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SU Profile Seattle University's commitment Seattle University strives to help you bridge the gap between what

FACTS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Jesuit Catholic One of 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the U.S. and 133 around the world

Albers School of Business and Economics Accounting; Business Economics; Economics; Information Systems; Finance; Individualized Major; International Business; Management; Marketing

you can afford to pay for your education and what it actually costs.

Faculty-to-student ratio: 1:13 719 total faculty

When an incoming freshman receives a financial aid offer, the amount

Average class size: 20 Classes taught by professors: 100%

of institutional gift aid (scholarship and/or Seattle University grant) is guaranteed for all four years. (If you are a transfer student, the initial sum varies depending on your class level at enrollment). Sources for institutional gift aid may change from year to year, although the total amount will not fluctuate as long as you remain in good standing and file your annual FAFSA for need-based awards.

SU financial aid facts $27,519

The average amount of aid awarded to eligible full-time undergraduates in 2011–12.

$103 million The amount of financial aid that Seattle University administers annually (including $60 million in undergraduate scholarships and grants). 1,912

Number of students employed in 2012-13. Student employment positions are easy-to-find, part-time jobs that don’t interfere with your class schedule. On-campus wages start at $8.95 per hour.

76.25%

Of those who applied, entering freshmen who received financial aid in 2011-12.

Freshman retention rate: 86% Alumni Approximately 69,000 in all 50 states and 77 nations Undergraduate Tuition (2012–13) Full time: $34,200 Average room and board: $10,296 University enrollment 7,755 Undergraduate: 4,631 Graduate: 2,124 Law: 1,000 Undergraduate profile 870 new freshmen 40% men; 60% women 53 states and territories and 89 nations represented 54% Caucasian 21% Asian/Pacific Islander 9% International students 8% Latino 5% African American 1% Native American 6% Unknown NOTE: individuals can self-identify with more than one race or ethnicity and are counted within each group, which results in a total of more than 100%.

Freshman class (middle 50%) GPA: 3.3–3.9 SAT math score: 520–630 SAT critical reading score: 530–630 SAT writing score: 530–630 ACT composite score: 24–28 41% from Washington state

College of Arts and Sciences American Law and Politics; Art History; Asian Studies; Catholic Studies; Chinese; Communication Studies; Creative Writing; Criminal Justice; Cultural Anthropology; Digital Design; Drama; English; Environmental Studies; Film Studies; Fine Arts; French; German; Global African Studies; Global Awareness; Global Politics; History; International Studies; Italian; Japanese; Journalism; Latin American Studies; Liberal Studies; Medieval Studies; Military Science/ROTC; Music; Nonprofit Leadership; Philosophy; Photography; Political Science; Prelaw (Pre-professional programs); Premajor (for freshmen and sophomores only); Psychology; Public Affairs; Social Welfare; Social Work; Sociology; Spanish; Sport and Exercise Science; Strategic Communications; String Performance; Theatre ; Theology and Religious Studies; Visual Art; Women Studies

Your educational investment All investments offer risks and rewards. You want the biggest investment in your life so far—your college education—to have low risks and high rewards. One way to achieve this is to attend a respected university, one with a reputation that assures a lifetime of valuable returns. Your academic career largely determines what doors open in

seattle university

your professional career. You want to find the ideal route to long-term success and satisfaction. A selective private institution like Seattle University offers personal attention and a rigorous yet supportive academic environment that brings out your best. You may recognize the far-reaching value of private education yet feel concerned about the cost. This brochure explains how to make it affordable.

College of Nursing Nursing College of Science and Engineering Biochemistry; Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; Chemistry; Civil Engineering; Computer Science; Computer Science–Business; Computer Science– Mathematics; Diagnostic Ultrasound; Electrical Engineering; Environmental Science; General Science; General Science–Preprofessional; Marine and Conservation Biology; Mathematics; Mathematics–Applied; Mathematics–Pure; Mechanical Engineering; Physics

Financial Aid

Matteo Ricci College Humanities; Humanities for Teaching; Humanities for Leadership Studies To view SU’s Common Data Set and other noteworthy statistics, visit www.seattleu.edu/ir.

Admissions (206) 220-8040 or (800) 426-7123 admissions@seattleu.edu Financial Aid (206) 220-8020 or (800) 426-7123 financialservices@seattleu.edu

WWW.SEATTLEU.EDU

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries related to these policies may be referred to the university’s Assistant Vice President for Human Resources and Equal Opportunity Officer at (206) 296-5870. Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and its implementing regulations, Seattle University has designated three individuals responsible for coordinating the university’s Title IX compliance. Students or employees with concerns or complaints about discrimination on the basis of sex in employment or an education program or activity may contact any one of the following Title IX coordinators: Gerald Huffman, assistant vice president for Human Resources, Equal Opportunity Officer, University Services Building 107, (206) 296-5870, huffmaje@seattleu.edu; Dr. Michele Murray, associate vice president of Student Development, Student Center 140B, (206) 296-6066, mmurray@ seattleu.edu. Individuals may also contact the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education.


SU Profile Seattle University's commitment Seattle University strives to help you bridge the gap between what

FACTS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Jesuit Catholic One of 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the U.S. and 133 around the world

Albers School of Business and Economics Accounting; Business Economics; Economics; Information Systems; Finance; Individualized Major; International Business; Management; Marketing

you can afford to pay for your education and what it actually costs.

Faculty-to-student ratio: 1:13 719 total faculty

When an incoming freshman receives a financial aid offer, the amount

Average class size: 20 Classes taught by professors: 100%

of institutional gift aid (scholarship and/or Seattle University grant) is guaranteed for all four years. (If you are a transfer student, the initial sum varies depending on your class level at enrollment). Sources for institutional gift aid may change from year to year, although the total amount will not fluctuate as long as you remain in good standing and file your annual FAFSA for need-based awards.

SU financial aid facts $27,519

The average amount of aid awarded to eligible full-time undergraduates in 2011–12.

$103 million The amount of financial aid that Seattle University administers annually (including $60 million in undergraduate scholarships and grants). 1,912

Number of students employed in 2012-13. Student employment positions are easy-to-find, part-time jobs that don’t interfere with your class schedule. On-campus wages start at $8.95 per hour.

76.25%

Of those who applied, entering freshmen who received financial aid in 2011-12.

Freshman retention rate: 86% Alumni Approximately 69,000 in all 50 states and 77 nations Undergraduate Tuition (2012–13) Full time: $34,200 Average room and board: $10,296 University enrollment 7,755 Undergraduate: 4,631 Graduate: 2,124 Law: 1,000 Undergraduate profile 870 new freshmen 40% men; 60% women 53 states and territories and 89 nations represented 54% Caucasian 21% Asian/Pacific Islander 9% International students 8% Latino 5% African American 1% Native American 6% Unknown NOTE: individuals can self-identify with more than one race or ethnicity and are counted within each group, which results in a total of more than 100%.

Freshman class (middle 50%) GPA: 3.3–3.9 SAT math score: 520–630 SAT critical reading score: 530–630 SAT writing score: 530–630 ACT composite score: 24–28 41% from Washington state

College of Arts and Sciences American Law and Politics; Art History; Asian Studies; Catholic Studies; Chinese; Communication Studies; Creative Writing; Criminal Justice; Cultural Anthropology; Digital Design; Drama; English; Environmental Studies; Film Studies; Fine Arts; French; German; Global African Studies; Global Awareness; Global Politics; History; International Studies; Italian; Japanese; Journalism; Latin American Studies; Liberal Studies; Medieval Studies; Military Science/ROTC; Music; Nonprofit Leadership; Philosophy; Photography; Political Science; Prelaw (Pre-professional programs); Premajor (for freshmen and sophomores only); Psychology; Public Affairs; Social Welfare; Social Work; Sociology; Spanish; Sport and Exercise Science; Strategic Communications; String Performance; Theatre ; Theology and Religious Studies; Visual Art; Women Studies

Your educational investment All investments offer risks and rewards. You want the biggest investment in your life so far—your college education—to have low risks and high rewards. One way to achieve this is to attend a respected university, one with a reputation that assures a lifetime of valuable returns. Your academic career largely determines what doors open in

seattle university

your professional career. You want to find the ideal route to long-term success and satisfaction. A selective private institution like Seattle University offers personal attention and a rigorous yet supportive academic environment that brings out your best. You may recognize the far-reaching value of private education yet feel concerned about the cost. This brochure explains how to make it affordable.

College of Nursing Nursing College of Science and Engineering Biochemistry; Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; Chemistry; Civil Engineering; Computer Science; Computer Science–Business; Computer Science– Mathematics; Diagnostic Ultrasound; Electrical Engineering; Environmental Science; General Science; General Science–Preprofessional; Marine and Conservation Biology; Mathematics; Mathematics–Applied; Mathematics–Pure; Mechanical Engineering; Physics

Financial Aid

Matteo Ricci College Humanities; Humanities for Teaching; Humanities for Leadership Studies To view SU’s Common Data Set and other noteworthy statistics, visit www.seattleu.edu/ir.

Admissions (206) 220-8040 or (800) 426-7123 admissions@seattleu.edu Financial Aid (206) 220-8020 or (800) 426-7123 financialservices@seattleu.edu

WWW.SEATTLEU.EDU

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries related to these policies may be referred to the university’s Assistant Vice President for Human Resources and Equal Opportunity Officer at (206) 296-5870. Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and its implementing regulations, Seattle University has designated three individuals responsible for coordinating the university’s Title IX compliance. Students or employees with concerns or complaints about discrimination on the basis of sex in employment or an education program or activity may contact any one of the following Title IX coordinators: Gerald Huffman, assistant vice president for Human Resources, Equal Opportunity Officer, University Services Building 107, (206) 296-5870, huffmaje@seattleu.edu; Dr. Michele Murray, associate vice president of Student Development, Student Center 140B, (206) 296-6066, mmurray@ seattleu.edu. Individuals may also contact the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education.


Education pays for itself

Apply for outside scholarships or work a couple of hours a week. In a city, there

The accompanying graphs say it all. The more education you have, the better your earnings will be and the less likely you are to become unemployed. There is another way of looking at it, too. Your degree can pay for the cost of your education. Look at the difference in the median weekly earnings between high school graduates ($638) and those with a bachelor's degree ($1,053). That difference of $415 a week adds up to more than $20,000 a year or $200,000 in 10 years' time. Your Seattle University education not only launches your future but also pays for itself in less than a decade with your increased earning power. Unemployment rate in 2011

Median weekly earnings in 2011 2.5%

Doctoral degree

2.4%

Professional degree

3.6% 4.9% 6.8% 8.7% 9.4%

$1,665

Master's degree

$1,263

Bachelor's degree

$1,053

Associate degree

$768

Some college, no degree

$719 $638

High school graduate Less than a high school diploma

14.1%

$1,551

$451

7.6% Average, all workers

$797 Average, all workers

Note: Data are 2011 annual averages for those age 25 and older. Earnings are for full-time wage and salary workers. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey.

Even though the cost may seem high for four years, consider that your undergraduate education will set the trajectory for your lifelong career. In that light, SU is an investment that pays dividends far beyond the day you graduate.” —Aaron Van Dyke, ‘04, BS in chemistry with honors. ‘09, PhD organic chemistry, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology. Current post-doctoral fellow, American Cancer Society

are lots of opportunities for work not only on campus, but off campus as well.”

Budget 1

Budget 2

—Anna Long, ‘14, University Honors, double major: history and economics

ON-CAMPUS RESIDENT OR OFF-CAMPUS (NOT LIVING WITH PARENTS OR RELATIVES)

LIVING WITH PARENTS OR RELATIVES

How to apply FALL QUARTER APPLICANTS When you seek financial aid, you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after January 1. You can do so via the web at www.fafsa.gov or by paper application. Both you and a parent need a Personal Identification Number (PIN) which serves as your electronic signature on the FAFSA. You can request a PIN ahead of time at www.pin.ed.gov or apply for and receive your PIN within the application as you complete it.

Not all investments yield the same rewards, so it’s critical to do your research. In addition to the deep and lasting value of the education you receive at Seattle University, you benefit from the vast and highly respected network of Jesuit Catholic colleges and universities across the country and around the world. For the past 450 years, Jesuit educators have focused on academic excellence and social justice, grounded in a strong liberal arts and sciences foundation. Graduates are highly competitive, sought after and admired.

ROOM AND BOARD

3 QUARTERS

3 QUARTERS

$10,296

$3,531

EXPENSES $6,114 $4,956 Books and supplies

$1,485

$1,485

$300

$300

Technology fee Personal

$2,328

$1,170

Transportation

$1,659

$1,659

Indicate you want your FAFSA results sent to: Federal School Code No. 003790 Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle WA 98122-1090

TUITION (12-20 credits per quarter)

The FAFSA processor needs the address and school code to ensure your application reaches Seattle University. To maximize your financial aid opportunities, you must send your FAFSA to the FAFSA processor by February 1 or within 30 days of admission.

TOTALS $50,610 $42,687

WINTER, SPRING OR SUMMER QUARTER APPLICANTS Scholarships and grants are also available to students who enter Seattle University in winter and spring quarters. Scholarships and grants are not available for students who enter in summer quarter. If you apply for spring quarter, file both the current academic year’s FAFSA and one for next year. Students who apply later may still be eligible for the Federal Pell Grant and/or loans.

To receive priority funding consideration for winter or spring quarter, complete financial aid files by September 1. You have the best chance of receiving aid if you plan ahead and apply early.

FAFSA priority dates by entry term February 1, 2013 September 1, 2013 February 1, 2014 September 1, 2014 Summer ‘13 Winter ‘14 Summer ‘14 Winter ‘15 Fall ‘13 Spring ‘14 Fall ‘14 Spring ‘15

Categories of financial aid Scholarships: Seattle University awards institutional and privately donated funds based on academic achievements and talents as well as other distinctions. Scholarships do not have to be repaid. See available scholarships at: www.seattleu.edu/scholarships. Grants: State, federal and institutional grants are based on need. As with scholarships, they do not have to be repaid. They include Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, State Need Grants and Seattle University Grants. Work Opportunities: Underwritten by state and federal work-study programs, these jobs offer part-time employment either on or off campus during the school year. Loans: Some student loans are interest-free while a student attends college. Although loans must be repaid, interest rates are low and the terms are generally far more favorable than loans available commercially. Payments may be deferred or forgiven based on certain conditions set by the federal government.

$34,200 $34,200

Find out more To learn more about the many financial aid options, the Student Financial Services Office is ready to assist you.

SU has been extremely generous in helping me pay for college. Though I was

Student Financial Services (206) 220-8020 / (800) 426-1723 Hours: Monday and Tuesday - 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesday - Friday - 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. E-mail: financialservices@seattleu.edu

initially concerned with the cost, SU ended up being the best choice for me and

www.seattleu.edu/sfs

my family, and for that I will always be thankful.” —Robert Zehra, ‘14, major: biology

The staff members at Seattle University really do everything they can to make sure that if you want to be here, it can happen.”

The Student Financial Services Office assembles a financial aid package composed of all resources still available at the time of processing, so file as soon as possible.

An education with a deep and lasting value It may be hard to imagine how to fund a high-quality education. Well, consider this: The majority of Seattle University freshman and transfer students receive financial aid.

Tuition, room and board costs, and estimated living expenses

—Christopher Whidbey, ‘10, BA in chemistry/biology and BA in philosophy with honors

APPLICATION SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE November 15 Freshman early action application deadline.

December Student and parent request PIN for FAFSA at www.pin.ed.gov. December 23 Freshman early action decision and scholarship notification.

January 1 First day to file FAFSA for 2013–14. File online at www.fafsa.gov or by paper application available from high school and college counseling offices. January 15 Freshman regular decision application deadline.

February 1 Priority deadline for FAFSA to the federal processor for eligibility for freshman financial aid.

March 1 Freshman regular decision and scholarship notification. Fall transfer application deadline and priority financial aid form due. Late March Priority financial aid packages mailed to admitted freshmen.

April 1 Transfer decision and scholarship notification. Mid April Priority financial aid packages mailed to admitted transfers.

May 1 Candidates’ reply date. Admission confirmation deposit due.

July Enrolling students’ orientation programs on campus.

September 15 Fall tuition due. Work-study authorizations released. September 25 Fall quarter classes begin.

25


Education pays for itself

Apply for outside scholarships or work a couple of hours a week. In a city, there

The accompanying graphs say it all. The more education you have, the better your earnings will be and the less likely you are to become unemployed. There is another way of looking at it, too. Your degree can pay for the cost of your education. Look at the difference in the median weekly earnings between high school graduates ($638) and those with a bachelor's degree ($1,053). That difference of $415 a week adds up to more than $20,000 a year or $200,000 in 10 years' time. Your Seattle University education not only launches your future but also pays for itself in less than a decade with your increased earning power. Unemployment rate in 2011

Median weekly earnings in 2011 2.5%

Doctoral degree

2.4%

Professional degree

3.6% 4.9% 6.8% 8.7% 9.4%

$1,665

Master's degree

$1,263

Bachelor's degree

$1,053

Associate degree

$768

Some college, no degree

$719 $638

High school graduate Less than a high school diploma

14.1%

$1,551

$451

7.6% Average, all workers

$797 Average, all workers

Note: Data are 2011 annual averages for those age 25 and older. Earnings are for full-time wage and salary workers. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey.

Even though the cost may seem high for four years, consider that your undergraduate education will set the trajectory for your lifelong career. In that light, SU is an investment that pays dividends far beyond the day you graduate.” —Aaron Van Dyke, ‘04, BS in chemistry with honors. ‘09, PhD organic chemistry, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology. Current post-doctoral fellow, American Cancer Society

are lots of opportunities for work not only on campus, but off campus as well.”

Budget 1

Budget 2

—Anna Long, ‘14, University Honors, double major: history and economics

ON-CAMPUS RESIDENT OR OFF-CAMPUS (NOT LIVING WITH PARENTS OR RELATIVES)

LIVING WITH PARENTS OR RELATIVES

How to apply FALL QUARTER APPLICANTS When you seek financial aid, you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after January 1. You can do so via the web at www.fafsa.gov or by paper application. Both you and a parent need a Personal Identification Number (PIN) which serves as your electronic signature on the FAFSA. You can request a PIN ahead of time at www.pin.ed.gov or apply for and receive your PIN within the application as you complete it.

Not all investments yield the same rewards, so it’s critical to do your research. In addition to the deep and lasting value of the education you receive at Seattle University, you benefit from the vast and highly respected network of Jesuit Catholic colleges and universities across the country and around the world. For the past 450 years, Jesuit educators have focused on academic excellence and social justice, grounded in a strong liberal arts and sciences foundation. Graduates are highly competitive, sought after and admired.

ROOM AND BOARD

3 QUARTERS

3 QUARTERS

$10,296

$3,531

EXPENSES $6,114 $4,956 Books and supplies

$1,485

$1,485

$300

$300

Technology fee Personal

$2,328

$1,170

Transportation

$1,659

$1,659

Indicate you want your FAFSA results sent to: Federal School Code No. 003790 Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle WA 98122-1090

TUITION (12-20 credits per quarter)

The FAFSA processor needs the address and school code to ensure your application reaches Seattle University. To maximize your financial aid opportunities, you must send your FAFSA to the FAFSA processor by February 1 or within 30 days of admission.

TOTALS $50,610 $42,687

WINTER, SPRING OR SUMMER QUARTER APPLICANTS Scholarships and grants are also available to students who enter Seattle University in winter and spring quarters. Scholarships and grants are not available for students who enter in summer quarter. If you apply for spring quarter, file both the current academic year’s FAFSA and one for next year. Students who apply later may still be eligible for the Federal Pell Grant and/or loans.

To receive priority funding consideration for winter or spring quarter, complete financial aid files by September 1. You have the best chance of receiving aid if you plan ahead and apply early.

FAFSA priority dates by entry term February 1, 2013 September 1, 2013 February 1, 2014 September 1, 2014 Summer ‘13 Winter ‘14 Summer ‘14 Winter ‘15 Fall ‘13 Spring ‘14 Fall ‘14 Spring ‘15

Categories of financial aid Scholarships: Seattle University awards institutional and privately donated funds based on academic achievements and talents as well as other distinctions. Scholarships do not have to be repaid. See available scholarships at: www.seattleu.edu/scholarships. Grants: State, federal and institutional grants are based on need. As with scholarships, they do not have to be repaid. They include Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, State Need Grants and Seattle University Grants. Work Opportunities: Underwritten by state and federal work-study programs, these jobs offer part-time employment either on or off campus during the school year. Loans: Some student loans are interest-free while a student attends college. Although loans must be repaid, interest rates are low and the terms are generally far more favorable than loans available commercially. Payments may be deferred or forgiven based on certain conditions set by the federal government.

$34,200 $34,200

Find out more To learn more about the many financial aid options, the Student Financial Services Office is ready to assist you.

SU has been extremely generous in helping me pay for college. Though I was

Student Financial Services (206) 220-8020 / (800) 426-1723 Hours: Monday and Tuesday - 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesday - Friday - 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. E-mail: financialservices@seattleu.edu

initially concerned with the cost, SU ended up being the best choice for me and

www.seattleu.edu/sfs

my family, and for that I will always be thankful.” —Robert Zehra, ‘14, major: biology

The staff members at Seattle University really do everything they can to make sure that if you want to be here, it can happen.”

The Student Financial Services Office assembles a financial aid package composed of all resources still available at the time of processing, so file as soon as possible.

An education with a deep and lasting value It may be hard to imagine how to fund a high-quality education. Well, consider this: The majority of Seattle University freshman and transfer students receive financial aid.

Tuition, room and board costs, and estimated living expenses

—Christopher Whidbey, ‘10, BA in chemistry/biology and BA in philosophy with honors

APPLICATION SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE November 15 Freshman early action application deadline.

December Student and parent request PIN for FAFSA at www.pin.ed.gov. December 23 Freshman early action decision and scholarship notification.

January 1 First day to file FAFSA for 2013–14. File online at www.fafsa.gov or by paper application available from high school and college counseling offices. January 15 Freshman regular decision application deadline.

February 1 Priority deadline for FAFSA to the federal processor for eligibility for freshman financial aid.

March 1 Freshman regular decision and scholarship notification. Fall transfer application deadline and priority financial aid form due. Late March Priority financial aid packages mailed to admitted freshmen.

April 1 Transfer decision and scholarship notification. Mid April Priority financial aid packages mailed to admitted transfers.

May 1 Candidates’ reply date. Admission confirmation deposit due.

July Enrolling students’ orientation programs on campus.

September 15 Fall tuition due. Work-study authorizations released. September 25 Fall quarter classes begin.

25


Education pays for itself

Apply for outside scholarships or work a couple of hours a week. In a city, there

The accompanying graphs say it all. The more education you have, the better your earnings will be and the less likely you are to become unemployed. There is another way of looking at it, too. Your degree can pay for the cost of your education. Look at the difference in the median weekly earnings between high school graduates ($638) and those with a bachelor's degree ($1,053). That difference of $415 a week adds up to more than $20,000 a year or $200,000 in 10 years' time. Your Seattle University education not only launches your future but also pays for itself in less than a decade with your increased earning power. Unemployment rate in 2011

Median weekly earnings in 2011 2.5%

Doctoral degree

2.4%

Professional degree

3.6% 4.9% 6.8% 8.7% 9.4%

$1,665

Master's degree

$1,263

Bachelor's degree

$1,053

Associate degree

$768

Some college, no degree

$719 $638

High school graduate Less than a high school diploma

14.1%

$1,551

$451

7.6% Average, all workers

$797 Average, all workers

Note: Data are 2011 annual averages for those age 25 and older. Earnings are for full-time wage and salary workers. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey.

Even though the cost may seem high for four years, consider that your undergraduate education will set the trajectory for your lifelong career. In that light, SU is an investment that pays dividends far beyond the day you graduate.” —Aaron Van Dyke, ‘04, BS in chemistry with honors. ‘09, PhD organic chemistry, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology. Current post-doctoral fellow, American Cancer Society

are lots of opportunities for work not only on campus, but off campus as well.”

Budget 1

Budget 2

—Anna Long, ‘14, University Honors, double major: history and economics

ON-CAMPUS RESIDENT OR OFF-CAMPUS (NOT LIVING WITH PARENTS OR RELATIVES)

LIVING WITH PARENTS OR RELATIVES

How to apply FALL QUARTER APPLICANTS When you seek financial aid, you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after January 1. You can do so via the web at www.fafsa.gov or by paper application. Both you and a parent need a Personal Identification Number (PIN) which serves as your electronic signature on the FAFSA. You can request a PIN ahead of time at www.pin.ed.gov or apply for and receive your PIN within the application as you complete it.

Not all investments yield the same rewards, so it’s critical to do your research. In addition to the deep and lasting value of the education you receive at Seattle University, you benefit from the vast and highly respected network of Jesuit Catholic colleges and universities across the country and around the world. For the past 450 years, Jesuit educators have focused on academic excellence and social justice, grounded in a strong liberal arts and sciences foundation. Graduates are highly competitive, sought after and admired.

ROOM AND BOARD

3 QUARTERS

3 QUARTERS

$10,296

$3,531

EXPENSES $6,114 $4,956 Books and supplies

$1,485

$1,485

$300

$300

Technology fee Personal

$2,328

$1,170

Transportation

$1,659

$1,659

Indicate you want your FAFSA results sent to: Federal School Code No. 003790 Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle WA 98122-1090

TUITION (12-20 credits per quarter)

The FAFSA processor needs the address and school code to ensure your application reaches Seattle University. To maximize your financial aid opportunities, you must send your FAFSA to the FAFSA processor by February 1 or within 30 days of admission.

TOTALS $50,610 $42,687

WINTER, SPRING OR SUMMER QUARTER APPLICANTS Scholarships and grants are also available to students who enter Seattle University in winter and spring quarters. Scholarships and grants are not available for students who enter in summer quarter. If you apply for spring quarter, file both the current academic year’s FAFSA and one for next year. Students who apply later may still be eligible for the Federal Pell Grant and/or loans.

To receive priority funding consideration for winter or spring quarter, complete financial aid files by September 1. You have the best chance of receiving aid if you plan ahead and apply early.

FAFSA priority dates by entry term February 1, 2013 September 1, 2013 February 1, 2014 September 1, 2014 Summer ‘13 Winter ‘14 Summer ‘14 Winter ‘15 Fall ‘13 Spring ‘14 Fall ‘14 Spring ‘15

Categories of financial aid Scholarships: Seattle University awards institutional and privately donated funds based on academic achievements and talents as well as other distinctions. Scholarships do not have to be repaid. See available scholarships at: www.seattleu.edu/scholarships. Grants: State, federal and institutional grants are based on need. As with scholarships, they do not have to be repaid. They include Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, State Need Grants and Seattle University Grants. Work Opportunities: Underwritten by state and federal work-study programs, these jobs offer part-time employment either on or off campus during the school year. Loans: Some student loans are interest-free while a student attends college. Although loans must be repaid, interest rates are low and the terms are generally far more favorable than loans available commercially. Payments may be deferred or forgiven based on certain conditions set by the federal government.

$34,200 $34,200

Find out more To learn more about the many financial aid options, the Student Financial Services Office is ready to assist you.

SU has been extremely generous in helping me pay for college. Though I was

Student Financial Services (206) 220-8020 / (800) 426-1723 Hours: Monday and Tuesday - 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesday - Friday - 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. E-mail: financialservices@seattleu.edu

initially concerned with the cost, SU ended up being the best choice for me and

www.seattleu.edu/sfs

my family, and for that I will always be thankful.” —Robert Zehra, ‘14, major: biology

The staff members at Seattle University really do everything they can to make sure that if you want to be here, it can happen.”

The Student Financial Services Office assembles a financial aid package composed of all resources still available at the time of processing, so file as soon as possible.

An education with a deep and lasting value It may be hard to imagine how to fund a high-quality education. Well, consider this: The majority of Seattle University freshman and transfer students receive financial aid.

Tuition, room and board costs, and estimated living expenses

—Christopher Whidbey, ‘10, BA in chemistry/biology and BA in philosophy with honors

APPLICATION SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE November 15 Freshman early action application deadline.

December Student and parent request PIN for FAFSA at www.pin.ed.gov. December 23 Freshman early action decision and scholarship notification.

January 1 First day to file FAFSA for 2013–14. File online at www.fafsa.gov or by paper application available from high school and college counseling offices. January 15 Freshman regular decision application deadline.

February 1 Priority deadline for FAFSA to the federal processor for eligibility for freshman financial aid.

March 1 Freshman regular decision and scholarship notification. Fall transfer application deadline and priority financial aid form due. Late March Priority financial aid packages mailed to admitted freshmen.

April 1 Transfer decision and scholarship notification. Mid April Priority financial aid packages mailed to admitted transfers.

May 1 Candidates’ reply date. Admission confirmation deposit due.

July Enrolling students’ orientation programs on campus.

September 15 Fall tuition due. Work-study authorizations released. September 25 Fall quarter classes begin.

25


Education pays for itself

Apply for outside scholarships or work a couple of hours a week. In a city, there

The accompanying graphs say it all. The more education you have, the better your earnings will be and the less likely you are to become unemployed. There is another way of looking at it, too. Your degree can pay for the cost of your education. Look at the difference in the median weekly earnings between high school graduates ($638) and those with a bachelor's degree ($1,053). That difference of $415 a week adds up to more than $20,000 a year or $200,000 in 10 years' time. Your Seattle University education not only launches your future but also pays for itself in less than a decade with your increased earning power. Unemployment rate in 2011

Median weekly earnings in 2011 2.5%

Doctoral degree

2.4%

Professional degree

3.6% 4.9% 6.8% 8.7% 9.4%

$1,665

Master's degree

$1,263

Bachelor's degree

$1,053

Associate degree

$768

Some college, no degree

$719 $638

High school graduate Less than a high school diploma

14.1%

$1,551

$451

7.6% Average, all workers

$797 Average, all workers

Note: Data are 2011 annual averages for those age 25 and older. Earnings are for full-time wage and salary workers. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey.

Even though the cost may seem high for four years, consider that your undergraduate education will set the trajectory for your lifelong career. In that light, SU is an investment that pays dividends far beyond the day you graduate.” —Aaron Van Dyke, ‘04, BS in chemistry with honors. ‘09, PhD organic chemistry, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology. Current post-doctoral fellow, American Cancer Society

are lots of opportunities for work not only on campus, but off campus as well.”

Budget 1

Budget 2

—Anna Long, ‘14, University Honors, double major: history and economics

ON-CAMPUS RESIDENT OR OFF-CAMPUS (NOT LIVING WITH PARENTS OR RELATIVES)

LIVING WITH PARENTS OR RELATIVES

How to apply FALL QUARTER APPLICANTS When you seek financial aid, you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after January 1. You can do so via the web at www.fafsa.gov or by paper application. Both you and a parent need a Personal Identification Number (PIN) which serves as your electronic signature on the FAFSA. You can request a PIN ahead of time at www.pin.ed.gov or apply for and receive your PIN within the application as you complete it.

Not all investments yield the same rewards, so it’s critical to do your research. In addition to the deep and lasting value of the education you receive at Seattle University, you benefit from the vast and highly respected network of Jesuit Catholic colleges and universities across the country and around the world. For the past 450 years, Jesuit educators have focused on academic excellence and social justice, grounded in a strong liberal arts and sciences foundation. Graduates are highly competitive, sought after and admired.

ROOM AND BOARD

3 QUARTERS

3 QUARTERS

$10,296

$3,531

EXPENSES $6,114 $4,956 Books and supplies

$1,485

$1,485

$300

$300

Technology fee Personal

$2,328

$1,170

Transportation

$1,659

$1,659

Indicate you want your FAFSA results sent to: Federal School Code No. 003790 Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle WA 98122-1090

TUITION (12-20 credits per quarter)

The FAFSA processor needs the address and school code to ensure your application reaches Seattle University. To maximize your financial aid opportunities, you must send your FAFSA to the FAFSA processor by February 1 or within 30 days of admission.

TOTALS $50,610 $42,687

WINTER, SPRING OR SUMMER QUARTER APPLICANTS Scholarships and grants are also available to students who enter Seattle University in winter and spring quarters. Scholarships and grants are not available for students who enter in summer quarter. If you apply for spring quarter, file both the current academic year’s FAFSA and one for next year. Students who apply later may still be eligible for the Federal Pell Grant and/or loans.

To receive priority funding consideration for winter or spring quarter, complete financial aid files by September 1. You have the best chance of receiving aid if you plan ahead and apply early.

FAFSA priority dates by entry term February 1, 2013 September 1, 2013 February 1, 2014 September 1, 2014 Summer ‘13 Winter ‘14 Summer ‘14 Winter ‘15 Fall ‘13 Spring ‘14 Fall ‘14 Spring ‘15

Categories of financial aid Scholarships: Seattle University awards institutional and privately donated funds based on academic achievements and talents as well as other distinctions. Scholarships do not have to be repaid. See available scholarships at: www.seattleu.edu/scholarships. Grants: State, federal and institutional grants are based on need. As with scholarships, they do not have to be repaid. They include Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, State Need Grants and Seattle University Grants. Work Opportunities: Underwritten by state and federal work-study programs, these jobs offer part-time employment either on or off campus during the school year. Loans: Some student loans are interest-free while a student attends college. Although loans must be repaid, interest rates are low and the terms are generally far more favorable than loans available commercially. Payments may be deferred or forgiven based on certain conditions set by the federal government.

$34,200 $34,200

Find out more To learn more about the many financial aid options, the Student Financial Services Office is ready to assist you.

SU has been extremely generous in helping me pay for college. Though I was

Student Financial Services (206) 220-8020 / (800) 426-1723 Hours: Monday and Tuesday - 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesday - Friday - 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. E-mail: financialservices@seattleu.edu

initially concerned with the cost, SU ended up being the best choice for me and

www.seattleu.edu/sfs

my family, and for that I will always be thankful.” —Robert Zehra, ‘14, major: biology

The staff members at Seattle University really do everything they can to make sure that if you want to be here, it can happen.”

The Student Financial Services Office assembles a financial aid package composed of all resources still available at the time of processing, so file as soon as possible.

An education with a deep and lasting value It may be hard to imagine how to fund a high-quality education. Well, consider this: The majority of Seattle University freshman and transfer students receive financial aid.

Tuition, room and board costs, and estimated living expenses

—Christopher Whidbey, ‘10, BA in chemistry/biology and BA in philosophy with honors

APPLICATION SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE November 15 Freshman early action application deadline.

December Student and parent request PIN for FAFSA at www.pin.ed.gov. December 23 Freshman early action decision and scholarship notification.

January 1 First day to file FAFSA for 2013–14. File online at www.fafsa.gov or by paper application available from high school and college counseling offices. January 15 Freshman regular decision application deadline.

February 1 Priority deadline for FAFSA to the federal processor for eligibility for freshman financial aid.

March 1 Freshman regular decision and scholarship notification. Fall transfer application deadline and priority financial aid form due. Late March Priority financial aid packages mailed to admitted freshmen.

April 1 Transfer decision and scholarship notification. Mid April Priority financial aid packages mailed to admitted transfers.

May 1 Candidates’ reply date. Admission confirmation deposit due.

July Enrolling students’ orientation programs on campus.

September 15 Fall tuition due. Work-study authorizations released. September 25 Fall quarter classes begin.

25


SU Profile Seattle University's commitment Seattle University strives to help you bridge the gap between what

FACTS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Jesuit Catholic One of 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the U.S. and 133 around the world

Albers School of Business and Economics Accounting; Business Economics; Economics; Information Systems; Finance; Individualized Major; International Business; Management; Marketing

you can afford to pay for your education and what it actually costs.

Faculty-to-student ratio: 1:13 719 total faculty

When an incoming freshman receives a financial aid offer, the amount

Average class size: 20 Classes taught by professors: 100%

of institutional gift aid (scholarship and/or Seattle University grant) is guaranteed for all four years. (If you are a transfer student, the initial sum varies depending on your class level at enrollment). Sources for institutional gift aid may change from year to year, although the total amount will not fluctuate as long as you remain in good standing and file your annual FAFSA for need-based awards.

SU financial aid facts $27,519

The average amount of aid awarded to eligible full-time undergraduates in 2011–12.

$103 million The amount of financial aid that Seattle University administers annually (including $60 million in undergraduate scholarships and grants). 1,912

Number of students employed in 2012-13. Student employment positions are easy-to-find, part-time jobs that don’t interfere with your class schedule. On-campus wages start at $8.95 per hour.

76.25%

Of those who applied, entering freshmen who received financial aid in 2011-12.

Freshman retention rate: 86% Alumni Approximately 69,000 in all 50 states and 77 nations Undergraduate Tuition (2012–13) Full time: $34,200 Average room and board: $10,296 University enrollment 7,755 Undergraduate: 4,631 Graduate: 2,124 Law: 1,000 Undergraduate profile 870 new freshmen 40% men; 60% women 53 states and territories and 89 nations represented 54% Caucasian 21% Asian/Pacific Islander 9% International students 8% Latino 5% African American 1% Native American 6% Unknown NOTE: individuals can self-identify with more than one race or ethnicity and are counted within each group, which results in a total of more than 100%.

Freshman class (middle 50%) GPA: 3.3–3.9 SAT math score: 520–630 SAT critical reading score: 530–630 SAT writing score: 530–630 ACT composite score: 24–28 41% from Washington state

College of Arts and Sciences American Law and Politics; Art History; Asian Studies; Catholic Studies; Chinese; Communication Studies; Creative Writing; Criminal Justice; Cultural Anthropology; Digital Design; Drama; English; Environmental Studies; Film Studies; Fine Arts; French; German; Global African Studies; Global Awareness; Global Politics; History; International Studies; Italian; Japanese; Journalism; Latin American Studies; Liberal Studies; Medieval Studies; Military Science/ROTC; Music; Nonprofit Leadership; Philosophy; Photography; Political Science; Prelaw (Pre-professional programs); Premajor (for freshmen and sophomores only); Psychology; Public Affairs; Social Welfare; Social Work; Sociology; Spanish; Sport and Exercise Science; Strategic Communications; String Performance; Theatre ; Theology and Religious Studies; Visual Art; Women Studies

Your educational investment All investments offer risks and rewards. You want the biggest investment in your life so far—your college education—to have low risks and high rewards. One way to achieve this is to attend a respected university, one with a reputation that assures a lifetime of valuable returns. Your academic career largely determines what doors open in

seattle university

your professional career. You want to find the ideal route to long-term success and satisfaction. A selective private institution like Seattle University offers personal attention and a rigorous yet supportive academic environment that brings out your best. You may recognize the far-reaching value of private education yet feel concerned about the cost. This brochure explains how to make it affordable.

College of Nursing Nursing College of Science and Engineering Biochemistry; Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; Chemistry; Civil Engineering; Computer Science; Computer Science–Business; Computer Science– Mathematics; Diagnostic Ultrasound; Electrical Engineering; Environmental Science; General Science; General Science–Preprofessional; Marine and Conservation Biology; Mathematics; Mathematics–Applied; Mathematics–Pure; Mechanical Engineering; Physics

Financial Aid

Matteo Ricci College Humanities; Humanities for Teaching; Humanities for Leadership Studies To view SU’s Common Data Set and other noteworthy statistics, visit www.seattleu.edu/ir.

Admissions (206) 220-8040 or (800) 426-7123 admissions@seattleu.edu Financial Aid (206) 220-8020 or (800) 426-7123 financialservices@seattleu.edu

WWW.SEATTLEU.EDU

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries related to these policies may be referred to the university’s Assistant Vice President for Human Resources and Equal Opportunity Officer at (206) 296-5870. Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and its implementing regulations, Seattle University has designated three individuals responsible for coordinating the university’s Title IX compliance. Students or employees with concerns or complaints about discrimination on the basis of sex in employment or an education program or activity may contact any one of the following Title IX coordinators: Gerald Huffman, assistant vice president for Human Resources, Equal Opportunity Officer, University Services Building 107, (206) 296-5870, huffmaje@seattleu.edu; Dr. Michele Murray, associate vice president of Student Development, Student Center 140B, (206) 296-6066, mmurray@ seattleu.edu. Individuals may also contact the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education.


SU Profile Seattle University's commitment Seattle University strives to help you bridge the gap between what

FACTS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Jesuit Catholic One of 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the U.S. and 133 around the world

Albers School of Business and Economics Accounting; Business Economics; Economics; Information Systems; Finance; Individualized Major; International Business; Management; Marketing

you can afford to pay for your education and what it actually costs.

Faculty-to-student ratio: 1:13 719 total faculty

When an incoming freshman receives a financial aid offer, the amount

Average class size: 20 Classes taught by professors: 100%

of institutional gift aid (scholarship and/or Seattle University grant) is guaranteed for all four years. (If you are a transfer student, the initial sum varies depending on your class level at enrollment). Sources for institutional gift aid may change from year to year, although the total amount will not fluctuate as long as you remain in good standing and file your annual FAFSA for need-based awards.

SU financial aid facts $27,519

The average amount of aid awarded to eligible full-time undergraduates in 2011–12.

$103 million The amount of financial aid that Seattle University administers annually (including $60 million in undergraduate scholarships and grants). 1,912

Number of students employed in 2012-13. Student employment positions are easy-to-find, part-time jobs that don’t interfere with your class schedule. On-campus wages start at $8.95 per hour.

76.25%

Of those who applied, entering freshmen who received financial aid in 2011-12.

Freshman retention rate: 86% Alumni Approximately 69,000 in all 50 states and 77 nations Undergraduate Tuition (2012–13) Full time: $34,200 Average room and board: $10,296 University enrollment 7,755 Undergraduate: 4,631 Graduate: 2,124 Law: 1,000 Undergraduate profile 870 new freshmen 40% men; 60% women 53 states and territories and 89 nations represented 54% Caucasian 21% Asian/Pacific Islander 9% International students 8% Latino 5% African American 1% Native American 6% Unknown NOTE: individuals can self-identify with more than one race or ethnicity and are counted within each group, which results in a total of more than 100%.

Freshman class (middle 50%) GPA: 3.3–3.9 SAT math score: 520–630 SAT critical reading score: 530–630 SAT writing score: 530–630 ACT composite score: 24–28 41% from Washington state

College of Arts and Sciences American Law and Politics; Art History; Asian Studies; Catholic Studies; Chinese; Communication Studies; Creative Writing; Criminal Justice; Cultural Anthropology; Digital Design; Drama; English; Environmental Studies; Film Studies; Fine Arts; French; German; Global African Studies; Global Awareness; Global Politics; History; International Studies; Italian; Japanese; Journalism; Latin American Studies; Liberal Studies; Medieval Studies; Military Science/ROTC; Music; Nonprofit Leadership; Philosophy; Photography; Political Science; Prelaw (Pre-professional programs); Premajor (for freshmen and sophomores only); Psychology; Public Affairs; Social Welfare; Social Work; Sociology; Spanish; Sport and Exercise Science; Strategic Communications; String Performance; Theatre ; Theology and Religious Studies; Visual Art; Women Studies

Your educational investment All investments offer risks and rewards. You want the biggest investment in your life so far—your college education—to have low risks and high rewards. One way to achieve this is to attend a respected university, one with a reputation that assures a lifetime of valuable returns. Your academic career largely determines what doors open in

seattle university

your professional career. You want to find the ideal route to long-term success and satisfaction. A selective private institution like Seattle University offers personal attention and a rigorous yet supportive academic environment that brings out your best. You may recognize the far-reaching value of private education yet feel concerned about the cost. This brochure explains how to make it affordable.

College of Nursing Nursing College of Science and Engineering Biochemistry; Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; Chemistry; Civil Engineering; Computer Science; Computer Science–Business; Computer Science– Mathematics; Diagnostic Ultrasound; Electrical Engineering; Environmental Science; General Science; General Science–Preprofessional; Marine and Conservation Biology; Mathematics; Mathematics–Applied; Mathematics–Pure; Mechanical Engineering; Physics

Financial Aid

Matteo Ricci College Humanities; Humanities for Teaching; Humanities for Leadership Studies To view SU’s Common Data Set and other noteworthy statistics, visit www.seattleu.edu/ir.

Admissions (206) 220-8040 or (800) 426-7123 admissions@seattleu.edu Financial Aid (206) 220-8020 or (800) 426-7123 financialservices@seattleu.edu

WWW.SEATTLEU.EDU

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries related to these policies may be referred to the university’s Assistant Vice President for Human Resources and Equal Opportunity Officer at (206) 296-5870. Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and its implementing regulations, Seattle University has designated three individuals responsible for coordinating the university’s Title IX compliance. Students or employees with concerns or complaints about discrimination on the basis of sex in employment or an education program or activity may contact any one of the following Title IX coordinators: Gerald Huffman, assistant vice president for Human Resources, Equal Opportunity Officer, University Services Building 107, (206) 296-5870, huffmaje@seattleu.edu; Dr. Michele Murray, associate vice president of Student Development, Student Center 140B, (206) 296-6066, mmurray@ seattleu.edu. Individuals may also contact the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education.


Financial Aid Guid