Page 1

THE FUTURE IS

SEATTLE UNIVERSITY 2014 President’s Report


SEATTLE IS A MIRROR FOR OUR UNIVERSITY, REFLECTING THIS FORWARD–THINKING, INNOVATIVE AND INCLUSIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. THE FUTURE IS HERE AT SEATTLE UNIVERSITY— AND IT IS BRIGHT.

CONTENTS FROM THE PRESIDENT

1

DEEPER LEARNING

2

SUSTAINABLE CHANGE

10

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

16

PROGRESS

18

OPPORTUNITY

22


From the President

SEATTLE’S UNIVERSITY Many institutions are defined by tradition. Here at Seattle University, we take immense pride in our history, yet we define ourselves foremost by the growing impact we are making in the world. The Jesuit imperative is to question and re-imagine, to push, span and, when necessary, break down boundaries. We feed off the restless energy of the city we are privileged to call home, breathing its fresh air of innovation and ingenuity. As our mission and location are interwoven, our impact reverberates throughout and beyond the region—deeply, meaningfully and sustainably. Seattle University’s forward-looking ethos is evident in our new Core curriculum, which is reinventing how our undergraduates are educated so they are prepared to lead in a world that every day seems to shift tectonically. It is seen in the College of Science and Engineering, with its commitment to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), one of the nation’s highest percentage of women faculty and the Project Center, which is incubating realworld solutions in engineering and business. It is apparent in the Seattle University Youth Initiative, which is opening new possibilities for the youth of our neighborhood and inspiring in them the belief that a college education is not just a dream, but also an expectation. And it is seen in the Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability, which is bringing the intellectual firepower of our faculty and students to the ecological crisis now before us.

In the years ahead, we will rise to meet new challenges. We will form leaders for fields that are particularly critical to the future of our region and nation by deepening our investment in STEM and health sciences. We will meet today’s students right where they need us to be by amping up continuing, online and professional education. We will further expand access for high-achieving students from all backgrounds, particularly those who have traditionally been on the outside of higher education looking in. And we will double down on what prospective students and community partners value most in us—our distinctive, transformative Jesuit education. All of this we will do because we hold ourselves responsible for creating a better way forward, bridging gaps and building a more just and humane world. I look forward to continuing this work together.

NOTABLES #1 MACROECONOMICS IN THE NATION Bloomberg BusinessWeek ranked Albers undergraduate macroeconomics program as tops in the nation. The business school offers a rigorous microeconomics and macroeconomics curriculum that focuses on theory and real world application.

TOP PRODUCER OF FULBRIGHTS Seattle University is one of the top producers of Fulbright Scholars in the country, The Chronicle of Higher Education reported. SU’s four Fulbright Scholars for 2013—14 is the fifth highest total among master’s institutions.

EXCELLENCE IN SCIENCE The College of Science and Engineering won the Best Educator Award at the 2013 Seattle Science EXPO at Seattle Center. It’s the second year of the EXPO and second time the college was honored.

GOING GREEN IN THE WORLD’S GREENEST BUILDING Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J. President

The Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability, led by Professor Phil Thompson (S&E), officially launched in the fall and is housed in the Bullitt Center, heralded as the greenest commercial building in the world.

WAC CHAMPS Women’s basketball, led by Coach Joan Bonvicini, won the Western Athletic Conference regular season title. The team secured its second consecutive NCAA post-season berth.

2


DEEPER LEARNING BEGINS

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT: SU AMONG THE BEST Seattle University has maintained its spot in the top 10 in the West consistently for more than a decade.

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report


#6 IN THE WEST (U.S. NEWS)

Opportunities for real-world experience abound at SU, where students can experience what it is like to work as a nurse in a clinical setting at our stateof-the-art Clinical Performance Lab (right).

A DEEPER LEARNING EXPERIENCE

in the United States in Belonging in America: Cultural Politics of Difference and Inequality.

Academic excellence in the Jesuit tradition is the first and most important strategic goal of Seattle University and the foundation for personal growth and professional success. This involves enhanced research and scholarship, effective student recruitment and advising and improved instructional facilities.

Can We Fix Health Care? Health Economics and Policy explores the government’s controversial role in health care. Taught by Katie Fitzpatrick, assistant professor of economics, the course has a microeconomic perspective to help students understand the demand for health care and the provision of health services.

BUILDING THE FUTURE STARTS WITH THE CORE The success of our undergraduate students begins with the Core curriculum. The Core offers a better appreciation for how SU inspires insightful and creative thinkers. “The implementation of the new Core is perhaps the most important step we have taken over the past several years to enrich the academic rigor and quality of the education we provide to our undergraduate students,” says Provost Isiaah Crawford. Here’s a glimpse at offerings in the new Core, which launched in 2013:

INQUIRY SEMINARS: THE NATURAL SCIENCES

Chemistry Professor Sue Jackels gives students the fundamentals in Chemistry, Food and Nutrition so they can understand what food is, how it’s processed and how it’s used by the body. The Digital Information Age, taught by Agnieszka Miguel, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, addresses the digital nature of daily life and probes this question: How can data created and gathered in the natural world be converted to a digital format, processed, transmitted and stored for future use?

INQUIRY SEMINARS: THE HUMANITIES

SOCIAL SCIENCES & GLOBAL CHALLENGES

Philosophy Professor James Risser teaches a course called The Meaning of Life that considers this perennial question through literary works.

Matteo Ricci College Assistant Professor Emily Lieb developed The Livable City to help students build skills and analytical tools to think critically and creatively about urban problems nationally and internationally.

Andrew Tadie, associate professor of English, bridges two contrasting themes in The Sacred and the Profane and gives students an opportunity to study literature, philosophy and the arts from ancient to contemporary times. INQUIRY SEMINARS: THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Society, Justice and Culture Chair and Professor Jodi O’Brien leads a look at the cultural politics of who gets ahead and why

NATURAL SCIENCES & GLOBAL CHALLENGES

Nuclear Arms Control and Nuclear Power: Science and Policy, taught by Physics Chair and Professor David Boness, provides students with the history and physics of nuclear weapons and the global threats they continue to pose. The course also examines nuclear power and its problems and benefits globally.

“The new Core curriculum engages our students more quickly, deeply and interestingly. It emphasizes more clearly our religious commitment and our global engagement; doubles the science requirement; makes us far more intentional and accountable for student learning; strengthens interdisciplinary learning and educates students to solve complex problems; and makes room for their fuller engagement in their major and career choices.” PRESIDENT STEPHEN SUNDBORG, S.J.

361 + 200 COURSES IN THE NEW CORE

FACULTY IN THE NEW CORE

4


HIGH STANDARDS START HERE WITH FACULTY $12 5M .

ACTIVE SPONSORED FUNDING SUPPORTING RESEARCH, CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY PROJECTS

ACHIEVING EXCELLENCE WITH ACCOMPLISHED FACULTY Outstanding teaching is sustained by active involvement in scholarship, research and artistic endeavor. Seattle University’s scholar-educators teach more than 7,400 undergraduate, graduate and law students. They lead and actively participate in cuttingedge research in their fields of study and publish award-winning books and articles in respected scholarly journals. As they integrate teaching, scholarship and community engagement, faculty members address today’s most pressing cultural, ethical and scientific issues and inspire their students to have a positive and personal impact on the world. Faculty members, in collaboration with their students, document how women can and do change societies. They lead humanitarian engineering efforts to find new solutions to water and sanitation problems in developing countries. They find unexpected ways to reduce human suffering among vulnerable populations.

NURSING PROFESSOR RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation selected Steven Palazzo, assistant professor in the College of Nursing, as a Nurse Faculty Scholar. Palazzo, PhD, MN, RN, will receive a threeyear, $350,000 award to promote his academic career and support his research. According to the RWJF, “the Nurse Faculty Scholar award is given to junior faculty who show outstanding promise as future leaders in academic nursing.”

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

FACULTY FOCUS: NEW DEANS DEANNA SANDS, EdD: COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Deanna Sands brings to the dean role a distinguished career as a teacher, scholar and administrative leader. Prior to joining SU, Sands was a professor and associate dean of research and professional learning at the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Colorado Denver (UC Denver). Sands has devoted much of her career to enhancing educational opportunities for people with disabilities. Her research has been supported by grants from such esteemed entities as the Institute of Education Sciences and the National Science Foundation.

In 2011, she served as interim dean at UC Denver’s School of Education and Human Development. ANNETTE CLARK, JD: SCHOOL OF LAW

Professor and Dean Annette Clark’s Seattle University roots are deep. A 1989 graduate of the law school, she is a highly accomplished scholar, teacher and administrator with a keen understanding of the challenges and possibilities for legal education. After receiving an MD with honors from the University of Washington’s School of Medicine and her JD summa cum laude from the law school, Clark joined the SU law faculty upon graduation. A 2008–09 James McGoldrick Fellow, Professor Clark teaches and writes in the areas of medical liability, bioethics and legal education and is a frequent local and national lecturer on these topics. JANIECE DeSOCIO, PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC (INTERIM): COLLEGE OF NURSING

Associate Professor Janiece DeSocio is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, one of the most prestigious honors in the field of nursing. DeSocio practices and conducts research in the area of childhood onset eating disorders. Her contributions to nursing education include leadership in industry organizations and the growing of a workforce of nurses prepared to meet the mental health needs of children. Other areas of scholarship include nurse home visitation to foster self-agency development in adolescent mothers, the role of school nurses in child mental health and the education of nurses to address the mental health needs of military service members.


THE FUTURE OF

SCIENCE IN THE CLASSROOM FRANK SHIH Associate Professor / College of Science and Engineering

Frank Shih, associate professor of mechanical engineering, and SU students are igniting a passion for learning among students at nearby Bailey Gatzert Elementary School.

“It’s perfect for us,” says Shih, who routinely makes the weekly trek with the Bannan Scholars to oversee the after-school program, also staffed by other SU volunteers and service learners.

“We try to teach science with fun projects while slowly building up their language skills since many of the students are struggling and can be discouraged by too much reading,” says Shih.

Recognizing that Bailey Gatzert’s students had the lowest science proficiency in the Seattle School District, Shih came up with an idea to bring a strong science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) curriculum to the elementary school—and to place SU’s Bannan Scholars at the forefront of the effort.

The program is part of the Seattle University Youth Initiative (SUYI), the university’s collaboration with community partners to improve the academic success of young people in the immediate neighborhood. Those leading the initiative say Shih and the Bannan Scholars have made some of the most significant gains in STEM proficiency district-wide with Bailey Gatzert fifth graders.

Shih continues to improve the after-school program, now in its third year, which gives students a variety of learning projects.

Recipients of the prestigious Bannan Scholarship demonstrate high academic achievement in STEM learning and also have a commitment to community service, making them ideal teachers and mentors for the elementary school’s fifth graders.

Says Shih, “The experiment, data collection and interpreting results are all part of the scientific process for them.”

As someone who learned English as a second language during his teen years, Shih has a personal understanding of the academic struggles some Bailey Gatzert students face.

6


THE FUTURE STARTS HERE WITH OUR STUDENTS “Coming to Seattle University, I realize everything in my life worked out exactly as I had hoped. Everything fell into place. People here are very supportive. The Sullivan Scholarship really allows me to pursue this dream of mine.” SHANDRA BENITO ’14, created six summer camps for homeless and disadvantaged youth

THE FUTURE OF LEADERSHIP

ACADEMIC HONORS

Through a combination of academics, athletics and other activities, Seattle University creates an outstanding student experience that attracts prospective students to the university, fosters their engagement and retention and supports a lifelong connection as SU alumni.

Seattle University is one of the top producers of Fulbright Scholars in the country, The Chronicle for Higher Education reported in October. SU has been highlighted as a top Fulbright producer in The Chronicle five times in the past decade. The university’s four Fulbrights for 2013–14 is the fifth highest total among master’s institutions and matches the previous year for the highest number of SU students who have received Fulbright awards in a single year.

Life at Seattle University is enriched by what happens in and out of the classroom. Seattle is an international hub of innovation and global impact with companies and organizations such as Boeing, Amazon, Costco, the Gates Foundation, Microsoft, PATH and Starbucks. Students develop professionally and personally. Just a short walk from SU, students congregate in coffee houses, music clubs and restaurants for a taste of all that this vibrant city has to offer. And our students give back to the community and to the city that becomes part of their Seattle University experience. In addition to Division I athletic events on campus—including WAC champions in both women’s and men’s soccer and women’s basketball—KeyArena at Seattle Center is home court to men’s basketball.

CUMULATIVE HONORS

32 14 9

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

FULBRIGHT

TRUMAN

NSF

4

UDALL

2

RHODES


THE FUTURE OF POLITICS ERIC CHALMERS, president of Student Government After internships with Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) in the nation’s Capitol and then-Washington gubernatorial candidate—and now Governor— Jay Inslee in Olympia, Eric Chalmers ’14, is prepared for a future that could very well involve politics. This Sullivan Scholar from Tempe, Ariz., and president of Student Government at SU focuses squarely on empowering his student constituency to voice their opinions and be themselves without feeling compelled to fit a particular mold. “I work for a more accurate read on what they want,” says Chalmers. How the senior political science major found his way into a leadership role at SU speaks to his strong connection with Jesuit values, dating back to his high school days at Brophy College Prep in Phoenix. Chalmers knew he wanted to continue his education at a Jesuit university and he’s pleased he chose SU. Service is a big priority for him. He volunteers 1½ hours each week at the King County Juvenile Detention Center where he listens to stories of the incredible journeys of the youngsters incarcerated there. As a result, he is considering law school, ideally to become a juvenile public defender. When he finishes his bachelor’s degree, though, he first hopes to gain a little more real-world experience working in Washington, D.C., as a legislative aide in policy development.

Our students reflect the mission and values of the university, both in and out of the classroom. They find success in labs and health sciences, excel in sports and soak up the city’s many cultural and artistic attractions.

8


WHAT DOES THE FUTURE OF STEM EDUCATION LOOK LIKE?

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE & ENGINEERING DEAN MICHAEL QUINN TALKS ABOUT THE DIRECTION OF SU’S SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH (STEM) PROGRAMS

ADDRESSING A NEED IN THE WORKFORCE AND SOCIETY The College of Science and Engineering provides a rich learning community with a culture focused on discovery-based and experiential learning. It’s a welcoming environment for students who want to pursue majors in science, mathematics, engineering or computer science. Here’s what Dean Michael Quinn has to say about the college, its faculty and the increasing importance of STEM education over the next decade and beyond.

Why do you call Science and Engineering the STEM College? Because we have science and engineering departments in the same college, collaborations among disciplines are easier here than at universities where these departments are in different colleges. An example of this collaboration is the creation of our new laser spectroscopy user facility. Professors from science and engineering departments collaborated to attract a half million dollars of funding from the National Science Foundation and the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust to create this facility, which gives our undergraduates the opportunity to build and use state-of-the-art instruments that would ordinarily be reserved for grad students.

How has the interest in STEM impacted enrollment? The college has seen an increase in undergraduate enrollment of 231 students, or 29 percent, in the past four years. Our faculty members are engaged in exciting research projects that are relevant to the mission of Seattle University and attractive to undergraduate students. Many of our students are publishing with their faculty mentors in top journals, which gives them an extra advantage when applying to top-tier PhD programs.

How has the Project Center set engineering and computer science students up for success? We run one of the oldest and strongest Project Centers in the country. It’s a great experiential learning opportunity for students in engineering, computer science and business. They learn what it’s like to tackle a real problem for a real company where they can’t look up the answer in the back of a book. Many students do go on to work for the sponsors of their projects. The College of Science and Engineering is also notable for the high number of women faculty. Forty percent of our full-time faculty are women, which is an unusually high percentage for a science and engineering college. More than a third of the engineering faculty are women, which gives us one of the best ratios in the nation. The presence of these faculty members means our female students have plenty of role models and mentors.

What’s your prediction for the college 10 years from now? We’re going to have significantly more undergraduate majors and the number of graduate students will increase dramatically,

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

from around 50 to around 250 students. And we’ll be the first choice of more high school and transfer students. We are committed to providing our students with great extracurricular experiences in addition to fantastic lectures and labs. This is how they develop skills in critical thinking, problem solving, teamwork and leadership. We continue to strengthen connections with major employers in the Puget Sound area. Ten years from now we will be sending many more of our students out to these employers for internships and these employers will be sending far more of their employees to SU to take courses or earn certificates or master’s degrees.

WOMEN IN STEM

As a forward-looking institution, Seattle University is firmly at the forefront of increasing the number of women in science and engineering.

40% Full-time faculty members in science and engineering are women, one of the highest percentages nationally.

$180K Grant received from the Luce Foundation to encourage more women to major in STEM fields.


STEM HIGHLIGHTS TAUGHT IN THE COLLEGE BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING COMPUTER SCIENCE

25K UNFILLED JOBS IN WASHINGTON

DIAGNOSTIC ULTRASOUND ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MATHEMATICS MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PHYSICS

HONORS

The National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES), which licenses professional engineers in the U.S., honors exceptional collaborative projects between student teams and professional engineers. Of the 18 awards presented in the past three years, SU has won six of them.

33

IN THE WORKFORCE

SU WINS 6 OF 18 PRESTIGIOUS ENGINEERING AWARDS IN 3 YEARS

PERCENT

80%

ARE IN STEM AND HEALTH SCIENCES

50K

ANTICIPATED UNFILLED JOBS IN THE STATE BY 2017

“Great Jobs within Our Reach,” Washington Roundtable, March 2013

WHAT SU’S FUTURE HOLDS SCIENCE WILL HAVE A BROADER IMPACT • 100%

of bachelor of science students will do research

• New

programs in health will benefit from greater STEM support

• Core

science classes will be enhanced for all undergraduate students

TECHNOLOGY FUNDING

SU’s new laser spectroscopy user facility in chemistry and mechanical engineering drew external funding of

$500K

ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE WILL BE STRENGTHENED • Consolidated

Project Center will boost interdisciplinary collaboration

• Engineering

labs will support a growing graduate population

New classrooms will nurture active learning 9


SUSTAINABLE CHANGE BEGINS

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

IN THE TOP 25 NATIONALLY FOR SERVICE When it comes to student success, SU is among the top schools in the nation for service learning or community volunteer work, according to U.S. News & World Report: Best Colleges 2014.


INVESTING IN OUR YOUTH Since its official launch in early 2011, the Seattle University Youth Initiative (SUYI) has been lauded as visionary, collaborative and empowering for the Central District neighborhood near campus. SUYI, the university’s largest-ever community engagement project, focuses on improving academic achievement for youth in the two-square-mile neighborhood that includes Bailey Gatzert Elementary School, which is at the center of the Youth Initiative. And it extends beyond Gatzert to encompass Washington Middle School and Garfield High School.

70

COMMUNITY PARTNERS IN THE YOUTH INITIATIVE

The Seattle University Youth Initiative is the university’s community engagement project focused on improving academic achievement for area youth.

75%

OF STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN SERVICE

(That’s three times the national average.)

“We are seeing very positive results,” says Kent Koth, director of the Center for Service and Community Engagement and director of the Youth Initiative. “In the next few years we will continue to expand our academic and co-curricular partnerships. We will particularly focus on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education, summer learning and support for families, nonprofits and small businesses that are the fabric of the neighborhood.”

and mission. Current student Meghan Kennedy suggests service learning enriches one’s spirituality. “SU taps into how college students today want to experience spirituality. With the Youth Initiative, SU does that in a very progressive way,” Kennedy says. Faculty members play a vital role in the Youth Initiative’s development and progress. With the new Core curriculum, a goal of enriching and expanding service learning is beginning to draw more faculty to add service components and connect their course development with SUYI partners. An ever-growing number of community organizations are enthusiastic about becoming Youth Initiative partners. In addition to SU students, faculty, staff and alumni, the Seattle School District, the City of Seattle, foundations, faith communities and families, the initiative has 70 distinct campuscommunity partnerships. The Youth Initiative and its partners continue to expand services such as health education, financial literacy, citizenship tutoring, tax assistance, employment opportunities, parent engagement workshops and more for 47 projects in all.

Proof points of the initiative’s success in three years’ time already are evident. For instance, in collaboration with five local nonprofits, SU extended the school day at Gatzert by two hours for 180 students. That’s almost 20 percent more time per student per year. One sign of the achievements of these collaborations is an after-school science program for fifth graders, which continues to show a dramatic impact on science test scores.

Another gauge of achievement: SU is a respected model for how higher education can approach community engagement. Highlevel delegations from universities in the U.S. and around the world—20 and counting— have clamored to know more and look to SU’s program as a successful prototype.

Those who shape and propel the Youth Initiative underscore that it’s a fitting reflection of the university’s Jesuit values

Numerous leaders from universities— including Santa Clara, University of San Francisco, Ohio State and others as

12


20

AND COUNTING

University delegations around the world that look to SU’s Youth Initiative as a great prototype for community engagement

1,000 Bailey Gatzert students and their parents served by the Youth Initiative

55.4

With help from SU, the percentage of Bailey Gatzert fifth graders who met the science standard in 2013. In 2011, only 10 percent—the lowest in the Seattle School District—met the standard.

1 OF ONLY 5 The White House honored SU with the 2012 Presidential Award for community service, the highest recognition by the federal government to a college or university for its civic engagement, service learning and volunteerism

SECOND

CONSECUTIVE YEAR FOR NATIONAL RECOGNITION Seattle University set a precedent by earning national recognition for the second consecutive year in 2013, making the President’s Higher Education Honor Roll with Distinction for community service. Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

far flung as England, Germany, Canada, China and Nicaragua—see merit in creating similar initiatives. In Tacoma, Pacific Lutheran University’s long-range planning committee sees PLU’s role and connection in the local community as a cornerstone to its future. According to Joel Zylstra, PLU’s director of community engagement and service, his university is especially interested in how SU approached the development of the Youth Initiative. “The Youth Initiative underscores the original role of higher education in America as the university informs and is informed by the concerns and opportunities of society,” says Zylstra. You know Kent Koth takes pride in how the initiative continues to flourish when he describes one of his favorite ways to find inspiration. He’ll hop on his bike, breeze the few blocks south from his office to Gatzert Elementary and drop in on an SU student who’s tutoring a kindergartner. He’ll recall how his own career began—as a tutor. He’ll think of his family and how the opportunities of his children contrast with those of Gatzert students. Then he’ll smile when he realizes it’s late in the afternoon, yet the pair in front of him remains resilient, energetic and completely tuned in to learning as a way to achieve success in life. “That’s the real magic,” Koth says.

400

STUDENTS ATTEND BAILEY GATZERT ELEMENTARY

37% OF BAILEY GATZERT NEIGHBORHOOD RESIDENTS LIVE AT OR BELOW THE FEDERAL POVERTY LEVEL


EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATION DEVELOPS HERE INNOVATIVE HIGH SCHOOL CHANGES LIVES AT SU Seattle University launched an innovative, alternative high school aimed at students who seek a small setting to complete their high school graduation requirements and prepare for success in college, careers and life. Located in Loyola Hall on campus, Middle College High School at Seattle University is administered by the Seattle Public School District and intended for students between ages 16 and 20. SU faculty and students contribute advice, advocacy, resources and support for the school in exchange for real-life learning opportunities.

50

STUDENTS IN ATTENDANCE AT MIDDLE COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL, WHICH IS GEARED TOWARD STUDENTS WHO SEEK A SMALLER CLASS SETTING TO COMPLETE THEIR STUDIES

It’s a dynamic collaboration between SU’s College of Education and Seattle Public Schools (SPS) that has been many years in the making, according to Charisse Cowan Pitre, associate professor in SU’s Master in Teaching program and the Middle College partnership director. The school has 50 high school juniors and seniors as students. Recruiting efforts focus on those who live near the university. Beth Brunton, SPS site coordinator and a humanities teacher, says factors that draw teens to the transformational learning environment of a Middle College are adversity at home and challenges at a traditional high school. Community building, leadership and setting norms—all common threads at Middle College—help students develop resilience and college readiness, according to Brunton.

The individualized attention students receive blends group learning with digital curriculum. Students focus on core classes of humanities, math and science in the morning. Afternoon classes provide college and career preparation and include special programming with guest speakers and career-focused panels. All prospective students are screened to learn more about their lives, dreams, career goals and what may have interfered with their success. Seattle Schools Superintendent José Banda described SU as a welcoming partner engaged in the community, especially the public school system.

“This partnership provides an opportunity for Middle College students to experience a university campus. What an added benefit to be part of a university. And not on the outer edges, but right here in the center of Seattle University. That says something.” JOSÉ BANDA Seattle Schools Superintendent

Julie Hungar, who received her doctorate from SU in 1982, introduced the idea of Middle College to Seattle. Based on a proven model that started in the 1970s in New York City, Middle College high schools first appeared locally in 1991. The Middle College program now thrives with nearly 200 students at five locations throughout the city.

14


THE FUTURE OF

YOUTH ADVANCEMENT BONIVI CACULITAN SANCHEZ & CHRIS CACULITAN ’07 and ‘12 MIT / Bailey Gatzert teacher and ‘13 / AmeriCorps coordinator

You want to be in third grade all over again when you look around the classroom of Bonivi Caculitan Sanchez, ‘07, ‘12 MIT, a teacher at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School.

Her brother Chris Caculitan, ’13, says that growing up in a low-income family, he and Bonivi saw firsthand the challenges facing those who are underprivileged.

Imagine a colorful and cozy room filled with children’s books, fun posters and activity stations and a Star of the Week contest.

“There were a lot of obstacles that could have gotten in my way, but I was lucky enough to have gotten the support I did. That is what drove me to do the work I do,” he says.

There’s a sign on the wall that this is the class of 2023, the year these third graders will graduate from college. “It’s to help them understand they’re shooting for something,” says “Mrs. Bonivi,” the name she embraced after arriving at Gatzert in 2012.

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

Chris is nearing the midway point of a 10-month AmeriCorps stint as coordinator of the Redhawk Academic Mentoring Program, which connects students at Washington Middle School with SU volunteers who help them navigate the rough spots of learning. As part of the daytime program, he recruits, trains and matches SU undergraduates with sixth graders in the Yesler Terrace area.

“I know the culture and population there. I wanted to be where I’d be the most effective and give back to the school that helped get me to where I am today,” says Chris, himself a graduate of Washington Middle School. As immigrants themselves, both say that serving immigrant populations is part of their mission. “I had one student from Ethiopia last year who was really low in everything. She benefited a lot from one-on-one with an SU tutor and the after-school program,” says Bonivi. “She passed math and her reading score came up, too, which says a lot because she only came to this country two years ago.”


THE FUTURE OF

SELFLESS LEADERSHIP FORMER CAPTAIN WILLIAM D. SWENSON ’01, Political Science / Medal of Honor recipient

Former Capt. William D. Swenson, a 2001 Seattle University political science graduate, received the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama at a ceremony at the White House in October. The SU alumnus received the medal for risking his life above and beyond the call of duty during the 2009 Battle of Ganjgal with Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan. He is the first Army officer since the Vietnam War to receive the nation’s highest award for valor and joins just six other living recipients of this medal.

One of those six is (Ret.) Major Gen. Patrick H. Brady, a 1959 graduate of SU and Board of Regents Emeritus. In 2002, Capt. Swenson attended Officer Candidate School in Fort Benning, Ga., and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. Swenson also received the Bronze Star and Purple Heart for service. His military career included a deployment to Iraq and two tours in Afghanistan. In his last tour there, Swenson was part of Task Force Phoenix, Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan. He served as an Afghan Border Police adviser as part of the 1st Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division.

President Obama, in his comments at the White House ceremony to present Swenson with the Medal of Honor, said: “Americans like Will remind us what our country can be at its best—a nation of citizens who look out for one another, who meet our obligations to one another, not just when it’s easy but also when it’s hard. Will, you’re an example to everyone in this city and to our whole country of the professionalism and patriotism that we should strive for.”

16


GLOBAL CONNECTIONS START

Our students strengthen cultural training experience through education abroad and international internships.

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report


GLOBAL EDUCATION Education at Seattle University is characterized by a deep and respectful engagement on a local and global level. Our students and alumni engage with local communities in service and in solidarity as they become informed global citizens.

CONNECTIONS AND COLLABORATIONS IN NICARAGUA Victoria Jones, associate provost for global engagement, describes the progress of developing a long-term relationship with a sister Jesuit school, the University of Central America (UCA) in Nicaragua. In November, Father Chepe Idiaquez, S.J., incoming president of UCA, visited Seattle and met SU leadership and program representatives. Other collaborations with UCA include: • Last spring, UCA faculty and staff came

to SU for a poverty conference on learning and teaching sponsored by Matteo Ricci College and the Office of Jesuit Mission and Identity. • Coffee wastewater treatment was the

focus of another exchange with UCA students. Last summer, SU students served as mentors who trained their Nicaraguan counterparts in water quality and filtration system testing. • A business immersion program for

21 MBA students and alumni from the UCA College of Business took part in a nine-day summer program of classes, visits to companies, service learning and cultural activities. UCA will reciprocate with a similar program for SU students. Other student exchanges continue to unfold.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING ABROAD: GUATEMALA A 10-day research project focused on ending violence against women in Guatemala is one example of short-term experiential learning on a global scale. Last summer, three professors, students and recent graduates spent time in Guatemala gathering data on the impact of Asociación Generando (ASOGEN), a grassroots Guatemalan nonprofit that offers support to women suffering from violence in their communities. While their analysis continues, already five student academic papers have been submitted for publication in undergraduate research journals and academic journals as well as English and Spanish news media. An academic research paper from faculty is also in the works. Many students say they learned more about the interconnectivity of societal problems that make it difficult to achieve justice— the experience also broadened their views of justice, equality and women’s rights. The successful collaboration between SU’s Poverty Education Center and the Seattle International Foundation offers fresh insights about the impact of women’s nonprofit leadership.

Junior political science major Mason Bryan is on a yearlong study abroad in Santiago, Chile, where he writes for the Santiago Times, an independent news source focused on Chilean current events reported in English. One of his more prominent articles details Chilean culture and music 40 years after the 1973 military coup that overthrew the democratically elected socialist president Salvador Allende. Bryan is studying theology, Latin American politics and Spanish in Santiago.

40+

NUMBER OF COUNTRIES WHERE STUDENTS ARE IN EDUCATIONAL AND SERVICE PROGRAMS ABROAD

STUDY ABROAD: STUDENT VIEW Sofiya Kostareva, a senior economics major with a specialization in international development, is spending a quarter abroad in Chiang Mai, Thailand, at a sanctuary that’s home to more than 30 rescued elephants. At the nonprofit Save Elephant Foundation, she’s coordinating events, doing public relations and outreach related to ecotourism and sustainability.

18


PROGRESS HAPPENS

533 PERCENT INCREASE IN ON-CAMPUS EMPLOYER INTERVIEWS

53

PERCENT INCREASE IN INFORMATION SESSIONS WITH EMPLOYERS

76

PERCENT OF THOSE WITH UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES FROM ALBERS ARE EMPLOYED FULL-TIME WITHIN 3 MONTHS OF GRADUATION

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report


SU TOPS IN SUSTAINABILITY Seattle University won top honors in sustainability among academic and government institutions in the 2013 Washington Green Awards from Seattle Business Magazine. The magazine lauded SU for its comprehensive approach to sustainability. Long recognized as a leader in eco-friendly practices, the university recently launched innovative academic programs such as the Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability, a hub for interdisciplinary scholarship and teaching, and the Environmental Studies program’s Urban Farm, which delivers its harvest to local food banks.

TOP 5 EMPLOYERS

Amazon, Boeing, Ernst & Young, Russell Investments and Deloitte hire the most Albers interns.

PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS Career Services plays a crucial part in preparing Seattle University graduates to lead meaningful and successful professional lives. Partnerships with employers are on the rise at SU, particularly for students and alumni in the College of Science and Engineering and Albers. Just a few years ago, only a half dozen employers who came to campus had positions in engineering. Today, a total of 42 employers who participate in career fairs are interested in filling engineering jobs, a 70 percent increase over the previous year. Here’s a glimpse at the powerful ripple effect Career Services recruitment efforts can have and how students and alumni play a major role. A couple of years ago, Aziz Yuldashev, an electrical engineering student, worked as an office assistant in Career Services. He helped students who came in for career advising and approved the employer job postings as part of his duties. He also met an engineer from Physio-Control, a leading provider of professional emergency medical response equipment headquartered in Redmond, Wash. When Yuldashev graduated in 2012, he became an intern for Physio-Control, one of the top Seattle area companies that offers internships in both engineering and business. At the end of his internship, Yuldashev was hired as a full-time electrical engineer. While still an intern, he returned to campus as part of the Physio-Control group that presented an information session for SU students seeking internships. Scott Moser, a senior electrical engineering major, listened to Yuldashev describe his internship and knew he wanted to be hired for one of the company’s 12 intern openings last summer. In addition to landing a PhysioControl internship, Moser was one of four interns to be offered a full-time electrical engineer position when he completes his degree this year. Both Moser and Yuldashev were on campus recently hoping to recruit the next wave of

summer interns for Physio-Control. They say they credit Career Services for their preparedness in a competitive job market. Career Services, they note, did more than review their resumes and cover letters. “They helped me understand how to construct effective resumes and how to write powerful cover letters,” says Yuldashev. “Career Services’ many events—including mock interviews, resume building and information sessions—allowed me to succeed in pursuing and obtaining this internship,” adds Moser. Monica Duke, SU’s assistant director of Career Services, sat in when Yuldashev and Moser recruited for Physio-Control. She says she was struck by many things—in particular, how students and alumni are part of this cycle of recruiting and bringing the next generation of SU graduates along with them as well as how Physio-Control offers meaningful careers that speak to SU’s mission.

CAREER SERVICES PROGRAMS • A first-ever career course in the Premajor

Studies program called “Purposeful Academic and Career Planning” was launched as a pilot in fall 2013 along with a two-year Career and Academic Planning certification program for premajors. • SU Advantage formally launched in fall

2013. Mentors, advocates, industry experts and employers share their expertise and contribute to the professional formation of students and alumni. • The School of Law’s Center for Professional

Development helps students identify and develop tools for career success. The center sponsors programs and events throughout the year to connect students with professional opportunities and to help them understand the job search and career development processes.

20


THE FUTURE OF

SEATTLE ARTS & MUSIC HOLLIS WONG–WEAR ‘09, Sullivan Scholar / Musician, singer-songwriter, producer

If you aren’t familiar with Hollis Wong-Wear’s music through her group, The Flavr Blue, or her ability to turn a phrase in a piece of poetry and amp up the impact via the delivery, you may have seen or heard her work with one of Seattle’s most popular and chart-topping acts of the moment: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. The homegrown hip-hop duo that made popping tags at the “Thrift Shop” a part of popular culture have Wong-Wear to thank, in large part, for the song’s fun and slightly kitschy music video, which she produced. That infectiously catchy hook on “White Walls,” Macklemore’s most recent single, was penned by Wong-Wear and elevated by her vocals. In addition to her work with Macklemore, she has carved out a nice music career
of her own as a member of that synth-pop
 trio, The Flavr Blue.

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

Others know Wong-Wear for her work as operations director for local hip-hop duo the Blue Scholars. Before all of this she was lighting up stages with rhymes as one-half of the rap-infused Canary Sing. The 26 year old is a 2009 SU graduate and Sullivan Scholar. She was in the University Honors program and drawn to SU for its location, academic offerings and small class sizes. “I thought Seattle was a really rad, creative city,” says Wong-Wear, who majored in history and minored in philosophy and Global African Studies. “I really saw myself here.” At SU, she quickly became known for her writing (she was a featured student diarist, who documented her experiences as an undergrad)—particularly as a spoken word artist with proven prowess.

Wong-Wear’s star has been rising for some time in Seattle’s music and art circles—she has been involved with One Reel and served on the Bumbershoot board—and knows many of the city’s established and up-and-coming singer-songwriters and rap and hip-hop artists. It’s through her associations she came to know Ben Haggerty, aka Macklemore. When it came time to put together material for his debut full-length recording, The Heist, Macklemore once again called on his friend when he needed a writing partner. “Without Hollis, our creative output the last couple of years wouldn’t be what it has turned into,” Haggerty wrote on a blog post on his website. “She’s the kind of person that when I’m spending time with her, she makes me better at my job.”


WHAT DOES THE FUTURE OF ONLINE EDUCATION LOOK LIKE?

RICK FEHRENBACHER SHARES THE DIRECTION OF SEATTLE UNIVERSITY’S CONTINUING, ONLINE AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

THE FUTURE OF ONLINE LEARNING When you walk into the new space for Seattle University’s Continuing, Online and Professional Education (COPE) on campus, you’re immediately struck with a feeling that you are staring right into the future. It is the beginning of a new era at SU that in time will see the rollout of new courses for graduate students, undergraduates and adults who are returning to college as nontraditional students. It’s all about responding to higher ed’s changing landscape, meeting today’s students where they are—and doing it the SU way. Leading the effort is COPE’s director Rick Fehrenbacher, who provides a status report on the push to elevate online and hybrid learning at SU.

What is the importance of online and hybrid education? Right now only 16 percent of students in post-secondary education are your 18-to-22year-old, on-campus students. Eighty-four percent of the students currently engaged in higher education are typically working adults of some sort. It’s incumbent upon SU to offer access to its transformative Jesuit education. You know, Ignatius, founder of the Jesuit order, was an adult learner. He came back to school late in his life. COPE is quite consistent with the university’s mission.

What’s the significance of Ignatian pedagogy in online courses? The liberal arts component of a Jesuit education—that concern with social justice and ethical leadership and finding a way to make your education not just about a job but a way in which you combine intellectual and vocational interests to lead a meaningful life— is what we want to focus on. Anybody can take an online course anywhere; they’re all over the place. We have to be Seattle University and without our Jesuit emphasis we’re just everybody else.

How will SU weave Jesuit ethos into online and hybrid learning? One thing we discovered was that some of the schools didn’t take Jesuit pedagogy into consideration when developing online courses, which I think is a mistake. But we are. It’s a six-month course development process. And it isn’t just about technology or formatting your courses or your lectures for online delivery. It’s about rethinking your course and how to offer it online while being consistent with Jesuit pedagogy.

“There are literally hundreds of thousands of people in the Seattle metropolitan area who have some college but don’t have a degree. We want to find a way to allow them access to a Seattle University education.” What’s ahead? Our plan is to have some graduate programs capable of being offered in online or hybrid fashion by next fall and to have about a dozen or so undergraduate courses offered this summer online. We’re also planning on having our first adult completion certificate ready to go in the fall, as well. And then by 2015, we hope to have a couple baccalaureate degrees ready to be offered for adult degree completion and even more summer classes and graduate courses. So we’re moving pretty quickly here.

What are three priorities with online and hybrid education? One is to work with our existing graduate programs to move them into hybrid or online delivery formats. The second is to examine some of our undergraduate courses and move those into online delivery. We’re going to do this strategically. We want to find ways to deliver courses to students online so, for instance, they can stay on track for graduation or to address scheduling problems for certain courses. Mostly, however, we’re developing undergraduate Core courses for delivery in the summer session. And third, we want to institute adult degree completion programs.

22


OPPORTUNITY IS

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND Being near the center of a major metropolitan hub provides opportunities for on-the-job training through internships and career shadowing at leading companies and organizations that call this region home.


BOEING AMAZON MICROSOFT GATES FOUNDATION PATH COSTCO STARBUCKS

THE FUTURE IS HERE, THE FUTURE IS NOW Seattle University offers a centralized urban location in one of the world’s most innovative, vibrant and culturally rich metropolitan cities. It means close proximity—and collaboration—with internationally known (and homegrown) companies and nonprofits, where students get on-the-job training through internships and job shadowing. It means this university reflects the forward-thinking climate of its home base, with longstanding community and international partnerships that enrich the service-learning component of a Jesuit education and help shape future leaders. Graduates recognize how this university enhances and strengthens abilities that businesses and organizations prize—critical thinking, effective communication, global perspectives and solving complex problems across disciplines. To be Seattle’s university calls for exceptional faculty scholars and bountiful opportunities for undergraduate research and intellectual exploration. An SU education offers all of this and inspires students to discover more.

With its central location in the heart of a world-class city, Seattle University is able to tap into the region’s innovative companies and nonprofits, community and neighborhood partners and cultural collectives that all serve to shape an SU education that is unlike any other.

24


THANKS TO YOU SEATTLE UNIVERSITY IS A GRATEFUL COMMUNITY, THANKFUL FOR THE GENEROSITY OF MANY ALUMNI, FRIENDS AND CORPORATE AND FOUNDATION PARTNERS.

BUDGET FOR FY14 OPERATIONS

(in thousands)

DONATIONS

7,296

TOTAL NUMBER OF DONORS TO ALL FUNDS

25 48

GIFTS RECEIVED IN THE AMOUNT OF $100,000+ Three of those gifts were larger than $1 million

$171,837 Net Tuition and Fees

$2,100 Annual Gifts $5,928 Endowment Income $13,430 Residence Hall Revenue $3,360 Bookstore Revenue

$203,216 TOTAL REVENUE

$6,562 Other

PERCENTAGE OF FACULTY AND STAFF WHO MAKE A FINANCIAL GIFT BACK TO SU

$53,074 Faculty Salaries

This equates to one of every two faculty/staff

$29,941 Fringe Benefits

FINANCIAL AID

$163M

$5,695 Student Wages

$184,329 TOTAL EXPENSES

$44,070 Admin/Staff Salaries

$51,548 Other Operating

AMOUNT OF FINANCIAL AID (UG, GR, LAW) THAT SU ADMINISTERS ANNUALLY (FY13)

87 4% .

$8,324 Capital Reserves

$18,187 CAPITAL TRANSFERS

STUDENTS WHO RECEIVE FINANCIAL AID

Of those receiving financial aid, the average aid award per recipient : $24,920 (annually) $10,563 Debt Service

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

BOARD OF REGENTS

CHAIR Betty Woods

CHAIR Butch Leonardson

VICE CHAIR Stuart Rolfe

EX OFFICIO

SECRETARY Maureen Lee

Stephen Sundborg, S.J., president Peter Ely, S.J. Mary Lou Amen

CHAIR-ELECT Robert Ratliffe

Mary Helen Bever

EX OFFICIO Stephen Sundborg, S.J., president

Maureen Brotherton

BOARD MEMBERS Mohamed Alabbar Rodney Bench Robert Blais Mark Bosco, S.J. David Burcham Peter W. Chiarelli Marta Dalla Gasperina Thomas Ellison Allan Golston Hon. Donald Horowitz Patrick Howell, S.J. W. Craig Jelinek Patrick Kelly, S.J. Maureen Lee Thomas Lucas, S.J. Michael McCarthy, S.J. Carol Kobuke Nelson William Owens Nicole Piasecki Robert Ratliffe Rick Redman Stuart Rolfe Peter Rose David Sabey Stevens Trainer John Vassall, II Jill Wakefield Eric Watson, S.J. Betty Woods Jeffrey Wright EMERITI Anne Farrell John Meisenbach James Sinegal Ann Wyckoff

Robert Brennan Patricia Buchsel Eric Chalmers Brian Comstock Christopher Corr John Costello Sr. Joyce Cox, BVM Hon. Anita Crawford-Willis Salah Dandan Michael Daniels Janet Dwyer William Eisiminger Ronald Giuffre Jeffrey Grant Timotha “Timmie” Hollomon Steven Huling James Jorgensen Anne Kilcup Weldon Leonardson Maurice “Curly” McNamee Marlene Miller Richard Mitchell, JD Katherine Myers-Wiesen Carol Penny Judy Rogers Kathleen Schafer Diane Siderius Kocer Pastor Paul Stoot Mark Wesley Deborah Wilds Kathleen Wright Martha Wyckoff Joseph Zavaglia Ralph Zech II

ADMINISTRATION Executive Leadership PRESIDENT Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J. PROVOST Isiaah Crawford EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Timothy Leary VICE PRESIDENT, ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT Marilyn Crone VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY PLANNING/ VICE PROVOST Robert Dullea VICE PRESIDENT, MISSION AND MINISTRY Peter Ely, S.J. VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN SERVICES AND UNIVERSITY SERVICES Jerry Huffman VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE AND BUSINESS AFFAIRS Connie Kanter VICE PRESIDENT, COMMUNICATIONS Scott McClellan VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT Michael Podlin (interim) VICE PRESIDENT, STUDENT DEVELOPMENT Michele Murray VICE PRESIDENT AND UNIVERSITY COUNSEL Mary Petersen UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN John Popko

Deans DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW Annette Clark DEAN, MATTEO RICCI COLLEGE Jodi Kelly DEAN, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY Mark Markuly DEAN, ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS Joseph Phillips DEAN, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES David Powers DEAN, COLLEGE OF NURSING Janiece DeSocio (interim) DEAN, COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Michael Quinn DEAN, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Deanna Sands


Seattle University

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 901 12th Ave. / PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122

Seattle University | 2014 President’s Report

2014 President's Report  

Seattle is a mirror for our university, reflecting this forward–thinking, innovative and inclusive learning environment. The future is here...