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6 5 4 Round 3 2 1 L/C

FALL 2012

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EDUCATION of DISTINCTION 25

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ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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A LOOK AT THE SCHOLAR-EDUCATORS WHO DEFINE AN SU EDUCATION

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M A G A Z I N E

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Seattle University


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AWARD-WINNING LIBRARY

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Seattle University’s Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons is the intellectual heart of the campus. And now, add "award winning" to its superlatives. The library is the recipient of the "New Landmark Library" award from Library Journal. Our library was recognized for its blend of architecture, design and services. It is one of just five in the U.S. to receive the high honor. PHOTO BY DOUG J. SCOTT

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ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin


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Seattle University Volume 36 • Issue Number 2 • Fall 2012

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Art Director Terry Lundmark, ’82

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Editor Tina Potterf

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Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor

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Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Caitlin King, Maura Beth Pagano, ‘12, Mike Thee

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Editorial Assistant Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

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Brand Director Mary Olson Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden

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Assistant Vice President/Alumni Relations Susan Vosper

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Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published in fall, winter and spring by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Alumni joined with community members during the first annual Alumni Day of Service.

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Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

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ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

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Seattle University

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Special Fall Edition

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an Education of Distinction

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34 Chiefly Academic

12 Professor of the Year

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SU’s Chief Academic Officer Provost Isiaah Crawford shares his vision for the future.

High honor for Chemistry Professor Vicky Minderhout and her non-lecture approach to teaching.

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36 Getting to the Core

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The Core, the foundation of an SU education, is undergoing some major changes.

Spotlight on SU faculty who exemplify excellence in teaching and research.

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38 Why I Teach

28 My Favorite Professor

Three professors share their stories of what drives their passion for teaching.

Alumni pick favorites on professors who were inspiring and motivational.

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Come Join Us

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Bookmarks

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Did You Know?

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Class Notes

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On Campus

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In Memoriam

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Faculty News

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The Last Word

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ON THE COVER Professor of the Year Vicky Minderhout is a standout in her field.

SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 1

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Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Alumni Voice

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DEPARTMENTS


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LETTERS B

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Seattle University sets the bar high

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Seattle University has a Top 10 ranking from U.S. News & World Report that reflects our position as one of the top universities and colleges in the West.

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President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., in a talk on the state of the university, put out the call loud and clear. When it comes to academic excellence, SU is on a path to be a leader, regionally and beyond: “When people hear or say ‘Seattle University,’ I want them first of all to think academic excellence… When academics is right, all else can go right.” Seattle University has a Top 10 ranking from U.S. News & World Report that reflects our position as one of the top universities and colleges in the West; Princeton Review, in its Best Colleges Guide, consistently counts SU among the best in the nation for overall educational experience. Our professor-scholars are widely acclaimed and widely published; classroom lessons are lived out in real-world scenarios. The university’s commitment to social justice and service is evident in the dedication of students, faculty, staff and alumni to give back and make a difference in their corner of the world and in the world at large. In this issue of Seattle University Magazine, we shine a spotlight on the foundation of an SU education: the people, the programs, the places where learning thrives, inspires, transforms. At the center of this is our faculty, who are doing amazing things in areas of research and scholarship. We also feature the work of Seattle-based photographer John Keatley, the man behind many of the faculty images in this issue. You’ll read stories from SU alumni, who share their educational experiences and which professors inspire them most. We want to hear from you. What was your favorite class? An inspiring professor? A learning moment that resonates today? Join the conversation at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/. Your comments may be published in a future issue of the magazine and online. And, as always, thanks for reading. Tina Potterf, editor

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ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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2 / Letters

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D.P. Van Blaricom, ’76 MPS Chief of Police (Ret.) Bellevue, Wash

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E-mail: sumagazine@seattleu.edu

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Letters Editor Seattle University Magazine Seattle University 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

Police Department and decided to actually implement my master project in the workplace and expanded the concept to include women. Accordingly, we became the first police department in the State of Washington to place women on the street as uniformed police officers, in what had previously and traditionally been solely a male role—that was 36 years ago. And, in the natural progression of what started back then, Bellevue has had Linda Pillo as Chief of Police for the past three years.

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Seattle University Magazine welcomes letters to the editor on subjects raised within the magazine. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Please include a name, address and daytime phone number with all correspondence. Send to:

Your article about City of Everett Police Department Chief of Police Kathy Atwood started me reminiscing [Top Cop, spring 2012]. I was a Deputy Chief in the City of Bellevue Police Department when I started attending Seattle University’s new Master of Public Administration degree program, although it was initially called a Master of Public Service. Director Lenny Mandelbaum and I agreed that my master project would be Recruitment and Employment of Minority Race Persons as Police Officers and I believe that I was the first graduate of SU’s MPS/MPA program in 1976. In the meantime, I had become Chief of Police of the City of Bellevue

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Implementing Change


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SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 3

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Annual tree lighting ceremony Wednesday, Nov. 28 at 7 p.m.

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For more information on alumni events, contact Alumni Relations at (206) 296-6127 or visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/.

ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Thursday, Dec. 13 5:30 p.m. (pre-game rally), 7 p.m. tip-off, KeyArena at Seattle Center Grab your SU gear and family and friends to watch the SU men’s basketball team play cross-town rivals, the University of Washington. A pre-game rally will occur at Club Live at KeyArena. Information: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail: alumni@ seattleu.edu.

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MEN’S BASKETBALL: SU VS. UW

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Sunday, Dec. 9 4 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius (reception to follow at PACCAR Atrium/Pigott Building) The Alumni Board of Governors, the President’s Club and Magis invite alumni and guests to attend this annual Christmastime tradition—the Alumni Advent Mass, with alumni chaplain Dave Anderson, S.J. A reception will follow. Information: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail: alumni@seattleu.edu.

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ALUMNI ADVENT MASS AND CHRISTMAS RECEPTION

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Friday, Oct. 26 6 p.m., Student Center Meet alumni and current recipients of the McGoldrick scholarship at this annual gathering, which coincides with Family Weekend (Oct. 26-28) at SU. Information: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail: alumni@seattleu.edu.

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MCGOLDRICK SCHOLARS DINNER

Wednesday, Nov. 28 7 p.m., Lemieux Library front plaza area/lawn Start off the Christmas season with some festive cheer at this annual tree lighting ceremony. Refreshments—cocoa and cookies—will be served in the Student Center. Information: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail: alumni@seattleu.edu.

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ILLUMINATING THE HOLIDAYS

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Sunday, Sept. 30 Noon to 2 p.m., Championship Field Plan to join us for a pre-game tailgate at SU’s Championship Field before the men’s soccer match. Information: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail: alumni@seattleu.edu.

Saturday, Nov. 3 6 p.m., The Westin Seattle Save the date for Seattle University’s annual Gala, a black-tie affair with fine dining, dancing and live entertainment. This year’s guests will dance to the music of Peter Duchin and His Orchestra. The St. Ignatius Medal, the university’s highest honor, will be awarded to Patrick O’Leary, S.J., as part of the evening’s festivities. All proceeds benefit student scholarships. The Westin Seattle is located at 1900 5th Ave., Seattle. Tickets and more information: (206) 296-6301 or visit www.seattleu.edu/gala/.

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MEN’S SOCCER TAILGATE PARTY

29TH ANNUAL GALA

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Saturday, Sept. 22 6 p.m., CenturyLink (Seattle) Gather with SU alumni and members of the campus for a pregame rally at Seattle’s CenturyLink North Loft. Then stick around for the Seattle Sounders FC soccer match at 7:30 p.m. A second pre-game rally is planned before the Oct. 21 game. Information: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail: alumni@seattleu.edu.

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ALUMNI SEATTLE SOUNDERS GAME

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Saturday, Sept. 22 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., around Seattle Looking to get involved with the community? Sign up with Magis as an alumni volunteer and give a portion of a Saturday making the community better. The next Service Saturday is 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Oct. 27. Information and to sign up: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail: alumni@seattleu.edu.

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MAGIS: SERVICE SATURDAY

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september

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COME JOIN US


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DID YOU KNOW?

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A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU. B

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Albers Professor Bill Weis was recognized for his significant contributions to the university and students as the 2012 Alumni Award winner for Distinguished Teaching. At Albers, Weis focuses on teaching leadership and team development and is a longtime champion of service learning. From 1995–2009 he was director of the MBA program at Albers. Additionally, he is credited with developing the MBA Leadership Skills and Team Development course, which has become a critical gateway course in SU’s MBA curriculum. Many students cite his courses as life changing and a hallmark of their SU education. In 2010, he was the recipient of SU’s McGoldrick Fellowship, which recognizes individuals who exemplify the ideals of Jesuit education.

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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BILL WEIS, DISTINGUISHED TEACHER

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The number of active and funded research grants and projects that faculty and students are involved in.

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FUN FACT

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Professor Bill Weis received the Distinguished Teaching award.

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SU PROFESSORS RECEIVE FULBRIGHT SPECIALIST AWARDS

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Associate Professor Mara Adelman (Communication/Arts & Sciences) and Assistant Professor Serena Cosgrove (Humanities/Matteo Ricci College) recently received Fulbright Specialist awards. Adelman will join the communication department at the University of Mekelle in northern Ethiopia from October-December. She will work with faculty and students and present workshops and seminars, consult and collaborate on community outreach activities. Cosgrove will join the sociology department at the University of Zambia (UNZA) in Lusaka for six weeks this academic year. She will work with UNZA faculty to support efforts to balance teaching, research and publication. The Fulbright Specialist program links American academics with colleagues at host institutions overseas for short-term collaborative projects.

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4 / Did You Know?

ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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OR SEPH TAYL

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Paul Milan, associate professor in Modern Languages and Cultures, has been named the 2012–2013 McGoldrick Fellow. The most prestigious honor Seattle University confers on its faculty, the fellowship recognizes faculty for their concern for students and commitment to Jesuit education. “Paul Milan has been a leader in global education for decades, well before many others recognized its value,” says David Powers, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. A graduate of Seattle University, Milan began his teaching career in 1966. Read more about Milan and his work at www. seattleu.edu/ magazine/.

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PAUL MILAN NAMED MCGOLDRICK FELLOW

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Associate Professor Paul Pau Milan P

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COSTCO’S JIM SINEGAL NAMED SENIOR EXECUTIVE IN RESIDENCE AT ALBERS

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ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 5

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Jim Sinegal (center) and the 2011–2012 Marketing Club officers, with then-faculty adviser Professor Rex Toh (who retired in June) and current adviser Jay Lambe.

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Jim Sinegal, retired CEO and co-founder of Costco Wholesale, is the Senior Executive in Residence at the Albers School of Business and Economics. Sinegal will serve as a guest speaker for Albers courses, clubs and student organizations. He also will mentor students, lead a seminar for faculty and assist in planning for the Albers Executive Speaker Series. Starting January 2013, he will serve on the Dean’s Executive Advisory Board.


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ON CAMPUS B

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A Higher (Education) Calling | By Tina Potterf

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ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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who were looking to change careers and recent college graduates to more individuals with a few years experience working in largely student-oriented areas in higher education. At its center is a mission of fostering an understanding of student diversity, ethics and values; alumni are equipped with the skills to adapt to changing educational environments. The program is structured around course work and practical application as students are required to do three internships by the end of their second year. Typically this hands-on experience covers a field that is of most interest to the student, which can include academic advising, student affairs and development, financial aid, residential life and more. For 2002 SDA graduate Bernard

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At the helm of the program is Jeremy Stringer, associate professor and SDA program director who first proposed the two-year degree while Vice President for Student Development. Of the 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States, only six offer this type of graduate degree, Stringer says. The program is a strong values fit with the Jesuit tradition and mission of SU. “What makes our program special is that students come out with a good grounding of ethical behavior and a holistic educational model,” he says. “There’s no other program like this in Washington state.” The program is designed for individuals who want to work at colleges and universities at the administrative level. The student makeup has evolved over the years, says Stringer, from applicants

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Graduates of the COE Student Development Administration program work at SU in various areas, from student activities and development to academic advising, financial aid and residential life.

Liang, director of Student Activities in Student Development, the program provides leadership tools that he can employ in his work with students and in networking. “I have a deep commitment to student affairs and the program helped me see that,” he says. “In a lot of ways, it helped me become a fuller version of my professional self.” Laura Hauck, a 2007 graduate of the program, is an academic adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences. She’s been at SU since 1999, when she was admitted as an undergrad. “I started as a freshman and never left,” she says. “I love this place.” An interest in becoming a university administrator attracted her to this master’s program. “I benefited from the ethical and reflective leadership training that I received,” Hauck says. “I gained a deeper understanding of the diverse needs and developmental stages that students experience, which helps me to serve as an effective academic adviser.” Andrew Anderson was drawn to the program because of its evening courses, which benefitted his full-time work schedule, and the fact that he could earn a degree in two years. Anderson, a 2006 graduate, is associate registrar at SU. “If higher education could be a career for you, this is the program that will provide the opportunity to explore the development of students, leadership and governance,” Anderson says. That many alumni of the program have chosen to work at SU speaks to the value of the university, Stringer says. “There’s something about Seattle University that leads them to want to be here,” he says. “We have a very special group of people here.”

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In 1992, the first group of students were admitted to the College of Education’s Student Development Administration master’s program. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the program, which has another distinction worth noting: out of its alumni base, 25 are staffers at Seattle University.

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Many graduates of College of Education master’s program are SU staffers

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Project Center marks quarter-century milestone

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ICS# 120353 • Seattle University 2012 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 56 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 7

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Through the Project Center, both engineering and business students gain communication and project management skills.

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Students Hoang Tran, Bobby Seidensticker, Chris McDougall and Shannon Hitchen (not pictured) display their entry for the Micromouse Competition, which challenges contestants to build a robot capable of autonomously mapping a maze and determining the fastest route.

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For one project this year, a team was tasked with producing an energy audit for St. James Cathedral. A few years ago, a couple of members of the parish council approached the university with an interest in installing solar panels to improve energy efficiency. Teodora Shuman, associate professor and PACCAR Professor of Mechanical Engineering, was involved in those discussions. “We told them we weren't sure it was the right solution and that the [financial and environmental] payoff would be small,” she says. “They very astutely listened and when we met about a year later, they were interested in enlarging the scope and seeing how the Cathedral was using heat and electricity.” The team examined the Cathedral’s utility bills and floor plans and met with Cathedral staff and their vendors before formulating their recommendations. Most notably, the team suggested the Cathedral move from steam to natural gas, which is about twice as energy-efficient, and install a more efficient condensing furnace. The team estimated that the initial cost of these changes could be paid off in four years, while lowering the Cathedral's carbon emissions by 15 percent and resulting in a savings of about $25,000 annually. The Project Center has completed projects with a range of companies and organizations in the region from Kenworth trucking to Seattle City Light, PACCAR, Microsoft, REI and Snohomish County.

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“Through the Project Center, both engineering and business students gain communication and project management skills and deliver solutions to complex problems to highly satisfied, repeat sponsors,” says Jean Jacoby, associate dean of the College of Science and Engineering and director of the Project Center. “We are proud of the accomplishments of our students and are grateful to the sponsors whose support makes these projects possible.” And this year the center celebrates a milestone—its 25th anniversary. At the most recent Projects Day, the efforts of these students’ work, which typically consumes most of an academic year from start to finish, was on full display. Projects, pairing senior engineering and MBA students with businesses and nonprofit organizations with problems in need of solutions, included developing a new method to monitor and manage storm water runoff; assisting with the largest dam removal project in U.S. history; and completing a market feasibility study on exporting U.S. products to China. Students graduate with real-world experience in their fields and the experience of working in a group and with a professional organization. The hands-on approach can give participants a leg up on their peers as many graduating students land internships or jobs with the companies they assisted through their involvement in the Project Center.

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The Project Center, a hallmark of Seattle University’s commitment to academic excellence, has a track record of engaging undergraduates in science and engineering, mathematics and business in real-world, hands-on projects. Only a small number of schools nationally have a program as formalized as SU’s, which is a joint venture between the College of Science and Engineering and the Albers School of Business and Economics.

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Chris Paul (foreground) leads students in his video games class.

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student activists, which appeared in the Kathmandu Post, Nepal's largest English daily. JESSICA LUDESCHER’S article, “Caritas in Veritate: Promises and Challenges of the Catholic Contribution to Sustainability,” will be published in the Journal of Catholic Social Thought. Ludescher is an assistant professor of finance at Albers. AUDREY HUDGINS, DIANE SCHMITZ and DHOREA BROWN have been inducted into the Tau Sigma Gamma Mu Chapter of the National Honor Society. Their recognition is for their work with transfer students. Hudgins is program coordinator for the Bachelor of Arts in Humanities program at Matteo Ricci

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CAL IHLER, associate director of facilities operations and maintenance, has received a BetterBricks Award from the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. Ihler has been instrumental in maximizing the efficiency of SU's buildings, which recently achieved carbon neutrality. The award recognizes owners and builders who promote and implement high-performance commercial building design and operating strategies in Portland and Seattle. AMANDA SNELLINGER, adjunct professor of anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences, wrote an op-ed based on her research on Nepali

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Professor GALEN TRAIL, director of the Master in Sport Administration and Leadership program, published an analysis of the athletic team merchandise model in the journal, Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science. A paper by Assistant Professor TINA ZAMORA (accounting, Albers), “Using a Social Enterprise ServiceLearning Strategy in an Introductory Management Accounting Course,” has been accepted for publication in Issues in Accounting Education. The publication has also accepted her co-authored article, "One Laptop per Child: The $100 Challenge."

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Game Time | By Annie Beckmann A&S professor Chris Paul takes a scholarly look into the world of video games

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CHRIS PAUL, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

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SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 9

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and Practices: Evidence from a Comparison of the U.S. and U.K.” co-authored by BONNIE BUCHANAN, assistant professor of finance at Albers, has been accepted for publication in the American Business Journal. The article was written with Jeffrey Netter, Annette Poulsen and Tina Yang. The article, “Customized Pricing: Win-Win or End Run?” by CAROL OBERMILLER, professor of marketing, DAVID ARNESEN, professor of business law and MARC COHEN, assistant professor of business ethics, will be published in the Drake Management Review. JANET AINSWORTH, the John D. Eshelman Professor at the School of Law,

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mathematics for 2011, according to the Library Journal. RUTH WHITE, associate professor of social work in the College of Arts and Sciences, is writing a new blog for Psychology Today. The blog, “Culture in Ruth White Mind,” explores the relationship between mental health, culture and ethnicity. The article, “Shareholder Proposal Rules

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College; Schmitz is director of commuter and transfer student life; and Brown is associate director of undergraduate programs at Albers. QUINTON MORRIS returned to Carnegie Hall for a sold-out concert performance at Weill Recital Hall. Morris, director of chamber and instrumental music at the College of Arts and Sciences, performed a solo show at the renowned concert hall in New York City. The Origin of the Logic of Symbolic Mathematics: Edmund Husserl and Jacob Klein by Philosophy Chair and professor BURT HOPKINS, was in the top 20 of best selling books on

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him is the comfort gamers find in predictability—even monotony—when they play games such as Tiny Tower. Those routines are called the “labor of fun” and play out much like television, he says. “Think about the TV shows you watch when you know exactly what’s going to happen. Is it really any different?” Paul asks. In his book, he suggests wordplay offers a way to examine the power of persuasion in video games.

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“There’s a difference between how men and women play games, too,” Paul says. “The ones played by women are shorter. My mom might play a little every day, but doesn’t consider herself a gamer. Dad, though, settles in with a bowl of snacks and plans on playing awhile.” On the gender front, Paul says that as gaming continues to draw different kinds of people there is greater variety in games as well.

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“The more that gamers are representative of a broader slice of society, the more interesting games should become.”

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“For all the same reasons that diversity is a key value for SU, increased diversity among gamers should have value for the games’ industry,” says Paul. “The more that gamers are representative of a broader slice of society, the more interesting games should become.” Another aspect that especially interests

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for Paul, who describes how gaming enhanced his relationship with his dad and created a common bond for them. They teamed up on games such as the Legend of Zelda, where Paul’s dad would grind through the content, then yell “boss fight”—a signal that it was his son’s turn to jump into the game.

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Maybe you think video games are for introverted teenage boys who aren’t old enough to drive and spend countless hours perched in front of the TV or computer playing their favorite virtual game. Well, bust that stereotype wide open. Seattle University’s Chris Paul, an assistant professor of communication and women’s studies, says more adult women play video games (37 percent) than boys younger than 17 (just 17 percent). Even more surprising—the average age of a gamer is 37. Paul is a gaming world wizard whose new book, Wordplay and the Discourse of Video Games, explores the cultural aspects of video games. And, as he investigates this very contemporary topic, he’s gaining recognition for using the ageold tools of rhetorical criticism—what he calls wordplay—to understand and analyze gaming. While it’s not exactly akin to online dating, gaming can bring people with similar interests together in real life, Paul says. “Games are becoming increasingly social.” Wordplay and the Discourse of Video Games is more than just a scholarly work


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say it was the toughest of their courses. Hollins had taken other classes from Paul and was intrigued by the history of video games and the strides from the days of game arcades to the proliferation of online gaming. “Everyone around the world is playing video games now,” he says. Osman Harb, ’12, says there just aren’t enough people studying video games. Says Harb, “Video games are incredibly rich with their own culture, but get little in terms of respect.”

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It’s Paul’s fifth year at SU and he’s pleased with how compelling and interesting his students are. “They can articulate what they want and don’t want from their education,” he says. He teaches two classes each term that include critical analysis of digital media, gender and film, and video games, communication and culture. While the video class examines several games, the popular World of Warcraft (WoW) takes top billing. Jaeger Shaw, ’12, one of 18 students

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“Video games are incredibly rich with their own culture, but get little in terms of respect.”

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in Paul’s video games class, says that with more than 11 million viewers and a shallow learning curve, WoW is a natural for study, especially because the game has plenty of social elements and role playing. When Marques Hollins, ’12, told his pals he was taking a course in video games, the response was, “How easy is that?” Yet Hollins and others in the class

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feminist journals. Soon he developed a method for rhetorical analysis of the World Wide Web, a topic that became his doctoral dissertation. “It became apparent that what I was doing with the web could be done with games as well,” he says. “How they’re made to be meaningful and influential, the persuasive and social dynamics of games are all important.”

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“A better understanding of what is at stake in the socio-cultural systems at work in video games offers benefits to scholars, developers and players,” he writes. For those who have doubts about the scholarly nature of video games, some of the people who grew up playing now have PhDs, Paul points out. In recent years, Paul’s research led to presentations at cutting-edge conferences on digital-game research in England, France, the Netherlands, Denmark and Sweden. A National Science Foundation workshop in Southern California sought him out to get his take on the future of computer games. This past spring, Paul gave a talk on EA Sports, the developer of sports video games, at a conference in Boston. He described how EA Sports’ recent emphasis on online play increases its control over how its games are played, while providing more opportunities to monetize its offerings. There’s a second generation of games scholars. Paul is sandwiched between those generations, with some six years older, others six years younger than he is. When he studied rhetoric at the University of Minnesota, where he received his master’s degree and PhD, Paul first explored the construct of modern-day

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Gleed Chair DINO FALASCHETTI’S article, "A Sex Difference in Risk Taking and Promotions in Hierarchies: Evidence from Females in Legislatures,” will be published in the Journal of Law and Dino Falaschetti Economics. LORRAINE BANNAI, professor of lawyering skills and director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the Due Process Guarantee

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at Albers the year-long Graduate Leadership Formation Specialization program, which includes the Red Winged Leadership Award. In research areas, Marrone’s work has focused on teams in the workplace and has been published in several journals. BEATRICE LAWRENCE, of Theology and Religious Studies, has been awarded a Luce Fellowship to participate in the American Academy of Religion seminars in 2012–13 on theologies of religious pluralism and comparative theology. Lawrence’s areas of expertise include the Hebrew Bible and Jewish hermeneutics. Only 18 people are chosen to participate in the seminars.

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was named to the Editorial Advisory Board of the International Journal of Semiotics and Law and the Editorial Advisory Board of the International Journal of Law, Language and Discourse. JENNIFER MARRONE, associate professor (management, Albers), has been selected as the Genevieve Albers Professor for 2012-15. Marrone has developed Jennifer Marrone

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RESEARCH

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Assistant Professor TANYA HAYES (Environmental Studies, College of Arts and Sciences) received a three-year National Science Foundation Research Grant to continue her research in community forestry in Ecuador. Joining Hayes as principal investigators are A&S adjunct faculty member Felipe Murtinho and Hendrik Wolff from the University of Washington. The project, “Influence of Economic Incentives on Common-Property Forest Management,” builds on faculty-student research conducted in 2011. With the NSF grant, Hayes and colleagues will focus on the impacts of an incentive program to conserve the Ecuadorian forests.

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Albers faculty members DAVID REID, JENNIFER MARRONE and QUAN LE were awarded Albers Summer Research Grants for 2012. Reid’s research topic: “A Chinese Model of Product Innovation”; Marrone’s: “When Bad Things Happen to Good Teams: Towards a Theory of Team Resilience”; and Le’s: “Microfinance, Entrepreneurship an Rural Development: Field Study and Empirical Evidence from Quang Tri Province, Viet Nam.”

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Psychology Adjunct Professor ELISE MUROWCHICK (Arts and Sciences) was a primary researcher on a study of middle school students in Seattle. The focus of the study was uncovering factors of “why and when” students start using drugs and alcohol. She’s done a lot of research with adolescents. The study was conducted in partnership with researchers from the University of Washington and Children’s Hospital.

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Sociology students now have more opportunities to participate in faculty research projects. Alumnus RICHARD F. BEERS II, ’07, has created an endowment for undergraduate research. The new endowment supports the Arts and Sciences Dean’s Research Fellowship program, launched last year. The Beers endowment provides a stipend for students to conduct research with members of the sociology department during the summer months.

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CARL OBERMILLER, professor and chair (marketing) in Albers, is doing research on “taboo marketing.” Here’s how Obermiller describes the work and paper on the subject: “Practitioners frequently use taboo themes in ads but the subject of taboo has received little attention in advertising research. This article proposes a new conceptualization and measure of consumer perception of taboo in advertising. Using the new measure, an empirical study reveals that, for a general audience, the use of sexual taboo and death taboo themes in ads produce a more negative brand attitude and triggers social normative pressure that reduces intention to purchase the advertised product.“

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Membership Boundaries and Identities in the Steampunk Subculture," examined a local steampunk group's norms and behaviors. THERESA GRANGER, assistant clinical professor in the College of Nursing, was selected to receive a Nursing Faculty Initiatives Grant for “The use of POGIL in first quarter nursing immersion courses: A pilot project.” POGIL (ProcessOriented, Guided Inquiry Learning) is a pedago-gical technique and philosophy well-studied in science, technology, engin-eering and math (STEM) courses at the high school and undergraduate level.

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religious leadership. Lesniak is associate professor and director of formation in the School of Theology and Ministry. JOT YAU, the Khalil Dibee Endowed Chair in Finance in the Albers School of Business and Economics, coauthored a paper that was published by the Cato Institute. The paper is “Would a Financial Transaction Tax Affect Financial Market Activity? Insights from Futures Markets.” MARK COHAN, assistant professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences, discussed the Steampunk subculture at the 2012 annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association in San Diego. His paper, "The Problem of Gears and Goggles: Managing

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Act on Feb. 29, 2012. Her testimony was focused on lessons of the Japanese American incarceration and was quoted on NPR’s “All Things Considered.” VALERIE LESNIAK had a chapter "Mystics and Leadership for Reform," accepted by SAGE Publications' new twovolume Valerie Lesniak work on


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Professor Vicky Minderhout's non-lecture style of teaching is being adopted by professors throughout the U.S. and beyond.

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12 / An Education of Distinction

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PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR

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Chemistry professor’s distinctive non-lecture teaching style earns accolades and converts

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PHOTOGRAPH BY JOHN KEATLEY

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s students settle into their seats, the room fills with energetic chatter on a particularly sunny, spring day. Listen closely. This is not just idle chitchat or water cooler talk. Students are constructing and initiating a lively discussion on topics such as how living cells convert food into energy or where the stages of cellular respiration occur. Heady stuff, indeed. Chemistry Professor Vicky Minderhout teaches the course but it’s the students who are leading the class. Her students learn by being critical thinkers, rather than being told what and how to think. They grasp concepts through discussion and debate, rather than rote memorization of lines in a textbook. What also sets Minderhout’s classes apart is the teacher’s teaching method: she doesn’t lecture. At all. Instead, she believes learning happens through collaboration. Unconventional? Maybe. Out of the box? Perhaps. But it’s not entirely new: Socrates used a similar method thousands of years ago. A better question might be whether it’s effective. The answer? Definitely. And now she’s getting national recognition for it. The effective teaching method, called discovery-based learning, that Minderhout adopted years back and the impact she has on the lives of students factored into her selection as Professor of the Year in Washington state. The national award is given by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). “My ‘ah ha’ moment came as I discovered I had been showing students what I would do as an expert, not taking into account how a student would approach a problem with their more limited knowledge base,” Minderhout explains. “I became a facilitator of learning, in essence a learning coach. Now I try to start where the student is, what they know and can do, then build from there.” Describing herself as a coach makes sense as Minderhout frames the comparison as such: “No one expects a coach to lecture during practice and then send everyone off to practice on their own. In fact, players practice for hours each week with the coach watching and offering suggestions or improvements, occasionally modeling correct performance followed by more practice. Why is the thinking we expect of students


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“I never thought I could love teaching more than I did previously, but this type of [active learning] classroom is really exhilarating.”

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these new ideas into their own unique view. I never thought I could love teaching more than I did previously, but this type of [active learning] classroom is really exhilarating.” Current and former students agree. “She doesn't let you slack off. It's way more interactive and you have to come prepared or else you feel like you’ve let your group down,” says alumna Karen White, who graduated with a major in cell and molecular biology. “By the time you leave the class you know what you need to know.” For someone who is known for her innovation in teaching, becoming a professor wasn’t a given for Minderhout. “I’d never actually considered being a teacher, but I wanted to do something that helps others,” she says. Growing up in the south suburbs of Chicago, Minderhout got her undergraduate Vicky Minderhout, professor/College of Science and Engineering degree at Kalamazoo College and a doctorate from Northwestern University. She headed west for post-doctoral studies at the Univteaching and learning at the undergraduate level,” Black ersity of Washington. When she finished her work at the UW said. “We at ISB believe the model Vicky embraces is she was offered a part-time job teaching clinical chemistry at a model that STEM educators as well as educational SU in 1980. administrators from across the country should look to.” As the years went by, she grew frustrated, she says, unsure Step into one of Minderhout’s biochemistry classes— if her students were really taking in the material through often taught alongside Associate Professor of Chemistry traditional lectures. The spark that would change the course Jennifer Loertscher—and it’s easy to see why she is among of her teaching came in 1997, while at an active-learning an elite group of the best faculty-scholars around. workshop. This non-lecture style, a focus of the workshop, With a friendly and warm disposition and broad smile, was a new way of doing things, of teaching, that she could Minderhout is at the ready to inspire, to guide, to motivate. get behind. After 17 years of lecturing at SU, she threw the Sitting in groups of three or four, students work through lesson plans out, she says, and never looked back. With the problems until a conclusion is reached, challenging one help of Jeff Stephens, then associate professor of chemistry, another until they arrive at an answer. Minderhout began writing active-learning materials for “As part of a group, students begin to see that others biochemistry. think about problems differently,” she says. “This The rest of the pieces fell into place in 2003, when she communication with peers makes thinking ‘visible’ rather joined with Loertscher. Loertscher, who shares a similar than ‘invisible’ as it is in a typical lecture classroom.” passion for active-learning environments, was eager to jump If an entire group is stumped, they consult with the on board. professors—Minderhout or Loertscher, or both—who are In 2007, the pair received a grant to co-author an readily available with a helpful hint or explanation. Not active learning workbook for biochemistry, Foundations of just a yes or no, but relevant, real-life examples to provide Biochemistry. As part of the grant, the professors were tasked clarity. Students—representing a variety of majors and with systematically designing, developing and assessing backgrounds beyond chemistry or general sciences—then classroom activities in their lecture-free biochemistry eagerly take the matter back into their own hands to break courses. With the book, now available and used at down how they reached their final conclusion. universities throughout the U.S., professors have a guide “My classrooms are noisy with students talking, asking to draw from in adapting this style as a new standard. questions and explaining ideas to each other,” she says. “As If you want further proof Minderhout made the right they do this, they refine their understanding and integrate shift from lectures to active learning, ask former student and

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any different? We need to see them practice so we can offer suggestions for improvement before the test is taken or a paper is due.” At a campus event late last year in Minderhout’s honor, guest Dana Riley Black of the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) spoke of the professor’s impact on science teaching and how her work benefits scholars, colleagues and scientists alike. “Vicky is a model for how we can effectively rethink STEM [science, technology, engineering, mathematics]


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“Dr. Minderhout truly embodies the mission statement of Seattle University, which calls upon faculty members to provide students with an intellectually challenging education through ‘excellent teaching supported by high-quality scholarship and personalized attention to student learning,’” wrote S&E Dean Michael Quinn and Chemistry Professor and Chair Kristy Skogerboe, in a letter to CASE. And while the attention that comes with the Professor of the Year honor is “incredibly rewarding,” Minderhout hasn’t surrendered to the limelight quite yet. Life outside of the classroom is busy for Minderhout, wife of David Thorsell—who retired this June from SU following a nearly 38-year career teaching chemistry—and mom to Devon, who is a student at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, majoring in international affairs with interest in environmental and marine issues. She starts most days arriving at school—she doesn’t call it “work”—around 7 or 7:30 in the morning. She recalls the early days of teaching at SU, when she and her husband had full schedules that would keep them away from home until the early evening. That meant making the most of the time with each other and with their daughter. “Our daughter Devon learned her multiplication tables in the car during our commute and we listened to a lot of books on tape, including the unabridged Lord of the Rings set,” she recalls. “We had her in private school in Seattle since we figured we would never see her if she was in school in Lake Forest Park [north of Seattle], where we live.” When free time allows, Minderhout and her husband can be found on the water. The couple has their own fleet: a boat in Bellingham, Wash., a dingy, a fishing boat, canoe and kayak. One sailboat was custom-made in New Zealand and the maker sailed his family up from New Zealand to Seattle so David and Vicky could purchase the boat. One of Minderhout’s best memories was a trip around Vancouver Island, a voyage she considers a “right of passage” for anyone who sets sail in the Northwest. Already difficult to travel—fog and large tidal swings can pose real problems— they circumnavigated the entire voyage without radar. These days, it’s smooth sailing for Minderhout, whose commitment to her craft continues to inspire and inform bright minds of the future. “At the end of the day, what we all want for our students is to acquire a love of learning,” she says, “which will allow them to be productive individuals who can contribute to the wonder of the world around us by making a positive impact on others.” Seattle University Magazine staff contributed to this story.

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alumna Brittany Sullivan. “All of our schooling careers we have been taught to memorize the material, usually a few nights before a test, and then regurgitate it and forget about it,” says Sullivan. [In Minderhout’s class] “because we figured the answer out ourselves, it helped us to remember and understand the concepts more thoroughly.” When Minderhout went to Washington, D.C., to accept her teaching award another former student, who made the trek from the School of Dental Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, joined her. Matthew Ryskalczyk, a 2009 graduate of the College of Science and Engineering, was among those who nominated Minderhout. In his letter to the CASE selection committee, he spoke of Minderhout’s positive influence on his studies in chemistry and biochemistry and her invaluable guidance as his academic adviser. “The most profound impact Dr. Minderhout has had on me was from the biochemistry group-based learning and interaction course she directed,” wrote Ryskalczyk. “She never failed to encourage me to explore beyond what I know and repeatedly fueled my curiosity for science, especially biochemistry.” Ryskalczyk added, “My hope is that more professors and students will witness the importance and power of teacherguided group-based activities that promote student selfdiscovery, as I have learned from Dr. Minderhout.” Minderhout is more than a professor—she also advocates for others looking to go the active-learning route. She realizes it is a shift that some educators may be reluctant to make. “I know from experience that teachers need live examples of what it would look and feel like in order to derive the conviction and confidence necessary to (make a change),” she says. “This is especially true since resistance to change is very often encountered in varying degrees from students, colleagues and administrators who are used to the status quo. … My 30 years of teaching experience, 17 of which were lecture-based, affords me a level of credibility that works to my advantage with students, administrators and faculty.” In 2003, she was sought by the organization ProcessOriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL), a project that focuses on discovery-based learning, to become part of the National Science Foundation-funded project steering committee. Today, Minderhout leads workshops on behalf of POGIL for teachers at SU and universities and colleges in the U.S. Recently she led six workshops in Australia. Her commitment to education hasn’t gone unnoticed at SU either, and her colleagues are some of Minderhout’s biggest supporters.


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Scholar-educators who define an SU education

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Seattle University is known for many things: its location in the heart of one of the world’s most vibrant cities; a campus life that is rich and robust with opportunities and activities; a commitment to sustainability that is evident in policies and practices—and in the many “green” buildings that dot the grounds; a dedication to Jesuit, Catholic traditions that inform our mission and drive the service element that so defines an SU education; and our top-notch faculty who educate students to be thoughtful and critical thinkers and leaders in their fields and in the world at large. Did you know that many members of SU’s faculty are active researchers, widely published in respected journals and books, sought after to speak about their work at national and international conferences? The university supports faculty research in myriad ways, from recruiting and hiring the best faculty-scholars to providing the resources to support research, scholarship and artistic work. The following pages offer a sampling of faculty who are leaders in their fields and who exemplify academic and scholarly excellence.

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Text by Annie Beckmann

Photography by John Keatley

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DANIEL DOMBROWSKI, PhD Professor of Philosophy College of Arts and Sciences

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tackles topics such as animal rights in philosophy books and papers.

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SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 17


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DANIEL DOMBROWSKI

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JANET AINSWORTH, JD John D. Eshelman Professor of Law

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anet Ainsworth earns international recognition in the legal community for her work on linguistics and the law. Today, this respected scholar travels the world to make presentations on the value of applying linguistics research to legal matters. A former public defender, Ainsworth is a recipient of the outstanding service award from the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and several outstanding teaching awards from the School of Law. Oxford University Press commissioned her to write two books while on sabbatical in 2012–13. One book will focus on consent and coercion in the law. The other addresses linguistic ideology and the law, a set of assumptions about how people communicate and how they ought to communicate. As an example, Ainsworth describes how the law presumes a person would never apologize about anything without admitting liability. For Ainsworth, academic and scholarly excellence at Seattle University means pushing herself and her students to explore a topic beyond its surface and to think about how it impacts real people. She says SU is not an ivory tower and it’s no accident that faculty choose to be here. Ainsworth sees SU as a place where she can conduct important scholarship that engages with real-world social problems as well as the legal community.

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Philosopher Daniel Dombrowski writes some of the most important books and scholarly papers in his discipline, which he modestly calls “a series of footnotes to Plato.” All told, his prolific efforts include an astonishing 130 published journal articles and 17 books, including one he worked on for 30 years. For Dombrowski, the epitome of academic excellence at Seattle University is to be a teacher–scholar who adds technically correct and insightful footnotes to the field of philosophy. A self-avowed truth junkie, Dombrowski’s books and scholarly articles span topics that include animal rights, civil disobedience, vegetarianism, abortion and athletics. Among his more than 100 national and international presentations, he received an invitation to present a paper at Oxford University, “Homer, Competition and Sport” and another from Harvard Law School to speak on his Catholic, pro-choice position in the abortion debate. His Oxford lecture was based on his book, Contemporary Athletics and Ancient Greek Ideals, published by the venerable University of Chicago Press. Dombrowski says it’s a book he wrestled with for three decades. His book suggests sport is a form of play—not preparation for war or a commodity in the marketplace—that should be taken seriously, yet not so seriously that athletes cheat or use illegal performance enhancements to win.


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THOMAS TAYLOR, PHD Chair and Associate Professor of History | Director, Global Awareness Program

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Thomas T Taylor l and student Gabrielle Porter co-wrote a paper about the first bicyclist to circle the globe.

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Social historian Thomas Taylor focuses his scholarship on world travelers and how they shape understanding across cultures. Taylor’s major ongoing project is Journeys in World History, his forthcoming comprehensive textbook of more than 1,000 pages that presents a history of the world through the experiences of travelers. As Taylor tells travelers’ stories, he not only teaches the discipline of history and brings his scholarship to life in the classroom but also attracts students to his research projects. In her sophomore year at Seattle University, Gabrielle Porter took Taylor’s class, “East Meets West: Travelers’ Accounts” and began to explore how travelers shaped the modern world. Intrigued with how the writings of travelers became an integral part of society, especially in the 1800s, Porter embarked on her own scholarly journey. Taylor recognized Porter’s interest in understanding history through the eyes of travelers and, with the support of an SU Dean’s Fellowship, invited her to be a research assistant on one of his projects. Taylor had a fascination with Englishman Thomas Stevens, who, in the mid-1880s, became the first person to circle the globe on a bicycle. For their co-authored article, which has been submitted to a scholarly journal for review, Porter and Taylor examined the bike as a symbol of Western modernization. The experience offered Porter new insights as a world traveler and she says it gave her faith in the future of academia, possibly as a career.

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SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 19


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strategies for solving the global safe water crisis.

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he worldwide attention Phillip Thompson gains for his humanitarian engineering efforts speaks to his unending desire to find new solutions for the problems of water and sanitation in developing nations. His creative problem solving drew notice from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as well as the Bullitt Foundation. Thompson has served as a consultant to both and continues to receive numerous grants and awards from organizations such as Engineers Without Borders USA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). He now reviews engineering proposals submitted to the NSF. Thompson’s goals at Seattle University and elsewhere are ambibitious. His papers related to drinking water, published in Environmental Science and Technology, Business and Society Review, Water Environment Research and other journals, outline a reasonable strategy for solving the safe water crisis. In addition to reviewing the technological solutions, he discusses how to build partnerships between medical clinics and local businesses, which can lead to reliable and safe water for the broader communities of developing countries.

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Professor and Chair, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

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PHILLIP THOMPSON, PHD

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Jean Tang aims to reduce suffering for vulnerable populations.

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JEAN TANG, PHD Associate Professor and Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

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not a replacement for medication, there’s exciting documentation to indicate that brain and heart plasticity is possible, even at an advanced age. In the mental health field, she is a leader in advocating for better treatment of people with Attention Deficit Disorder/ Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. After surveying nurse practitioners and naturopathic physicians across the United States, she discovered inadequate strategies for treating those with ADD/ADHD. While there were similarities between the two disciplines in their treatment approaches, conventional medicine focused on medication management while naturopathic medicine emphasized nutritional support. She now promotes interdisciplinary collaboration and says a combination provides patients with better care.

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Jean Tang finds unexpected ways to reduce human suffering and, in the process, receives considerable acclaim for her work. Tang’s scholarship targets vulnerable populations—older adults and those with mental disorders. Her goal: empower patients to have greater control over their own health. Tang received a research fellowship sponsored by the National Institute of Nursing Research to explore individualized care for at-risk aging adults. In one research project, she discovered music isn’t especially effective for lowering blood pressure or promoting sleep for older adults. For an article in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, she explored alternative ways to manage stress with a 12-minute CD offering guided audio relaxation, a self-help tool that significantly lowers blood pressure. Tang says that while it’s

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College of Nursing


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CAROL WOLFE CLAY, MFA

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KI GOTTBERG, MFA

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and Carol Wolfe Clay often collaborate on theater projects.

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n Rosa Joshi, hi Ki Ki Gottberg

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n Joseph Langenhan is

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inspired by how he and his students might affect human health.

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JOSEPH LANGENHAN, PHD

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The way chemist Joseph Langenhan sees it, undergraduate research is the pinnacle of academic excellence. Partnering with students in his ground-breaking research and mentoring them as they grow from novices into experts is just as important to him as his own scholarship. Langenhan is himself a formidable scholar, the author of 24 peer-reviewed articles in several leading science publications and the holder of two patents related to cancer-fighting drugs. Seattle University proved a good fit when Langenhan was searching for a university that would make use of his skills. He sought a small school where undergraduates are the singular focus of science programs. As a university that deliberately chooses to concentrate on interdisciplinary research in the sciences for undergraduates, Seattle University fit the bill and provided the diverse academic environment for him to excel at the junction between biology and organic chemistry. What he and his students can do to affect human health continues to inspire him. The work he does with students is both lofty and challenging. Together, they alter the structure of biologically relevant molecules to understand how they work, then find ways to change their functions. They might synthesize 100 molecules, do biological testing, apply a drug to human cancer cells and look for its potency and selectivity. One of Langenhan’s peer-reviewed publications compares two anticancer approaches he developed with his students.

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here’s tremendous synergy among this trio of theater professionals who ignite the imagination. A prize-winning playwright with training as an actor, Ki Gottberg directs and produces a range of theatrical productions in addition to teaching acting and playwriting. She received a playwriting fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts along with numerous other commissions and awards for her work. Theatrical scenic designer Carol Wolfe Clay likes to think about the look and feel of the stage and that powerful moment when the curtain goes up and an audience first experiences that visual revelation. Since joining the SU faculty, more than 50 productions have featured her designs. Her favorite themes include the use of puppets and ways architecture and design can be manipulated to tell a story. She served as chair of Fine Arts from 1996 to 2009. Rosa Joshi directs plays that explore the extremes of human behavior, whether classical or contemporary. This September, she directs an all-female cast in a campus production of Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus, an unusual twist on a classic. Teaching theater students how to collaborate is one of her favorite experiences. Joshi credits Clay and Gottberg with being especially formative to her career. The three of them regularly collaborate on projects, including an original play by Gottberg with puppets by Clay that won a grant from the City of Seattle mayor’s office in 2011.


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lends a cultural and ideological lens to interpretations of the Bible.

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eticia Guardiola-Sáenz finds ways to make Christian scriptures relevant to contemporary audiences. The author of nearly 50 publications, papers and lectures is a co-editor of The Peoples’ Companion to the Bible and The Peoples’ Bible: New Revised Standard Version, both published by Fortress Press. Unlike many theologians, Guardiola-Sáenz takes a less traditional approach and brings a broader cultural and ideological lens to her interpretations of the Bible. To do so means she gives careful consideration to historical events at the time scripture was written. And she takes into account the context of the reader—what current world and local events might influence a person’s take on the scripture. She also says scripture can’t be read as stories detached from someone’s personal experience. Guardiola-Sáenz says the Bible, while a sacred text, is not itself purely divine. Paying attention to cultural context affords a much richer understanding, however.

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examine workplace phenomena from different vantage points.

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n Gregory Prussia and Holly Slay Ferraro

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HOLLY SLAY FERRARO, PHD

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tional change, leadership and coping with job loss. To Ferraro, academic excellence means teaching and scholarship that provides innovative critical thinking methods to human resources professionals and business owners. As a scholar, it’s her mission to offer a new lens to think more inclusively in the workplace and empower students with new approaches to understanding the workforce. Ferraro’s research often wrestles with issues of professional identity as well as the influence of social identity—race and gender, for example—and their sway over career outcomes. She recently wrote an article for the respected journal, Human Relations, that examines how stigmatized cultural identities impact professional identities.

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Two Seattle University scholars are stars in the field of business management but they approach research from different vantage points. Gregory Prussia is an ace numbers cruncher who quantitatively pursues questions of leadership, organizational safety and more. Holly Slay Ferraro, an ever-curious qualitative researcher, prefers to collect stories—especially those related to race, gender, aging and organizations. Ferraro’s style is conceptual and interpretive; Prussia’s analytical. For Prussia, academic excellence involves the pursuit of knowledge or growth, almost always in collaboration with others who rely on his statistical techniques and expertise as a quantitative analyst. Prussia contributes his valuable analysis to any number of publications on topics such as organiza-


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MANIVONG RATTS, PHD

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frequently overshadows advocacy in the community, according to Ratts, yet combining advocacy with a more conventional approach is important and necessary when working with marginalized client populations. Ratts says his scholarship centers on integrating social justice into counseling research and practices. Since joining Seattle University, Ratts has been published in such peer-reviewed journals as the Journal of Counseling and Development, Professional School Counseling and Counselor Education and Supervision, among others.

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As Manivong Ratts pushes the boundaries of the practice of counseling and psychology, he continues to gain recognition for his efforts to promote social justice counseling. As a social justice counselor, Ratts urges counselors and psychologists to consider the relevance of advocacy, prevention and outreach efforts when working with those without power and privilege in society. He contends that counseling professionals need to expand the focus of their work to include community engagement. Traditional psychotherapy, typically in an office setting,

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suggests that social justice counseling calls for community advocacy.

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carves out new terrain with his writing on race and the law.

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RICHARD DELGADO, JD University Professor School of Law

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Read more on these faculty-scholars and watch video clips from the photo shoots at www.seattleu.edu/research.

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aberration but part of the fabric of American society. Most forms of racial discrimination are nearly invisible to those who perpetrate them, according to Delgado. A guest on numerous national television and radio talk shows, Delgado frequently writes with his wife, and co-author Jean Stefancic, a Seattle University research professor. His influential books include Latinos and the Law, The Latino/a Condition, Race and Races: Cases and Resources for a Diverse America, and Justice at War: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights During Times of Crisis.

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ll told, Richard Delgado is the author of more than 180 journal articles and 29 books and is one of the most cited legal scholars on race and the law in the nation. Delgado was among those who sought to bring civil rights into the modern age with critical race theory (CRT), a body of scholarship that explores how racism is embedded in laws and legal institutions. Delgado and others—including the late Derrick Bell, who was considered CRT’s intellectual father figure—say CRT casts doubt on many long-held assumptions by suggesting racism is not an


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INTERVIEWS AND STORIES BY TINA POTTERF

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Alumni Dish on Inspiring Teachers

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Dan Nicholson, ’03 (Accounting) on Professor Susan Weihrich (Accounting/Albers)

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is perhaps the single most important thing I have on my résumé. And if not for Susan, I wouldn’t have even known it existed. When I returned to Seattle I worked at Deloitte & Touche and in 2010 started my own accounting firm, Nth Degree CPAs. Susan stands out as my favorite professor for many reasons. She takes so much interest in her students, is always available and a great resource. She got me thinking about a lot of things and saw the potential in me that I may not have seen in myself. My experience at SU was, in one word, transformative.” Dan Nicholson is president-elect of the Alumni Board of Governors and a CPA who owns an accounting firm.

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came to Seattle University, while still in high school, for an Earth Day event and I fell in love with the campus. How did I get into the world of accounting? It started with a job in finance I got at the end of my freshman year. While at SU I was invited by Professor Weihrich to attend a luncheon to learn more about the accounting program. I found I was good at it. Later, Susan was instrumental in helping me land a prestigious yearlong Governmental Accounting Standards Board fellowship in Connecticut. This was such a great experience and I learned so much as part of the program, which included spending time in New York City on Wall Street. The fellowship

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which involves storytelling as a means to explain the heady subject matter. “I ask a lot of questions and try to call on every student every class,” she says. “Someone wrote on their evaluation of me that having someone call on them helped them not to be shy and to open up. I expect my students to come to class and be engaged in the discussion. If they work hard in class, they will succeed.” Weihrich remembers Dan as an “awesome student who was always prepared for class.” The recognition as her former student’s favorite professor means a lot, she says. “Dan always put a lot of expectations on himself. So this means that I have lived up to those expectations.”

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orking in the field of accounting seemed a natural choice for Susan Weihrich, who followed in the footsteps of her father, himself an accountant. For 23 years, Professor Weihrich has taught accounting at Albers. These days, in addition to leading her tax accounting courses, she serves as associate dean. For many years she headed up the VITA tax preparation service, with SU accounting students helping to prepare taxes for low-income residents in the community. She considers the accounting students a “very hard working” bunch who respond well to her style of teaching,


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Dan Nicholson calls his time at SU transformative, thanks in large part to his experience in Professor Susan Weihrich's accounting class.

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SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 29


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Kymberly Evanson, ’99 (French) on Professor Dave Madsen (History; Honors)

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becoming a priest. But, at age 19, he decided to enroll at a university, choosing SU and studying the Classics. In his senior year he received a graduate school fellowship and his draft notice on the same day. After serving in the Army, he headed to Seattle for graduate school and then back to his alma mater. Father William LeRoux, who was Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the time, encouraged him to apply for a Humanities teaching job at Matteo Ricci College. After six years at MRC, he shifted to a tenure track position in the History department. These days, he has a full schedule, teaching seven courses a year including at MRC, beginning Latin and Honors. Madsen has seen much change at SU in his decades here, notably the growing prestige of the university in the region and beyond. For him, however, it’s about students, such as Kymberly, whom he remembers well as a mature, smart student. “Serving my students is most important to me,” he says. “I think they appreciate, in the end, that what seemed harsh at the time in my class was really all in their best interest.”

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Dave Madsen rofessor Dave Madsen likens his style of teaching to that of conducting a boot camp— “college boot camp,” as he calls it. “The bar has been raised and I expect students to respond accordingly,” he says. “I try to break students of their bad writing habits. I want them to recognize that they can be great writers. It takes time. That’s why college takes four years [to earn a degree].” The longtime professor of history (who also teaches in the Honors program) is known for his lectures as much as he is for his no-nonsense approach. Madsen, who graduated from SU in 1969, has taught here for 31 years. He expects students to do their best, to live up to their potential, to write well and read with a critical eye. He challenges them and in return, he earns the admiration of many for his ability to make a history lesson both educational and interesting. “I think that history is really about storytelling,” he says. His path to becoming a professor was not a direct one. Born and raised in Everett, Wash., just north of Seattle, Madsen started out in the diocesan seminary with plans of

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question while preparing for the exam. I was studying with a friend and we were having a hard time with a question on the study guide. After a while, we finally mustered up the courage to go to a pay phone and call him. When we asked him a geography question, he responded, ‘Go look at a map.’ And that was that. There was no easy way out with Professor Madsen, which was part of why his class was so influential and prepared me well for my later studies. I learned so much from Professor Madsen and from my overall experience at Seattle University. In his class, and so many others, I was engaged and challenged in ways that continue to shape my personal and professional development today. I can sum up my experience at SU in one word: community.“ Kymberly Evanson is a member of the Alumni Board of Governors and an attorney in Seattle.

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y first quarter of the Honors program with Professor Dave Madsen was a daunting experience at first. His expectations were very high and the class moved quickly. But his class quickly became a favorite. He was so engaging, I wrote down every word he said in class. He would become so engrossed in the lecture—marching around the room, pulling off his tie and making wild facial expressions to drive home his point. He was hilarious and made the material approachable. And it was clear he really was moved by history. Rather than lecturing to us, it was more like he was telling a story. Speaking of stories, I recall a funny one: Before our first set of oral final exams, Professor Madsen gave us all his home phone number and told us to call him if we had a

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SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 31

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Kymberly Evanson appreciated the way Professor Dave Madsen challenged her in class, imparting lessons that resonate with her even today.


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Chris Canlas, ’01 (Economics) on Professor Teresa Ling (Economics/Albers)

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statistical analyses results across to lay audiences without using jargon terms. When Ling first started teaching at SU, after a long stint at a university in Hong Kong, she was well received by students for her humor and accessibility. Well, by most students, anyway. “The first time I taught at SU, one of my students—in her evaluation of me—wrote a four–page note about how bad I was,” Ling recalls, with a laugh. “I kept that note to this day.” The irony is that the following quarter, Ling was the recipient of a teaching award from Albers. Working at the business school, where Ling is also assistant dean of undergraduate programs, is “my dream job,” she says. “I find it very uplifting when you see a student understand the material. It’s all about what we can do for the students.”

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eresa Ling, aka “The funny statistics teacher.” Yes, you’ve read that right. Professor Ling has a reputation for making statistics—a subject that causes fear to rise up in many—fun. But for Ling, who has taught at SU since 1996 and who herself is an alumna, class of 1974, infusing humor into an Economics course is all for the benefit of the students—she wants them to really get statistics. So apart from her levity, she also looks for ways to make the subject matter relatable by framing it in real life terms. Besides having students take several in–class quizzes—a practice she picked up from her former SU math professor, Professor Emeriti Dr. Andre Yandl—to get quick feedback on whether students are understanding the material, she also has them doing case studies. Students have to get the

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patient and meticulous. I remember one time where I shyly asked for an appointment in her office and she calmly and positively helped me through a stats concept I had difficulty understanding. However, her impact on me does not stop there. She has always taught me the importance of being engaged in my community. I always see Dr. Ling at Mass at the Chapel of St. Ignatius. She is always present at university events, mingling and speaking with alumni and students. It is clear to me that she loves Seattle U and that is present in her commitment to being present with others in this community. She could probably easily unplug from Seattle U after a long day of teaching in the classroom, but her example has taught me the importance of reconnecting with my university.“ Chris Canlas is president of the Alumni Board of Governors and a financial adviser in Seattle.

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good teacher sets examples for his or her students not just inside the classroom, but also outside the confines of classroom desks and chalkboards. I have to admit that when I look back at my experience at Seattle U, I recall fondly that I had many of these types of professors. One of those professors was Dr. Teresa Ling. Dr. Ling was my statistics professor (1999–2000) and I took two classes with her. As an Economics major, I loved the qualitative aspect of my discipline. But I dreaded the quantitative aspects of it. I dreaded numbers. So you can imagine the horror of stepping into a college stats class and seeing Dr. Ling's slides of copious numbers filled with regression analysis and distribution curves. It wasn't the content that finally engaged me (I still hate numbers, ironically). It was how she taught stats to me. She was both

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Watch video clips of these alumni and their fave professors at www.seattleu.edu/magazine.


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Chris Canlas credits Professor Teresa Ling with helping make statistics relatable and even fun.


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Provost Isiaah Crawford believes the university has established itself among the finest master's comprehensive institutions in the nation.


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which we believe will better prepare them to become effective and knowledgeable world citizens.” As provost, Crawford directs the Division of Academic Affairs, which encompasses the university’s schools and colleges, libraries, enrollment and offices supporting academic achievement, faculty matters and global engagement. He also oversees Institutional Research and the Office of Information and Technology. Crawford has had a long career in Catholic higher education. He completed his undergraduate studies at St. Louis University and his doctoral work at DePaul University. He served on the faculty of Loyola University Chicago for 20 years as a tenured professor and chair of the psychology department and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. He is a well-published scholar in the areas of human sexuality, health promotion and the education and training of clinical psychologists. At SU, he describes the pursuit of academic and scholarly excellence and social justice as symbiotic and inextricably linked. “We look to promote social justice by educating our students deeply and broadly and encouraging them to seek truth wherever it may lead them,” he says. “In this way, they become experts in their fields of study, which we hope will empower them to develop and implement solutions that will effectively address the challenges that confront our times.”

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he promotion of academic and scholarly excellence is one of Seattle University’s key strategic priorities and Provost Isiaah Crawford is guiding its advancement. From his vantage point, for the last 3½ years or so, the university community—faculty, in particular—has been engaged in a process that looks at the academic programs across the university to ensure they are fulfilling the mission of the university and the academic needs of students. “Are we educating our students in the subject areas and in the ways in which we believe is most appropriate and best for them to meet our learning outcomes? We’re taking a good, hard look at that,” says Crawford, who joined SU in summer 2008. “Part of our role as educators is to provide a way for students to realize their potential and take full advantage of their intellectual and spiritual gifts. “That’s what I think of in terms of academic excellence—looking for precision of thought, breadth and depth of knowledge accompanied with the ability to apply what one has learned in a variety of circumstances or situations.” One major initiative that will roll out next fall is a revamped Core curriculum—the foundation of an SU education—that has been largely unchanged in 25 years. “The new Core remains very true to the Jesuit Catholic liberal arts tradition,” Crawford says. “… It retains a strong focus on the humanities while providing students with an opportunity to gain greater exposure in the areas of science and regional, national and transnational cultures,

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PROVOST ISIAAH CRAWFORD SPEAKS TO SU’S ASPIRATIONS TO BE AN ACADEMIC LEADER

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Read a Q&A with the provost at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.


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in the 2007–08 academic year. That also was the time President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., called for the creation of “a new Core for the new student of the new world.” By fall 2009, a University Core Revision Committee was formed and began to meet with students, faculty and staff from all the colleges to come up with a proposal. Questions were asked about what knowledge, skills and values graduating students should have. Then the committee designed a curriculum that aims to deliver those outcomes for students, according to Philpott, with emphasis on the many changes in how students learn today. “The key here is that new inquiry seminars will be built around faculty research and their passions. We’re

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here’s renewed vigor in the pursuit of excellence at Seattle University. And it starts at the very foundation of an SU education with an overhaul of the Core curriculum. Come next fall, the Core will have a markedly different look and feel, the first time major changes have been made to the curriculum in 25 years. This year, students will have an opportunity to get a taste of the new Core with a selection of pilot courses. The revision of the Core, the sequence of required courses that spans the four years of a typical undergraduate experience here, is long in the making. Led by Core Director Jeff Philpott, the changes create a curriculum driven by clear learning objectives

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“The goal is not simply to make students well-rounded. Well-rounded is for doughnuts. We want to help students become more insightful and creative thinkers.” Jeff Philpott, Core director

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asking students to dive deeply into these important questions alongside their professors,” Philpott says. “The goal is not simply to make students well-rounded. Well-rounded is for doughnuts. We want to help students become more insightful and creative thinkers.” Ki Gottberg, fine arts professor and member of the Core revision committee, says in the 25 years she has been at SU, both students and faculty have changed. “Kids today need to be impassioned. And faculty who aren’t impassioned are not trusting that their disciplines are powerful,” she says. “When they teach from their passions, that’s when they will hook students. And that’s when it gets good.” That hook quite often is research, according to

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for students. The new Core is leaner than the old, says Philpott, and guides students to a better understanding of how to reflect on their educational experience. Traditional broad survey or appreciation courses are gone and global engagement acquires more importance. (See accompanying chart comparing the old and the new Core.) “After 25 years (with our current Core), it was clear we were a different university, our students were different, our world was different and the academic disciplines in the Core had evolved,” Philpott says. “This was an opportunity to reshape it from the ground up.” He traces the decision to revise the Core to recommendations from strategic planning committees back


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the global world in which they live, which we think will enhance their ability to be competitive and thoughtful world citizens.” The way Provost Crawford sees it, the Core is built upon the good work that brought the university to this point. “It is our responsibility to the institution, to our students and to our prospective students to always focus on the ‘more,’ on the magis,” he says. “Ignatius was committed to the more and to excellence. If you’re going to do it, you’re going to do it right and you’re going to do it with a level of excellence all the time.”

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Philpott. “Getting students more involved in undergraduate research means they’re more engaged, have a higher graduation rate and learn more from their educational experience,” he says. “Undergraduate research is very high impact. That’s purposely why we built it into the new Core.” The fact that the Core will be based on outcomes and remains true to SU’s Jesuit, Catholic liberal arts tradition pleases Provost Isiaah Crawford. “We are also very excited about the global engagement component to the Core and the intercultural aspect of it,” he says. “Our students will have the exposure to

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Getting to the Core A look at how the Core once was and where it is headed.

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• Many broad, traditional survey courses

• Inquiry seminars tightly focused on important and interesting questions in the discipline, ideally reflecting faculty members’ research interests

• Generic course titles in literature, philosophy and modern history, for example • Limited exposure to research opportunities

• Faculty who bring their cutting–edge scholarship to the classroom, building courses around their research interests

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Learn more about the new Core at www.seattleu.edu/core/.

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• Curriculum that doesn’t systematically address university learning goals

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• Limited opportunities for student reflection

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• No systematic use of Core courses for global engagement; limited options for education abroad

• Course titles that suggest a specialized focus; examples include Creative Writing Across Cultures, The Book of Job and the Question of Suffering, Economic Booms and Busts–An investigation of Policy Alternatives and History of Financial Crises: Implications for the Future

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• Faculty with divided academic lives: survey courses may not reflect faculty passions or areas of research

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• Strong focus on Jesuit traditions of theology and philosophy

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NEW CORE • 63 credits (13 courses, including 3 credits in major)

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• 71–75 credits (15 courses)

OLD CORE

• Fifteen credits, or an entire quarter, devoted to applying knowledge and skills for global citizenship with opportunity for education abroad

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• Careful articulation of how courses and objectives work together; regular assessment on a continuing basis to improve student learning

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• Greater reflection on learning and values


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Why I Teach

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Professors share their thoughts on what drives their passion for teaching and scholarship at SU.

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ince 2001, I have been on the faculty at the Albers School of Business and Economics. I teach information technology (IT) management at the undergraduate, graduate and Executive MBA levels. For the past decade, I have led student groups to both China and India as well, trips that have been as developmental and enriching for me as I hope they have been for my students. In my classes, we aren’t really talking about technology itself but the management of technology. It’s a question of being able to put the subject matter into a context so students feel it is impactful in their lives. For my undergraduate students, I talk about how technology is used in a business context and emerging trends that will impact their careers. For graduate students, we speak of the strategic advantage IT brings to an organization and their role in ensuring that a technology–business fit occurs. I love technology and that shows, I hope, in how I teach. My classes tend to be interactive and case–based. As part of an approach to critical thinking, I always play devil’s advocate in a discussion forcing students to look at issues from a perspective opposite their own. As I warn my students on the first day of class, I’m an “argumentative Indian.” My teaching is reinforced by my research, which focuses on the intersection of international business and information technology. I look at the way global teams work BY MADHU RAO together on outsourcing tasks in a virtual environment, how Associate Professor, IT Management they coordinate activities and collaborate across borders. Albers School of Business and Economics Recently I received a Pacific Marketing International (PMI) research grant to examine the unique factors affecting outsourcing teams in China and how those impact the manner in which they work with their U.S. counterparts. The goal of this research is to create a framework of best practices for managing projects effectively among U.S. and Chinese IT management teams. I really enjoy being at Seattle University. Before coming here, I had never taught at a Jesuit university and I now realize how fortunate I am to teach at a business school where students are asked to understand the societal and environmental impact of what they do. Having grown up in India that appeals to me immensely. I’ve taught at a lot of universities but Seattle University and Albers are the first to make me feel proud to be part of a greater mission. It’s easy to be a better person and a global citizen when everyone around you—students, staff, professors and administration—all believe it’s possible to harmonize people, profit and planet.

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Madhu Rao teaches IT management at the Albers School of Business and Economics and is an expert in areas of global IT management. His research has been published in widely used textbooks and in respected academic journals such as the Journal of Management Information Systems, the Journal of Global Information Technology Management, Information Systems Management and Small Group Research.


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have been privileged to teach at Seattle University since 1986. The last few years have been especially rewarding thanks to my many great teaching colleagues at SU and to SU’s teaching–learning environment enriched by our approach to assessing student learning. As a specialist in writing across the curriculum, I frequently consult on other campuses and return home happily aware of Seattle University’s distinctive strengths as a teaching institution. Particularly, we are good at promoting what cognitive psychologists call “deep learning”—the kind of engaged, meaningful learning that involves critical thinking and problemsolving, rather than memorization and recall. Here are some of SU’s particular strengths:

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• A faculty comprised of teacher–scholars: We differ from most liberal arts colleges in our commitment to faculty scholarship; we differ from Research I institutions by our outstanding teaching in the small liberal arts tradition • An exceptionally effective Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning that hosts research–based workshops for faculty • A new Core curriculum with opportunities for sequencing and integrating assignments to teach inquiry, argument and reflection • A recently completed Teagle Foundation grant for “writing-inBY JOHN C. BEAN the-majors” that helped departmental faculty do backward design of Professor, English the curriculum beginning with gateway courses for new majors and College of Arts and Sciences culminating in a senior–year capstone project • Extensive emphasis on writing throughout the Core and the majors with particular attention to developing information literacy and addressing the problems of transfer of learning from one course to the next • A nationally recognized Writing Center and strong collaboration between faculty members and reference librarians—all enhanced by the McGoldrick Learning Commons • A long tradition of supporting undergraduate research

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What is not so evident on this list is the way that professors talk to each other about teaching. Our approach to assessment asks departments to decide what they want students to learn and then to design the curriculum to help our students achieve these goals. With assessments, we can measure how our students are learning. We are particularly trying to promote undergraduate research by helping students pose and investigate their own disciplinary problems. Since the mid-90s, Seattle University has increasingly required faculty to publish their own research for promotion and tenure. Professors do more research here than most people realize and we are finding payoffs in the teaching side of our mission. Our professors can mentor students in undergraduate research because they are researchers themselves. The university also values pedagogical research aimed at promoting a more rigorous, engaging and challenging learning environment for students. My colleague Larry Nichols (director, Writing Center) and I have co-authored an article with chemistry colleagues P.J. Alaimo and Joe Langenhan (Science and Engineering) that has been cited in the journal Science. Some of our other articles have been cited as influencing the writing–across–the–curriculum movements in the United Kingdom and Germany. For me, there has been no separation between my teaching life and my research life. Seattle University has been an ideal place for collaboration with colleagues on teaching and learning.

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John C. Bean is the co-author of three textbooks on composition and argument and the author of the best-selling JosseyBass book Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking and Active Learning in the Classroom, now in its second edition. Professor Bean has conducted workshops on teaching writing and critical thinking around the world, most recently to educators in Ghana.


L/C

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B

A

Why I Teach, continued

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s an undergraduate, I knew I wanted to be a professor at a university where I could focus on teaching. I used to keep a notebook, which I still have, where I would write down notes on my professor’s teaching styles and techniques. I continue to look back through that notebook to refine my own technique. So, for the first phase of my career, my past professors inspired me. From them, I learned to be well prepared, organized and thorough in my explanations. In my first seven years at Seattle U, my approach to teaching has been very traditional. I spend a majority of class time lecturing and a small portion working example problems with students. With that said, I hope to make my teaching style in the second phase of my career look nothing like that in the first phase. The problem with a "lecturebased" approach to teaching is that there is a large disconnect between the information being taught and the ability to apply that information to real engineering problems. Also, there are many students who do not learn well by sitting and listening to a professor lecture for an hour each class period. I’d say about half of our students get into engineering because they like to work with their hands. Recently, I read a research paper with authors from Boeing and Montana State University that showed evidence that there is virtually no correlation between an engineering BY CHRISTOPHER STIPE employee’s GPA at graduation and their value to a company. Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering This paper made me question two things: One, am I grading College of Science and Engineering my students on the right skills and two, am I teaching my students the correct skills. Early in my career, I was confident that I was doing a good job at both. Upon reflection, I am not so sure. That is why I want to make a fundamental shift to the way I teach. Over my sabbatical year, I had a number of experiences that changed the way I look at the time I have with students in and out of the classroom. First, I worked on a couple really exciting research projects with two Seattle University students. The first was a Mars Rover project to develop a geochronology instrument to do rock dating on the surface of Mars. The second was to develop an instrument to measure silica in underground mines to improve the air quality for miners. What I realized was that active learning, through research, provides opportunities for the students to learn both fundamental science and engineering principles while also being forced to work on problems that do not have one nicely packaged solution, like most engineering textbook homework problems do. Secondly, I started to explore alternative methods for teaching, including the inverted classroom, problem–based learning and other active learning methods. Dr. Greg Mason, in the mechanical engineering department, has been experimenting with the inverted–classroom approach where he uploads screen–capture videos to YouTube that the students watch before coming to class. This allows the class time to be used for solving more challenging problems or designing engineering systems. Dr. Vicky Minderhout and Dr. Jennifer Loertscher have done some great work with the POGIL (Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) approach to teaching. Exploring these messier, more fluid methods to teaching keeps me excited about the next phase of my teaching career.

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Christopher Stipe’s research focuses on the development of laser spectroscopy and methods to synthesize nano and micro-scale materials. His students recently developed a backpack portable laser measurement system for doing chemical analysis in the field, with plans in the works to test-drive the system.

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L/C

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Round 3

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ALUMNI VOICE B

A

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News from Alumni House

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From Susan Vosper, ’90, ’10 MPA, Assistant VP/Alumni Relations

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Connecting alumni through our faculty is an initiative we will focus on in the coming year. One of the ways we will look to do this is through opportunities that bring our alumni and faculty together in an array of events and special programming. Soon the university will hire a new director to oversee continuing and online education programs, which is an important next step in the investment in our students and alumni. Watch for more on this and other initiatives in the coming months. As I, along with the university and alumni near and far, work to advance Alumni Relations, the aim is to build a rock solid foundation that will support our efforts to be a world-class program. With all of your help, I have no doubt this is an achievable goal.

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and Kymberly Evanson, ‘99— members of the Alumni Board of Governors who reflect on their time at SU and share memories of their favorite professor. I have my own “favorite”— Professor Steen Halling. As a psychology major I was interested in so many aspects of the subject matter and was drawn to the work Professor Halling did in interpersonal relations. His course on the Psychology of Forgiveness had a profound impact on me. As a professor, he always listened; but what most impressed me was his ability to ask great questions that challenged me to push myself. He never let me take the easier, softer way when he knew I could do better and deliver more. I have drawn from what I learned in his classroom many times in my life and in my career.

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With a new academic year upon us, I find myself reflecting on what it was like when I was a student here. I can recall the excitement of first stepping on campus—some 20 years ago—as a freshman. My classes and the professors, in particular, left a lasting impression. Many lessons learned in the classroom I carry with me to this day. In the spring edition of the magazine, we rolled out key highlights of the alumni survey. The results reinforce the value alumni place on their relationships with professors. Alumni repeatedly share with me how proud they are of their education and readily point to their professors as a key component of their transformative experiences at SU. This issue of the magazine features three such alumni—Chris Canlas, ’01, Dan Nicholson, ’03,

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High Marks for SU’s Faculty Scholars

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“Connecting alumni through our faculty is an initiative that we will focus on in the coming year.”

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SUSAN VOSPER, ASSISTANT VP/ALUMNI RELATIONS

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GET CONNECTED

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Recently engaged or married? Got a job promotion? We want to hear from you. Send us your updates for Class Notes through the new and improved alumni directory: www.seattleu.edu/alumni/get-involved/directory/. And join in the conversation as part of our growing online community via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.


L/C

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Round 3

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BOOKMARKS B

A

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Legal Gridlock: A Critique of the American Legal System

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points to nations in Europe and Asia where citizens enjoy a high degree of civility, but where the extent of the law is far less encompassing. Fischer makes several suggestions for reducing this reliance. He advocates for streamlining our legal system through simplification and efficiency. Simplification, he says, would involve removing old and unenforced laws from the books and limiting the amount of appeals filed. Fischer believes efficiency “could be achieved through greater interconnectivity, computer use, standardization and outsourcing.” In Legal Gridlock, Fischer’s passion is palpable. He wants change to happen and he offers tangible, easy-tounderstand ways to make it happen. Not only does he promote a reformation of our legal system, he inspires his readers to seek change too.

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cycle and the omnipresence of social media and blogs have allowed the public to observe the legal system in ways like never before. The problem with this, Fischer says, is that the media is providing a skewed view of what our legal system is really like. Of the way in which law is represented in broadcast news, he writes, “Even when media reports are fairly objective, they are often incomplete or contain misinformation.” Fischer worries about how the public might perceive legal proceedings when they aren’t aware of the scope of a case, but says, “Such is the nature of our sound-bite world.” If the public is misinformed about the law, we can’t expect individuals to be educated about how large a role the legal system should play in their lives. Herein lies another problem Fischer discusses— the U.S. relies too heavily on law. Fischer

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Thomas C. Fischer’s Legal Gridlock: A Critique of the American Legal System is a cautionary tale. Fischer warns readers that if change is not brought to this country’s courts, America as a whole is likely to fall victim to legal gridlock. A congested legal system, Fischer explains, will thwart social and commercial progress. This sets up a potential major crisis for a nation where democracy and economic vigor are celebrated. Legal Gridlock is not a read intended only for attorneys and law students. The author himself says his book is written for “the average reader who is concerned about the direction in which our legal and political system is headed.” Fischer’s intentions are in the right place, as law practitioners are no longer the only group paying close attention to what’s happening in U.S. courts. The dawn of the 24-hour news

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By Thomas C. Fischer [Faculty/Visiting Scholar, School of Law] | Reviewed by Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

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42 / Bookmarks

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EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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This book is written for “the average reader who is concerned about the direction in which our legal and political system is headed.”


L/C

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Read On…

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World Sports: A Reference Handbook

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Author | Maylon Hanold, ’08 EdD

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Maylon Hanold's book on a range of issues and controversies within the world of sports has just been released. World Sports: A Reference Handbook looks at the factors that can influence sports—both on a U.S. and global scale—such as drug use, economics, gender, politics, race and more. Hanold is an instructor in the Sport Administration Leadership program (College of Arts and Sciences).

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Author | William H. Smith

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In his book, The Phenomenology of Moral Normativity, Philosophy Professor William Smith examines the question, “Why should I be moral?” He draws on contemporary moral theory represented by Christine Korsgaard and Stephen Darwall, and contemporary phenomenology represented by John Drummond and others. The work also looks at the phenomenological and existential philosophy of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger and Emmanuel Levinas.

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MORE BOOKS BY FACULTY

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Professor Janelle Wong’s Asian American Political Participation: Emerging Constituents and Their Political Identities, written with S. Karthick Ramakrishnan, Taeku Lee and Jane Junn, is a comprehensive study of Asian American political behavior. This includes behaviors when it comes to voting, donating to a political campaign, community organizing and political protests.

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Several essays by Assistant Professor Ken Allan (Art History, College of Arts and Sciences) have been published in Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles Art, 1945-1980. Allan also co-authored a chapter in the book, which traces the beginnings and transformation of the post-World War II art scene in southern California. The book was developed for a major program of the same name sponsored by the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.


L/C

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Round 3

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ALUMNI VOICE B

A

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class notes

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Megan Olson Morrow, ’99 MIT, and Craig B. Morrow married at Sinclair Estate Vineyards in Walla Walla, Wash., Oct. 29, 2011.

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Lillian Hochstein, ’96, MPA, is the new executive director for the Pike Place Market Foundation. Hochstein brings more than 18 years of experience in the nonprofit and community relations worlds. She is active with the Rotary Club of Seattle, the Association of Fundraising Professionals and the Northwest Development Officers Association.

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Christian Mejia, ’08, recently accepted a promotion with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). He has relocated to the VA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Mejia and his wife Angela (Nelson) Mejia live in Fairfax County, Virginia, and have two children, Alyvia and CJ. Pictured (l-r): Michael Cardarelli, VA principal deputy under secretary for benefits and Christian Mejia at his graduation ceremony from the VA National Leadership Program in Washington, D.C.

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Susan Meyers, ’99, has returned to SU, joining the faculty of the English department in the College of Arts and Sciences. Meyers earned her PhD in rhetoric, composition and the teaching of English from the University of Arizona. She has an MFA in creative writing from the University of Minnesota. Additionally, she is a published writer and poet. She comes to SU following a teaching position at Oregon State University.

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Kaye Dowdy, ’06, received her medical degree from the Uniformed Services University May 19, 2012.


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B

A

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villagers gain access to clean water. Hesketh has visited Sierra Leone several times since 2008, joining with other volunteers to build three schools and supply 11 villages with clean water and medical care.

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James Harvey, a graduate of the College of Education, had his essay, “NAEP’s Odd Definition of Proficiency,” published in the October 2011 issue of Education Week.

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Gabriela Mottola has teamed up with her father Vincent to expand their luxury tour company, Mottola Italian Tours. The Mottola family has owned and operated Italian restaurants in the greater Seattle area for more than 50 years.

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Kate Cohn, a graduate of the Student Development Administration program in the College of Education, was named Outstanding Mid-level at the Western Regional gathering of the National Association of Student Affairs Administrators in Higher

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Michael Floyd, a graduate of the School of Law, and two colleagues recently released the book, SPY THE LIE: Three Former CIA Officers Teach You How to Detect Deception, published by St. Martin’s Press.

Jeannie Kirkhope, ’00 MAPS, was recently profiled in The National Catholic Reporter for her work with the poor in West Virginia. Kirkhope remains active with Seattle University by hosting Campus Ministry’s Appalachia Service Immersion program.

Todd Wathey, ‘09 MBA, has been hired as a portfolio manager with Hamrick Investment Counsel, LLC, a Seattle-based investment management firm. Wathey has worked in investment management since 2003. Prior to his current role, he developed and managed investment strategies for individuals and families as a portfolio manager with Pacific Portfolio Consulting.

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Dave Hesketh is currently serving as president of Clean Water Equals Life International (CWEL), founded in 2011. The organization recently sent a delegation of Boy Scouts to Sierra Leone to help impoverished

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Letealia Redi-Scott retired from Harborview Mental Health Services after working there for 40½ years.

Adam Jussel is an assistant attorney general for Washington state. Previously, Jussel worked at Seattle law firm Miller Nash.

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Dr. Christine Stevens is an associate professor at the University of Washington Tacoma in the Nursing and Healthcare Leadership Program. She has been awarded the UWT Distinguished Teaching Award for 2012.

Tom Meyer and the community in Madison, Wis., recently marked the 5th anniversary of Aaron’s House. In 2005, Meyer’s teenage son, Aaron, made the decision to live clean and sober. Four days after his 18th birthday, Aaron died in an auto accident. The memory of Aaron’s commitment to a life free of substance abuse inspired his father to start Aaron’s House in 2007 in Madison. Aaron’s House has been home to more than a dozen young men seeking sobriety. It has been the recipient of donations from the Green Bay Packers Foundation for three consecutive years.

Education. Cohn is Assistant Dean of Students at University of Puget Sound.

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Constance Ripley Lujan’s book, Montessori: Living the Good Life, was recently released. Following graduation from Seattle University’s Institute of Theological Studies, she returned to Alaska, took writing courses and wrote a couple of novels. Then she decided to research and write about her true passion, Montessori education. Lujan is a retired director of religious education who lives in Anchorage. She enjoys spending time with her family, exercising, writing and traveling with her husband Ted.

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Jack and Julie (Holm) Kavanagh, ’62, recently retired, Jack from his position with J.K.L.B. Beverage Corp. and chairmanship of the local bank and Julie from 20 years in the planning department with the City of Livermore, Calif. Recently, Jack was appointed chairman of the Alameda County Fair Horse Racing Committee in Pleasanton, Calif. Julie and Jack have been married 46 years and have seven grandchildren.

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CORRECTION In Class Notes in the spring 2012 issue, the incorrect graduation year was given for David R. Doran. He is a 2003 law school (JD) graduate. We apologize for the confusion and the error.

Fran (Kols) Hall, ’58, recently celebrated her 50th anniversary to Dr. Walter Hall. To mark the milestone, the couple received a Papal Blessing on World Marriage Day, Feb. 19, 2012, by Rev. William Brown, pastor of St. Hilary Catholic Church in Tiburon, Calif.

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Chau Nguyen, ’09, and Aaron Schiffer, ’09, were married on July 2, 2011, in West Seattle. After meeting in middle school and rekindling their friendship at SU, they tied the knot after five years of dating in front of 100 of their closest friends and family.

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Kate Hudson ’12, and Emily Nauseda ’12, were recently hired as assistant account executives at FRAUSE, a Seattle-based integrated communications firm. Hudson and Nauseda served on the executive board of Seattle University’s chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) and both earned degrees in strategic communications. Previously they were interns at FRAUSE.


L/C

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ALUMNI VOICE

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A

Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Seattle University’s Career Services awarded its Employer of the Year honors at the annual Career Expo job fair in spring. Alumni representing the recipients accepted on behalf of The Boeing Company and the offices of Sen. Maria Cantwell and Sen. Patty Murray. Paul Pasquier, ’79 (far right), accepted the award for Boeing; Sergio Cueva-Flores (far left), who attended SU 2004-09, accepted for Sen. Patty Murray’s office; and Christian Chiles, ‘06 (center), accepted on behalf of Sen. Maria Cantwell’s office.

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At the 2012 Alumni Awards dinner and celebration, Martha Choe, ’86 MBA, was named Alumna of the Year, in recognition of her outstanding service and leadership in the community and through her work with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

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CELEBRATING THIS YEAR’S ALUMNI AWARD WINNERS

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This year’s annual Alumni Crab Feed marked a milestone as it celebrated its 10th year and the 10th anniversary of the Alumni Advisory Board, which produces the springtime crab feed and the Albers fundraising golf tournament every summer. More than 240 alumni and friends attended this year’s crab feed, which raised more than $12,000 for scholarships for both undergraduate and graduate students of the business school.

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GOOD EATS AND A GOOD CAUSE


L/C

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B

A

BEING SCENE

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ALUMNI DAY of SERVICE

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Alumni of Seattle University were joined by faculty, staff and students to take part in the National Jesuit Alumni Day of Service, April 21, 2012. Participants rolled up their sleeves to serve meals, spruce up green spaces and meet with community members and SU neighbors.

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For the Alumni Day of Service, volunteers participated in projects at various sites in the area, including Yesler Terrace Community Center, the Dr. Blanche Lavizzo Park, St. Francis House and along the Jackson Street corridor.


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Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community we’ve lost.

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1950 After graduating from Bellarmine High School, Rudolph enlisted in the Army and served during World War II. Following graduation from Seattle University, he started work with United Pacific Insurance.

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1958 Clair Markey (June 20, 2012; age 76)

Robbie Jean Reitz (Dec. 28, 2011; age 76)

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Robbie worked in the religious education office of St. Francis of Assisi Parish and in the development office of John F. Kennedy High School in Burien, Wash. She lived out her faith by always putting others first.

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John Riggs, who was born in Montana and raised in the Seattle area, developed a great love of the outdoors from his time in the Pacific Northwest. He enjoyed hiking, cross-country skiing and boating. Following his time at SU and grad school at the

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John Riggs (June 10, 2012)

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Born in Nebraska and raised in Washington state, Markey played on the famed SU basketball team during the 1957-58 season that went head to head with Kentucky for the national championship title. (One of his teammates was Elgin Baylor.) Later he would coach the SU team. As a student athlete Mackey won state championships at Juneau Douglas in 1969 and Lathrop High School in Fairbanks, Alaska in 1972.

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Seattle University Magazine publishes full obituaries online only at www.seattleu.edu/ magazine/. Note: Obituaries are edited for space and clarity.

A graduate of Seattle’s O’Dea High School, James spent 44 years with Farmers Insurance Group, serving as vice president of Farmers New World Life, Investors Guaranty Life and Ohio State Life.

70 70 40

40 70 40

We ask readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@ seattleu.edu or send via mail to Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122–1090.

James W. King (Dec. 21, 2011; age 78)

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70 40 40

THINKING OF YOU

1956

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40 70 40

Mary was a lifelong member of Seattle’s Catholic community and worked for 25 years as an administrative assistant at St. Joseph’s Church.

Ernest worked in the Atomics International and Rocketdyne divisions of The Boeing Company, where he was employed for 38 years.

40 100

40 100

Mary Juanita Webb (Feb. 13, 2012)

Ernest Baumeister (Dec. 19, 2011; age 80)

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40 100

1944

1953

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100 40

A gifted high school athlete, Thomas continued his love of sports (football, basketball, baseball) and academics at Seattle University, where he earned a degree in philosophy. A member of the men’s basketball team, he later became the team coach.

Dolores started her professional career at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Tacoma and later went to work for the University of Washington Medical Center, working as the head of the hematology department. She was known for her beautiful singing voice and as a talented musician who loved to entertain.

30 30

30

Thomas Ryan (Dec. 30, 2011; age 90)

Dolores Agren (March 7, 2012; age 82)

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70

Frank played varsity football at O’Dea High School and would go on to SU to earn a business degree. He worked various jobs early in life that included caring for elephants at Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo and making ice cream.

1952

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100 60

Frank C. Buty (Dec. 28, 2011; age 92)

Peggy was a graduate of Roosevelt High School and Seattle University, where she was twice crowned homecoming princess. She had a knack for art and was known for her Christmas decorations.

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30

1943

Peggy Sears (Dec. 24, 2011; age 83)

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70

Faith, family, education, a strong work ethic and service to others were part of Pat’s DNA. Her nine children all attended Seattle University, as did seven of her 44 grandchildren. In 1991, in commemoration of SU’s 100th birthday, Roach was named one of SU’s 100 outstanding alumni.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Johanna Patricia “Pat” Sullivan Roach (May 16, 2012; age 90)

30 30

30

Rudolph Lawrence Mockel (Aug. 20, 2011; age 88)

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70

1946


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

1976

100

Ronald White, ’78 MA (Dec. 13, 2011; age 72)

Sharonlee Ruth McDonald was a founding member and longtime parishioner at St. Thomas More Catholic Church.

Before attending Seattle University, Ronald worked for The Boeing Company and enlisted in the Air Force, serving from 1957-1961. After earning a bachelor’s degree and a master’s in rehabilitation from SU, Ronald worked as a substance abuse counselor and started his own treatment center.

1963 Patricia (Martin) Bray (Dec. 15, 2011; age 70)

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Jeffrey Gerald Parr (Dec. 13, 2011; age 55)

1996

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Aurora Brandvold, MA (Feb. 8, 2012; age 70) Aurora was raised on her family’s wheat farm in Saskatchewan, Canada. She was passionate about reading, nursing, genealogy and gardening. Every spring she made it a point to attend the Tulip Festival in Mount Vernon, Wash.

100 40

40 100

James Wiehoff (Dec. 23, 2011; age 69)

40 100

40 100

Before joining the Army, James attended law school. In the Army he served as a captain in the military police.

Rev. Jack Olive (Jan. 9, 2012)

James was a longtime employee of Lakeside Industries.

10

1972 Joseph Sauter, MA (Nov. 29, 2011; age 54)

25 50

1975

90

James Ozanne, who taught as an adjunct professor in the College of Science and Engineering, was an engineer for the city of Everett for 25 years.

Thomas R. Garvin, S.J. (March 24, 2012) Father Garvin taught in the philosophy department at SU and was co-pastor at St. Madeleine Sophie Church in Bellevue (1977-80) and St. Thomas Church in Seattle (1980-90). In the 1990s he was pastor of St. Francis Church in Friday Harbor.

100

SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 49

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James Ozanne, MBA, ’76 (Sept. 22, 2011)

Pierre taught mechanical engineering at Seattle University for 24 years. The Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering was active with Engineers Without Borders.

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Joseph Sauter worked for many years at St. Joseph’s Parish on Capitol Hill. There he met his wife of 24 years, Carol.

Pierre Gehlen (Jan. 3, 2012)

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3

For years Timothy worked at Todd Shipyards in Seattle before changing careers to restore and broker antiques in Seattle’s Pioneer Square. He was a man with a quick wit and penchant for kindness.

0000

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Timothy James Flanagan (March 9, 2012; age 65)

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James Billerbeck (Feb. 2, 2012; age 65)

Rev. Olive was an assistant dean of ecumenical relations at SU’s School of Theology and Ministry. He also started a scholarship fund for STM students who come from nonChristian faith traditions.

70 70 40

40 70 40

1969

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FACULTY

Christine Wall (Dec. 23, 2011; age 68)

10 40 40

40 70 40

1965 For 25 years Christine worked in public utilities. In her spare time she enjoyed quilting, traveling and spending time with family and friends.

100 40

100 40

1964

30 30

Maurice Whale (Dec. 25, 2011; age 81)

70 70

After serving in the Army, Gerhard attended Seattle University, where he earned a civil engineering degree. During college he worked on fishing boats in Alaska. Maurice was a longtime employee of The Boeing Company and active with St. Matthew Episcopal Church, where he sang in the choir. He also enjoyed the Seattle Gilbert and Sullivan Society and Seattle Opera.

100 100 60 100 100

1985 Following graduation from Seattle University, Jeffrey embarked on a successful career in the college publishing industry. He worked as a senior marketing manager with McGraw-Hill Publishing.

Gerhard Groeschel (Feb. 25, 2012; age 83)

30 30

30

After years of working as a bookkeeper, Patricia returned to school to become a drug and alcohol counselor. She dedicated her life to service, taking in and caring for anyone who crossed her path.

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70

1977

Sharonlee Ruth McDonald (Nov. 17, 2011; age 73)

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100 60

1961

For 18 years Barry served as a patrolman with the Seattle Police Department.

30 30

30

Barry Anthony Fletcher (Jan. 30, 2012; age 67)

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70

University of Nevada, Reno, Riggs went to work in the engineering industry. He shared with others what life was like since his diagnosis with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), which he lived with for 31 years.


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

THE LAST WORD

5

6

The Last Word is an interesting take on the arts/literature/academia/travel and more. B

A

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100 60 100

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70

Welcome to the [Alumni] Family Congratulations to the Class of 2012

30 30

30 100

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Honorary doctorate degree recipient Mark Pigott.

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30

100 40

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40 100

10 40 40

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GRADUATE CEREMONY Mark Pigott, chairman and CEO of PACCAR Inc was awarded an honorary doctorate degree at the graduate ceremony. The fourth generation of the Pigott family to actively support the university, Mark has taught students in the Albers MBA program for 15 years. His commitment to SU resulted in the establishment of the Pigott Center for Leadership. Earlier this year, the university announced the Pigott Family Arts Endowment, a $1.5 million endowment to support the arts at SU.

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70

UNDERGRADUATE CEREMONY Best-selling author and New York Times columnist Tim Egan, who calls the Seattle area home, was the speaker at the undergraduate ceremony. Egan was part of the team of Times reporters to win a 2001 Pulitzer Prize for the series, “How Race is Lived in America.” Here’s an excerpt of Egan’s speech to the graduating class: “…You know, these Jesuits were fabulous teachers. What I remember from them is how much they challenged us to think for ourselves and ignore fads and trends. One priest said you must be in constant search for your God and yourself.

“So now, in the face of accelerated change of all our major institutions— technology, democracy, the planet itself—the imperatives of the Jesuit tradition, dating 450 years, are more vital than ever before. And what are those imperatives? To question conventional wisdom, to nurture the heart as well as the mind, to go forth and engage the world. “You leave here today with a commodity from Seattle University. The commodity is the ability to think clearly, to think logically, to think humanely. You’ve been apprentices of this great tradition until now, when you are released—masters of the method.” Egan, himself a product of a Jesuit education, has written six books, including the New York Times bestseller, The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl. He’s also written extensively about this corner of the country, including the popular The Good Rain.

100 100 60 100 100

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Of the 1,200 undergraduate students and 775 graduate students eligible to participate in commencement, 1,100 undergrads and 650 grads walked across the stage at KeyArena at Seattle Center to claim their degrees at the June 10 commencement ceremonies. Congratulations to the newest members of the alumni family, 67,000 strong and growing.

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RELIVE THE MOMENT

0000

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Best-selling author and New York Times columnist Tim Egan was the speaker at the undergraduate ceremony. Read Tim Egan’s commencement speech in its entirety at www. seattleu.edu/magazine/.

10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

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50

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR 100

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100

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30

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25

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SU Magazine Fall 2012 / 51

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SU Alumni 67,000

0000

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1,200 Undergraduate Students 775 Graduate Students

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commencement

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2012

B

A

{

6 5 4 Round 3 2 1 L/C


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100

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100 60

SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

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70

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30

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Saturday, November 3, 2012 The Westin Seattle

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Featuring a night of dining, celebration and dancing with music by Peter Duchin and His Orchestra

70 70 40

40 70 40

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All proceeds benefit student scholarships. Individual tickets are $500.

0000

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To RSVP or for table sponsorships, please contact (206) 296-6301 or visit www.seattleu.edu/gala.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

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SEATTLE UNIVERSITY

29 ANNUAL

50

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TH

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Seattle University Magazine - Fall 2012