Issuu on Google+

L/C

1

2

Round 3

Come join us for events on campus

4

5

6

Everett Police Chief alum Kathy Atwood

Professor of the Year Vicky Minderhout

Chapel of St. Ignatius celebrates 15 years B

A

100

30 30

30 100 60 100

100 100 60 100 100

SPRING 2012

70 70

70

Seattl attle e Univ Unive ersity

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

70 40 40

40 70 40

FC1

70 70 40

40 70 40

pg.

20 70 70

70 40 40

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

10 40 40

40 70 40

“There’s a great vibe on campus today.”

40 100

40 100

“It is great how athletics is creating more opportunities for students to socialize and build school spirit.”

100 40

40 100

“The SU campus is beautiful... and an oasis in the city.”

100 40

100 40

“I was a Sullivan Scholar and would love to reconnect with others in that program.”

30 30

30

“THE NEW ALUMNI BUILDING IS AMAZING.”

70 70

70

“Seattle Universityy promotes diversity and tolerance.”

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Alumni Voice is

6 5 4 Round 3 2 1 L/C

B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

10

25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50

90

100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

IFC2

pg.

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 3 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

CITIZEN OF THE WORLD

50 40 40

50

Kwaku Asiedo, a senior international studies major (minoring in international economic development), was one of three SU students studying abroad in West Africa at the University of Ghana, Legon, during fall quarter. This was a return trip for Asiedo, who was born in Ghana. "Studying at the University of Ghana laid an important educational foundation that is lifelong and constructed in the context of Africa," Asiedo says. Learn more about SU Education Abroad at www.seattleu.edu/abroad/.

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

90 100

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

Intro-A

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Seattle University Volume 36 • Issue Number 1 • Spring 2012 STAFF

30

Art Director Terry Lundmark, ’82

100 60

Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor

100

Editorial Assistant Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

70 70

70

Editor Tina Potterf

30 30 100 100 60 100 100

12

70 70

70

Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Chelan David, Donny Harrel, Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

30 30

30 100 60 100

100 100 60 100 100

Brand Director Mary Olson Interim Assistant Vice President/MARCOM Casey Corr Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden

70 70

70

Assistant Vice President/Alumni Relations Susan Vosper

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published quarterly in fall, winter, spring and summer by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

0000

70 40 40 10 25

Chemistry Professor Vicky Minderhout is honored as Professor of the Year for her distinctive teaching methods.

50 40 40

50 90

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75 100

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

pg.

Intro-B

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

L/C

1

Round 3

2

4

5

6

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

B

A

Seattle University

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

features

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

18

70 70

70

30 30

30

18 We Are Listening ening

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Dissecting key findingss and mni survey. feedback from the alumni

28 Top Cop

70 70

70

30 30

30

Kathy Atwood, ’99 MPA, A, speaks le as first to her high-ranking role female police chief in Everett.

100 40

100 40

DEPARTMENTS S

70 40 40

16

Athletics

40 70 40

32

Alumni Voice

40 70 40

34

Bookmarks

70 40 40

36

Class Notes

3

40

In Memoriam

10

42

The Last Word d

14

25

34

50 40 40

50

Web extras and special i l features f at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

90 100

pg.

1

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 1

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

Faculty News

0000

40 70 40

12

(left) Michael Alcantara, ’09, weighs in alum. on his experience as an alum

70 40 40

Perspectives

70 70 40

40 100

6

20 70 70

Did You Know??

10 40 40

40 100

4

40 100

Come Join Us 100 40

2

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

COME JOIN US B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

april

100 100

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

HUI O NANI HAWAII’S 50TH ANNUAL LUAU

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25 90 100

2 / Come Join Us

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Monday, May 14 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., SU Pigott Auditorium Join us for a discussion with Gary Scott, former president of Bombadier Commercial Aircraft, guest of the Albers Executive Speaker Series. Information: (206) 296-5700.

50 40 40

50

ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS EXECUTIVE SPEAKER SERIES

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Tuesday, May 8 7 to 9 p.m., SU Pigott Auditorium Peter Steinfels of Fordham University will give a talk on “Catholicism and Politics: Secularization and Secularism.” This is the third talk as part of the Catholic Heritage Lecture Series. Information: E-mail ely@seattleu.edu.

2

70 70 40

40 70 40

CATHOLIC HERITAGE LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS PETER STEINFELS

pg.

20 70 70

70 40 40

Saturday, May 5 Doors open at 5:30 p.m., SU Campion Ballroom The Seattle University community is invited to SU’s oldest student club’s annual celebration of Hawaiian culture and heritage featuring authentic Hawaiian cuisine, entertainment and cultural dances. Information: E-mail luau@seattleu.edu.

10 40 40

40 70 40

may

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

100 40

100 40

For more information on alumni events, contact Alumni Relations at (206) 296-6127 or visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/.

30 30

30

27TH ANNUAL ALUMNI AWARDS CELEBRATION Tuesday, April 17 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., SU Campion Ballroom Come celebrate the achievements of alumni and members of the SU community at the annual Alumni Awards celebration. The dinner will recognize this year’s award recipients and members of the President’s Club and Legacy Society. RSVP and information: (206) 296-6127.

Thursday, April 26 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., SU Pigott Auditorium Join us for a discussion with Dan Nordstrom, CEO of Outdoor Research, guest of the Albers Executive Speaker Series. Information: (206) 296-5700.

70 70

70

Sunday, April 15 4:30 to 7 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius Alumni and friends of the university are invited to attend a special Mass and reception to mark the 15th anniversary of the Chapel of St. Ignatius. Information: (206) 296-2637.

ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS EXECUTIVE SPEAKER SERIES

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

CELEBRATE 15TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CHAPEL OF ST. IGNATIUS

Wednesday, April 25 6 p.m., Wyckoff Auditorium Join us for a lecture and discussion with special guest Irena Papadopoulos of Middlesex University, London. Professor Papadopoulos will speak about her research on a cultural competence model or nursing care and education from a European perspective. Information: www.seattleu.edu/nursing/.

30 30

30

GRADUATE PROGRAMS OPEN HOUSE Thursday, April 12 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., SU Student Center 160 Alumni interested in pursuing a graduate degree or certificate are invited to learn about Seattle University’s graduate degree programs from faculty and current students. Representatives from Admissions and Student Financial Services will be on hand to speak with prospective students. Information: Troy Sterk, Graduate Admissions, (206) 296-5998 or e-mail sterkt@seattleu.edu.

COLLEGE OF NURSING LECTURE

70 70

70

Saturday, April 21 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., surrounding Seattle neighborhoods Alumni and friends are invited to participate in Seattle University’s annual day of service in the community. Information: (206) 296-2637 or e-mail magis-rsvp@seattleu.edu.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

ALUMNI DAY OF SERVICE

Thursday, April 12 4 to 6 p.m., Poquitos Restaurant, Seattle Join the Magis staff for the monthly happy hour mixer where you can connect with staff members, learn about Magis programs and meet other Magis participants. Light appetizers will be provided and happy hour specials are available until 5 p.m. Alumni, friends and family of other Jesuit institutions are welcome. Magis Mixers occur every second Thursday of the month with the next one slated for May 10. Information: (206) 296-2637 or e-mail magis-rsvp@ seattleu.edu.

30 30

30

MAGIS MIXER

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70 100

Wednesday, May 30 1 to 5:30 p.m., SU Sullivan Hall (School of Law) The Project Center will celebrate its 25th anniversary with its annual event to showcase projects tackled by seniors in the College of Science and Engineering and Albers. The event will feature presentations and a reception. Information: E-mail haedta@seattleu.edu.

30 100

june

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

Friday, May 25 8 a.m. to noon, SU Lemieux Library Boeing Room The Master of Public Administration and Executive Master of Nonprofit Leadership programs invite alumni to the last “Service in Action Seminar” of the academic year. Information: (206) 296-6143 or e-mail potterd@seattleu.edu.

Saturday, June 9 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., SU Connolly Center Rejoice with the newest set of alumni on their latest achievement—graduating! Open to graduates and their families. Reservations are required for this event. Information and reservations: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail alumni@seattleu.edu.

70 70

70

SERVICE IN ACTION SEMINAR: THE POWER OF FRAMING YOUR ORGANIZATION’S STORY

PRESIDENT’S COMMENCEMENT BRUNCH

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

May 18 – 20 All Day, Location TBA Three-day retreat for Jesuit-educated alumni in their 20s and 30s who are seeking a way to reflect on their current life and circumstances, grounding them in a sense of faith. All faiths are welcome. Information: (206) 296-2637 or e-mail magis@seattleu.edu.

30 30

MAGIS YOUNG ADULT RETREAT

70 70

70

Thursday, May 17 Noon to 6 p.m., SU Campion Ballroom It’s the finals—and award reception—for the Albers Entrepreneurship Center’s annual Business Plan Competition. Support students and alumni on their business ventures and get inspired to participate in next year’s competition. Information: (206) 296-5715.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

PROJECTS DAY: 25TH ANNIVERSARY 30 30

30

BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3 10 25 50

50 40 40

ROCK OUT AT QUADSTOCK

90 100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 3

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

pg.

3

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Saturday, May 19 All Day, SU Quad Get ready for the annual Quadstock outdoors music and arts festival, featuring live up and coming local bands and national acts in a festive atmosphere. Ticket information: (206) 296-6047.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

DID YOU KNOW?

5

6

A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU. B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

SU SERVICE SCORES WITH PEACE CORPS

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 70

70 70

30

30 30

100 60 100

100 100 60 100 100

70

70 70

Seattle University is among the best in the country when it comes to volunteer service following graduation. In the recent Peace Corps ”Top Colleges“ list, SU is eighth—up from 23rd place in 2011— moving up more spots than any other university on the list. Currently, 21 undergraduate alumni are serving overseas. Since the Peace Corps was founded in 1961, more than 340 SU graduates have served the agency. The Peace Corps ranks its top volunteerproducing schools annually according to the size of the student body. The rankings are selfreported by Peace Corps volunteers.

30 30

30

100 40

40 100 40 100

40 100

FUN FACT

100 40

100 40

10 40 40

40 70 40

100%

...of SU campus buildings are carbon-neutral, through energy efficiency, low-carbon energy sources, solar energy installations and carbon offsets.

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

10 25 90 100

4 / Did You Know?

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

4

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Read more about Pete Fewing at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

50 40 40

50

Men’s soccer coach Pete Fewing talks about his return to SU at a recent press conference in his honor.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

A familiar face has come back to Seattle University’s soccer program. The university recently hired Pete Fewing as the head coach of men’s soccer. From 1988 through the 2005 season, Fewing coached the team and had a record of 220-125-26 (.628) during his 18 seasons at the helm. In 1997, he lead the Redhawks to the NAIA National Championship and in 2004 the NCAA Division II National Championship. “I am thrilled to have this opportunity to return to Seattle University,” says Fewing. “My goal is to build the program to winning conference championships and competing in the NCAA Tournament.”

0000

70 40 40

Pete Fewing back as head coach of men’s soccer

70 40 40

40 70 40

FAMED SOCCER COACH RETURNS TO SU

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

WELCOME, NEW JESUITS TO CAMPUS

70 70

70

Jason Welle, Lorenzo Herman and Matthew Pyrc all took very different paths on the road to answering their callings. One served in the Peace Corps, one in the Air Force and one worked with at-risk youth. One thing they share in common: all three are new Jesuits on the Seattle University campus. At SU, Welle is a special projects coordinator in Global Engagement; Herman is studying at the School of Theology and Ministry; and Pyrc works with the Campus Ministry team.

30 30

30

Read more about this interesting trio at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

70

70 70

30

30 30

100 60 100

100 100 60 100 100

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

The 2011-12 Jesuits group photo—an annual tradition at SU—features a few new faces. (Front row, second and third from left) Matthew Pyrc and Jason Welle and (third from right) Lorenzo Herman.

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

The Good Word

0000

70 40 40

Faith, justice and interreligious dialogue focus of the latest Good Word column by Patrick O’Leary, S.J., who writes:

10 25 90 100

pg.

5

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 5

50 40 40

50

Read the Good Word column in its entirety at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

“Liturgical changes might not seem connected to questions of faith, justice and interreligious dialogue but how we pray does shape our faith and vice versa.”

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

PERSPECTIVES B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

Greener Pastures | By Caitlin King

70 70

70

Alumni Heather, ’93, and Mike Vincent, ’94, find success with cattle business

30 30

30 100 100

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

70 70 40

40 70 40

6

20 70 70

70 40 40

pg.

10 40 40

40 70 40

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

40 100

40 100

PHOTOS BY HEATHER VINCENT AND JAMI DAVIS

6 / Perspectives

100 40

40 100

for local families,” says Heather. Later that year, the Vincents moved their twisty horned herd onto the Gardiner Family Ranch, officially launching their collaboration. Disease-resistant and able to withstand changing weather conditions, the Texas Longhorn breed is an ideal match for this part of the country. They’re also naturally lean and low in cholesterol, garnering a trendy following among health conscious

100 40

100 40

those years, raising cattle became a family hobby. Heather, who had owned horses in her hometown of Walla Walla, was persuaded by Mike, who was interested in becoming a cattleman. Soon enough they had two horses and seven cows on their plot of land. The Vincent family knew if they wanted to get serious about raising cattle, they would need more acreage. That summer, Mike ran into Mark Torres. They had previously met serving

30 30

30

OF SNOQUALMIE CATTLE COMPANY.

70 70

70

HEATHER VINCENT, ON THE PREMIUM GROUND BEEF

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

“I call it healthy fast food.”

30 30

30

on various wildlife conservation groups and by coincidence had attended the same fundraising picnic. That was the day they began discussing the Gardiner Family Ranch. As it turns out, Mark’s wife, Sally, owned 80 acres of farmland in North Bend, purchased by her great, greatgrandfather in 1883. The ranch, which also held a dairy and orchard, was in the family for five generations. The soil had sat vacant, untouched since the 1950s. The Torres’ were eager to jump on board. “Mark and Sally were inspired by the idea of producing a healthy product, but they also had an even stronger desire to return her family’s property to what it once was—a place where healthy, local food is produced

70 70

70

The dream sparked in his youth has been realized—and in a big way. Today, Mike Vincent is co-owner of Snoqualmie Cattle Company, alongside his wife Heather, ’93, and friends Mark and Sally Torres. The families together tend to a herd of gregarious Texas Longhorns on an 80-acre ranch in North Bend, Wash., east of Seattle. In 2003, Heather and Mike Vincent left the city looking for greener pastures, settling on a five-acre farm in the Snoqualmie Valley with a stunning view of Mount Si. Close in proximity to hiking and the slopes, they knew it would be a perfect place to start a family—and perhaps a business. They spent the next five years raising their three children: George, who’s now 10; Ellen, 8; and Campbell, 6. During

producers and consumers. Finding a feed model, on the other hand, proved more difficult. It took years of consulting industry professionals and experience raising their own cattle before they decided on a grass-fed model. They found that grass-fed is not only healthier and safer for the consumer, but also doesn’t compromise the health and humane treatment of the cattle, either. Today, they focus their efforts on raising cattle without the use of growth hormones, antibiotics or processed grains and grass feeding from start to finish. When summer rolls around, the herd feasts on fresh fruit, one of the many perks of grazing on an orchard. “All four of us are doing this for different reasons,” says Mike. “Sally really wanted to bring that community back, Heather loves producing a healthy, unique product for neighbors and friends and Mark and I enjoy taking care of the cattle.” The day-to-day duties of a working ranch includes feeding, pulling fence or moving the cattle through the chutes for branding and weaning, a process made easier by the herd’s gentle nature. Children George, Ellen and Campbell chip in a few ideas of their own, taking on more creative tasks and are particularly skilled at naming their four-legged friends. Today, about 50 Longhorn graze the land on which Snoqualmie Cattle Company operates. Found commonly in Texas and Oklahoma, most of the company’s herd came from a high school agriculture teacher in Clarkston, Wash. Recognizable by their iconic horns, each member of the herd sports a stunning shade of black, brown or white, while the boldest of the bunch have spots. They spend most days roaming the region, exploring their

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

As a young boy growing up in Maple Valley, Wash., Mike Vincent, ’94, looked forward to visiting his grandparents’ farm in Michigan. He spent a few memorable days each year watching the herd sink their hooves into the soil, grazing under the summer sun. He knew someday he’d be a cattleman too.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

The family behind Snoqualmie Cattle Company: (back row, l-r) Heather, ’93, Mike, ’94, and George Vincent, and Sally and Mark Torres; (front row, l-r) Ellen and Campbell Vincent with critters Agent 99, Clay and Rio.

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50

The Vincent and Torres families tend to a herd of Texas Longhorns that occupy 80 acres in North Bend, Wash.

90

Learn more about the Snoqualmie Cattle Company at www.snoqualmiecattlecompany.com.

100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 7

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

7

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

many fields of green, satisfied both under the sun and in the shade. While raising cattle can be demanding work, Mike continues to commute to his job in the investment industry in downtown Seattle. Heather handles marketing and the business side of Snoqualmie Cattle Company; both Sally and Mark hold down full-time jobs also. To keep things simple, Snoqualmie Cattle Company focuses on one product, premium ground beef. By grinding the best cuts—rib eye, tenderloin, sirloin—into one single product, they can provide consumers with a healthy and easy mealtime solution. “I call it healthy fast food,” Heather says.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

PERSPECTIVES B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

An Artful Life | By Annie Beckmann

70 70

70

Realtor finds the fun in funky art

100

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

continued on page 10

70 70

70

Intiman Theatre as a special events coordinator. These opportunities solidified her future as an independent curator and arts event planner. Soon, though, she found herself fantasizing about owning a fancy mansion and turning it into a bedand-breakfast. She managed to convince a woman to carry a contract on a 10-bedroom house on Capitol Hill. Her friends were amazed and started asking her to find homes like that for them. By 1985, Marlow was a licensed real estate agent. There’s a magic to how her arts event planning skills, her love for tacky art and her work as a successful real estate agent for Coldwell Banker

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Harris and this consortium of art collectors, who founded what they call the "Museum of Wonders" plan to host Leeteg's work starting in April at a gallery space a few blocks south of SAM. That’s just the sort of tongue-incheek love of the arts that wins fans for Harris, who revels in the juxtaposition of fine art and kitsch. Don’t let her devotion to paintings on velvet and other funky art fool you—she’s one smart businesswoman, too. When she was still a public administration major at Seattle University, Harris had an internship with the National Endowment for the Arts. Later, she did public relations for the Bellevue Philharmonic and worked for

Bain meld so well. She supports the arts at any opportunity and positive wordof-mouth brings her plenty of artistic and creative clients looking to buy or sell homes. Today, her own four-story home, which she shares with her husband JoDavid and her three teenage sons, is a 1914 Capitol Hill parsonage. The home is an homage to both the whimsical world of art and her real estate savvy. Not everyone would buy an old parsonage and transform a room into what she calls the Dead Elvis Tiki Lounge. “It’s a bad joke,” she says. “We don’t really like Elvis, but we feel he’s one of the original performance artists.” The funny part is, you’d never guess she doesn’t like the King, from her kicky shorts emblazoned with the image of Elvis Presley to photos featuring her with various Elvis impersonators she meets. It doesn’t stop there. Her home has several busts of Elvis (chia pet Elvis, anyone?) and a commissioned painting of her husband JoDavid as Elvis, on velvet, no less. Earlier this year, Harris and her

30 30

30

When she heard the Seattle Art Museum would host a Paul Gauguin exhibition this spring, Marlow Harris, '83, and a group of art collectors hopped into action. She and her pals planned a complementary counter exhibit of the works of lesser-known artist Edgar Leeteg, sometimes heralded as the "American Gauguin," although his paintings are more provocative. And done on velvet.

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3 10 25

50 40 40

50

Inside the Capitol Hill home of Marlow Harris is evidence of an art connoisseur cut from a different cloth. Visitors can get lost in the kitschy to quirky-cool art objects (above)—including several shrines to Elvis— that Harris has amassed over the years. (Right) Harris poses in front of one of the many works of art at her home, a painting by local artist Sean Hurley.

90 100

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

8

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

8 / Perspectives

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

MARLOW HARRIS, ’83

70 70 40

40 70 40

“Eighty percent of what I do is create community. The rest is indulging my own whimsy and passion for the arts.”

50 40 40

50 90 100

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

pg.

9

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 9

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

PERSPECTIVES B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10

A tour through the Harris house might lead one to think Marlow loves all things Elvis. In reality, Harris says she doesn’t really like the King but instead appreciates that he was one of the original performance artists.

25 90 100

10 / Perspectives

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

pg.

10

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Deborah Lawrence. JoDavid, who taught art and co-chaired the design department at Cornish College of the Arts for 15 years, encouraged the students to be outgoing. “I really think you have to be very social to better yourself, connect and

50 40 40

50

Farce,” where passengers are treated to a tour of artists’ homes in the region. Proceeds from the tours benefit area arts groups. Last fall, the couple spoke about unconventional art careers at an SU class taught by Fine Arts Adjunct Faculty

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

artist husband organized an Elvis Invitational at Seattle Center’s Experience Music Project to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Seattle World’s Fair. And in September, she will bring “Elvistravaganza” to Seattle’s annual Labor Day weekend music and arts festival, Bumbershoot. Harris and JoDavid will also curate “Bumber by Number,” an interactive paintby-number art exhibit at the Seattle Center Pavilion during Bumbershoot. The entrance of the retro Dead Elvis Tiki Lounge in her home is devoted to the Paint-by-Number Salon with a collection of throwback paint-bynumber works embellished with the personal style of local artists. From religious mini-shrines to recycled red fezzes once worn by Shriners, there’s a lightheartedness to the visual vignettes in this home. Harris is a big fan of wacky pop surrealist Mark Ryden, so much so she lost count of how many of his works she and JoDavid acquired. Near the home's entry is a large painting by local artist Sean Hurley, one of many who contribute works to another of Harris' endeavors, a museum called the Official Bad Art Museum of Art (OBAMA for short) located inside the restaurant Café Racer in Seattle’s Roosevelt neighborhood. “The Bad Art Museum is both bad and funny. Life is too short not to enjoy yourself,” Harris says. The dynamic husband-and-wife duo, who married shortly after Harris graduated from Seattle University, can be seen around town in a playful seven-seater van they call the Traveling Elvis Museum and Chapel of Love. The roving art caravan frequently doubles for what Harris calls the “Tour de

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25 90 100

Watch a video tour of the Harris house and find out where you can see her work at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 11

pg.

11

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

encouraged students to think in fresh ways about careers they fashion. “Coming to Seattle University is one of the best things I ever did,” she said. “It taught me how to make a cohesive career out of real estate and my love of the arts.”

50 40 40

50

your art, good things will blossom out of that,” JoDavid added. Then he smiled at his wife of nearly 25 years and said, “Of course, it’s good to have a muse or a partner in your life to keep you going.” Harris, a third-generation Seattleite,

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

find your place,” he told the class. “Volunteering is also really important.” Harris told the class, “Eighty percent of what I do is create community. The rest is indulging my own whimsy and passion for the arts.” “As long as you’re passionate about

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

FACULTY NEWS B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

Head of the Class | By Mike Thee

100 100

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

exhilarating,” Minderhout says. It’s a model that works, says Michael Quinn, dean of the College of Science and Engineering. “With Vicky’s active-teaching model, students construct their own understandings and build their own solutions.”

70 70

70

teaching—she stepped away from the classroom lectern and assembled students into small groups for discussion. She challenged her students to delve into course work through an active exchange of ideas. Initially, there was some trepidation—even resistance. But in time,

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

MICHAEL QUINN, DEAN, COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

30 30

30

“With Vicky’s active-teaching model, students construct their own understandings and build their own solutions.”

70 70

70

her new lecture-free way of teaching, also known as guided inquiry learning, was embraced by Minderhout’s students. “I never thought I could love teaching more than I did previously, but this type of classroom is really

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

experience for her students while taking a leadership role in reshaping our nation’s approach to science education.” In 1997, 17 years after joining the SU faculty, Professor Minderhout radically changed her method of

30 30

30

If you’re looking for one the most highly regarded faculty members in the United States, you don’t have to look very far. Chemistry Professor Vicky Minderhout of the College of Science and Engineering is the 2011 Washington State “Professor of the Year” as named by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Minderhout is the first Seattle University faculty member to receive this honor and one of only 27 faculty chosen nationwide. “Dr. Vicky Minderhout is an exemplary scholar-educator who embodies the high standard of excellence that has come to characterize Seattle University,” says Provost Isiaah Crawford. “An educator in the fullest sense of the word, Dr. Minderhout is committed to providing the very best learning

70 70

70

Chemistry Professor named Professor of the Year by Carnegie Foundation and CASE

10 40 40

40 70 40

Watch a video clip from the event at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

FACULTY & STAFF / news and notes

10 25 90 100

pg.

12

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

50 40 40

50

12 / Faculty News

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

dean at the college. The paper, “Legal Issues of Online Social Networks and the Workplace” co-authored by TERRY FOSTER, assistant professor of business law and Christopher Greene, MBA, JD, has been accepted for publication in The Journal of Law, Business and Ethics. The article, “Auctions of Hotel Rooms and Airline Seats,” by Albers Professors of Marketing REX TOH and PETER RAVEN and Associate Professor of Economics FRED DEKAY, has been accepted for publication in Tourism Analysis. Professor of Philosophy DAN DOMBROWSKI gave a lecture at Harvard Law School, titled “Immediate

0000

70 40 40

The paper appeared in the Journal of Sports Management. The article, “Dual-Agenda Leadership Formation: Pedagogy Design and Impact in a Leadership Executive MBA,” by Professor of Management SHARON LOBEL and MARILYN GIST, executive director of the Center for Leadership Formation, has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Corporate Citizenship. JODI KELLY has been appointed Dean of Matteo Ricci College. Kelly, who has been at Seattle University since 1984, has served in various scholarly and leadership roles including most recently as interim

70 40 40

40 70 40

Assistant Professor of Finance KATYA EMM and Professor of Finance VINAY DATAR had their article, “Going public through the back door: A comparative analysis of SPACs and IPOs” accepted for publication in the Banking and Finance Review. The paper was co-authored with Professor Ufuk Ince. Professor GALEN TRAIL, director of the Master of Sport Administration and Leadership program in the College of Arts and Sciences, published “The Influence of Relationship Quality on Sport Consumption Behaviors: An Empirical Examination of the Relationship Quality Framework,” with Yu Kyoum Kim and Yong Jae Ko.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100 40 100

40 100

President Sundborg, S.J., presents an award honoring Vicky Minderhout as Professor of the Year.

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40 10 25 90 100

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

pg.

13

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 13

50 40 40

50

For more faculty/staff achievements visit www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

His presentation drew on his study of the SU Nicaragua Immersion Experience and was titled, “Impacts of a CrossCultural Experience on Faculty/Staff Development Relevant to Education for Personal and Social Responsibility.” The paper, “We Are the Corporation: Distributed CSR,” by Assistant Professor of Business Ethics JESSICA LUDESCHER and Professor of Management GREG PRUSSIA, has been accepted for publication in Business and Society Review.

0000

70 40 40

Children: A Matter of Social Justice” at the installation ceremony. She joined the nursing faculty in 2003. STEVEN J. PALAZZO, assistant clinical professor in the College of Nursing, was awarded a Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy (NFLA) fellowship. The fellowship provides a top leadership development program for nursing faculty. Palazzo joined the College of Nursing in fall 2011. JOE ORLANDO, assistant vice president for Mission and Ministry, shared some of his research at an Association of American Colleges and Universities conference, “Educating for Personal and Social Responsibility.”

70 40 40

40 70 40

Hominization v. Delayed Hominization in the Abortion Debate.” College of Education’s KATHERINE SCHLICK NOE has released a youngadult novel, Something to Hold. Schlick Noe, director of the Literacy for Special Needs program, based the book on her experiences growing up on Native American reservations. Something to Hold explores universal issues of injustice, bullying, belonging and friendship. The College of Nursing’s KATHERINE CAMACHO CARR is the N. Jean Bushman Chair in Nursing. This past fall, Carr delivered a distinguished lecture, “Caring for Women and

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

FACULTY NEWS B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

Matteo Ricci College’s Serena Cosgrove inspires through action and activism

100 100

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

100 40

100 40

14

30 30

30

pg.

70 70

70

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

14 / Faculty News

30 30

30

of your students to make the connections and try to take a role in the world, in history.” It was 1989 when Cosgrove lived in San Salvador where six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper and her daughter were murdered by members of the Salvadoran Army’s elite battalion, the Atlacatl. In a recent campus panel on protest movements, Cosgrove referred to that horrific occurrence: “To this day, those of us who were there feel we owe our lives to the martyrdom of the Jesuits.” Cosgrove’s journey later took her to Northeastern University in Boston for graduate studies in anthropology and sociology, including a Fulbright for her doctoral research, then back to Latin America where she worked for a private foundation in sustainable development. Lectures and papers brought her to Seattle again and she began work on a book, Leadership from the Margins: Women and Civil Society Organizations in Argentina, Chile, and El Salvador. She soon learned from Arthur Fisher, then-dean, and Kelly, then associate dean, that a new leadership degree was in development at Matteo Ricci. “A Jesuit education ties theory to real-world issues for me,” Cosgrove says. “I knew I was ready to form leaders for a different kind of world.” Today, Cosgrove is expanding her research into Africa, hoping to facilitate exchange between women nonprofit leaders in the Americas with women in Africa. Cosgrove’s family is another point of pride for her. Her daughter, Meme Garcia-Cosgrove, is a sophomore SU Sullivan Scholar who studies theater so she can support art-for-social-change efforts in Latin America. Cosgrove has known her husband Martin Bosworth, ’85, since they were both students at Seattle Prep and later at Matteo Ricci College. A thought-provoking speaker, when Cosgrove was recently on that SU panel about protest movements, she offered advice on how to stay safe during times of conflict. “I took risks, but they were calculated risks,” she said. “You need to have a family of supporters to keep an eye on you. You also need information so you know what’s going on—have the history and facts. ... My impact would have been so much less had I been killed.”

70 70

70

For Serena Cosgrove, Matteo Ricci College is perhaps the best fit imaginable. Not only did she graduate from Matteo Ricci in 1985, with degrees in French and Humanities, but she is now an assistant professor there. Jodi Kelly, Matteo Ricci’s dean, has known Cosgrove since the days when Kelly taught at Seattle Prep, where Cosgrove was a student in the late 1970s. “Serena represents the best of our hopes for our graduates,” says Kelly, “namely, that they take advantage of their years as undergraduates to earn a well-rounded education in the Humanities in order to construct a solid foundation on which they can build anything.” Cosgrove’s reasons for returning to SU are more complex than one might think. When she graduated, she embarked on an odyssey that took her to Latin America for extended periods in the revolutionary times of the late 1980s. An unarmed civilian in war zones, she put to use all she learned about social justice as an undergraduate at SU, first as a volunteer with human rights groups in Nicaragua, then in El Salvador. “It wasn’t about charity. It wasn’t about saving anyone, it was about learning from them, accompanying people as they transform their lives and standing in solidarity with the people of Latin America,” she says. There were those who wanted her to return to Seattle. Among them, Dave Madsen, ’69, then in his greener years of teaching at SU, who left a memorable impression on her—and soon became her sponsor/ godfather when she converted to Catholicism shortly after she found her way to Latin America. When he read a story in the Seattle Times Pacific Magazine about Cosgrove’s fundraising efforts for Latin American women whose husbands had disappeared, Madsen wrote her. He suggested Cosgrove was involved in problems much bigger than she was and maybe it was time to be thinking of people other than herself. Madsen, today an associate professor of history, chuckles over the irony—as if Cosgrove was thinking only of herself at the time. Nevertheless, in correspondence Madsen still keeps in his office file cabinet and shares with his students today, Cosgrove wrote back: “Hey, quit teaching if you don’t want some

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Changing the World | By Annie Beckmann

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 60 100

100 100 60 100 100

PHOTOGRAPH BY KJ ZUNIGHA

L/C

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40 10 25

50 40 40

50 90 100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 15

pg.

15

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Serena Cosgrove stands outside the house of Petronila Catrileo in Pocuno, Chile.

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

SERENA COSGROVE, ’85

0000

70 40 40

“A Jesuit education ties theory to real-world issues for me. I knew I was ready to form leaders for a different kind of world.”

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

ATHLETICS B

A

100 100

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

ition to start shutting down opposing teams’ running games. Redshirt sophomore Ryan Somers and junior Steve Kirbach lead the team and are the most seasoned behind the plate. Senior Tyler Sustare continues to improve and freshman Brian Olson led all catchers in hitting during the fall season. The combination of the four players gives us depth and great leadership to draw from. Our program and alumni have been hard at work to enhance our facilities and get us up to speed with Division I expectations. We built two new dugouts and bullpens at Bannerwood Park—site of our home games—while the City of Bellevue enhanced the park with new lighting. This should be a great season ahead for Redhawks baseball.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

100 40

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

Donny Harrel is head coach of men’s baseball.

40 100

40 100

Yardley brings experience to the bullpen, while freshman Mason Stidham and junior Blaine Jones will take the closing roles for the pitching staff. Offensively we return our team MVP in senior second baseman Trent Oleszczuk. Senior Doug Kincaid, second on the team in RBIs last season, returns in the outfield and will be complemented in the middle of the lineup by juniors Josh Kutz and Sean Narby, along with seniors Riley Tompkins and Jace Sloan. Senior outfielders Marcelino Morales and Michael Tevlin, who is coming back from a broken wrist but had an excellent fall season before his injury, are both expected to compete at the top of the order. Returning infielders Cullen Hendrickson, Nick Latta and Nate Roberts add experience to the front end of the lineup, while junior outfielder Bryndon Ecklund could set the table or mix into the middle of the lineup after adding strength to his frame this past summer. Behind the plate, we are in a pos-

30 30

30

We are extremely excited about our third year of baseball at the Division I level. We are finally in a position in our program where we have true experience. The first freshmen in our signing class are now juniors and our junior college transfers are seniors. With their experience, coupled with a tremendously hard-working freshmen class, I expect great things this season. Our team goal for the season is to reach the 30-win mark. If we play like I know we are capable of, this is a very reachable goal. This year we have more home games than away games and we are excited for our team and fans to see us play great teams such as UConn, Portland, University of Washington, Santa Clara and BYU. We’ve added 12 new student athletes to our roster to help fill the problem areas that were exposed in the past two seasons. Pitching depth is key. Senior right-handers Brandon Kizer and Seafth Howe will anchor the pitching staff and should pitch the Redhawks into each weekend this season. Right-hander Eric

70 70

70

Head coach expects great things from this year’s team

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Baseball Looks for Standout Season | By Donny Harrel

20 70 70

70 40 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Baseball Hall of Famer, the legendary Cal Ripken, Jr., hit it out of the park at a fundraiser for the SU baseball program. Ripken met with fans and players alike at the "Meet the Redhawks" dinner and auction, which attracted more than 400 guests.

70 40 40

40 70 40

PHOTO BY ERIC BADEAU

70 70 40

40 70 40

RIPKEN A HIT AT FUNDRAISER

50 40 40

50 90

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

FOR SCHEDULE AND TICKETS, VISIT WWW.GOSEATTLEU.COM.

100

16 / Athletics

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

16

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

SU Style looks at what’s “in fashion” on campus. A

100

70 70

70

SONORA JHA, PHD

30 30

30

Chair/Communication, Associate Professor/ Journalism and Mass Communication

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

WHO instilled in you your fashion sense?

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

The city of Bombay. That city is a perfect blend of East and West, which gave me an appreciation for “mix and match.” And it has a funky, frenetic pace, which influences the fact that I can never, ever spend too much time putting my clothes together. Even now, I make sure I get dressed in under 15 minutes a day.

WHAT is your most cherished item of clothing?

70 70

70

30 30

30

A tweed coat I designed and got tailored in Bombay a few years ago. It's gray with red wool piping and a red wool belt. I feel wonderful every time I wear it because it brought out a fashion creativity in me and was tailored by a men’s tailor using Indian tweed and wool.

100 40

100 40

WHERE do you shop for clothes and accessories?

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

I don't enjoy “going” shopping and find very little time to do it, so I do most of my shopping online. My online shopping is all over the place. But, locally in Seattle, I stray into thrift stores and always get drawn into Banana Republic, although I don't always find the perfect clothes there. I do always find some great accessories at Nordstrom Rack, such as a lovely polka-dotted umbrella that gives me much joy in the rain. I still do most of my shopping for Western clothes and jewelry in Bombay (the city, not the store).

70 40 40

40 70 40

WHEN did you develop your signature style?

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

I resist having a signature style. I wouldn’t say I am a rebel or quirky or anything of the sort, but part of the idea of style is to let it grow as you grow as a person. I don't like when people look like they stepped out of a store window that I can identify.

HOW would you describe your look?

50 40 40

50 90

Compiled by Annie Beckmann 100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 17

pg.

17

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

If I want to be pretentious, I’d call it, “intellectual chic.” But, in my humbler moments, I will say that I am just a sponge, gathering up aesthetics from wherever I have been, whether it's the streets of my hometown, or what I see in a magazine at the dentist's office or in the window of Forever 21 in downtown Seattle.

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

su style

B

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

L/C

L/C

1

Round 3

4

5

6

News from Alumni House

B

A

SU

2

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

Alumni want ways to better connect and engage with alma mater

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

W

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

hen the call went out to alumni to solicit opinions, via a survey, on how to make the most of your university and alumni experience, you answered—loud and clear. Many alumni say they don’t feel a strong connection to the university and that their alma mater isn’t doing enough to engage them or compel them to give back. As alumni, you are proud of where you went to school but want ongoing and meaningful opportunities to contribute and reasons to return to campus. Recently, Seattle University Magazine sat down with three alumni representing three distinctive periods in SU history—pre-1970, 1971-99 and 2000-present— and got their take on what it means to be an alum of Seattle University and how their experiences helped shape who they are today.

50 40 40

50

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75 90 100

18 / We are Listening

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

18

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

From the President

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

This issue of the Seattle University Magazine is especially dedicated to you, our alumni. I want to thank all of our alumni for being an important part of our success and continuing to serve as an inspiration to our university. Our alumni have built successful careers, are devoted to their families and serve their communities. As a university, we are very proud of you.

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

This past fall, I had an opportunity to speak to the entire university community. I spoke of how one of my most heart-held hopes is for Seattle University to find new ways to engage our 67,000 alumni. This is critical. As I enter my 15th year as president, I am more and more convinced that our university can only reach its potential by connecting more fully and meaningfully with our alumni. We look to you to live out our mission, to help tell the story of our university, to support what you most prized as students and to lend your voice in shaping the direction of your alma mater.

100 40

40 100

Whether it’s career connections, social networking or ongoing education, we feel an important responsibility to continue to be relevant in your life long after you graduate.

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

My hope is that together we can accomplish two important things: 1) Create a truly great, transforming and meaningful alumni experience; and 2) Engage our alumni in shaping the future of Seattle University. To do this, I plan to engage with you more often in a dialogue about our university. I’d like to begin by asking you to respond to the question I posed below. We’ll summarize the responses and report what you had to say in an upcoming issue of the magazine. I hope to hear from you and I hope you stay connected to your alma mater.

0000

70 40 40

Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J.

3

We Want to Hear From You

10

President Sundborg poses this question to alumni:

25

“How can Seattle University be more relevant to your life?”

90 100

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

pg.

19

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 19

50 40 40

50

Send your responses to alumnifeedback@seattleu.edu.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

PRESIDENT

100

Hearing Your Voice

L/C

1

Round 3

4

5

6

100 60 100 70

70 70

pre-1970

100 100 60 100 100

News from Alumni House

B

A

SU

2

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

“If we can get alumni to campus, they’ll stick around.”

70 70

70

JIM DYKEMAN, ’61 Majors: History/Philosophy

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

SU Service: Former Board of Regents member; President’s Club; Fine Arts Advisory Board

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

Jim Dykeman seemed destined to attend Seattle University. Like his brother, he went to Seattle Prep (before transferring to Garfield High School) and his father was a good friend of SU’s Father James McGoldrick. The work and values of the Jesuits resonated with him. Fresh in his memory is the day when he came to SU, seeking admission, and found himself seated in the office of President Father Lemieux, his knees shaking. The meeting proved successful as he was accepted. Years later he would find himself in that same office to interview a Jesuit seeking the presidency: Stephen Sundborg, S.J. Following graduation, he served in the military, got married—to his wife of now 52 years, Geri—started a family and a career. One day he came across an event at SU, featuring the late Perry Lorenzo and operatic music, and made his way back to campus. That was more than 20 years ago and has been active with SU ever since.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3 10 25

50 40 40

50 75

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

Read more of Jim’s story at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

90 100

20 / We are Listening

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

pg.

20

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

*

Alumni from this period have a higher level of engagement than students who graduated after 1970.

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70 30 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

40 100

26%

70 70 40

40 70 40

Reside in the Seattle area.

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 3

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

Have donated in their lifetime.

10 25

50 40 40

50

YOU SAID “Want more opportunities to return to campus”

90 100

> Return of a Homecoming/Alumni weekend tradition SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 21

pg.

21

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

WHAT WE ARE DOING > Alumni influence and participation in undergraduate and graduate student orientation, Welcome Week events and commencement

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

20 70 70

70 40 40

Alumni from this era who feel a strong connection to Seattle University.

10 40 40

40 70 40

45%

40 100

40 100

$

100 40

100 40

Pre-1970 alumni report the highest level of emotional engagement with the university.

81%

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

32%

30 30

1 in 3

Res Respondents say their relationship with SU is rela important to them. imp

L/C

1

Round 3

4

5

6

100 60 100 70

70 70

1971-1999

100 100 60 100 100

News from Alumni House

B

A

SU

2

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

“I loved the small classes and being involved with ASSU.” SUE PARISIEN, ’87

30 30

30

SU Service: Active with ASSU as an undergrad; Resident Assistant frosh-senior years

70 70

70

Major: Psychology

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Coming from a large public high school in Brooklyn, ue Parisien was NY, swelling with 6,000 students, Sue rent when it came looking for something entirely different time to choose a college. The East Coaster set her ted in her teens. sights on Seattle, a city she first visited Two years later, she would return ass a freshmen—at y. age 16—to attend Seattle University. “I knew that because I was young,, a large university risien. “I wanted would just swallow me up,” says Parisien. ntimate.” something more personalized and intimate.” ast to attend law After graduation she went back east school at Villanova University. She practiced law for o Seattle, where she several years before coming back to was an Assistant Attorney General. The importance en in deep and of giving back was instilled in Parisien ion that continues profound ways while at SU—a tradition ess teens at area today as she serves meals to homeless churches. crazy Redhawks” The mother of two is a diehard “crazy fan, who rarely misses a basketball game. “I am always attle University.” proud to say I am a graduate of Seattle

50 40 40

50

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Read more about Sue at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

90 100

22 / We are Listening

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

22

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

*

Alumni from these graduating years are likely to give back to the university through board service and mentorship.

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

100%

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

62%

30 30

30

1 in 4

Respondents say their relationship with SU is important to them.

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

Overall, very positive feelings toward SU.

51% 100 40

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

Respondents who rate SU as

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

$ ”excellent” 66%

40 100

40 100

81%

Alumni from this era who feel a strong connection to Seattle University.

3

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

Have donated in their lifetime.

10 25

50 40 40

50 75 90

WHAT WE ARE DOING > Expanded career networking and training opportunities, including webinars and workshops

100

> Relaunch of the Student Alumni Ambassador program SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 23

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

23

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

YOU SAID “Promote a stronger connection through career services and mentoring”

L/C

1

Round 3

4

5

100 60 100 70

70 70

2000-today

100 100 60 100 100

News from Alumni House

6

B

A

SU

2

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

“An SU education puts you in a place where you can make a difference.”

70

70 70

MICHAEL ALCANTARA, ‘09 Majors: Humanities/Fine Arts–Digital Design

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

SU Service: Active with SEAC (Studentt Events & Activities Council); sings with Chapel choir; helped lped start Mad Grad ic events) Crew (networking, support of athletic

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Michael Alcantara’s first introduction to Seattle University was ied for the Sullivan by way of a visit to campus when he applied aduate was urged Leaders scholarship. The Seattle Prep graduate d he knew SU was by his father to apply and when he arrived mmuter student, he the place for him. Although he was a commuter g community immersed himself in campus life: building dence halls, with others students who lived in the residence etics and attending lots of events, supporting athletics ience. He’s getting the most out of his college experience. ay nights at still active with SU, singing at Mass Sunday the Chapel of St. Ignatius and showing hiss Redhawks pride at basketball games at KeyArena. gner for the Alcantara, who works as a graphic designer U education Puget Sound Business Journal, says his SU nce to be a equipped him with the skills and confidence nt viewpoints free thinker, to open his mind to divergent and boundless possibilities. “A Seattle U education challenges you. My Humanities erent sides of an education gave me the ability to see different ck and white.” argument,” he says. “That it’s not just black

50 40 40

50

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Read more about Michael at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

90 100

24 / We are Listening

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

pg.

24

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

*

Alumni from this group are strongly influenced by the Jesuit traditions of social justice and commitment to service.

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

78%

70 70

70

100%

Respondents who rate SU as

30 30

30 100 60 100

100 100 60 100 100

”excellent”

69%

70 70

70

30 30

30

34%

31%

40 100 20 70 70

70 40 40

Alumni from this period who feel a strong connection to Seattle University.

70 70 40

40 70 40

Alumni who are connected to SU via Facebook.

10 40 40 70 40 40 0000

70 40 40

40 70 40 40 70 40

40 100

Have donated in their lifetime.

100 40

40 100

$ 41%

100 40

100 40

Overall, very positive feelings toward SU.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3 10 25

50 40 40

50 75 90

WHAT WE ARE DOING > Build community and pride by connecting alumni through social media (Facebook, Twitter, Linked In)

100

> Programs aligned with the SU mission, starting with the Alumni Day of Service on April 21

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 25

pg.

25

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

YOU SAID “Provide more ways to connect with SU through service and programs”

L/C

1

2

4

5

6

News from Alumni House

B

A

SU

Round 3

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

67,000 alumni

100

Reside in all 50 states and many countries

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 70

70 70

▼ ▼ ▼

30 30

30

Alumni Snapshot

30 30

30

46,000 call Washington state home— 31,000 of those reside in King County

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

There’s a strong appreciation for the relationships formed with students, faculty and staff.

100 40 10 40 40

20 70 70 70 70 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

Particularly among older alumni, there is a lack of awareness of the services and opportunities that Alumni Relations provides, including the alumni website.

70 40 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

Most alumni aren’t aware of how to become more involved or how to stay connected to other alumni.

40 70 40

40 100

40 100

Alumni are interested in reconnecting with friends, faculty and staff they met through campus clubs and organizations.

10

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Graduate alumni tend to feel more connected to a specific graduate degree program, rather than the university community as a whole.

40 100

Most undergraduate and graduate alumni reported moderate levels of emotional engagement with SU.

Many alumni have a strong connection to faculty members and their schools.

25

50 40 40

50

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75 90 100

26 / We are Listening

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

pg.

26

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

“You told us you’re looking for something more than a social experience. You want to be able to come together in meaningful ways…”

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Exciting Things are Happening By SUSAN VOSPER Assistant Vice President, Alumni Relations

70 70

70

30 30

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90

Home away from home: Visit your place on campus, the A&A Building on the corner of 12th and Marion.

100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 27

pg.

27

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Learn more about the initiatives and new programs in the works for alumni and the reactivated Faculty/Staff Alumni Chapter at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

100 40

40 100

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

30

The vestibule of the Admissions and Alumni Building on campus features a photo exhibit of graduates and friends of the university. Every day when I walk through the building I am inspired by these individuals, recognized for their significant contributions to Seattle University and the broader community, and by their stories. These photos inspire me daily as we work to be a world-class Alumni Relations office and presence on campus. I encourage you to stop by your home on campus, on the corner of 12th and Marion, and get inspired yourself. From our recent alumni survey, and from my own conversations with countless alumni since I became assistant vice president last June, I know you share in the passion for living out the mission of our university. You’ve told us you’re looking for something more than a social experience—you want to be able to come together in meaningful ways, to participate in activities that serve others, stimulate the mind and nurture the soul. Alumni Relations and the university as a whole are dedicated to providing opportunities that live up to your vision and our mission. By the time you read this, there will be several things in play based on your feedback. To start, there have been significant upgrades in our online presence. These include a refreshed look for our website [www.seattleu.edu/alumni/] along with improved access to get connected. More importantly, we are relaunching an updated alumni directory that will provide an online community to help better build connections for alumni. We are also increasing the visibility and engagement of the Alumni Board of Governors. We’re bolstering our career services support for all alumni. In partnership with SU’s Career Services office, we are on the path to create more opportunities for networking, internships and mentorships. Look for a reinvigorated student-alumni ambassador program coming soon. Together we are capable of much more than we can do separately. Together we will carry out the shared mission of service, affinity and pride for Seattle University. I see this as the start of a lifelong journey. Join the conversation and tell us how Seattle U can be more relevant to your life at alumnifeedback@seattleu.edu.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100 70

70 70

T p C p

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

Kathy Atwood, ’99 MPA, brings homegrown awareness to her role as first female Everett Chief of Police

10 25

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

28

0000

70 40 40

pg.

70 40 40

40 70 40

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

70 70 40

40 70 40

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MERYL SCHENKER

28 / Top Cop

20 70 70

70 40 40

continued on page 30

10 40 40

40 70 40

Police Department, who dreamed of becoming an officer ever since she was a student at Everett High School. At the time, her uncle had other ideas for his law enforcement-minded niece. “He wanted me to join the FBI,” Atwood recalls. Although she couldn’t be swayed, it would take several years before she would officially begin her career as a cop. After she graduated high school, Atwood worked mostly retail jobs. When she was 21 she had the chance to join the Mount Vernon Police Department, in Skagit County, Wash. That didn’t quite go as planned. “I took the police test and flunked it,” she says, now able to laugh it off. In the mid-1980s, Atwood’s law-enforcement career began to take off when she took a job as a Community Assistance Officer with the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office. During this time she also served as a crime prevention specialist, where she conducted block watch programs in neighborhoods and led seminars on personal safety. When she left the Sheriff’s Office, she headed to Florida to manage a retail store. A few years later she was back in Everett and ready to fully focus her attention on becoming a cop. After passing the necessary exams to

40 100

40 100

E

Everett’s Chief of Police Kathy Atwood is well acquainted with the city that the officers on her force—more than 200 strong—patrol daily. The Everett native knows the neighborhoods, the city blocks she once patrolled and the people in this city through and through. Everett, Wash., 25 miles north of Seattle, was an “AllAmerica City” in 2002 and was once known largely as a mill town and home to the late Sen. Henry M. “Scoop” Jackson, one of its most famous residents. These days, it’s perhaps best recognized as home to Boeing’s central production plant and Naval Station Everett. The city has a small town, community-focused feel despite its population of more than 103,000 residents, making it the fourth largest metropolis in the Puget Sound region. Atwood’s family has deep roots here. For years, they operated Solie Funeral Home near downtown Everett and a cemetery in the south end of town. Her upbringing was not reminiscent of the TV show Six Feet Under, however. It was, she says, quite normal, even though she lived at the funeral home with her family (they occupied the basement) until age 2. Working in the city where she was raised carries special meaning for Atwood, a 22-year veteran of the Everett

100 40

40 100

BY TINA POTTERF

 E E L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

100

70 70

70

30 30

100 60

100 100 60 100 100





30

100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

 40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40 70 40 40

0000

E

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

10 25

50 40 40

50 90

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

SU Magazine Spring g2 2012 012 / 29 9

pg.

29

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75 100

E

3

Kathy Atwood, ’99 MPA, outside of the Everett Police Department headquarters, is the city’s first female Chief of Police, a role she relishes.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

KATHY ATWOOD, ’99 MPA on being Everett’s first female Chief of Police

70 70

70

“I’ve always been surrounded by a culture that values diversity and women. It’s been a non-issue. I am just treated as a police officer.”

30 30

30 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

40 100

40 100

30

100 40

40 100

pg.

100 40

100 40

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

30 30

30

30 / Top Cop

70 70

70

Taking on the role of Chief of Police was not top of mind for Atwood, who was approaching her 50th birthday and considering retirement. That changed in late 2010 when her predecessor, Police Chief Jim Scharf, announced his retirement and recommended Atwood as his replacement. This past July she officially began her tenure. “I’m humbled that I was chosen and also very proud that the department and city helped create a foundation for me to be successful,” she says. As police chief, Atwood’s typical day involves handling personnel issues, making hiring decisions, lots of meetings and engagement with community groups. Atwood also serves on various boards, committees and associations, including the FBI National Academy Association (Washington chapter)—she is a 2003 graduate of the FBI National Academy—and the Dawson Place Child Advocacy Board of Directors. Additionally, she is on the Snohomish Regional Drug and Gang Task Force Executive Board and the executive board for the NW High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA). As a guest lecturer for the criminal justice program at Everett Community College, she often covers topics pertaining to women in law enforcement, drawing from personal experience. One of her immediate priorities as chief is developing a long-term strategic plan for the department. Another is staffing. “One of my goals is to get us up to full staff,” she says, adding that the department is fortunate as one of the few in the region to be hiring. As she talks about her work, Atwood is conversational and friendly, at times self-effacing. She isn’t fazed that she is the first woman police chief in Everett. In fact, she downplays its significance while acknowledging that other women in this line of work may have faced greater adversity because of gender. “I view myself as a police officer. The gender makes

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

become an officer, she started on patrol in Everett in 1989 and never looked back. Fairly early on in her career she was doing special operations and undercover work that included posing as a prostitute in a John sting. “It was very stressful. You have to maintain your safety at all times,” she recalls of the experience. This type of undercover work was especially difficult, Atwood says, because she had to assimilate into a culture that was foreign to her. She also had to learn what she calls the “sub-culture language” and slang used in that world and be convincing in wrangling a deal all the while maintaining her cover. “Prostitution is a tragic lifestyle and in many ways I consider the women and girls, and young men as well, who are involved in prostitution victims,” she says. “I don’t know of anyone who grew up aspiring to be a prostitute.” Atwood has made it a personal mission to reduce prostitution and human trafficking citywide. The Everett Police Department is part of the Sexual Exploitation Intervention Network in Snohomish County and Atwood was instrumental in developing the group in its early days when it was known as the Prostitution Prevention Network. The network, which consists of social service agencies and law enforcement partners, works to assist young people who were in the sex-trade industry and provides programs and services for them to get out the business and lead healthy, productive lives. “Through these efforts we endeavor to ‘rescue’ young women and get them on a new track,” says Atwood. “I’m in a position to continue to support these efforts by allocating resources in that direction.” Atwood, a single mother to teenage son Andy, worked her way up the ranks in the department, from patrol officer to detective to sergeant, then on to lieutenant, captain and deputy chief.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

Everett Police Chief Kathy Atwood and Lt. Jerry Strieck take a break from running a dispatch scenario.

10 40 40

40 70 40 10 25 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

50 40 40

50

31

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

pg.

0000

70 40 40

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 31

70 40 40

40 70 40

Read a list of SU alumni in law enforcement at www.seattleu.edu/magazine.

70 70 40

40 70 40

“It has meant a lot to me not only to have the credential that the MPA has given me but also the advantage of seeing the bigger picture,” she says. “When making decisions I consider how they effect things both internally and externally. I look at the responsibility we have to help create a safe place to work, live and play, which ties into the economic vitality of our city.” When talk turns to her proudest moments as Chief of Police, Atwood touts the department’s many community outreach programs that focus on crime prevention, the success of the gang prevention visits to area high schools and resource officers in the public schools that put a friendly face on public safety. She also praises her colleagues and those who have helped her get to where she is today. “I’m proud to be part of a wonderful organization that is full of high-caliber professionals,” Atwood says. “I’m also very proud of the hard-working men and women here, the work they do and the difference they make.”

20 70 70

70 40 40

no difference to me,” Atwood says. “Most departments now have an acceptance for diversity. I’ve always been surrounded by a culture that values diversity and women. It has been a non-issue. I am just treated as a police officer.” In the late 1990s, she began to contemplate going back to school to get a master’s degree. She saw it as a way to enhance her managerial skills and challenge herself. Although familiar with Seattle University, she didn’t know too much about its master’s degree offerings until she started talking to a woman at a baseball game who was a graduate of the Master in Teaching program. After doing some research of her own, Atwood decided to apply to the Master of Public Administration (MPA) program. Shortly after being admitted to the program, she became a detective and started a family. “I had an infant while in grad school,” she says. In 1999, she graduated from SU with an MPA and finds she still draws from the knowledge she gained in the program.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

ALUMNI VOICE B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75 90

Bonnie, ’73, and Alan Cashman, ’72, have brought a different type of fitness experience to Capitol Hill with a unique pilates studio.

100

32 / Alumni Voice

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

0000

70 40 40

BONNIE CASHMAN, ’73

70 40 40

40 70 40

“We’re not in the fitness business; we’re in the people business providing fitness, which is an unusual approach.”

pg.

32

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

30 30

30

33

70 70

70

pg.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

30 30

30

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 33

70 70

70

Learn more about Lab 5 Fitness at www.lab5fitness.com.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

It has been years since Alan, ’72, and Bonnie Cashman, ’73, sat in a Seattle University classroom. But running their recently opened Capitol Hill fitness center has them harkening back to lessons learned as students. The Cashmans met as students at Seattle University in 1971— Alan was a business major and Bonnie studied psychology—and they’ve been together ever since. (The Cashmans’ roots at SU are deep, as Alan’s father Ben was the head of the political science department; Bonnie’s brother is a 1967 graduate and Alan’s brother Jeff a 1978 law grad.) When the couple decided to start a new business, Lab 5 Fitness, it made sense for them to stay on Capitol Hill, near the SU campus, having met here and lived on the Hill for the past 40 years. The concept for Lab 5 Fitness came together several years after Bonnie experienced a herniated disc and suffered from various neck problems. She began Pilates classes in Palm Springs, where she and Alan live part of the year and fell in love with the exercise. During a morning class, she was mesmerized by an older woman working out on a Pilates reformer machine. When she asked the instructor about her, she was amazed to learn that the woman was nearly 80 years old. Back in Seattle, Bonnie was unable to find a Pilates class that offered the same benefits as the studio in California, so she bought a reformer and trained at home. “I couldn’t find … something that was high energy, fun and effective.” “I wanted to create something like that here,” says Bonnie. And soon Lab 5 was born. “We love watching people’s mental and physical transformations, and seeing their confidence levels increase,” says Bonnie. “We’re not in the fitness business; we’re in the people business providing fitness, which is an unusual approach. Too many people forget to focus on the people.” Lab 5, on Broadway, is a comprehensive studio offering mat and reformer Pilates, yoga, stretch, bar and aerial conditioning classes. The stars of the studio are the 10 Pilates reformer machines, custom-designed for lengthening and conditioning the body. Reformer classes are 50 minutes long with various focuses. Lab 5 memberships work like a punch card, allowing individuals to take advantage of the different class offerings, each personalized to accommodate various body types and physical limitations. Alan and Bonnie believe that the experience they had at Seattle University helped shape their success. “People who are attracted to Seattle University are people who are accomplished throughout their lives and who want to give back to the community because of what we got as students,” says Alan. “The things our parents taught us at home growing up were reinforced at Seattle University through the Jesuit teaching model.“

30 30

30

Alumni find success with local fitness business

70 70

70

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Passion for Pilates | By Sarah Hyde

L/C

1

2

Round 3

BOOKMARKS

4

5

6

Books by Faculty/Staff/Alumni B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Devil’s Den | By Timothy Ashby, ’05 Reviewed by Chelan David

70 70

70 100

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

Aided by his girlfriend Peggy, the daughter of a deceased Union soldier and an archivist at the Library of Congress, Armitage ultimately unravels the truth, nearly losing his life in the process. Meeting the requirement of a good historical mystery novel, at the conclusion of Devil’s Den we are left wondering, “What if?” Without giving away the ending, what if the famed Gettysburg address delivered by Lincoln had not been so pithy? What if Hoover hadn’t pushed for early forensic practices to be put in place by the FBI? And bigger picture, what if the Union hadn’t won the Battle of Gettysburg? It’s impossible to answer such questions, but Devil’s Den, through a skillful display of historical fiction, makes us ponder the alternative possibilities to today’s reality.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

characters with real life icons including J. Edgar Hoover, Charles Lindbergh, Abraham Lincoln and George McClellan. A 20-something Hoover, trusted aide Helen Gandy by his side, plays a central role in the storyline as he makes his way up the law-enforcement ladder. The trail of corruption and coverup Armitage discovers stretches over a period of six decades from the Battle of Gettysburg to the corridors of the Harding-era Congress. As he tracks his suspects, Prohibition is in full swing, racial injustice rampant and Civil War veterans are falling like flies— murdered in cold blood. In order to find the killer, Armitage must figure out what links the victims, naïve to the fact that the investigation is being manipulated by Harry M. Daugherty, a real-life Attorney General in the Harding administration.

30 30

30

Devil’s Den, written by Timothy Ashby, ’05 JD, is set in two different eras: the 1860’s and the roaring 1920’s. Ashby masterfully mixes characters and scenes from these periods to craft a page-turner that mixes history, mystery, romance and political intrigue. The historical novel begins with an elderly Union veteran being brutally murdered on the battlefield of Gettysburg just weeks before the 60th anniversary of the Civil War’s climactic battle. Seth Armitage, an agent of the nascent Bureau of Investigation (BI)— a precursor to the FBI—is assigned to the murder case. Armitage, a Virginian whose grandfather was killed in the Civil War, traverses the streets of Boston to the plains of Kansas and unearths a conspiracy that reaches the highest levels of Washington. Meticulously researched, Ashby seamlessly integrates fictional

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40 10 25 90 100

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

34

50 40 40

50

pg.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

0000

70 40 40

34 / Bookmarks

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

70 40 40

40 70 40

Meeting the requirement of a good historical mystery novel, at the conclusion of Devil’s Den we are left wondering, “What if?”

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

For Your Reading Pleasure…

100

70 70

70

FACULTY

30

30 30

Peculiar Honors Editors | Sharon Cumberland

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

The poetry collection of Sharon Cumberland, associate professor and director of SU’s Creative Writing program, has been published by Black Heron Press. Peculiar Honors is Cumberland’s first full-length collection of poetry, which has been published in various journals including Iowa Review, Image and more. Gordon Miller, director of Environmental Studies, photographed the book cover art.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70 30

30 30

ALUMNI

100 40

100 40

Saving the Leader Within: The Impact of Childhood Trauma on Leadership Author | Doreen Cato, ’07 MEd

100 40

40 100

Saving the Leader Within: The Impact of Childhood Trauma on Leadership by 2007 College of Education graduate Doreen Cato examines how childhood trauma influences the lives of future leaders. The book was born from Cato’s dissertation on the subject and research of experiences in her own family and that of historical leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Eleanor Roosevelt.

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

FACULTY

3 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

The Philosophy of Husserl Author | Burt Hopkins

50 40 40

50 90 100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 35

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

pg.

35

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

The Philosophy of Husserl, the latest book by Burt Hopkins, a faculty member in the College of Arts & Sciences, has been awarded the prestigious Edwin Ballard Book Prize in Phenomenology. The subject of the book focuses on Edmund Husserl, the founder of phenomenology and his role in developing the contemporary continental philosophy.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

ALUMNI VOICE B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 70

70 70

class notes

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

Nicole Grabler, ’09, ’11 MACJ, and Rand Lutomski, ’09, married Sept. 4, 2011. The two met on their first day at Seattle University during orientation. Four SU graduates were with the couple on their special day: Brittany Miller, ’11 MACJ, Elyssa Mudd, ’11 MACJ, Christopher Jay, ’09, and Matthew Tilton, ’09. Also in attendance were Rand’s mother, uncle and aunt, Teresa (Maassen) Lutomski, ’86, Joseph Maassen, ’87, and Joan (Maassen) Rigg, ’80, all SU alums. Rand writes, “We are grateful to find ourselves in the company of friends from an institution that has created tremendous value in our lives and continues to build on a legacy of integrity and excellence that we cherish.”

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25 90 100

pg.

36

Lauren Ciminera, ’05, and Marcus Cannon, JD candidate for 2012, announced their engagement in June and plan to marry in Italy later this year.

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

Erin Byrn McElroy, ’03, and husband Sean McElroy, who married in August 2008, welcomed Kellan Patrick Nov. 16, 2011. Erin is the advancement coordinator at Lakeside Legacy Foundation at the Dole Mansion in Crystal Lake, Ill. Erin is also an adjunct instructor and part-time academic adviser at McHenry County College.

50 40 40

50

36 / Class Notes

Frances (Capestany) Hewitt, ’89, ’94, has expanded her FHI Marketing Consulting business to provide full marketing solutions for small- to medium-sized businesses in the Bay Area. In addition, she is founder of GNON™ (Girls Night Out Networking), an informal networking group for women that currently has three chapters in the Bay Area and more than 1,200 members.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Amanda (Prakoso) Jacobs, ’02, and David L. Jacobs, Jr., and daughter Prita welcomed baby Eli Raditya on Sept. 24, 2011, at Northwest Hospital. Here big sis Prita holds little brother Eli for the first time.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70 100

1989

100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

Lindsay Gossack was chosen as a 2011 Medtronic Global Hero. Medtronic, a medical technology company, honors inspirational individuals who maintain athletic lifestyles with the help of a medical device. Since her freshman year at SU she has lived with Type I diabetes and since 2008 has relied on an insulin pump. Gossack accomplished a major goal in 2010, when she completed her first full marathon.

100 40

40 100

Cara Haney, who teaches kindergarten at Panther Lake Elementary in Kent, Wash., received the Horace Mann Award for Teaching Excellence. Her award comes with recognition as one of the nation’s top educators. She received the

2010

100 40

100 40

1993

30 30

30

Chris Grivas has written a new book, The Innovative Team, published by Jossey Bass/Wiley. The book looks at work-style preferences and the creative and effective leadership skills of high-functioning teams in the work place.

Maj. David Doran is currently studying at the Naval War College as a student in the Naval Command and Staff College as well as the Maritime Advanced Warfighting School. He is pursuing a master’s degree in National Security and Strategic Studies. Previously, Maj. Doran served in Afghanistan and Iraq and received two Bronze Stars and four Air Medals, including the Combat Action Badge. Maj. Doran and his wife of 10 years Shauna are the parents of four children.

70 70

70

Sim Osborne, JD, recently won Maxine Parker graduated from Ar- the American Board of Trial Advogosy University with her doctorate cates (ABOTA) Trial Lawyer of the degree in educational leadership Year Award. The award is given to in 2011. attorneys who exhibit exemplary trial work. Osborn represents 1981 clients who are seeking justice Doug Hill, JD, and his daughter, and accountability in tragic situAlycia Hill, ’11, both won gold ations. In the past 27 years, he medals at the World Age Group has won his clients jury verdicts Triathlon Championships in Bei- or settlements totaling more than jing, China, this past September. $100 million. The races were on the same course where the 2008 Olympic triathlon 1988 was staged. With their wins, Doug Don Hewitt is senior account and Alycia qualify for the 2012 executive with Symantec Corporachampionships in New Zealand. tion in the Bay Area.

2000

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

1991

1975

award at the NEA Foundation’s Salute to Excellence in Education Gala in February in Washington, D.C.

30 30

30

Robert Ittes, MBA, was named Executive Vice President, Chief Credit Officer, at Seattle Bank. In this role, Ittes will oversee the administration of the bank’s policies and procedures regarding the credit the bank extends to its 1984 customers, and will also manage Jim Duncan was elected board the bank’s loan portfolio. Ittes chair of ArtsFund and recently has been in the banking industry joined the board of Seattle’s Bena- for 34 years, most recently as the roya Hall. Duncan, who lives in President of Issaquah Community Seattle with his wife Gaylee is also Bank of the Northwest. the board chair of Sparling.

70 70

70

Therese (Blazina) Andre recently received two project management certifications: the PMP from the Project Management Institute and the Certified Senior Project Manager from IBM.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

1983

William Hamilton was honored with the John Dominis Holt Award for Excellence in Publishing at the Hawaii Book Publishers Association 2011 Book Awards gala. Hamilton is the longest serving director of the University of Hawaii Press, with a career in book publishing that spans 43 years—25 of those years at the university. Hamilton and his wife, Mary (Donahue), ’67, live in Honolulu and have five children and seven grandchildren.

30 30

30

1967

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25 90 100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 37

pg.

37

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

Kristin (Decker) Donahue, ’96, and her husband Nathan Donahue welcomed the birth of their son Logan Jenner Donahue Nov. 1, 2011. After her maternity leave Kristin plans to return to her post as an editor at MSN Real Estate. Kristin, Nathan and Logan reside in Glacier, Wash.

50 40 40

50

Stephen Sullivan, ’02, and Megan Peterson, ’04, ’08, were married July 30, 2011, at Megan’s parents’ home in Shoreline, Wash. The couple met at SU in 2000 and were reintroduced the summer after Stephen received his MBA from MIT in 2009. They got engaged in Paris the following year. Stephen is a senior product manager for Zynga and Megan a registered nurse in the trauma/neuro intensive care unit at Stanford Hospital. The couple lives in San Francisco.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Jennifer Keough, ’92, ’96 MA, ’99 JD, was promoted to chief operating officer at the Garden City Group, Inc. (GCG), one of the largest legal administration firms in the United States and a leader in class action and bankruptcy administration. To the position Keough brings more than 15 years of legal expertise, including management of highprofile class action administrations.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

ALUMNI VOICE B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 70

70 70

class notes

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

Mick Schreck, ’65, and his wife Marnie Schreck, ’66, and their 10 grandchildren pose with Rudy the Redhawk after a men’s basketball match at KeyArena at Seattle Center.

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25 90 100

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

pg.

38

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

Bob Frause, ’67, received the Jay Rockey Lifetime Achievement award from the Puget Sound chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). The award recognizes career achievements of public relations professionals who have advanced the industry and demonstrated outstanding professional ability and conduct.

50 40 40

50

38 / Class Notes

Stephanie (Lum) Itoman, ’98, married Ryan Itoman in Honolulu, Hawaii, Dec. 3, 2011. Ryan is an F22 fighter jet pilot. Stephanie is a reporter and the primetime news anchor for Hawaii News Now. Pictured (l-r): Best man Erick Itoman, groom Ryan, bride Stephanie and maid of honor and sister Monica Lum.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Lauren Divina, ’94, MEd, a lead guidance counselor at Madison Middle School, and colleagues were selected as the national winners of the Career Awareness and Exploration Award from the National Consortium for State Guidance Leadership. The school counselors at Madison Middle School (l-r): Linda Mundinger, Lauren Divina and Claudia Whitaker-Greenway.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

Jordan (Hollar) Markert ’06, and James Markert, ’06, met during Gabriel Anderson’s Spanish class at SU, in the 2004–05 academic year. Recently Jordan contacted the magazine as a follow up to our winter 2010 issue, “Love, SU Style.” She and James wanted to share their story of finding love at SU: My husband and I have something very special in common with his parents, Mike Markert, ’66, and Mary Caldwell, ’67, who met each other while attending SU—actually, their first real meeting was a blind date over President’s Day weekend in February 1966. Their first ‘official’ date was at a Seattle U men’s basketball game vs. Texas Western. The couple were married in Yakima, Wash., Jan. 18, 1969, and have been happily married for nearly 43 years. Who knew that when Mike and Mary had their first date in 1966, they would start a legacy of love followed by their youngest son, James. I met James in Señor Gabriel Anderson’s Spanish class. We spent the better part of two quarters as classmates, occasionally hanging out together at Kelly’s Pizza across from campus. After coyly slipping James my number, he asked me out. We had our first date on Feb. 4, 2005, and have been inseparable since. On May 5, 2007, James asked me to marry him as we sat on a porch swing in the quaint town of Port Gamble. We married there on Feb. 7, 2008. Currently I work as a legal assistant at the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and James is merchandising manager at Columbia Distributing Company. If ever James and I are blessed with children, we must insist that at least one of them attend Seattle U because, according to tradition, their beloved spouse awaits them there.

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25 90 100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 39

pg.

39

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

Scott Wolf, ’01, and Emily Jorgenson, ’00, welcomed son Emery Jacob Wolf on Nov. 23, 2011. Emery was born at St. David’s Medical Center in Austin, TX, and joins brothers Coleson, age 5, and Drewen, age 2. The family resides in Leander, TX.

50 40 40

50

Jennifer Kampsula, ’95, joined the Fort Vancouver National Trust as director of gift planning. Previously, she practiced law with Kell, Alterman & Runstein, LLP for almost 12 years. The 2004 recipient of the Trust’s General George C. Marshall Public Leadership Award, Kampsula is a member of the Trust’s Marshall Award Recipients Society (MARS).

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Jason Curtis, ’06, and Lauren Farricker, ’08, were married Sept. 10, 2011, in Whistler, Canada. The couple met in the Marketing Club at the Albers School of Business and Economics while undergrads at SU. They both work in online advertising and reside in Mercer Island, Wash.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

IN MEMORIAM B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community we’ve lost.

100 70

Flavia Lagerquist (May 30, 2011; age 80)

30

While a student at Seattle University—then Seattle College— Tony Daigle helped found the Hiyu Coulee hiking club. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II.

In the fashion of a true Seattle native, Flavia Lagerquist was a fan of the Mariners and Starbucks. She was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend.

1942

1953

Evelyn Pressentin (July 25, 2011; age 90)

Beverly Kaufer (Nov. 8, 2011; age 79)

Raised in Montana, Evelyn Pressentin came west to Seattle University, where she met her husband Norman. Pressentin was a gentle and generous woman, known for her dry sense of humor.

After graduating from Seattle University, Beverly Kaufer went to work as a lab technician at Providence Hospital in Seattle.

1945

Robert Lloyd Lavergne (Sept. 15, 2011; age 87)

Aubrey Albright (Oct. 29, 2011; age 89)

Robert Lloyd Lavergne served in the Army in WWII and worked for many years at Boeing, McDonald Douglas and McClellan AFB. He was an avid and passionate golfer.

30 30

30

Robert Geiger (May 28, 2011; age 70) Robert Geiger was a registered nurse who worked for many years as a nurse manager at Rainier School for the Developmentally Disabled.

1973 Roscoe Bass, MEd (Nov. 8, 2011; age 85)

40 100

40 100

1976

20 70 70

70 40 40

Ted Dooley was a proud WWII veteran and employee of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer until his retirement.

Paula Anne Rust spent the last 30 years of her medical records career at Ballard Community Hospital (later Swedish Hospital).

10 40 40

40 70 40

Ted Dooley (Oct. 13, 2011; age 86)

Shirley Ryan (April 27, 2011; age 76)

1987 Frank Connelly, JD (Oct. 10, 2011; age 59)

10 25

FACULTY

50 75 90 100

40 / In Memoriam

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 80# Orion Satin

pg.

40

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

Richard Turner, who taught at SU for 30 years, retired in 1993 as a Professor Emeritus in Engineering.

50 40 40

Dr. Richard Turner (Sept. 5, 2011; age 87)

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Frank Connelly started his career in public safety in 1974 as a fire department dispatcher in South Kitsap County, Wash. Later he served as a 911 dispatcher, police officer and detective and had a legal practice.

0000

70 40 40

Seattle University Magazine publishes full obituaries online only at www.seattleu.edu/ magazine/. Note: Obituaries are edited for space and clarity.

70 40 40

40 70 40

We ask readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@ seattleu.edu or send via mail to Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122–1090.

While at Seattle University Shirley Ryan met her husband Tim Ryan. The couple married at St. Joseph’s Parish in Seattle.

70 70 40

40 70 40

THINKING OF YOU

100 40

40 100

A celebrated school administrator and civil-rights activist, Roscoe Bass was a fixture of education in Seattle.

Paula Anne Rust (Oct. 3, 2011; age 60)

1951

100 40

100 40

Michael Thomas Comer, who served in the Army and was a German interpreter, taught chemistry in the Seattle School District for 15 years and taught physics at Seattle University.

70 70

70

Michael Thomas Comer (Aug. 13, 2011; age 87)

100 100 60 100 100

100

1950

1972

30 30

100 60

In 1942, Richard Corrigan joined the Army and married his childhood friend, Florida Frances Perri. He had a long and distinguished career in business and finance primarily in the construction field.

Bill MacIsaac worked as an engineer with Lockheed Martin for 35 years until his retirement in 2001.

70 70

30

Richard Corrigan (Oct. 27, 2011; age 90)

Bill MacIsaac (July 17, 2011; age 71)

100 100 60 100 100

70

1948

1962

30 30

100

A Navy man, Aubrey Albright served his country as a Turret Officer on the USS Vicksburg and as an officer in charge of the small craft salvage depot at Pearl Harbor.

70 70

1952

Tony Daigle (Jan. 16, 2010; age 94)

100 60

1940

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

BEING SCENE

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

SEARCH for MEANING

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

James Martin, S.J., New York Times bestselling author and frequent guest on The Colbert Report, was a keynote speaker at the Search for the Meaning Book Festival, presented by the School of Theology and Ministry. The book festival brought out more than 3,000 people for Father Martin, Pulitzer prize-winning author and poet Mary Oliver and more than 40 authors for discussions around issues of spirituality, faith, social justice and theology.

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 25 50 90 100

41

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

pg.

50 40 40

PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

10

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 41

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

(Clockwise from top left) The annual Search for Meaning Book Festival had literary and scholarly fans lined up at Seattle University; many came to catch the talk by James Martin, S.J., seen here (top right) with STM Dean Mark Markuly (left) and President Sundborg; there were more than 40 authors represented at the book festival, including authors with SU ties such as Katherine Schlick Noe (bottom right) of the College of Education.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

THE LAST WORD

5

6

The Last Word is an interesting take on the arts/literature/academia/travel and more. B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

TIME TO CELEBRATE Alumni and friends of the university are invited to attend a special Mass and reception in honor of the 15th anniversary of the Chapel of St. Ignatius, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., April 15. Information: (206) 296-2637.

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

MASS AT THE CHAPEL Weekday Masses are 12:30 p.m. Monday-Friday; Sunday Masses are 11 a.m. and 9 p.m. (Note: There are no 9 p.m. Sunday Masses in the summer and during SU academic breaks) Information: (206) 296-6075 or www.seattleu.edu/chapel/.

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

In 1997, the Chapel of St. Ignatius arose on the campus of Seattle University, becoming in the years since the spiritual center of the SU landscape and an architectural achievement marveled at by visitors near and far. This is not your typical chapel—once inside, visitors are greeted with interesting angles, high ceilings, curvy lines, white textured walls and a lightness of space. The chapel, as envisioned by award-winning architect—and Bremerton, Wash.-born—Steven Holl, has been the place of countless Masses, joyous occasions and somber

25 90 100

pg.

42

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

50 40 40

50

42 / The Last Word

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

10

The chapel, which opened on Palm Sunday 15 years ago, is constructed around this idea of “seven bottles of light in a stone box,” with each bottle or vessel of light corresponding to an aspect of Catholic worship. Visitors to the chapel will notice the way the light is diffused and cast on the walls and throughout the space, no matter the time of day or the season. The chapel’s size provides an intimate place for prayer and liturgy. The Chapel of St. Ignatius is a landmark that attracts visitors from far and wide and from all faith communities.

0000

3

remembrances. Many couples have wed there and many individuals have found its quiet beauty the perfect place to steal away from the day a few moments for reflection and discernment. When crafting this distinctive and modernistic space, Holl followed a concept based on “a gathering of different lights” to guide his design. Metaphorically this gathering of lights speaks to the vision of its namesake St. Ignatius of a spiritual life that consists of light and darkness, which St. Ignatius referred to as ”consolation“ and ”desolation.“

70 40 40

20 70 70

40 70 40

Celebrating the spiritual heart of campus

70 40 40

70 40 40

Happy 15th Anniversary, Chapel of St. Ignatius

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 70

70 70

30

30 30

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

FUN FACTS ABOUT THE CHAPEL

10

Each year, upwards of 40 couples marry at the chapel. But if you have your sights set on marrying there, plan ahead. The space is usually booked months in advance for nuptials, which are held on Saturdays.

25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Interesting angles: The chapel is made of 21 separate wall panels, the largest of which weighs 77 tons. Each panel was hoisted into place separately.

0000

70 40 40

Students had a say in the design. As one of the central objectives of building the chapel was to meet the spiritual needs of the student body, SU students’ contributions factored into Holl’s design.

50 40 40

50

Award-winning design: The design and finished Chapel of St. Ignatius has garnered architect Holl many awards, including a design award from the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). A scale model of the chapel is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

90 100

SU Magazine Spring 2012 / 43

ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

pg.

43

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Award-winning designer: Architect Holl, who is known not only for his chapel design but also for the Kiasma Contemporary Art Museum in Helsinki, Finland, and Simmons Hall at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology—among many others—was named the 2012 AIA Gold Medal Winner, the highest professional honor bestowed upon an architect. In 2001, Time magazine named Holl “America’s Best Architect.”

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

T!

EN NT

20 70 70

70 40 40

IV

70 70 40

40 70 40

US

L XC

CO

-O

EB

W E,

Y NL

10 40 40

40 70 40

Scoop If you aren’t reading Seattle University Magazine online, here’s what you are missing:

40 100

40 100

Here’s the

E

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

EXTENDED ARTICLES AND EVENT LISTINGS! PH OT OG AL LER IES AN DM UC HM OR E!!

50 40 40

50 90 100

www.seattleu.edu/magazine/ ICS# 120123 • Seattle University 2012 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 70# Orion Matte Text

pg.

BC2

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Check it out today and join the conversation.


Seattle University Magazine - Spring 2012