Basketball put SU on the map,” says Zimmerman. “Father Lemieux was the number one basketball fan. Everybody at SU lived and breathed basketball. … I think

the spirit is there.” How to rekindle the level of enthusiasm and outward pride that was so much a part of the SU experience during Zimmerman’s time here is on the minds of many in the university community. What pride means—and if Seattle University has a shortage of it—differs depending on whom you ask. For some, it is conspicuous at select basketball games at KeyArena at Seattle Center, such as when the men’s team takes on Oregon State or the University of Washington. Pride can take root in university accomplishments in many areas, though most agree that better attendance at athletics events is the most visible measurement. But it’s not the only measurement. Others see spirit alive and thriving when a few hundred students and members of the campus turn out for the annual International Dinner or when bodies fill Campion Ballroom for the Battle of the Bands. Others might say that pride at SU is generated by academic success, illustrated by the achievements of our students and faculty, our extraordinary run of students winning Truman Scholarships and our prominent

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SPEAK UP

How would you describe school pride at Seattle University? “I think students here are very proud of their school. Sports-wise, it’s lacking a little, but overall I think it’s good.” Ed Walugembe senior, liberal studies

“Today I would say spirit is building. It has a ton of potential and is moving in the

“Through the campus communities that we have, and the bonds that we form—in all the ways you can get involved—I think that’s how we really show pride.” Cydni Carter junior, photography/Spanish

right direction.” ERIC CHALMERS, ’14 “I think most people have pretty good school pride, but I wish everybody got into it. I wish more people went to sporting events. Josh Winkler junior, economics

rankings in U.S. News & World Report and the Princeton Review Best Colleges Guide. For students, joining a club or organization on campus is a way to meet new people while showing pride in the institution. Alumni can volunteer as mentors or advisers for students or attend one of the many lectures that bring notable authors, artists and scholars to campus. “Having pride in your school also means giving back to your school,” says Renata Opoczynski, assistant director of Student Activities. “Not only financially, but also as mentors or participants in student programs. Giving back shows that SU means a lot to you.” One student group working hard to improve school spirit is the REDZONE, a student-based organization that focuses its work on pumping up enthusiasm at SU athletic events. Freshman Eric Chalmers, ’14, is involved with the REDZONE as vice president of game day operations— essentially in charge of coordinating a cheering section at games. His hope is that by the time he enters his senior year,

“That’s a difficult question, but I’m proud of SU students’ intellectual and academic accomplishments.” Emily Medcalf senior, social work

Interviews conducted by Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 Photos by Heath Braun, ’11

Watch a video clip of these students’ take on pride at SU at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Students show pride—and turn out full-force—for the springtime music and arts festival, Quadstock.

Campion Ballroom is bustling winter quarter when SU bands hit the stage for the annual Battle of the Bands competition.

One of SU’s latest traditions, started by students, is a Christmas tree lighting. Members of the campus and greater community came out for the first event this past December.

Service in the community is another way students, faculty/staff and alumni show pride in the university.

attending the games will be a must for students and alumni. “Many people may still think of SU more for academics and not for sports,” he says. New communication programs about games and the free bus service from campus to KeyArena are so far showing mixed results. Even after numerous e-mail reminders of the service, many seem unaware that it exists and may skip a game because it’s off campus, and parking in downtown Seattle near the arena can be difficult and costly. But there is hope that the atmosphere is ripe for pride-building. “Today I would say spirit is building. It has a ton of potential and is moving in the right direction. Ideally I would love to have a cheering section like that of Duke and Gonzaga, but something unique for SU.” Working with students, university leadership recognizes that campus spirit is kindled in many ways, including revising traditions and starting new ones. “We have to ask ourselves if we are able to provide

students with the events and moments that they can rally around,” says Jake Diaz, vice president of Student Development. “The challenge is that we could be doing more around other university-wide traditions for students to express themselves.” To get clarity on how to build pride, through activities or the starting of new traditions, members of the university recently organized a Campus Pride and Traditions Committee tasked with identifying ways to bolster existing events and happenings and look for ways the campus and alumni can get more involved. Already in existence are a slew of programs and activities that aim to cultivate pride. In the fall and spring quarters, students join faculty and staff in rolling up their sleeves to help beautify a green space or community center in a day devoted to service, a clear measure of pride in SU and in the surrounding neighborhood. Another outlet to express pride is Quadstock, the springtime music and arts festival that fills SU’s hangout spot—the Quad—with a sea of

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NEW LOOK The SU Redhawk recently got a makeover. The redesigned Rudy 2.0 is more fierce, with a sharp and streamlined profile.

OLD

bodies bobbing and dancing to the beats of local and national bands. Students started a new tradition this past Christmas season of lighting a majestic tree in front of the library and learning commons. The event, dubbed “Illuminating the Holidays,” brought together not only a large SU presence but also our neighbors who packed the space on a chilly early December evening for Christmas carols, hot chocolate and an old-fashioned tree lighting. It was a sight to behold as students including ASSU President Kevin Eggers, ’11, donned festive Christmas attire— including kitschy Christmas sweaters—and spread a healthy heaping of yuletide cheer. This tradition is one that Diaz points to as a sign that pride does have a pulse here. The Campus Pride and Traditions Committee, composed of students, staff, faculty and representatives from Alumni Relations, will look at these and others existing traditions, including those that can engage incoming students when they arrive on campus during Welcome Week and orientation in the fall. They also are looking outside of the perimeter of campus for events to draw SU support, such as the Capitol Hill Block Party, a summer outdoor music festival a few blocks north of campus. Diaz says building pride and spirit is part of the whole educational experience and the care of students. “I’ve picked up on a desire from our students to express their pride for the university in their own ways,” he says. “Students are proud of Seattle University for many different reasons, be it our size, our commitment to service and justice or because we are academically rigorous.” says Diaz. ”One of the reasons I came to work at Seattle University is that I sensed and felt the pride here.” There is evidence that more people are at least wearing their pride, based on an uptick in the sale of branded apparel and merchandise at the Seattle

NEW

University Bookstore. According to manager Bob Spencer, there has been an increase in sales of university apparel and merchandise over the past decade. Each year the bookstore now sells about $500,000 worth of sweatshirts, hats, T-shirts and other branded apparel. Sophomore Morgan Mushlitz is president of the 650-member-strong REDZONE and is someone who takes her role seriously. Like other students leading the spirit revival, she is not one to sit on the sidelines and encourage participation from a spectator’s standpoint. Instead, she is in the midst of the crowd, wearing her REDZONE apparel proudly and painting faces—her own included. Around her, it’s impossible to watch a game in the passive tense. “We are all about promoting spirit,” says Mushlitz, who is also a cadet in the ROTC program. She joined the REDZONE because of her interest in all things sports. (Membership in the REDZONE costs $5 and includes a T-shirt, among other perks.) “At my high school everyone came out for the games,” she says. “I wanted to help create that atmosphere at Seattle University. Whether you are a Chieftain or a Redhawk, be proud.” This sentiment is echoed by nursing major Carmen Cueto, ’13, who says it’s important to get involved with her school. Cueto is vice president of membership for the REDZONE and a Resident Assistant at Campion. The REDZONE is a way for students to connect and bond with other students while taking in a game or other social activity, says Cueto. “You meet awesome people, gain leadership experience and get to learn how you work with others.” She knows building student attendance takes time. “I would love to have the student section packed at every game,” she says. ”It can’t happen in one year.”

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ALUMNI VOICE

Glimmer of Hope

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By Tina Potterf

Mallory Erickson, ’08, is helping improve the lives of Nicaraguan families as director of a unique jewelry program Some regard jewelry as nothing more than fanciful baubles or an accessory to complete an outfit. But Mallory Erickson sees something much more. Jewelry handmade by Nicaraguan youth—many of whom call a municipal landfill home—is offering a way to a better life, thanks to a vocational jewelry-making program the 2008 SU graduate oversees in Managua, Nicaragua. The road Erickson traveled to get to Nicaragua was paved while an undergraduate and through her participation in SU’s Engineers Without Borders chapter, which took her to the Central American country twice. Those experiences engendered “a strong connection to the city and people there,” Erickson says. Following graduation she worked for a year with AmeriCorps at El Centro de la Raza in Seattle. When that ended she decided to take some time off to travel. Nicaragua again was calling. Initially, she planned a threemonth stay, living with a family she met during her earlier trips there and

volunteering in the city. As she scouted for volunteer opportunities, she came across the Nica HOPE jewelry program, an offering of the Asociacion Familia Padre Fabretto. The nonprofit, founded in the 1950s, operates schools and educational centers in Managua and rural areas in northern Nicaragua. Asociacion Familia Padre Fabretto aims to break the cycle of poverty through education. “It’s funny, my initial plan was to only stay for three months. I thought that by then I would be homesick and ready to return,” she says. “I’m now completing 16 months of living and working here and I’m still as excited as I was the first day.” Erickson works in the Cento San

To learn more about Nica HOPE jewelry, including how to purchase items, visit www.fabretto.org or e-mail jewelry@nicahope.org.

Francisco center, just blocks from La Chureca, the city dump. The center is open to youth and their families who live in and around the dump and focuses on three forms of outreach: academic reinforcement, computer classes and the jewelry program, each working to support the other. The jewelry program, founded more than three years ago, serves about 100 youth. Students are given materials and tools to make jewelry that is purchased by Nica HOPE to be sold online and through various organizations. The artisans are paid for every piece they produce. Erickson says that while most students in La Chureca earn less than $2 a day, a student in the jewelry program can make that in an hour’s time. Sales from the jewelry contribute to their families’ incomes and needs. The rewards of Erickson’s work are apparent in the pride she sees among students after they’ve created jewelry. “I love to hear about their plans to start their own small businesses, go to college and travel,” says Erickson. “It makes me so proud to be a part of something that can help make those dreams a reality.”

Mallory Erickson, ’08, with the children helped by the Nica HOPE program; (above)a sample of the handmade jewelry.

20 / Alumni Voice

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PHOTO / MALLORY ERICKSON

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“...My initial plan was to only stay for three months...I’m now completing 16 months... and I’m still as excited as I was the first day.” MALLORY ERICKSON, ’08

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ALUMNI VOICE

Guest column by Chris Canlas, ’01

Redhawk Pride Is Alive PHOTO BY CANDACE SHANKEL

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Chris Canlas is president-elect of the Alumni Board of Governors.

“Seattle University’s athletic traditions are poised for a resurgence, alongside new traditions that showcase school spirit and pride for the institution.” CHRIS CANLAS, ’01

Seattle University has a rich history of cheering on its teams and demonstrating school spirit and pride. Some alumni even remember the basketball team of the 1950s, and the memorable season that matched so many exciting games. John Dougherty, ’66, remembers the student body gathering with the SU basketball team in front of Dick’s Drive-In on Broadway for pre-game rallies in the 1960s. As soon as the games were over, according to John Ruffo, ’65, ’71, members of the Chieftain basketball squad would rush to a restaurant called Keith’s at 15th Avenue and Madison for burgers and socializing. With ardent student and alumni support, SU produced more NBA players in the 1960s than any other NCAA institution. Seattle University’s athletic traditions are poised for a resurgence, alongside new traditions that showcase spirit and pride for the institution. Here are some ways I encourage alumni to get involved. SUPPORT HOMEGROWN TALENT. See some of the best student athletes when you check out a men’s or women’s basketball, volleyball or soccer game. Get schedules and tickets at www. goseattleu.com. And why not plan a tailgate party before the game. SHOW YOUR COLORS. The Seattle University Bookstore offers a variety of collegiate sportswear, along with everything from SU embroidered sweatshirts to binders, pens and mugs. Alumni can get a coupon for 15 percent off gear. Stop by the A&A Building to pick one up. Check out the wares at www.seattleubookstore.com. HOST A PARTY. Get involved in one of our alumni chapters, organized in the greater Seattle area and throughout the United States. Contact Alumni Relations (call 206-296-6127 or e-mail alumni@seattleu.edu) for a list of chapters in your area, and consider hosting a reunion or gameday party. Wherever you are and however you celebrate, remember to snap photos showing off your Redhawks pride. Send them to sumagazine@seattleu.edu for potential inclusion in future Class Notes.

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Concocting a Condiment

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By Annie Beckmann

Law school alum and family create a line of savory dipping sauces The Dore family fantasizes about the day when their own creations, Docco’s Dipping Sauces, will woo the masses, saddling up next to the ketchup, mustard and other condiments in fridges across America. For now, the Dores are content with their loyal Docco’s following, cultivated over the five and a half years they’ve spent selling the savory sauces at area farmers’ markets and food, meat and wine shops. The original Docco’s was a sauce cooked up by Dr. George Dore, whose sons, Barry and David, grew up on Mercer Island enjoying the tangy concoction. Attorney Barry Dore, a 1991 School of Law alumnus, his wife, Wendy, and their son, Jeff, who graduates from the School of Law this spring, are all key players in a family business named after Jeff’s greatgrandfather, Docco Dore. Jeff Dore sold 100 bottles of sauce in his first three weeks on the farmers’ market circuit, which reinforced the family’s hunch about

Grandpa’s creation. The Docco’s line soon expanded to include variations— hot, extra hot, merlot wine and smoked porter beer—as well as a savory seafood cocktail sauce. With the exception of the seafood sauce, Docco’s is meant to be served warm and as a dipping accompaniment for sandwiches, burgers, chicken, sausages and more. Jeff says he never cooked with the sauce until it went commercial. Now he’s an expert at whipping up a dish he calls Docco’s Pulled Pork—made with pork shoulder, a little water and Docco’s in a slow cooker. Do the same with brisket, he recommends. Or add Docco’s to a favorite meatloaf recipe

for a little je ne sais quoi. The decision to add a spicier rendition came when folks started asking the Dores to crank up the heat. “When we added the hot version, people said it was nice, ‘And now how about something that will bowl us over?’” Barry says. “So XX Hot was born, with a heat that lingers.” A beer-flavored sauce was Jeff’s idea. It’s made with smoked porter, a fullbodied dark beer from Big Al Brewing south of Seattle in White Center. What distinguishes Docco’s from barbecue sauce? For one, fresh celery, onion and bell pepper are key ingredients. Unlike most barbecue sauces, Docco’s has only a gram of sugar per tablespoon, which means it won’t burn when grilled. It’s so low in sugar that the Dores were invited to bring Docco’s to an American Diabetes Association expo. Once or twice a year, the Dores make a pilgrimage to Gold Bar to make their sauces in a licensed kitchen, an all-day family affair that nets 175 gallons.

PHOTOS BY HEATH BRAUN

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THE DORE FAMILY HOPES ITS DIPPING SAUCES WILL OWN A PLACE NEXT TO THE MOST POPULAR OF CONDIMENTS.

Jeff, a current School of Law student, and his father, Barry Dore, a 1991 SU law grad, are finding success with their sauces.

For a list of where Docco’s is sold and recipe ideas, visit www.doccossauce.com.

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ALUMNI VOICE

class notes

Audra Query, ‘01, married Gerald Lawlor on Sept. 24, 2010, at Roche Harbor Resort in Washington state. The couple was joined by SU alumni Allan Query, ‘73, father of the bride, Therese Verone Brogan, ‘54, the bride’s great aunt, Mandy Okazaki Hartman, ‘01, a bridesmaid, Lila Martin, ‘01, also a bridesmaid, Christopher Canlas, ‘01, officiant, and Cara Priestley, ‘01. After 10 years living in New York City, the couple recently moved to Orcas Island.

Rosina Carpenter, MIT, ’98, and her husband, Wes, welcomed their daughter, Erin Christine Carpenter, on Oct. 7, 2010. Erin weighed 6 pounds, 10 ounces.

Jennifer, ’09, and Spencer Harding, ’09, were married July 11, 2009, at the Browns Point Lighthouse Park overlooking Puget Sound. The couple met at SU and dated throughout their undergraduate years here. They reside in Southern California.

Colin Thorgerson, ’01, and Erin (Carlile) Thorgerson, ’01, ’07 MBA, welcomed their first child, Evan Patrick Thorgerson, on Oct. 22, 2010. The family lives in Newcastle, Wash.

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1963 Father Steve Bossi, CSP, left his position as director of formation for the Paulist Fathers in Washington, D.C., and now resides in Toronto, Ontario. Currently, he is the associate pastor at St. Peter’s Catholic Church. In addition to his work in the parish, Father Bossi offers missions and retreats in Catholic parishes throughout the United States and Canada.

1968 Fred Whyte, president of STIHL, Inc., has been appointed to executive boards at Old Dominion University and the Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters in Virginia. Gov. Bob McDonnell selected Whyte for the board of visitors at Old Dominion University. He will serve on the hospital’s foundation board of directors. As president of STIHL, Inc., based in Virginia Beach, Va., Whyte is responsible for STIHL’s U.S. operations.

1970 Mike Daniels, deacon for the Diocese of San Diego, has been appointed chair of the board

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of trustees for Nativity Prep Academy. Nativity Prep is a Jesuit middle school dedicated to providing tuition-free education to children of all faiths from lowincome families in San Diego’s inner-city neighborhoods.

1973 Col. James McKay received a brevet promotion to the rank of brigadier general in retirement ceremonies at Joint Force Headquarters, New Mexico Army National Guard, in Santa Fe, N.M. McKay was also awarded the Legion of Merit and the Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal, among other state awards. His retirement marks 33 years of combined active duty and reserve service, including military service in Vietnam. During the Vietnam War, he was awarded the Silver Star for Gallantry in Action, the Soldiers Medal for Heroism, the Bronze Star with Valor Devise, the Air Medal with Valor Devise and the Combat Infantryman Badge. McKay is currently a lawyer and resides in Santa Fe with his wife, Janet.

Matthew Sanderl, ‘02, and his wife, Amy, welcomed to their family son Ryker William Sanderl, born Dec. 25, 2010. He was 7 pounds, 11 ounces. The family lives in Fairfax, Va.

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1982

Julie Sprague-McRae, since graduating from the College of Nursing, has had a rich career as a pediatric nurse practitioner in the San Francisco Bay Area for almost 30 years. This past fall, she published two books, Child Neurology Telephone Encounter Guides and Child Neurology Telephone Encounter Pocket Guides, in collaboration with the Association of Child Neurology Nurses (ACNN) and the Child Neurology Society (CNS). She was the recipient of the 2010 ACNN Claire Chee Award for Excellence in Child Neurology Nursing at the ACNN annual meeting.

Christy Leskovar is the author of a new book, Finding the Bad Inn: Discovering My Family’s Hidden Past, a follow-up to her first historical nonfiction book, One Night in a Bad Inn.

1976 Ezra Teshome received a 2010 World Citizen Award from the World Affairs Council. Teshome was recognized with the prestigious award for his outstanding leadership in working to eradicate polio in Ethiopia and, in the process, engaging and educating Washingtonians about the impact of global health issues.

1989 Ryan C. Bell, JD, MD, recently had a book published by McFarland. Bell describes The Ambulance: A History as follows: “This is the first truly comprehensive scholarly survey of the evolution of the ambulance, a claim that surprised me to no end, because the history of this element of the emergency medical services is pretty colorful stuff.” Bell is the medical doctor at the Steve Schwarzkopf Community Mental Health Center in Rochester, N.Y. Lt. Col. Andrew Green and Susann Green were blessed with a baby girl, Shannon Rose Green, on Oct. 23, 2010.

Filipino Alumni Reunion About 50 alumni, students and staff attended the Filipino Alumni Chapter’s fourth annual Fall Reunion, a celebration of Filipino American History Month. The reunion was organized by the chapter and is the group’s annual signature fall event.

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ALUMNI VOICE

Jered Boyd, ’94 and Jenni (DeBord) Boyd, ’95, celebrated the birth of their eighth baby, Katherine, this past August. Katherine joins siblings Emily, Luke, Andrew, Noah, Grace, Sophia and Lucy. The family lives in Olympia, Wash.

Verna (Parks) Garton, ’95, and her husband, Chris, welcomed their second baby in February. Their first son, Charlie (pictured), was born in 2007.

26 / Class Notes

Susan Audrey Tadie, ’02, and Robert Oliver Moeller were married on June 19, 2010, at the Chapel of St. Ignatius. The wedding Mass was celebrated by Father Robert Spitzer, S.J., assisted by Father Robert Egan, S.J., and Father David Leigh, S.J. The couple lives in Port Saint Lucie, Fla., where Susan is a district sales manager and Robert an assistant state attorney and a captain in the Army Reserve JAG Corps.

Philip Hurvitz, ’83, earned his PhD this past December. After obtaining his master’s degree from the University of Washington College of Forest Resources (CFR), he worked for several years as a lecturer in geographic information science at Green River Community College and UW-CFR. He then decided to pursue additional studies in urban design and planning at UW. In November, he married Kristin Lewis. The couple resides in Seattle and is expecting a baby in April. Hurvitz works as a postdoctoral research associate at the UW Urban Form Lab. The photo is of Phil and Kristin at the Iron Monkeys Flame Garden during Nevada’s Burning Man festival this past September.

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1992 Stewart Mesher, MBA, has joined the Austin office of Conley Rose, P.C. Mesher, who earned his JD from Vanderbilt University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington, most recently worked as in-house counsel at Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Mesher’s areas of legal expertise include technology licensing and development agreements, open source software licensing and intellectual property litigation related to computer hardware and software and electronic devices.

2000 James Stoicheff received his juris doctor last May from the Santa Barbara College of Law, where he was the valedictorian of the class of 2010. After passing the California bar exam, he is working in private practice.

2003 David Doran is presently a student at the Naval War College in the Naval Command and Staff College as well as the Maritime Advanced Warfighting School.

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He is working toward a master’s degree in national security and strategic studies. Previously, Doran served in Afghanistan as a helicopter pilot and company commander. He has also served in Iraq as a cargo airplane pilot and company commander. Most recently, his assignment included commander of the Alaska Regional Flight Center, flying passenger jets out of Anchorage, Alaska. Doran has received two Bronze Stars and four Air Medals. Doran and his wife, Shauna, recently celebrated 10 years of marriage. The couple has four children.

CORRECTIONS Julie Smith, ’08, married Bryan Alexander in August 2010. The couple resides in Montana. The graduation year and wedding date were incorrect in the winter 2010 Class Notes. The listing for Doreen A. Harden-Cato, ’07 EdD, incorrectly stated that she is the former executive director of Seattle’s First Place. It should have read that she is currently the executive director. Seattle University Magazine regrets these errors.

2008 Brandon Jonathan Bruan, along with Fred, ’52, and Dorothy Cordova, ’53, joined Filipino community leaders for the City of Seattle and King County’s proclamation of October 2010 as Filipino American History Month. Members of the Seattle University Filipino Alumni Chapter and SU’s United Filipino Club were present for the reception and ceremony.

Megan (Branch) Rathgeb, ’96, and her husband, Cristian Rathgeb, are overjoyed to announce the birth of their daughter, Noemi Teresa, on April 12, 2010. She joins her big brother, Joaquin Emilio. The family resides in San Francisco and continues to travel to Chile frequently to be with relatives and friends.

John Bianchi, ’02, and Julie Gabelein, ’02, were married on July 24, 2010, in a ceremony overlooking Puget Sound on Whidbey Island, Wash. The wedding party included Mario Bianchi, ’97, Brian Langhorst, ’02, and John Boyle, ’02. Many more alumni attended. The couple lives in Seattle.

Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

McGoldrick Scholars Alumni Reception Riley, Kathryn, Jenny and Robert Gaffney were in attendance at the annual McGoldrick Scholars alumni event. Kathryn, a senior, and Riley, a freshman, are both recipients of the McGoldrick Scholarship.

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28 / In Memoriam

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Remembering Father Rog Members of the Seattle University family, including alumni, came together to remember Roger Gillis, S.J., known affectionately as “Father Rog,” who died Dec. 3, 2010, after a lengthy battle with cancer. Patrick Lee, S.J., gives a blessing at the funeral Mass at Seattle’s St. Joseph’s Parish.

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IN MEMORIAM

Seattle University remembers those in our alumni community whom we’ve lost. 1949

1960

George Grattan Flood (July 5, 2010) Kathleen Duvall (Oct. 15, 2010)

Dolores Rothaar (Oct. 17, 2010)

1950

Robert (Bob) Charters (Aug. 15, 2010)

Neil Laurance Harmon (Sept. 10, 2010) Arthur Lum (Oct. 16, 2010)

1951 Neal Cameron (April 3, 2010) Robert E. Fenn (Nov. 5, 2010) John Hixson (Oct. 23, 2010)

1962 1963 Eugene “Nick” Immel (Aug. 9, 2010)

1966 Kathy Braganza (Oct. 21, 2010)

1972 John Nielsen, ’76 MA (Oct. 8, 2010)

1952 Hugh Goldsmith (Aug. 22, 2010)

1974 Rose Marie Stimson (May 20, 2010)

1953 Helen Feeney (Oct. 29, 2010)

1980 Jerome Baer, MS (Aug. 15, 2010)

1956 James Joseph Byrne (Oct. 20, 2010)

1985 Kathy Schoch (Aug. 7, 2010)

1958 Lois Jane Zander Noonan (Aug. 1, 2010) Ray Weber (Oct. 23, 2010)

1987 Anita Wampach (Sept. 5, 2010)

1988

1959 Anthony Jerry Vukov (Aug. 22, 2010)

Kristin Ollenbrook (Sept. 20, 2010)

1989 Margaret Herzog Stern, MA (Oct. 9, 2010) KEEP US INFORMED We rely on readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@seattleu.edu or send via mail to Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090.

2004 Betsy Arntz (Sept. 20, 2010)

SU FACULTY Nina Harding (Nov. 12, 2010) Joseph Galluci, PhD (Feb. 18, 2011)

Seattle University Magazine now publishes full obituaries online only at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/. There you can read more about the individuals above and share memories in the comments section.

Roger Gillis, S.J. (Dec. 3, 2010) 30 / In Memoriam

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BOOKMARKS

Motherhood Is the New MBA: Using Your Parenting Skills to Be a Better Boss Shari Storm, ’04 MBA

(St. Martin’s Press, New York)

Reviewed by Kelly Stone, ’09 In her debut book, Motherhood Is the New MBA: Using Your Parenting Skills to Be a Better Boss, Seattle University alumna Shari Storm illustrates the striking parallels between motherhood and management. Through the use of clever correlations and humorous tales, Storm offers practical advice that is applicable to parents, employees and managers alike. Storm, who has 20 years of management experience, is currently an executive for a large financial institution. Motherhood Is the New MBA features her experiences and observations as well as those of more than 60 moms, mentors and managers. Each chapter details skills learned through being a boss both at home and in the workplace, and closes with her top three takeaways applicable to business leadership. In one chapter, titled “Don’t Put

Things in Your Mouth,” Storm discusses the significance of modeling exemplary behavior in front of her children, which is also important to do in front of employees. She offers this nugget: “Don’t speak poorly about other staff or departments if you want your staff to play well with others.” The overlap between parenting and managing is also evident as she writes about the importance of being the boss, not the friend, and being firm when it comes to decision-making. Another pointer covers how to handle the equivalent of tantrums at work: don’t approach the situation when angry or upset and address it with the person directly. That means in person, not via e-mail. Storm underscores the value of good manners, for both employees and managers, and suggests that while it is important to have a plan of action and goals, it’s also important to be flexible.

The author urges mothers to recognize that applying these practices to their home life can increase their confidence in managerial roles at work. In the book’s final chapter, “Remember What They See in the Mirror,” a mother recounts the time she planned a birthday party for her daughter with a theme based more around her own interests. As a result, the party was not a hit. Storm relates this incident to the work setting by asserting that the incentives that motivate her do not necessarily reflect those of her staff. Rather than presume she already knows, she goes directly to her colleagues to get at the heart of what motivates them. The amusing stories of parenting and management in Motherhood Is the New MBA are not only valuable but also empowering for women who question whether they can really have it all.

“Don’t speak poorly about other staff or departments if you want your staff to play well with others.” FROM THE CHAPTER, ”DON’T PUT THINGS IN YOUR MOUTH”

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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THE LAST WORD

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The Last Word is an interesting take on the arts/literature/academia/travel and more.

A Sip of Tea (Art) Who She Is / Naomi Kasumi What She Does / An accomplished artist and an associate professor in Fine Arts, where she teaches digital design. Work of Art / For her latest art installation, MEM: memory•memorial no.7 scriptorium, Kasumi went with what to some may seem an unlikely artistic medium—used, recycled tea bags. Nearly 3,000 tea bags—of some 3,500 collected—were dried and stitched by hand in a tapestrylike fashion. The small squares are inscribed with Japanese calligraphy and scriptures, with some of the panels featuring objects found in nature. A coating of beeswax, which casts

By Tina Potterf

a golden light, covers the floating artwork. Where It’s At / MEM: memory•memorial no.7 scriptorium continues its monthslong run at Seattle’s Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience. The art installation has exhibited in Nagano and Osaka, Japan, Chicago and Eugene, Ore., among other cities. Wow, That’s a Lot of Tea … and Time / Kasumi began collecting the tea bags—a two-year process that involved plenty of tea drinking for herself, friends, colleagues and even strangers—even before she knew how they would factor into her latest

work. Kasumi gives special thanks to colleague Sharon Suh, associate professor of theology and religious studies, who was a great collaborator and supporter throughout the process. Why Tea Bags? / The inspiration for this art installation came from Kasumi’s own tea ritual that she does every night. It’s also in line with her research as a scholar, which focuses on ritualistic behavior and the ritualistic process she employs when making art. “For a long time, I have made handmade objects spontaneously and obsessively. I call it ‘ritual.’ Going through my ritual process of making art is my healing process.”

32 / The Last Word

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SEE FOR YOURSELF Naomi Kasumi’s installation is showing at the Wing Luke Museum through May. Location / Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience / 719 South King St., Seattle Hours / Tuesday–Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. First Thursday and third Saturday open until 8 p.m. More Info / www.wingluke.org / 206-623-5124

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SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

Join the 600+ Challenge! Seattle University alumni, are you up for a challenge? Seattle University Trustees Carol Nelson, Allan Golston and Carolyn Kelly think you are. They will donate $15,000 to support SU students if we add 600 new alumni donors between May 1 and June 30, 2011. Donate today at www.seattleu. edu/challenge and help us go from 0 to 600 in 60 days.

seattleu.edu/challenge

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SU Magazine Spring 2011