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L/C

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INSIDE Rebirth of 23rd & Union

Arts Grad an Arts Leader

Climb Any Mountain B

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Seattle University

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FALL 2013

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Joan Bonvicini, “Coach B,” draws out the best from her players on and off the court

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ICS# 130285 • Seattle University 2013 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 52 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL Epson

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ICS# 130285 • Seattle University 2013 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 52 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL Epson


L/C

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B

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QUA QUADSTOCK A D ST O C K ROC CKS ROCKS

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Quadst Quadstock, Quad stoc ock, the longstanding lon ngs gsta tand n in ing g music musi mu sicc and si and arts arts festival festiva al that thatt is is the the th biggest b bi gg ges estt student-supported s ud st den entt-su supp ppor o te ted d event event ev eve en e nt of of its att SU SU,, ro roared again its ki kind nd a S roar ared to o lillife ife e a gain gain ga n this th hiss year yea earr with w th wi t the the music mus usic ic of of Super Su S upe perr Mash Ma assh h Bros., Bross., Brother Bro roth ther er Ali, Alili,, Youth Yout Yo uth ut h Lagoon, La ago g on on,, Ivan IIvvan Iva an & Alyosha and an nd the th he Ramblin’ Ramb Ra m lliin’ mb n Years. Ye ea ars rs. s. Past Past s Quadstock Q ad Qu adstock alums alum ms have have e gone gone on to to big big things, most notably no otta ab b bly ly Seattle’sly Sea eatt tttle le’s ’sown ch chart-topping Macklemore char artt to op pp pin ing M Ma ackkle lemo ore and a n d Ryan an R ya Ry an n Lewis. L ew e is is..

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PHOTO PHOT PHO OT TO BY B CHR C CHRIS IIS S JJOSEPH OSEP OSEP EPH TA TAYLOR YLOR YLOR

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L/C

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B

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Volume 37 • Issue Number 3 • Fall 2013 STA F F

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Senior Art Director Terry Lundmark, ’82

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Editorial Assistant Emily Downing

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Contributing Photographers Eric Badeau, Sy Bean, John Lock, Kyle Scholzen, Chris Joseph Taylor

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Editor Tina Potterf

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Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Jason Behenna, Caitlin King, Mike Thee

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK URSINO

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Seattle University

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Vice President/University Communications Scott McClellan Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden

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Assistant Vice President/Alumni Relations Susan Vosper

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Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published in fall, winter and spring by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Alumnus Mark Ursino has climbed mountains on all seven continents. Locally, he’s ascended Mt. Rainier multiple times.

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Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

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ICS# 130285 • Seattle University 2013 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 52 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 GRACoL Epson

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B

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MAGAZINE

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Seattle University

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Faculty News

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Athletics

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Academic Excellence

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Alumni Voice

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Class Notes

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Bookmarks

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In Memoriam

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The Last Word

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On Campus

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[11 blocks to the southwest]

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Seattle University

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East Union Street

23rd and Union

Come Join Us

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Albers students work with business owners to map long-term plans for stability and sustainability amid a sea of change.

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Helping Neighbors

Did You Know?

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n 23rd Avenue

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Coach Joan Bonvicini led her team to the WAC championship and inspires her players to be the best in sport and in life.

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22 Building Champions

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features

DEPARTMENTS

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COVER PHOTO BY JOHN LOK

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SU Magazine Fall 2 013 / 1

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Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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ON THE COVER Women’s basketball coach Joan Bonvicini is putting the program on the map nationally with a formula for success that goes beyond just winning.


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DID YOU KNOW?

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A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU. B

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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PHOTO BY AGNIESZKA MIGUEL

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EXCELLENCE AT THE SCIENCE EXPO

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Seattle Science Expo visitors try out one of the interactive and engaging activities created by members of SU's College of Science and Engineering.

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Professor Phil Thompson stands outside the Bullitt Center, the home of the Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability. The center is the world’s greenest commercial building.

Seattle University’s College of Science and Engineering recently won the Best Educator Award at the 2013 Seattle Science EXPO at Seattle Center. It’s the second year of the EXPO and the second time the college was honored for its engaging exhibit, besting other educational exhibitors that included major universities in Washington state. The event, part of the two-week Seattle Science Festival, is organized by the Pacific Science Center. This year’s booth, guided by Agnieszka Miguel, associate professor and chair of electrical and computer engineering, and Frank Shih, associate professor of mechanical engineering, featured 12 interactive activities that spanned biology, chemistry, electrical and mechanical engineering, math and diagnostic ultrasound.

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If where you live says something about who you are, the Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability's new home speaks volumes. Launched this year, the center hangs its shingle in what is heralded as the greenest commercial building in the world—the Bullitt Center. Just steps away from the SU campus, the building is a natural fit for the new center, says Phil Thompson, professor and center director. “There is a tremendous harmony between what this building stands for and what we are aspiring to accomplish. We are thrilled to be located at the Bullitt Center and look forward to collaborating with our partners there.” Of the Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability, one of SU’s centers for excellence, President Stephen Sundborg says, “The center will bring faculty members who are influential scholars on environmental issues together to address the most urgent question of our time—how we as human beings can more responsibly and equitably steward the planet on which we live.”

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GOING GREEN IN THE GREENEST BUILDING


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B

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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At the end of the academic year the Seattle University community bid farewell to James Reichmann, S.J., who left the university to live in the Jesuit Senior Apostolic Community in Spokane. The beloved Father Reichmann, a professor of philosophy, arrived at SU in 1955 and taught six classes a year until 2009. Fr. Reichmann lived in the Jesuit community for 53 years.

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SAYING GOODBYE TO AN SU TREASURE

Thomas Lucas, S.J., who was a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of San Francisco, is the new rector of the Jesuit community at SU. He succeeds Pat Howell, S.J., who served in the role for the past three years. Father Lucas joined the USF faculty in 1995 and was a professor of art and architecture and director of the university’s Thacher Gallery. Prior to joining USF he served as National Secretary for Communications at the U.S. Jesuit Conference in Washington, D.C. At USF, he was a founding chair of the fine and performing arts programs. He is internationally recognized as an expert in Jesuit art history and a well-known liturgical designer and artist.

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SU WELCOMES NEW RECTOR

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Read more about Fr. Lucas at www.seattleu.edu/commons/.

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C O CO O

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ALBERS #1 IN MACROECONOMICS 10 25

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Bloomberg BusinessWeek ranked Albers #1 in the nation as the best undergraduate macroeconomics program. The high standing is based on student survey responses that rank specialty areas. Albers offers a rigorous microeconomics and macroeconomics curriculum that focuses on theory and its real world application. The school also offers courses in applying macro models to economic growth, forecasting business conditions and a variety of courses in financial markets. “We are honored to be recognized by Bloomberg BusinessWeek for the strength of our undergraduate economics program,” says Albers Dean Joseph Phillips. “The ranking speaks to the value of having our economics program within the business school. It also speaks to the academic excellence of Albers and Seattle University.”


L/C

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COME JOIN US B

A

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14TH ANNUAL COSTCO SCHOLARSHIP FUND BREAKFAST

Class of 2003 Reunion

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4 / Come Join Us

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Oct. 1, 15, 29, Nov. 12, 26, and Dec. 10, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.; SU campus The Alumni Seminars Program, organized by the College of Arts and Sciences, presents “Issues in the Middle East Today: What is Happening and How is it Affecting the World?” Faculty experts will lead the seminar, which explores major conflicts and movements in the Middle East that are in the news such as the Arab Spring and the status of the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks.

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ALUMNI SEMINARS PROGRAM

Tuition: $240 (six sessions per seminar; fee includes all materials, refreshments and parking). Information and sign up: alumniseminars@seattleu.edu.

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Friday, November 1 5 p.m., SU campus Return home to your alma mater for Alumni and Family Weekend! Join President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., and members of the community as we celebrate legacy families with an evening of good company, conversation and appetizers.

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Alumni and Parents Legacy Reception

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Friday, November 1 through Sunday, November 3

Sunday, December 8 4 – 7:30 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius and PACCAR Atrium Pigott Building Seattle University invites alumni, family members and friends to celebrate the advent season by attending the annual Alumni Advent Mass and Christmas reception. The Mass will be followed by refreshments and holiday music at a reception in PACCAR Atrium.

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ALUMNI AND FAMILY WEEKEND

ADVENT MASS AND CHRISTMAS RECEPTION

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Saturday, October 26 6 p.m., The Westin Seattle Join us for an evening of inspiration and entertainment at the annual Gala. This black-tie affair includes fine dining, dancing and live entertainment. Proceeds benefit student scholarships. Information: (206) 296-6301, www.seattleu.edu/giving/gala or e-mail gala@seattleu.edu.

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30TH ANNIVERSARY GALA

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Tuesday, October 22 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Campion Ballroom (SU campus) Join Career Services at the Business and Engineering Career Fair. Employers from the business and science sectors will be recruiting for full-time jobs and internship positions for the coming year. It’s a great opportunity to make connections, network and get job leads. Information: Hannah Garcia at (206) 296-2029.

Sunday, November 3 2:30 p.m., SODO Kitchen, Seattle The Wine, Cheese and Chocolate event is a fundraiser for the women's basketball program. Guests enjoy a selection of wines, cheese and chocolate from the Pacific Northwest while mingling with the women's basketball coaching staff, players and supporters of the program. Guests also will have the opportunity to bid on silent and live auction items. Information: www.goseattleu.com.

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BUSINESS AND ENGINEERING CAREER FAIR

3RD ANNUAL WOMEN'S BASKETBALL WINE, CHEESE AND CHOCOLATE EVENT

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october

Saturday, November 2 Evening, SU campus Connect with your SU friends at a fun and casual party. Help us create a great event to connect with your classmates and other alumni. Become a reunion volunteer! Information: E-mail alumnireunions@seattleu.edu.

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Wednesday, September 25 7:30 to 9 a.m., Hyatt Regency Bellevue Annual fundraising breakfast to support scholarships for underrepresented students at Seattle University and the University of Washington. Tickets and more information: www.costcoscholarshipfund.org.

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Saturday, November 2, 2013 11:30 a.m., LeRoux Conference Center (Student Center 160) Reunite with classmates and share your favorite college memories. Help us to make this a fun and successful event. Become a reunion volunteer! Information: E-mail alumnireunions@seattleu.edu.

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Class of 1963 Golden Reunion Luncheon

Monday, September 9 11 a.m., Redmond Ridge (Redmond) Join Seattle University for the 11th Annual O’Brien Golf Tournament benefiting SU Athletics. Registration begins at 11 a.m., with game playing at noon. The event is $175 including greens and cart, lunch, an SU hat, golf balls and dinner. Information: www.goseattleu.com.

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11TH ANNUAL O’BRIEN OPEN GOLF TOURNAMENT

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september


L/C

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PERSPECTIVES B

A

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Fine Arts alumnus draws on education as he leads Pratt Fine Arts Center

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PHOTOS BY SY BEAN

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Art Awakening | By Annie Beckmann

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Executive director Steve Galatro, '09 MFA, is leading the charge to raise the profile of Pratt Fine Arts in Seattle.

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SU Magazine Fall 2 013 / 5

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points proudly to a fundraiser that brought in a whopping $750,000 earlier this year, the highest ever for Pratt. “It’s a statement that the donor community is on board and that feels good. We had an incredible lineup of contributing artists. The quality was very high—Dale Chihuly donated a piece for our drawing—which says artists believe in Pratt. “Now that I’m a year in, a lot has

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If you saw his comfort level at that event, you never would have guessed he knew only a handful of those in attendance. The successful 2012 auction brought in $500,000 to support Pratt’s programs for artists of all ages, abilities and backgrounds. With a little more savoir-faire and audience familiarity, Galatro dressed in a bright teal blazer for the “Mad Pratter” theme of the next auction gala and now

happened,” says the 2009 graduate of the master of fine arts degree in arts leadership. “What I credit is my MFA degree. Combined with various elements of leadership, I now have a comprehensive vision that’s sustainable in the long term. That includes marketing, development, fundraising, arts programming, strategic planning, business planning and all the elements in between.” Not long after he started at Pratt, he pulled together a gathering of board members, staff and volunteers for a cleanup day. Wood chippers whined. Saws hacked. And one of the first things Galatro did was tear down an ominous

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His fifth day on the job as executive director of Pratt Fine Arts Center, Seattle University alumnus Steve Galatro found himself onstage at the Seattle nonprofit’s annual fine art auction giving a speech to 600 people he’d never met.


L/C

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PERSPECTIVES B

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STEVE GALATRO, ’09 MFA

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“Pratt used to be called a hidden gem, a best-kept secret, but how can you be accessible if nobody knows about you?”

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Department as operations manager. It was the year the Lee Center for the Arts opened on campus and he saw it as a chance to expand his skills in arts administration. At that point, the MFA in arts leadership didn’t yet exist. Kevin Maifeld, Fine Arts professor and director of the fine arts leadership program, says experience in the arts—like Galatro’s—is critical for those who pursue this degree. “It’s a confluence of experience and a desire to learn the life skills to become a leader in the arts,” says Mafield. The first nine students began in August 2007. Among them was Galatro, pleased that he had an opportunity to offer insights for the back-end creation of the

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organizations,” Galatro says. “As we teach people to make art at Pratt, are we also educating the whole person and teaching them to be artists?” After completing a theater degree at Arizona State University, Galatro came to Seattle in 2001 because he wanted an environment with a thriving arts scene. He started as an intern at Empty Space Theater and four years later, at age 24, became managing director of the struggling community theater. “I had some success but also the feeling I was operating on pure passion and instinct rather than a previously developed skill set,” says Galatro. That feeling led him to Seattle University. In 2006, he joined the Fine Arts

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fence around the property. “Removing the fence was symbolic and powerful. It said to the community, ‘We are here, please come.’ It might seem like a small thing, yet access is part of our mission so it’s very impactful,” he says. The way he describes his vision for Pratt—which offers lectures, classes, demonstrations and studio rentals for glass, sculpture, jewelry and metalsmithing, painting, drawing and printmaking—you sense how well his role there melds with his affinity for SU’s academic excellence and mission. “The learning experience at SU is rooted in the commitment to service and the public good. That’s why it’s easy to understand the nature of nonprofit

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Pratt Fine Arts Center BY THE NUMBERS

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2: Open houses Pratt hosts each year

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3,500: People who register annually for classes in glass, sculpture, jewelry and metalsmithing, painting, drawing and printmaking 900: People in attendance at these open houses

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300: Working artists served by Pratt each year

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$750,000: Amount raised at the 2013 fine art auction to support Pratt programs

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$2 million: Pratt’s annual budget

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6 / Perspectives

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Pratt Fine Arts is located at 1902 S. Main St., southeast of SU’s campus. www.pratt.org


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Steve Galatro emcees the 2013 annual auction and fundraiser for the Pratt Fine Arts Center. The event raised $750,000 to support Pratt programs.

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ICS# 130285 • Seattle University 2013 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 52 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL Epson

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SU Magazine Fall 2 013 / 7

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ments of responsible management. ... Steve’s arts leadership education, nonprofit experience and metric-based management approach appealed to us,” Swain says. The best thing Galatro has done for Pratt? “Steve's determination to tame the financial challenges of Pratt has calmed the books and thus the donors,” Swain says. Galatro is confident he’s headed in the right direction. “I found myself at the helm of a struggling organization again,” he says with a laugh, “but it’s different this time because I know what to do, how to fix problems and what questions to ask. And that’s because of SU.”

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year at Pratt, he’s very much the downto-earth realist. “Little wins are my strategy. Pratt used to be called a hidden gem, a best-kept secret, but how can you be accessible if nobody knows about you?” he says. “We’re developing a whole new business plan for the organization that recognizes the need for change. We’re embracing that change in order for Pratt to thrive again. Instead of an academic calendar, we’ve opened up our capacity with programs year round.” Bob Swain, Pratt’s board president, says it was Galatro’s business acumen that made him such a good choice for the nonprofit. “Like all-too-many nonprofits, idealistic goals can ignore the practical require-

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program. Most faculty members are from leading arts organizations and MFA students apply what they learn in practica with various arts groups, according to Maifeld. Unlike many three-year MFA programs, SU’s is a more intensive twoyear program, which gives students greater traction, says Maifeld. To accommodate students with full- and part-time jobs, most classes are in the evening. The program also shares curriculum with another program in the College of Arts and Sciences, the master of nonprofit leadership, which was the first graduate degree of its kind in the country for those who lead or aspire to lead nonprofit organizations. From where Galatro sits after his first


L/C

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PERSPECTIVES B

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Reaching New Heights | By Tina Potterf

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Alumnus scales world’s most majestic mountains on all seven continents

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8 / Perspectives

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captured plenty of shots of breathtaking mountain views in the midst of a climb, with Ursino unveiling seemingly gravity-defying angles and formidable slabs of ice. The walls of his home on the Eastside of Seattle, which he shares with his wife Sue Ursino—SU Athletic Hall of Fame golfer—serve as a gallery showcasing his travels via an impressive collection of stunning and dramatic photos. He has opened his home to friends and family for showings of his work, from scenes of Moscow, the Swiss Alps, Antarctica and Mt. Adams to the crater rim of Mt. St. Helens and exploration on an African Safari. “I feel so blessed to be able to do what I’ve done and be able to share my experiences with folks back home,” he says. Beyond his accomplishments ascending some of the world’s most majestic peaks, Ursino has also reached high points professionally, particularly in the tech field. When he graduated from Seattle University the job market was bleak. Having worked his way through high school and college in the restaurant industry he returned to his roots and took a job managing Ivars. After a couple years he entered the technology field with a job in the computer services department at Boeing, which ultimately led him to an opportunity with an upstart software company

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It was the first time he came face to face with death on a mountain while having a hand in saving the life of another climber in distress. “As soon as we hit base camp at 15,000 feet, we knew there was trouble as we were hearing that at 19,000 feet people were injured and sick,” recalls Ursino. “We got word that they were dropping like flies up there.” Once Ursino and his climbing companions reached High Camp at 19,000 feet, after four days of climbing, they decided not to risk the potential of injury or worse and stopped their ascent. That week, five people died on the mountain. During this time Ursino and the other climbers came across another climber at High Camp who was in bad shape and needed to be stabilized to be taken down the mountain for treatment after suffering pulmonary edema. Ursino was among the climbers to come to his aide and help administer steroid shots while talking to the man to keep him conscious and breathing. The man survived and all made it off the mountain. Although he has retired from expedition climbing, Ursino still climbs locally and does adventure treks. While the memories of his many climbs are undoubtedly etched into Ursino’s mind, he has another way of recalling the details, the people and places that construct a vivid picture of this period in his life. When he was in a new state or country for a climb, Ursino began spending time away from the mountain photographing locales, villages and the people who made these areas interesting or unique. As a photographer he has

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“Neither of us had done a climb before,” says Ursino, a 1973 graduate of Albers. “I had to talk myself into climbing.” The first attempt in 1986 didn’t go as planned as Don hurt his knee on the way up to the summit. While Ursino was able to reach the summit, the pair agreed to try it again in a year so Don could reach the top. This first climb piqued Ursino’s interest in climbing. He did some training and took mountaineering seminars to be better prepared for the next climb. One of the guides he met during a later climb asked Ursino if he would want to join a group of climbers for a future ascent of Mount McKinley, the highest mountain peak in North America. In the nine years between his first climb and McKinley, Ursino continued to train and climb on local peaks. Ursino agreed to the Mt. McKinley climb, figuring this was his “one great adventure of a lifetime.” Climbing the famed mountain was especially impressive for someone as new to the sport as Ursino. “We spent 21 days on the mountain. It’s a whole different experience,” he says. “You get very close with your climbing partners, very fast. You are totally immersed in a world that if you haven’t experienced it you don’t know it existed.” That climb was in 1995. In the years since, Ursino has climbed some of the world’s most regarded mountains on all seven continents. Locally, he’s made it up Mt. Rainier multiple times and has reached base camp at Mt. Everest. Two of his most memorable experiences while climbing happened during a climb of Mt. Huascaran in northern Peru.

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When Mark Ursino hit his mid-30s—or as he describes the time, “looking at the wrong side of 35”—he decided he was going to do something he’d never done before. Career change? Nope. Buy a fancy sports car? No, not that. Ursino opted to take up the challenge put forth by his longtime friend Don who, ever since the two were in high school, prodded him to climb Mount Rainier.


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PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK URSINO

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Alumnus Mark Ursino (right), with his brother Jeff, at the summit of Ishinka in Peru. Jeff has accompanied Mark on trips including to Indonesia.

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In his free time, Ursino continues to hone his photography interest and enjoys reading thrillers, which he calls his “mind candy.” He also trains climbers who graduate from the Seattle Union Gospel Mission’s recovery program, plus mission staff and supporters, in an annual climb at Mt. Rainier.

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with a focus on workplace culture and operations. The program was presented in workshops offered at companies of various sizes, both locally and nationally. Although he no longer presents the program he helped develop, Ursino does occasionally offer his workplace training and management methods at local community colleges and for city governments.

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in Redmond, Wash.—Microsoft. Hired as its first account manager, Ursino was one of the original 37 employees of the company. “Microsoft was a young, brash company at the time,” he recalls. “It was all cutting-edge stuff.” After nine years at Microsoft he left to join a friend’s consulting company that created executive training programs for businesses and organizations,


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By Peter Ely, S.J.

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Stirring Hope |

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A PILGRIMAGE TO ROME

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10 / On Campus

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For more information on the pilgrimage, contact Father O’Leary at oleary@seattleu. edu, Father Ohno at ohnon@seattleu.edu or Gennyn at garnetcross@msn.com.

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Alumni are invited to take “An Ignatian Pilgrimage from Assisi to Rome,” March 20-30, 2014. The trip is sponsored by Seattle University and Spiritual Exercises in Everyday Life (SEEL), under the direction of Patrick O’Leary, S.J., Natch Ohno, S.J., and Gennyn Dennison.

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Peter Ely, S.J., is vice president for Mission and Ministry and associate professor of theology and religious studies.

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added to that a deep respect for the value of learning. By the time of his death in 1556, Jesuits were running 35 high schools and universities. And Jesuits would become missionaries to India, China, North and South America, following explorers who were opening up new geographical frontiers. Before becoming auxiliary bishop of Buenos Aires in May of 1992, Fr. Bergoglio served as novice master, introducing newly entered Jesuits into the spirituality and customs of the Society of Jesus. Later that same year, Bergoglio became provincial superior of the Jesuits in Argentina. The second half of his term as provincial overlapped the brutal military dictatorship that ruled from 1976–83. In 1998, Bergoglio became Archbishop of Buenos Aires. The papacy of Francis has stirred hope in people around the world longing to see a simpler, more modern and more accessible papacy. Pope Francis, who comes to the Chair of St. Peter in the year of faith declared by his predecessor, Benedict XVI, has rekindled the hopes born during the Second Vatican Council. He seems, like another of his predecessors, John XXIII, to be opening windows and doors to the renewing breath of the Holy Spirit. We long for the completion of Vatican II. We will be praying, as he has asked us to, that God will bless him in his ministry.

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From the moment he appeared on the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica, Francis has been breaking precedents. He wore only the simple white cassock, not the traditional velvet cape trimmed in ermine. He asked the crowd to bless him before he blessed them. He declined the offer of a papal limousine, returning instead by van with the other cardinals to the place they had been staying, where he paid his own bill. The man who had registered as Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, Argentina, now checked out as Francis. He broke the tradition of a papal Mass of the Lord’s Supper in the Basilica of St. John Lateran, instead opting to celebrate the ceremony in the Casal del Marmo youth detention center and wash the feet of the prisoners. All of this comes about in the wake of another precedent-breaking event, the resignation of Benedict XVI, for whom Francis prayed when he first stepped onto the balcony. This Jesuit cardinal, by choosing the name of Francis of Assisi, has brought together two spiritual traditions. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits in 1540, drew much of his early inspiration toward holiness from Francis of Assisi: “If he could do it,” asked Ignatius, “why can’t I?” By his simplicity and love of nature Brother Francis helped to rebuild a Church corrupted by the love of luxury, wealth and prestige. Ignatius chose a simple life, too—requiring Jesuits to renounce any ambition for prestigious positions inside or outside the Church—but

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Out of the highly traditional process of electing a pope has come an untraditional choice, Pope Francis. First pope from outside Europe, first from South America, first Jesuit, first to choose the name of the beloved Saint of Assisi.


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VICE PRESIDENT, MISSION AND MINISTRY

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“From the moment he stepped onto the balcony, Pope Francis has been breaking precedents…”


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Finding the Sacred in the Everyday | By Annie Beckmann

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Jesuit-led spiritual exercises aim to transform lives

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WILLIAM WATSON, S.J.

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“We experience sickness, disease, sadness and emotional dysfunction of all kinds when we turn from God to satisfy the self.”

Fr. Watson accumulated thousands of pages of feedback from contemporary Catholic and interfaith audiences on how a 21st-century take on the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises might transform a person’s dysfunctional patterns into grace and healing. In his early 50s he completed his doctorate and returned to SU in 2009 as a resident chaplain at Campion Hall (he previously served at SU as liturgy and music director in 1978.) Last year Watson launched the nonprofit Sacred Story Institute (SSI). Hundreds of spiritual directors and parishioners—including SU students and alumni—throughout the Seattle Archdiocese have been participating in SSI’s research project to help create a pastoral resource of Fr. Watson’s Sacred Story method, recently published in the book, Forty Weeks: An Ignatian Path to Christ with Sacred Story Prayer. Participants in the Sacred Story program spend one to two 15-minute sessions daily devoted to awakening one’s conscience and consciousness through prayer. Husband, father and engineer Bret Taylor was raised in Evangelical, Fundamentalist and Gospel churches before he became a Catholic nearly seven years ago. He was among 25 parishioners from Our Lady of the Lake in Seattle who signed on to take part in the 10-week Sacred Story prayer exercises featured in Fr. Watson’s book, Sacred Story: An Ignatian Examen for the Third Millennium. “Sacred Story turned out to be very palatable to a new Catholic with roots on the Protestant end of Christianity,” says Taylor. “Early on Sacred Story seemed a two-person effort—myself and God.” Julie MacAller says she was motivated to participate in the Ignatian prayer exercises to have a better relationship with God. MacAller is a 2013 graduate of the Master of

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later, though, that he called his program Sacred Stories. Fr. Watson concentrated on how St. Ignatius developed his Spiritual Exercises with prayers, contemplation and meditations for greater discernment, moral wisdom and, ultimately, deep personal transformation. He reread the saint’s autobiography to explore not just the spiritual but the psychological for a closer examination of conscience. Remarkably, the many life crises Ignatius experienced in the 16th century—narcissism, gambling addiction, aggression and more— make him relevant today, according to Fr. Watson. Learning to recognize who you are, he says, is central to understanding the prayer exercises, which Watson adapted with modern-day approaches for conquering fear, anxiety, grief, sins, addictions and destructive compulsions.

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Since the early 1990s, William Watson, S.J., has been on that winding path. Motivated by a daily spiritual discipline that proved therapeutic in his own life, Father Watson chose to devote his energies to bringing tools for discernment and reflection to a wider audience. Today, he’s an evangelist among students, alumni, faculty, admin-istrators and chaplains from other faith traditions, connecting them with the spiritual legacy of St. Ignatius, the founder of the Jesuit order. Early on, Fr. Watson decided he wanted to build an Ignatian-based retreat program that might guide religious faithful—Catholics and Christians of all ages—around the world. He served as director of retreats for Georgetown University before he was named vice president for mission at Gonzaga University in 1999. It wasn’t until

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It’s no small task when you decide to amplify St. Ignatius Loyola’s 16th century examination of conscience to make it inviting, relevant and meaningful to a contemporary lay audience.


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Learn more about the Sacred Story Institute at http://sacredstory.net/.

the gentle mercy of God will awaken you to a whole new way to live well. … People are hungry for an experience of God’s sacred presence, something that is deep, real, personal and living,” he explains. “For me, the Sacred Story Institute program fed this hunger in a unique and special way.” Fr. Watson says the program makes you look at what might be blocking your surrender to God. “We experience sickness, disease, sadness and emotional dysfunction of all kinds when we turn from God to satisfy the self,” he says. “God is the one who can repair our hearts and get us back on the road of integrated healing.”

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I found the basic discipline of prayer periods easy,” she says. Jesuit spirituality has always captivated Tom Schutte, coordinator of Campus Ministry and chair of the religion department at Seattle’s O’Dea High School. “Since my high school days, the Ignatian path has helped me gain intimacy with my faith in Christ and shown me a deeply human route to connect with God,” he says. His parish, Holy Rosary in Edmonds, offered him the opportunity to work with Sacred Story Institute resources for the individual daily retreat experience. “With daily dedication to the program,

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Arts in Transforming Spirituality program in the School of Theology and Ministry. While taking part in the prayer exercises was mostly a solo experience, MacAller appreciated the monthly group meetings with Fr. Watson at her parish, Holy Family in Kirkland. “Those meetings were very helpful because I heard where others were struggling,” says MacAller. It wasn’t always easy, though. “I was constantly anxious at the beginning about whether I was doing them ‘right,’ which made them more difficult than they needed to be. Beyond that,

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William Watson, S.J., built the Sacred Story program based on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius.


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Fighting Poverty | By Tina Potterf

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on is in collaboration with Seattle Central Community College to offer courses in the Humanities to low-income men and women. The program will be a Seattle version of the nationwide Clemente Courses in the Humanities and Curtis sees lasting long-term benefits. Access to college courses can improve reading and writing skills and critical thinking, “which in turn can improve people’s sense of efficacy and job skills so they can be successful in whatever they choose to do,” says Curtis. “Regardless of your educational history or socioeconomic level, you should know about Michelangelo, Toni Morrison, Beethoven, Jane Austen…all part of this rich tradition in the Humanities.” Curtis is also planning a speaker series with leaders from throughout the world who have had success with poverty alleviation. From this he would propose SU hosting a national conference on the pedagogy of poverty, bringing together a delegation of professors from throughout North America to “find out what’s actually working, to have our students hear about their research and success stories, to have it be a much more intensive learning experience.”

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group of faculty, staff and administrators from SU who hosted a delegation of educators from our sister school in Nicaragua, Universidad Centroamericana (UCA), to engage in discussion about confronting poverty through teaching, research and service. Thanks in part to these meetings, future collaborations between the Poverty Education Center and UCA in Managua are already taking shape, including internship placements, study abroad opportunities and possibly joint classes. Curtis cites the work that the university and some of his colleagues are doing with poverty on a global level. These include immersion courses in Ghana, Chile, Zambia and Guatemala. Together with Sue Oliver of Albers’ Innovation and Entrepreneurship Center, he is also working on promoting the culture of social entrepreneurship at SU to encourage students’ creative ideas on how to alleviate poverty. “These experiences get our students out of the classroom, so they learn about poverty firsthand and think about ways to solve problems related to poverty,” he says. One project that Curtis is working

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Ben Curtis wants to do away with some pervasive myths and misconceptions about poverty—namely that those who are impoverished are lazy, unmotivated individuals who aren’t trying to improve their lot in life. The reality, offers Curtis, is largely the opposite: people who are impoverished may often be cut off from or unaware of the very resources that could help them immensely. Issues of poverty—locally, nationally and globally—are of great interest to Curtis, who is the director of the Poverty Education Center at Seattle University’s Matteo Ricci College. The center’s objective is to increase awareness of issues of poverty and explore the most effective ways in teaching about poverty within the framework of social justice. “A main difference between our center and similar centers at other universities is that they tend to focus more on research,” says Curtis. “Research is great and important but at SU, we can focus on how to improve teaching about poverty. What’s most important to me is the ‘action’ piece. What are we doing about poverty?” Jacqueline Helfgott is a leading In late spring part of a force in criminal Curtis justicewas education.

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about her book, Rebozos de Palabras: An Helena Maria Viramontes Critical Reader (University of Arizona Press). Gutiérrez y Muhs also presented recently at the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity. ROBERT HORTON, adjunct faculty, curated "Celluloid Seattle: A City at the Movies," a special exhibit at Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry.

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KEEP US INFORMED Submit news of achievements, awards and more to sumagazine@seattleu.edu

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FACULTY AND STAFF

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books about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues that “exhibit commendable literary quality and significant, authentic LGBT content.” Professor BURT HOPKINS, who chairs the Philosophy department, presented “Philosophical Problems in the Foundation of Arithmetic: Ancient and Modern” at the University of Indianapolis. GABRIELLA GUTIÉRREZ Y MUHS, associate professor of Latin American Studies, Modern Languages and Cultures, Women and Gender Studies, was recently interviewed by Los Angeles Review of Books

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SVEN ARVIDSON, director of the Liberal Arts program, presented “Challenges of Interdisciplinarity” at the 2013 Hawaii Universities International Conference on Arts and Humanities. The presentation aimed to answer what philosophers who seek convergence between these disciplines can learn from current thinking about interdisciplinary studies. Professor GARY ATKINS’ book, Imagining Gay Paradise: Bali, Bangkok and Cyber-Singapore was named to the American Library Association’s “Over the Rainbow” list for 2013, honoring

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

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FACULTY / news and notes


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“What’s most important to me is the ‘action’ piece. What are we doing about poverty?”

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DIRECTOR, POVERTY EDUCATION CENTER/MATTEO RICCI COLLEGE

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SU Magazine Fall 2 013 / 15

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micro-enterprise zones (MEZOs) in China,” co-authored with Dianne Welsh (North Carolina Greensboro), J. Mark Munoz (Milliken University) and Shengliang Deng (Brock University), has been accepted for publication in Management Decision. Professor GREG PRUSSIA is the 2013–16 Eva Albers Professor in Business. Prussia, who teaches management, leadership and team building, has been published in nearly 30 journals including the Journal of Applied Psychology and Academy of Management Review, among many others.

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Associate Professor JESSICA LUDESCHER’S paper, “The Sustainable Body: Ecological Self-Leadership as a Basis for Sustainable Development,” will be published in the International Journal of Sustainability Policy and Practice. Associate Professor MADHU RAO’s paper, “Control and Coordination of Information Systems in Multinational Corporations: An Empirical Examination of Subsidiary and Host Country Factors,” was accepted for publication in the Journal of Global Information Technology Management.

MEENA RISHI will be the inaugural holder of the Howard J. Bosanko Professorship in International Economics and Finance. The three-year term in Albers begins this academic year. Rishi, associate professor of economics, has been instrumental in the development of the business school’s international economic development specialization and minor. Her research focuses on economic development challenges faced by emerging economies such as capital flight and the role of entrepreneurship in economic development. Professor PETER RAVEN’s paper, “Microenterprise performance and

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ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS


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Faculty member DANIEL PETERSON has recently published his book, Tillich: A Brief Overview of the Life and Writings of Paul Tillich. The book offers an introduction to the Protestant theologian who challenged conventional notions of God and was called “the most dangerous theologian alive” at the height of his career.

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MARIANNE LABARRE, who spearheaded both the Seattle DR. SUSAN MATT has been appointed University Executive Master of Business to a three-year term as chair of the Administration degree program and Adult Health Department beginning this Seattle University School of Theology academic year. As chair she will provide and Ministry's Certificate of Graduate leadership and support for faculty and Studies in Pastoral Leadership, guidance for scholarship and publishing, contributed to a new book, So Much along with working with adjunct and Better: How Thousands of Pastors Help newly appointed tenure-track colleagues. Each Other Thrive. Assistant Professor LETICIA COLLEGE OF SCIENCE GUARDIOLA-SÁENZ was the sole AND ENGINEERING Latina among 70 contributors of varied ethnic backgrounds to the 20th Associate Professor PEGGY Anniversary Edition of Women's Bible HUDSON’s article, “Easy, Cheap and Fun: Role-Play on Endocrine Regulation Commentary, Third Edition. This is a and Negative Feedback,” was awarded trusted and classic resource for biblical scholarship, written by some of the best the NABT BioClub Recommendation feminist scholars in the field today. The and appeared in the November– contributors raise important questions December 2012 issue of The American and explore the implications of how Biology Teacher. women and other marginalized people Assistant Professor CHARLOTTE are portrayed in biblical texts, looking GARDEN’s article (co-authored with Nancy Leong), “So Closely Intertwined: specifically at gender roles, sexuality, Labor and Racial Solidarity” was accepted political power and family life, while for publication by the George Washington challenging long-held assumptions. Law Review. She also presented the paper at the Interuniversity Research Center on Globalization and Work's 2012 conference on Union Futures. COLLEGE OF NURSING

TOM ANTKOWIAK, associate professor and director of the Latin America program, presented his article, “Rights, Resources and Rhetoric: Indigenous Peoples and the InterAmerican Court,” at the annual conference of the Junior International Law Scholars Association. DEIRDRE BOWEN, associate professor of Lawyering Skills, presented empirical research on “How Jurors Respond to the Timing of Disclosure of Negative Information.” Bowen’s presentation, with her co-principal investigator Kathy Stanchi, was by invitation of the Delaware Valley, Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia Feminist Law Teachers 20th Annual CLE Conference.

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Dean MARK MARKULY spoke on the topic of “Finding New Ethical Moorings for American Society” at the Community School in Winthrop, Wash. The Methow Valley Unitarian Universalist Fellowship invited him to be a guest speaker for a second consecutive year. SHARON HENDERSON CALLAHAN’s two-volume work, Religious Leadership: A Reference Handbook, recently released its second volume. STM staff member RABBI ANSON LAYTNER and faculty member JEANETTE RODRIGUEZ served as part of the editorial board that conceived, negotiated and invited authors to contribute. Among the contributors: Core faculty TITO CRUZ and VALERIE LESNIAK.

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MARGIT MCGUIRE, director of Teaching Education in the Master in Teaching program, has been appointed to the Washington State Charter School Commission along with eight other members. BILL O’CONNELL, associate professor in Counseling and School Psychology, co-authored the article, “The hope and healing response team program model: A social work intervention for clergy abuse” in the Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics. Additionally, he co-presented a peer-reviewed publication at the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) annual conference in Washington, D.C.

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LEO SIMPSON, professor of management, has been inducted into the Enactus Sam Walton Hall of Fame. It is the highest honor bestowed upon a fellow/moderator of Enactus. Formerly SIFE, Enactus is an international nonprofit organization that works with leaders in business and higher education to mobilize university students to make a difference in their communities while developing the skills to become socially responsible business leaders. Visiting Assistant Professor MARINILKA KIMBRO’s paper, “Should Shareholders Have a Say on Executive Compensation? Evidence from Say-onPay in the United States,” co-authored with Danielle Xu (Gonzaga), was recently featured in the Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

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Welcome, New Deans College of Education, School of Law select deans

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Deanna Sands, EdD, is dean of the College of Education and Annette Clark, JD, of the School of Law

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Professor and new School of Law Dean Annette Clark’s Seattle University roots are deep. A 1989 graduate of the law school, Clark has been part of the university community for nearly 24 years as a highly accomplished scholar, teacher and administrator with a keen understanding of the challenges and possibilities for legal education. After receiving an MD with honors from the University of Washington’s School of Medicine and her JD summa cum laude from the law school, she joined the law faculty immediately upon graduation. Along with her teaching and scholarly activities, Clark served in a number of leadership positions including as associate dean for academic affairs, vice dean and interim dean. After a year as dean at St. Louis School of Law, she returned to Seattle University’s faculty in fall 2012. A 2008–09 James B. McGoldrick Fellow, Professor Clark teaches and writes in the areas of medical liability, bioethics and legal education and is a frequent local and national lecturer on these topics. A respected health law scholar, she has published articles in New York University Law Review, the Georgetown Law Journal and the Tulane Law Review, among others.

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Deanna Sands brings to the dean role a distinguished career as a teacher, scholar and administrative leader. Prior to joining Seattle University, Sands was professor and associate dean of research and professional learning at the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Colorado Denver (UC Denver). Deeply dedicated to diversity and inclusive education, Sands has devoted much of her career to enhancing educational opportunities for people with disabilities. An active and prolific scholar, her research has been supported by grants from such esteemed entities as the Institute of Education Sciences and the National Science Foundation. As associate dean at UC Denver she expanded UC Denver’s collaborative research with community partners, enhanced faculty mentorship initiatives, forged ongoing partnerships with school districts and led the schools doctoral faculty through the development of a new Doctorate of Education program in Leadership for Educational Equity. In 2011, she served as interim dean at UC Denver of the School of Education and Human Development. She began her role as College of Education dean July 1.

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ANNETTE CLARK School of Law

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DEANNA SANDS College of Education


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AT H L E T I C S B

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Red Tie Hits it Out of the Park | By Jason Behenna

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PHOTOS BY KYLE SCHOLZEN

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SAVE THE DATE Next year’s Red Tie Celebration will be May 31, 2014.

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FALL SPORTS PREVIEW

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18 / Athletics

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For the most up-to-date information on all of SU’s NCAA-sponsored sports, visit www.goseattleu.com.

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year of WAC contests in October. The volleyball program, under new head coach James Finley, hosts its first conference weekend in late September, facing CSU Bakersfield Sept. 26 and Utah Valley University Sept. 28 at Connolly Center. The highlight of the season comes in November when SU hosts its first WAC championship event, as the 2013 WAC Cross Country Championships are at Jefferson Park Golf Course Nov. 2. That will start a busy day for Redhawk athletics as women’s basketball plays an exhibition game in the afternoon and volleyball faces New Mexico State that evening as part of Senior Night.

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SU Begins Second Season in WAC While the majority of Seattle University students return to campus in mid-September to start the new academic year, the student-athletes participating in men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s soccer and volleyball will have already started their seasons as they prepare for conference play. It is SU’s second year within the Western Athletic Conference (WAC), but the league has undergone another transformation, with six new schools joining SU, Idaho and New Mexico State this year. The women’s soccer team is looking to improve on its semifinal appearance in the 2012 WAC Tournament and has the honor of hosting the first conference contest this year, welcoming Grand Canyon University to Championship Field Sept. 20. Men’s soccer, moving into the WAC after the league now sponsors the program as a championship sport, is scheduled to host crosstown rival University of Washington Oct. 8 before the start of it first

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the auctioneering skills of alum Kip Toner, ’66—and the silent auction the event, which was co-chaired by Anne, ’87, and Matt Moran, ’86, raised more than $250,000 for SU Athletics.

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accomplishment of becoming the first American to summit Mount Everest. Both in a video introduction and in his live speech, Whittaker talked about the importance of going outdoors and facing challenges, both physical and intellectual, while enjoying everything the world has to offer. Between the live auction—featuring

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With a sold-out crowd, a captivating speaker celebrating the 50th anniversary of his most famous accomplishment and a lineup of auction items exclusive to the event, Seattle University’s first annual Red Tie Celebration was a major win for the athletics program. Jim Whittaker, ’52, was honored on the 50th anniversary of his

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The first annual Red Tie Celebration, a fundraiser for Athletics, was a huge success. In attendance (pictured far right): Women’s basketball coach Joan Bonvicini with William Bakamis, ’78 JD, and his wife Gretchen Bakamis. The night’s keynote speaker, alum Jim Whittaker (far right, with Bill Eisenminger) shared memories of his summit to Mt. Everest and inspired the sold-out crowd to give.


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Headed to Harvard | By Tina Potterf

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New alum Kelly Biette credits SU for success in academics and sports

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known as a research institution, Biette calls the support for undergraduate research here “amazing” and the opportunities to work with faculty members who are leading researchers in their fields invaluable. As an undergraduate she has presented her work and findings, at three national conferences and an international conference in Switzerland. Biette has spent the past three years working on a range of projects in the labs from basic science experiments to

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The small class sizes and the opportunity of hands-on lab research work were also guiding factors in selecting SU and pursuing her interest in medical research. “I feel fortunate to have had the opportunities to work in the labs here,” says Biette, who spent 20 hours a week in the lab during the academic year and worked full time in the summer. “I genuinely love looking at and finding new data.” While Seattle University may not be

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At Seattle University Biette, a 2013 graduate of the College of Science and Engineering with a focus in cellular molecular biology, was a bright star in the classroom and on the court as a talented volleyball player. When it came time to pick a school as an undergraduate Biette, who hails from Boulder, Colo., was drawn to SU because of its urban location, academic options, a strong volleyball program and its Jesuit Catholic foundation.

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As you read this, Kelly Biette is likely in a lab at Harvard doing some cutting edge experiment that may, one day, change the world.

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Success on and off the court: Kelly Biette was a leading force in women’s volleyball, serving as a top scorer and team captain.


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20 / Academic Excellence

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KELLY BIETTE, ’13

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“Where else can you play Division I athletics and be a full-time undergraduate research student.”

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At the Red Tie fundraiser for Athletics, Kelly Biette chats with alums and members of the SU community including event co-chair Anne Moran, '87 (center) and David Rothrock, ’91 (far right).

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Her academic achievements are matched by Biette’s accomplishments on the court. As a freshman she led the Redhawks volleyball team with 81 total blocks. During her four years at SU Biette was team captain, played in 209 sets, collected 132 kills, 15 service aces, 60 digs and 145 total blocks. She was president of the Student-Athlete Advisory Council and last fall earned Academic All-District First Team honors. This year Biette was awarded the SU Athletics Mission Award for her commitment to the university mission, one she embodies. “The things I have been able to do at SU I couldn’t have done anywhere else. Where else can you play Division I athletics and be a full-time undergraduate research student,” she says. “The sum of all of my experiences has made me who I am today.”

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outstanding young scientist-in-the-making." Professor DuBois, says Biette, is a “great teacher who has this incredible knack for getting students to understand things that are difficult.” “There’s a special group of people at SU who want you to succeed,” she says. When it came time to consider graduate schools, Biette looked at 10 schools— West Coast and East Coast alike—before narrowing her choices to Stanford, Duke and Harvard. The offer from Harvard she couldn’t refuse. At the Harvard Medical School she will focus on pharmacology and bio-medical sciences, with the hope to continue working in the chaperone field. Biette is looking forward to working in one of the school’s nearly 700 labs. Ultimately, she would like to teach at a small college. Like SU? “That would be my dream job,” Biette responds without pause.

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more advanced clinical studies. Much of her work involves the role of the molecular chaperone protein hsp90 in facilitating glucocorticoid receptor signaling. Biette credits her mentor, Patrick Murphy, associate professor in the College of Nursing, and Michelle DuBois, associate professor of biology, for supporting her research exploration. “Professor Murphy has taught me so much. I have a ton of independence,” she says. “He lets me do work that mimics a graduate student’s research life. …He gets excited about the results and he has made me a much better research scientist.” Says Murphy, "Kelly is the sort of person who has the potential to be successful at whatever she puts her mind to. I feel fortunate that she chose to direct so much of her energy while at SU to becoming an


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22 / Building Champions


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Women’s basketball coach Joan Bonvicini puts winning program on the map

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n the day of a press conference introducing Joan Bonvicini as the new head coach of women’s basketball, the coach—who is known by players as “Coach B”—announced that she was a championship coach at a championship university and that she was at Seattle University to build a championship program. That last point is one that Coach B is proving since taking over the program in 2009. When a team achieves success, some people lean back, but Bonvicini is always working to get better. Entering her fifth season as head coach of women’s basketball, she has led the Redhawks through their first full season of NCAA Division I in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) and back-to-back second straight 20-win seasons. Her coaching style earned her many accolades this past season including the 2013 WAC Coach of the Year honor and a Naismith nomination for National Coach of the Year. Building champions takes talent, perseverance, focus, time and travel. Lots of travel. Last year alone, Coach B spent 220 days on the road with scouting, recruiting and games. For the veteran coach, it’s all part of the rebuilding process and achieving sustainable success. The task of rebuilding a program is not new to Bonvicini, who has been coaching since the late 1970s. It is a job she seemed destined to do. The second oldest of five, Bonvicini grew up in a boisterous household in bluecollar Bridgeport, Conn. Interested in sports from a young age, her parents, both immigrants from Europe—her father from Italy and her mother Ireland—were supportive from the start. She began to take softball and basketball seriously in elementary school. Memorable mentors along the way, including her 12th grade softball coach Ralph Raymond, who later became an Olympic softball coach, and her father, who was also a talented athlete, both led Bonvicini to pursue sports seriously.


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24 / Building Champions

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Toward the end of high school, she knew her true talent and passion belonged in basketball. She attended college at a time women’s sports received little recognition and scholarships for women’s basketball were nonexistent. Undeterred, Bonvicini chose a school with a proven basketball team, Southern Connecticut State University. Like many other female athletes, Title IX, the law that requires gender equity in education, majorly impacted high school and collegiate athletics and changed the course for Bonvicini. Title IX was signed into federal law during her freshman year when she was a guard on Southern Connecticut’s team. Her work on the court led the team to its first national AIAW tournament. The AIAW (Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women) was the central body that governed women’s intercollegiate sports predating the NCAA acceptance of women in 1981. She was named Region I-A MVP and an honorable mention All-American. She also became an Olympic finalist for the U.S. Olympic basketball team in 1976. Bonvicini was one of 25 people participating in final tryouts in Colorado Springs. Although the Olympics were not in her future, her career in basketball was on fire. Bonvicini was offered the chance to play in a women’s summer league in Southern California and she jumped at the opportunity to move west. Shortly after, in the summer of 1975, she landed her first coaching job as assistant coach at Cal Poly Pomona. While coaching was not originally in her plans, the transition from player to coach came easy. Just barely making $1,000 in salary, she also kept a full-time job as a computer programmer for a Fortune 500 company. In 1977, Long Beach State University recruited her for an assistant coaching job. Two years later, at age 25, she became head coach and signed the number one player in the country. The team earned 10 conference championships and 10 straight berths in the AIAW Tournament and two Final Four appearances. Her

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Building champions takes talent, perseverance, focus, time and travel. Lots of travel. Last year alone, Coach B spent 220 days on the road with scouting, recruiting and games.


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Bonvicini believes that if you want change as a leader, it starts with you. She knows that if she aims for success, her players will too.

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determination and dedication to the program at Long Beach State caught the eye of the University of Arizona, which wanted her for the head coaching job. She welcomed the opportunity to turn a program around, much as she did at Long Beach State. Bonvicini, who took the job at Arizona in 1991, did just that: she led the Wildcats to nine postseason appearances, including seven NCAA tournament berths. In 1996, the team took the WNIT (Women's National Invitation Tournament) Championship and in 2004, won the PAC-10 Conference Title. The Wildcats success attracted talent and Bonvicini hit a career high in 2000 when she signed Shawntinice Polk, nicknamed “Polkey,” the number one center in the country. At 6-foot-5, Polk was a powerhouse and an incredible athlete. Inarguably the most popular athlete at the university during that time, not to mention a force on the court, Polk and Bonvicini shared a special bond; Bonvicini was her coach, mentor and friend. In 2005, a heartbreaking tragedy forever changed the course of the coach’s life. While preparing for her senior season, 22-year-old Polk died in the training room from a blood clot in her lungs. “The program plummeted. It’s still hard for me to understand. She had her family and she saw them occasionally, but we were her family,��� Bonvicini says. “The school gave us great support, but it affected the players, the staff and me.” Stricken with grief and sadness, the program could not recover. Unable to get the team back on track, Bonvicini was let go. At first, she thought she was going to get another coaching job immediately, but that wasn’t the case. She stayed involved in the game and became a broadcaster for FOX Sports until she was recruited for the head coaching position at Seattle University. Attracted to the changing athletic culture of SU, following Athletic Director Bill Hogan’s call, one of the first things she did was read SU’s mission statement. “It read: empowering leaders for a just and humane world,” she says. “I could identify with that. I’m very much into the community and mentoring not just my players, but my staff.” When taking on a head coaching job, you’re hired typically in one of


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Coach Bonvicini chats with players following the 2012–13 season in preparation for the season ahead.

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26 / Building Champions

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KACIE SOWELL forward / WAC Player of the Year

two scenarios. Either you’re replacing someone who’s successful or you’re taking over for someone who’s been fired. The SU job presented its own unique set of challenges. “I leaned heavily on my experience. I could anticipate issues and see them because I had already experienced them,” she says. Not only was the team she inherited transitioning from Division II to Division I, and yet to join a conference, the NCAA ruled three of her best players ineligible due to academic violations. Initially, they thought they’d be out for a few games, but the NCAA ruled them out for the entire season. The women’s team finished the 2009–10 season with six wins. Bonvicini knew she needed talented players. Because of established relationships, she was able to go into California and scout student athletes that could fit into SU’s academic and athletic culture. The changes moved the win column in the next season modestly, finishing 2010–11 with eight Ws. While the scoreboard kept the pressure on, it didn’t come close to the pressure the coach put on herself. “I thrive under pressure, I enjoy it,” she says. That same year, the Redhawks were voted into the WAC conference. Playing in the WAC conference paid off. The next season, the team’s turnaround was more pronounced with 20 victories in Division I and its first post-season appearance in the division. Bonvicini believes that if you want change as a leader, it starts with you. She knows that if she aims for success, her players will too. With expectations comes responsibility. And as coach, she sets a vision, not to be competitive, but to build champions in everything. Not just on the court, but in the classroom too. Her experiences shape the kind of coach she is today. “I understand my strengths and weaknesses. And I have a great staff. I have people around me that complement me,” she says. Her coaching philosophy resulted in the Redhawks second

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“I love how Coach B wants things fast-paced. Everything we do in practice she wants done quickly and accurately, which helps prepare the team for game time.”


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The coach celebrates with a ceremonial removal of the net following a winning season and post-regular season playoff berth.

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November 2 | Connolly Center

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Catch the women's team in early season action. For information and tickets, visit www.goseattleu.com.

Visit www.seattleu.edu/magazine for the video clip One Year in One Minute, highlighting the team’s winning season.

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How does Coach B instill this winning mentality in her players? Ask her and she’ll give you the bottom line. “Because I expect it.”

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straight 20-win season in 2012–13, earning the Western Athletic Conference regular-season title, a postseason appearance in the WAC Championship game in Las Vegas and their first-ever WNIT berth. Bonvicini’s methodical approach to building the program extends beyond the court. To the players, Coach B expects excellence. “I get people to feel uncomfortable,” she says. “Practices are intense, a level of hard work most incoming players aren’t accustomed to.” “I love how Coach B wants things fast-paced,” says Kacie Sowell, a forward and WAC Player of the Year. “Everything we do in practice she wants done quickly and accurately, which helps prepare the team for game time.” She also has time for a few laughs. “My favorite memory with Coach B is when she was showing me how to place my feet while defending my opponent,” says guard and WAC Defensive Player of the Year Sylvia Shephard. “She tried to move my foot but kicked me so hard everybody heard it and just started laughing. It hurt but it was pretty funny.” Bonvicini does her best to balance work and life. Her family, who still resides in Tucson, trade off visiting one another. With a number of halfmarathons and 10ks under her belt, she takes on an intensive workout to stay in shape. A lover of the outdoors, Bonvicini is a Dive Master (assistant instructor) of scuba diving. Her favorite memory is on a live aboard in the Great Barrier Reef. She even took on Dos Ojos, Spanish for Two Eyes, a flooded cave system located north of Tulum, on the Caribbean coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. And although she’s completed close to 200 dives all over the world, she has no desire to dive in Puget Sound. “That’s a little chilly for me,” she says. Above all, her focus remains on building SU’s women’s basketball into a championship program. “I have high aspirations for me personally and for this program,” she says. How does Coach B instill this winning mentality in her players? Ask her and she’ll give you the bottom line. “Because I expect it.”


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By Annie Beckmann

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Earl Lancaster, whose barbershop is a fixture on 23rd and Union, cuts the hair of SU Men’s Basketball Coach Cameron Dollar.

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Photos by Chris Joseph Taylor

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Albers students work with community business owners and residents to plan for future development

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Earl’s is more than a place to get a haircut. Some customers consider it a meeting spot and pop by to play chess, check out a sports score on the TV or catch up with neighborhood goingson. Lancaster’s renowned for attracting big-name athletes as customers over the years. Cameron Dollar, Seattle University’s men’s basketball coach, is a regular along with basketball player Taylor Mays and football pro Martell Webster. The walls of the barbershop are filled with framed jerseys from several highprofile clients, including local basketball and football greats Gary Payton, Brandon Roy, Jamal Crawford and Jason Terry. Some Saturdays, the line for a haircut is out the door. Lancaster doesn’t want his barbershop to lose its distinctive character and neighborhood vibe. He’s not alone. Merchants and residents in this Central District neighborhood recognize that revitalization is well on its way. In a vacant lot on

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Brothers Hugh and Tom Bangasser look over a development and marketing plan with Enactus President Timothy O’Reilly.

the southwest corner of 23rd and Union, construction was expected to begin in August on a six-story, 92-unit apartment building with 4,000 square feet of retail space. Across the street, community members speculate on the fate of a fountain created by the late African American sculptor and painter James Washington, whose neighborhood home and studio is a designated landmark. As the contours and character of change continue to give rise to new issues, SU’s student-run club Enactus (formerly Students in Free Enterprise, or SIFE) enters the picture with its small business consulting services to help with what’s ahead for 23rd and Union. Enactus President Timothy O’Reilly, ’14, says the club was drawn to the project by Tom Bangasser, ’67, ’82, and his brother Hugh, ’68, whose family has owned 2½ acres of commercial property on the southeast corner of 23rd and Union since 1941. Last spring Enactus started to coordinate an initiative using the activities of undergraduate and graduate management classes in Albers. The goal is to give community leaders and businesses the tools and strategies to help in the evolution of their neighborhood. Called “Union Street 98122,” the initiative’s vision is a thriving and sustainable multicultural neighborhood. A big part of the initiative is the Union Street Business Association (USBA), a neighborhood-based nonprofit leadership organization established with help from SU MBA students. The USBA encompasses residents as well as merchants and is designed to become the driving force for a diverse neighborhood. A website that brands the area with a distinct identity voiced by residents is in the making as are workshops

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arl Lancaster has been cutting hair at the corner of 23rd Avenue and East Union Street since he was a teenager. He’s a fixture in a neighborhood that’s primed for big changes. Often dubbed the “Mayor of 23rd and Union,” Lancaster stands tall, an impressive figure with long locks and a full saltand-pepper beard. He grew up 10 blocks from here and in 1992 opened his barbershop, Earl’s Cuts & Styles.


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services they want to see, how they get—and want to get—their neighborhood news and information and what other topics they feel the community should consider going forward. At the first of the community meetings, Edward Hill, an urban planner who lives in the neighborhood, said that while there’s little argument residents want the likes of bakeries, small businesses and parks in the area, they don’t want bigbox retailers, chain stores and giant apartment towers, adding, “We have very little time to get this straight if we don’t want to become another Pike/Pine corridor.” O’Reilly is pleased with the wide participation in the Enactus project. “Engaging our university in the neighborhood benefits students, faculty and community members alike. It is an amazing opportunity for transforming a neighborhood into a thriving and vibrant community,” he says. MBA students continue to be instrumental in helping the

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and other consultation services for business owners. The USBA is exploring ways to acquire neighborhood properties currently leased by businesses in an effort to create local ownership. Developing a working framework for the USBA was a project MBA student Jason Lee, ’14, especially enjoyed. “This is an organization that will be able to succeed year after year. To have some impact to help them along the way, that in itself has been rewarding,” says Lee. In community meetings hosted by Casey Family Programs last spring, MBA students asked residents and merchants what it means to be a thriving and sustainable neighborhood, what retail goods and

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Seattle University’s Enactus chapter, a student-led club operated through Albers, lives by its mission statement: “Improving the quality of life for those in need through economic development.” Enactus works on several sustainable projects throughout the year and develops new ones and new approaches regularly. The projects respond to an identified need such as helping the homeless or working with community businesses to develop operation or marketing plans, for example. For the past several years the team has earned a spot at the national competition where they have made an impact for their creative projects. These projects, in addition to the work with 23rd and Union, include:

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Donation drives to collect food and goods for the city’s homeless. Within the past year the team collected more than 12,000 pounds of canned food and informed homeless youth and adults about resources available to them including locations of shelters.

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Organized and hosted a career fair for the homeless, military veterans and others in search of professional development, networking and job opportunities. Enactus put prospective employers in touch with job seekers, resulting in employment offers.

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Team members worked with high school students from the Seattle area in providing computer training to schools and business owners in Ghana, in addition to small business consultation and training. Partners include the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, GE, Microsoft and Rotary International. REDEEMING SOLES

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In partnership with Scott Sowle and the Union Gospel Mission, among others, Enactus members helped collect shoes and socks for the homeless and the poor in the greater Seattle area. With the involvement of Enactus, 50,000 pairs of shoes have been collected for Redeeming Soles.


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neighborhood develop its vision and assisting with the creation of the USBA. Undergraduate students are hammering out business plans for some of the existing 23rd and Union merchants so the impact of higher rents in a new development won’t force them to leave. Earl’s Cuts & Styles is among them. “Change is good. There are going to be more people around here,” says Lancaster as he trims a bank manager’s hair and nods in the direction of traffic out the window. Even now, an estimated 30,000 vehicles pass through the intersection of 23rd and Union each week. “As long as I’ve been here, I know everybody. I’d be willing to move to a new location temporarily, but I love this neighborhood and I like this corner,” says Lancaster. Meeting with SU undergraduate students weekly, Lancaster says he’s becoming more knowledgeable about the organization of his business. He has new strategies for increasing clientele and sees how adding to his services and products also could improve revenue. O’Reilly says Enactus will continue its involvement at 23rd and Union for the long haul. “The Enactus role is more focused on sustainability and how we can help them implement the business model and ensure that the USBA has a successful and profitable future,” he says. Robert Spencer, adjunct management faculty, is gratified by the work of a student team from his spring quarter MBA course, New Ventures Consulting. That team was tasked with engaging the community in the revitalization effort. “There couldn’t be a better example of the stewardship capabilities of our students,” says Spencer. “They have the ability to apply their knowledge in ways that help people in this neighborhood get a voice and sort out their destiny. Profound issues are at stake here—people’s homes and at times even their sense of heritage. Yet our students are helping the community find its own way, not showing them their way.” Property owners Hugh and Tom Bangasser agree. “The old maxim, ‘think globally, act locally’ applies here. We are trying to formulate practical solutions to concrete local problems and to provide opportunities to the underserved right here in this transitioning neighborhood,” says Hugh. Adds Tom, “Businesses that last, like Earl’s, have a passion and when they lose that passion, they sell the business. We want to create a sense of a neighborhood where people help each other.”

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“As long as I’ve been here, I know everybody. I’d be willing to move to a new location temporarily, but I love this neighborhood and I like this corner.”

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There are 11 flags out front of the businesses on 23rd and Union, signifying the diversity of the businesses, their owners and the neighborhood. Brothers Tom and Hugh Bangasser were instrumental in getting the flags installed.


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News from Alumni House

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From Susan Vosper, ’90, ’10 LEMBA, Assistant VP/Alumni Relations

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continue to build in the coming years, making our reunions at Seattle University an annual tradition to be proud of.

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November 1-3, 2013 CLASS OF 1963 50th Golden Reunion Luncheon 11:30 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 2 LeRoux Room (Student Center 160)

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Recently engaged or married? Got a job promotion? We want to hear from you. Send us your updates for Class Notes through the new and improved alumni directory: www.seattleu.edu/alumni/get-involved/directory/.

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GET CONNECTED

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SUSAN VOSPER, ASSISTANT VP/ALUMNI RELATIONS

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E-mail alumnireunions@seattleu.edu with your name, class year and contact information and how you’d like to be involved. We are excited to celebrate with you!

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• Plan with Alumni Relations your 10th reunion. Know a venue that would be perfect for you and your classmates? Help us pick the spot and invite your friends.

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GET INVOLVED! • Send us your pictures and favorite class memories. • Act as a class representative and help spread the word by extending personal invitations to your classmates.

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CLASS OF 2003 10th Reunion Party Evening, Saturday, Nov. 2

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“We are continuing to build and strengthen the alumni relationship with the reintroduction of reunions, which are an integral part of the alumni experience.”

Alumni & Family Weekend

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UPCOMING REUNIONS In early May, you’ll get your chance to celebrate and help us to kick off the new SU tradition of springtime reunions. We want your involvement to make these truly great and memorable reunions. If you are interested in helping, e-mail us at alumnireunions@seattleu.edu. We look forward to seeing many of you in the months and years to come.

Mark your calendars for

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FALL REUNIONS The class of ’63 will commemorate its 50th golden reunion with a luncheon on Saturday, Nov. 2. If you graduated in 2003, we need your support to plan an amazing reunion. Shape your experience by sharing what’s meaningful to you and helping plan your reunion. Send your feedback to alumnireunions@seattleu.edu.

ALL ALUMNI:

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Our goal in Alumni Relations is to build a foundation that allows our alumni to connect with each other and with their alma mater. We've already begun to do this through engagement opportunities such as the Alumni Awards, the reintroduction of Homecoming, the Alumni Day of Service, professional development workshops, networking events and basketball pregame rallies. With that, we are happy to announce that reunions are back. Classes of 1963 and 2003, mark your calendars for Nov. 1–3 as we celebrate you and your classmates. Class doesn’t end in a 3? No worries, as we are inviting all alumni back to campus for the Alumni & Family Weekend opening reception on Friday, Nov. 1. We continue to build and strengthen the alumni relationship with the reintroduction of reunions, which are an integral part of the alumni experience. In this first year we will offer reunions in fall and spring. The reunions will

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Reignite Traditions

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President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., congratulates Alumnus of the Year Gordon McHenry, Jr., ‘79 (above) for his award and contributions to the university at the 2013 Alumni Awards dinner and celebration. Awards are given to alumni, faculty and members of the community for their dedication to service, the university and in their professional fields.

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR


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class notes

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Andre Dayani was among the more than 270 graduates of the School of Law to receive their degrees at this year’s law school ceremony in May. Beth Leonard was honored as the Faculty Scholar and Sarah Haywood received the Dean's Medal. Professor Brooke Coleman addressed the graduates as the Faculty Award recipient.

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Christopher Canlas, ’01, was promoted to vice president of wealth management at UBS Financial Services in Seattle. Currently, he serves as president of the Seattle University Board of Governors.

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Carol Nelson, ’78, ’84 MBA, has been selected by Governor Jay Inslee to lead the Department of Revenue. Nelson has worked for some 25 years in the banking industry, including as regional executive director of Bank of America and CEO of Cascade Financial, the parent company of Cascade Bank.

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William Hickman, ’64, received the 2012 Robert Giegengack Award that honors individuals who contribute greatly to the sport of track and field. For nearly 40 years Hickman served with the USA Track and Field Association. He officiated the 1984 Olympic games and at five USA Olympic Trials. Currently he is president of the Pacific Track & Field Association.

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Amber Baker, ’04, 11, and Jay Sanjurjo were married in July at an intimate ceremony in Tacoma. The couple got engaged last December when Jay proposed aboard the Argosy Christmas ship.


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Association for Play Therapy. Newman is a child and family therapist at Valley Cities Counseling and Consultation. She came to Seattle with an undergraduate psychology degree from Richmond University in London, England. After working on a crisis line in the Bay Area, she traveled to India to work with autistic children before beginning her graduate studies in psychology.

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Greg Dole, MFA, was named grants director and community development director at the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge. In his role, Dole manages outreach, technical assistance and the application and review process for the council’s grants programs. Dole received his undergraduate degree in landscape architecture with a minor in art history from Louisiana State University.

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Joe Clark, Cyndi Carter, Lindsey Chen, Heather Hanson, Andrew Shahamiri, Justin Willis and Erin Boniface are Jesuit Corps volunteers in the Northwest. Clark is volunteering at Alaskan AIDS Assistance Association, Anchorage; Carter at Corpus Christi House in Boise; Chen at JOIN in Gresham, Ore.; Hanson and Shahamiri at St. Margaret’s Shelter in Spokane; Wills at Central City Concern Old Town Clinic in Portland; and Boniface at Pretty Eagle School in Montana.

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Dave Stensland, MBA, lives in Bend, Ore., with his wife Karen. When he is not mountain biking, skiing, kayaking or hiking, Stensland works as 1989 Marianne Mersereau, MA, has written a credit analyst at the Bank of the 1983 Cascades. a book of poems that was recently Kathleen Shannon Dorcy was released by Finishing Line Press. The 1997 awarded her PhD by the University collection, Timbrel, was selected as a of Utah. Her dissertation focused on semifinalist in the 2012 New Women’s Kirk Knestis, MIT, was named chief the role of hope in decision-making Voices National Chapbook Competi- executive officer at Hezel Associates, by patients diagnosed with cancer. LLC, a Syracuse, NY-based education tion. Mersereau grew up in the Dorcy is a staff scientist in the clinical Southern Appalachian Mountains research and consulting firm. He had research division at Seattle’s Fred served as director of research and and received her bachelor’s degree Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. evaluation since 2009. To this position from the University of Virginia at Additionally, she is director of research Wise. She is a recipient of the Lois Knestis brings significant experience development at Seattle Cancer Care in the educational research industry, Lowry Award for Superior AchieveAlliance. Dorcy is completing her ment in Language Arts and Children’s most recently as a research and 22nd year on the nursing faculty at the Literature. Mersereau’s writing has evaluation specialist with Edvantia, University of Washington, Tacoma. Inc., in Charleston, West Virginia. been published in the Seattle Times Previously, he served as senior and various journals. 1987 evaluation specialist for the SERVE David Johnson, EdD, a former Center at the University of North 1991 instructor in the College of EducaCarolina at Greensboro. Rev. Annette Andrews-Lux, MDiv, ion’s Graduate School of Counseling former faculty and program coordinand Psychology, received the prest2010 ator for the School of Theology and igious Visionary Leadership Award Rev. Elizabeth Felt, MDiv, was Ministry’s Scripture and Leadership from the National Council for Com- Training (SALT) program, was ordained in 2011 and installed as munity Behavioral Healthcare. The the new associate pastor of comordained earlier this year at Trinity award honors staff or volunteers munity life at First Lutheran Church Lutheran on Whidbey Island and who demonstrate outstanding installed as pastor at Bethany Lutheran of Richmond Beach. leadership in the behavioral healththe following day. Andrews-Lux care field and who exemplify the received her post-master’s certificate in Rosie Newman, MA, was elected president of the Washington State spiritual direction at STM in 1997. values and ideals embraced by the National Council.

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Ed Hayduk has been named Outstanding Professional by the California Association of Recreation and Park Districts.

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Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Jean (Wahlborg) Ladden, ’04, and her husband Kevin welcomed their first child Ian Joseph Ladden April 6, 2012. The family currently lives in Warminster, Penn.

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Matt Axness, ’83, and Dave Fulton, ’83, previous roommates in Campion Hall, ran into each other after 30 years while hiking the Narrows of Zion National Park. They almost didn’t recognize each other—what are the odds?

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Karen Brandvick-Baker, ’88, Monica Alquist, ’89, and Helen Fitzpatrick, ’88, long-time friends and graduates of the English department, recently attended a black-tie auction for BookIt Repertory Theatre, where Baker and Alquist serve on the board. Baker and Fitzpatrick grew up together and attended kindergarten, high school and college together. Adds Baker, “Monica and I were classmates at Seattle U and were both fortunate to have Fr. Carroll as a teacher and adviser.”


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My Seattle University Education | By Derrick McLean, ’13

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“My experience at Seattle University has been the result of hard work and dedication to the university and to my academics. ...This community has provided more for me than I could ever articulate.”

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admitted the errors as a flaw in the measure. After analyzing the data, I formulated a rule that could be applied to the data and wrote a computer program to analyze this information. Academics is one of the largest aspects of a university, but more time is spent outside of the classroom than in it. I was fortunate to return my senior year as an RA, to help lead and exemplify what SU hopes for its student leaders. This was recognized by Campus Ministry and I was offered the student leader position on the Belize service immersion trip during spring break. I can see a bright future ahead of me and I have all of the departments at this university to thank. My goal at Claremont University is to learn how to create the optimal life for individuals beginning in early development so that others can feel a similar joy for living. My experience at Seattle University has been the result of hard work and dedication to the university and to my academics; however, I could not have gotten anywhere without the help of others. This community has provided more for me than I could ever articulate and to say thank you does not do it justice. There are a few people who have played substantial roles: Dr. Hy has been a great teacher and adviser throughout my time on campus. Campus Ministry, Housing and Residence Life, Student Academic Services and my course work have provided me the training and empowerment to continue leadership for a more just and humane world.

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F

rom Student Development to academia, I feel fortunate for the guidance I have received in my time at Seattle University. Over my first two years I got close with members of Campus Ministry, Housing and Residence Life and the Psychology Department through my daily interactions. I got hired by Housing to be a Resident Assistant (RA) so I could share the same tight community that I feel on campus. In addition to this, I was fortunate to be accepted into the Jesuit honor society: Alpha Sigma Nu (ASN). These opportunities helped shape my senior year. The RA position opened the doors to a job working for Student Academic Services as a tutor for psychological statistics. Through this and the recognition by ASN, I have strengthened my own statistical knowledge and thus began to work closely with Dr. Le Xuan Hy in the Psychology Department. We were able to design and execute a study on gratitude. This study was accepted for presentation at the Western Psychological Association annual conference and the article on the study is currently in the peer review process on its way to publication. Hy continued my educational growth by teaching me a psychometric measure seldom taught to undergraduates. In this work, I began to notice some irregularities in data we were looking at from Indiana UniversityPurdue University Indianapolis. When I asked about this, Dr. Hy

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It’s not every day that a 21-year-old psychology student graduates from college and immediately enters into a prestigious psychology doctorate program. But then again, Derrick McLean is not your typical college student. At age 18, he arrived on campus as a transfer student with 90 credits. In August, SU’s newest alum—who is also accomplished in the Olympic sport of curling—began his doctoral studies with world-renowned psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi at the School of Behavioral and Organizational Sciences at Claremont Graduate University in California. As he finished up his time at SU, McLean shares how his education here—particularly in his senior year—proved transformational. —Tina Potterf, Editor

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B

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BEING SCENE

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THE CLASS OF 2013

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Seattle University’s newest alumni embark on the next phase of their lives as graduates of this fine university. In June, undergraduate and graduate students accepted their degrees and were treated to inspiring stories and hopeful messages from their peers and keynote speakers Erik Larson (above), renowned author, and Dr. John Koster, a leader in the health care industry and longtime member of the Providence Health & Services team.

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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SU Magazine Fall 2 013 / 39


L/C

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Round 3

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BOOKMARKS B

A

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Guatemala in My Blood | Reviewed by Tina Potterf

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far removed from the comforts of home. It’s also a story of the dedicated colleagues and friends who served alongside Desimone, bringing muchneeded care and services to men, women and children. Guatemala in My Blood includes a collection of black-and-white photographs that serve to bring another layer of context and perspective to the words that transplant the reader to Guatemala. The work of Desimone had not only a lasting imprint in her life but also in the life of the Kek’chi people of Poptun, where she co-founded a health promoter program, which has trained nearly 200 locals to provide health care in the small Guatemalan villages. Written in a fashion that is straightforward and insightful, Guatemala in My Blood takes the reader along as a passenger on Desimone’s amazing life journey. By the book’s end, you might just be inspired to embark on a lifechanging journey, too.

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existent. The nurse from Seattle was working as part of the Maryknoll Lay Missionaries, who were headed to the village of Poptun to set up medical care services. The opening chapters set the tone for an engrossing and interesting read, as Desimone documents the adventures and experiences that shape, inspire, challenge and motivate her over a span of 22 years from the time she arrived in Guatemala, unsure of what to expect, to her return to Poptun in 2009. During this period, she and her fellow medical professionals were dealing with more than just bringing health care to this remote corner of the world—they were serving at a time of political upheaval in Guatemala, which presented its own set of perilous challenges. The jungles of Guatemala come to life in Desimone’s accounts and descriptions of the people she met along the way, the places are etched in her mind, the political climate, the struggles of traveling in rural areas and being

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“…I felt like I had gone from one world to another. The sky had darkened and the lights of the town beckoned when we arrived in Poptun,” writes Elizabeth Desimone in the early pages of her book, Guatemala in My Blood: How Nursing in Remote Jungle Villages Revolutionized My Life. This sums up the culture shock Desimone, a 1963 graduate of the College of Nursing and retired family nurse practitioner, experienced upon arriving in Guatemala City in 1977. At the time she was 35 years old and a seasoned traveler who left her comfortable life in Seattle for a journey halfway around the world to embark on what would turn out to be a transformative experience, both professionally and personally. Desimone was in Guatemala at the request of Father Maurice Healy, who sought the service of nurses as part of his efforts to provide medical care to citizens in remote areas where health care was largely inaccessible, if not entirely non-

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How Nursing in Remote Jungle Villages Revolutionized My Life by Elizabeth Desimone, RN, ‘63

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40 / Bookmarks

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EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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The jungles of Guatemala come to life in Desimone’s accounts and descriptions of the people she met along the way.


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B

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Boy Singing to Cattle

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ALUMNI PICK

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Read This…

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Author | Mark D. Hart, ’78, ’91 MA

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Boy Singing to Cattle is a rich and varied collection of poetry that is accessible and captivating for the poetry novice and the avid fan alike. With Boy Singing to Cattle double alumnus and former faculty member Mark D. Hart transplants the reader to moments in time, conjuring up images of children at play, of family and faith, of loved ones deeply loved and deeply missed and more. While the book explores the theme of death, it does so with eloquence and poignant memories. Boy is a recipient of the 23rd Annual Pearl Poetry Prize. Watch for a full review of Boy Singing to Cattle in a future issue of the magazine.

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FACULTY PICKS

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Queenship in Medieval Europe Author | Theresa Earenfight

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History Professor Theresa Earenfight documents in vivid detail the lives and work of queens and empresses throughout Europe, Byzantium and the Mediterranean in the Middle Ages. Specifically, the book highlights four crucial periods across the full span of the Middle Ages—ca. 300, 700, 1100 and 1350—when Christianity, education, lineage and marriage law fundamentally altered the practice of queenship.

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Resisting Structural Evil

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Author | Cynthia D. Moe-Lobeda

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In Resisting Structural Evil, Cynthia Moe-Lobeda explores Christian ethics in light of the ecological crisis and relates eco-justice to economic justice. Moe-Lobeda is the Wismer Professor of Gender and Diversity Studies and teaches environmental studies in theology and religious studies. Says Moe-Lobeda of her book’s subject matter, “The future of the earth is not simply a matter of protecting species and habitats. The earth crisis cannot be understood apart from the larger human crisis—economic equity, racial equity, social values and human purpose.”


L/C

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Round 3

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Faculty Hildegard Hendrickson: Pioneer in MBA program

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Prayer vigils continue for Hildegard Hendrickson, the retired Seattle University faculty member who disappeared June 8, 2013, while mushroom hunting in a mountainous area north of Lake Wenatchee in Chelan County, Wash. Hendrickson, professor emerita and member of the Albers School of Business and Economics faculty from 1967 to 1996, was last seen about 15 miles northeast of Lake Wenatchee where she went on a solo day hike in search of morel mushrooms. Her expertise in mushroom identification is legendary and she was an active member of the Mycological Society. Born in Yugoslavia into a family of German origin, Hendrickson came to the U.S. to pursue her bachelor’s, MBA and PhD at the University of Washington. When she joined the faculty at SU, she was a pioneer in the launch of the MBA degree program, at the time the singular evening, part-time MBA degree program in the Seattle area. She was the only instructor for courses in money and capital markets until her retirement in 1996. Hendrickson chaired the school’s economic and finance departments and served as acting associate dean. Law enforcement and emergency agencies, family, friends, dozens of members of the Puget Sound Mycological Society and several search-and-rescue dogs spent 2,400 hours in a six-day search to no avail.

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IN MEMORIAM Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community we’ve lost.

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Peter Cereghino (June 21, 2013; age 90)

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Patricia graduated from West High School, St. Mary’s College in South Bend, SU and St. Mary’s School of Nursing. She married Bob Danaher in 1950.

Robert D. Middleton, ’58 MEd (Aug. 15, 2012; age 85)

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At age 17, Robert enlisted in the Navy, serving as a Pharmacist Mate Third Class. While stationed at the Seattle Naval Hospital, he met his wife Jeanne Doran. He worked for 30 years with Seattle Public Schools, before retiring in 1980; his roles included serving as principal at Georgetown Elementary, Webster Elementary in Ballard and McGilvra Elementary.

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Born in Brooklyn, NY, Peter grew up in Fife, Wash., where his father was a founding member of the Colonial Gardens and where Peter worked alongside him. In 1942, he enlisted in the Coast Guard, stationed at Winchester Bay, Ore. Following his service, he enrolled in Seattle University. He worked for years in the insurance industry.

Patricia Anderson Danaher (Sept. 1, 2012; age 86)

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Born in Culver City, Calif., Clement grew up in and lived his life in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. He is remembered for his love of family, creativity, work on engineering projects and an appreciation for kindness shown to him.

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At a young age, James was fascinated with books and began his daily habit of reading that continued through his entire life. For 39 years he taught English at Western Washington University, specializing in Irish literature.

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Clement A. Felzer (Nov. 9, 2012; age 89)

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James Howard O’Brien (Jan. 19, 2013; age 93)

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1943

A lifelong resident of Seattle, Betty was active in various community groups including the Association of Catholic Childhood, the Seattle Skating Club and the Washington State Society of Clinical Laboratory Scientists. She had worked in the medical technology field until her retirement from Group Health Coop-erative and the UW Medical Center. After retirement, Betty pursued her interests in gardening and world travel.

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With her husband Earl, Betty was active in her church, Holy Rosary Catholic Church in West Seattle. She was an avid reader, loved physical activity and gardening and was a swimmer until late in life. A skilled pianist, she taught all of her six children the rudiments of piano playing.

Elizabeth Ann “Betty” Morrison Drummey (May 31, 2013; age 85)

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Mary Elizabeth (Betty) Williams Sifferman (April 24, 2012; age 95)

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1938


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B

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1951

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Born in Seattle, Ronald was a proud Marine, having served in the Korean War and spending nine months on the front lines. He was past president of the Italian Club, a Little League coach, banking lender and executive who retired from Wells Fargo after a successful 40-year career. A talented athlete, he loved to play tennis and pickleball and was a member of a close-knit bridge groups for four decades.

1956 Philip attended Seattle University after serving in the Korean War. Active in the community, he supported numerous organizations including the Museum of Flight, Seattle Repertory Theater, the Aboretum Foundation and more. Following SU, he designed factory equipment.

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John Edward Levin (April 17, 2012; age 73)

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Sister Noreen Linane CJSP (Jan. 9, 2013; age 89)

Barbara followed in her mother’s footsteps in dedicating her career to education. For many years she worked as a school counselor in the Kent School District and vice principal and principal in the Monroe School District. In 2008, she was the first alum of SU to receive the Accendo Award for her distinguished record of achievement and service in her field.

Born in Ireland the fourth of five children, she joined the postulancy of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace in Cabra, Newry, Northern Ireland. After World War II, she traveled by ship to New Jersey and then on to Washington state. Sister Linane served as a surgical nurse and supervisor in PeaceHealth hospitals of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace in Bellingham.

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Barbara Brady Heneghan (May 2, 2013; age 74)

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In 1960, John introduced fresh pizza to the people of Vancouver when he opened a chain restaurant there. He was also active in the community as a fundraiser and founded the Playhouse International Wine Festival. His greatest legacy is his children and grandchildren.

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Marshall earned his bachelor’s from SU and then relocated to the Bay Area to receive a master’s and PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He co-founded and was president of Stanford Telecommunications, Inc.

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Marshall Fitzgerald (Feb. 18, 2013; age 79)

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Joseph James Belonis (May 30, 2013; age 87)

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Philip Gustav Johnson (April 15, 2013; age 82)

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1955 Born in Framingham, Mass., Joseph enlisted in the Navy following high school and served in World War II and the Korean War. Following his military career, Joseph settled with his wife June in Seattle and worked for 30 years a teacher, counselor, vice principal and principal in the Seattle School District. Joseph and his wife enjoyed travel on cruise ships and by car.

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Ronald Joseph Santucci (June 7, 2013; age 83)

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1953

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A Garfield High School Bulldog, Solomon raduated from Seattle University and served as a sergeant in World War II and the Korean War. After the war he and his business partner opened Shorewood Foods on Mercer Island, which later became Pine Street Foods. He loved spending time with his family and playing golf.

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Solomon “Monie” Isreal (April 13, 2012; age 86)

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1952

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Born in Butte, Mont., John was a graduate of Seattle Prep and went on to SU after serving two years in the Army. He worked as a longshoreman on the docks of Seattle during World War II, was a sports writer for the Seattle Times and vice president of Thomas Aquinas College, among other professional achievements.

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John Wesley Blewett (Feb. 8, 2013; age 84)

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George J. Krsak, a longtime friend and supporter of Seattle University, the Jesuits and the community at large, died Feb. 28, 2013. He was 90. An alumnus of Seattle University—then Seattle College—George was a familiar figure at many university functions and was a friend to many. His family donated the organ in the Chapel of St. Ignatius in memory of his beloved wife Rita Horan (pictured here with George), who George met while they were students here and married in 1948. Rita passed away in 2003. After serving in the U.S. Army as part of the “Greatest Generation,” George worked for Boeing. He was also a bricklayer and masonry contractor who left his mark on many homes and buildings throughout the region. A founding member of St. Monica Parish, George was patron of CYO Camping’s Order of the Cross and longtime volunteer with Friends of the Needy. George is survived by his sisters Maryanne Anthony, Nicky McVeigh and Ellen Johnson; his children Mike, Mimi, Katie and Jeannie; his 14 grandchildren, 16 great grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife, Rita.

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1949 George J. Krsak: Remembering a Life Well Lived

Anthony served in the Army during World War II and received a purple heart. Earning a civil service degree from SU, he worked for a time with the U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife and later started a construction and engineering company with his oldest son in 1975.

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Anthony Joseph Opstedal (Jan. 29, 2013; age 90)


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IN MEMORIAM B

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1961 Leonard Alfred Hulsman (Sept. 4, 2012; age 80)

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Born in Miami, Richard earned his MBA and CPA certification from SU then served as CFO for several corporations. Active in the community, he was an officer in the Rotary Club and a member of the Olympic Fly Fisher Club.

1971 Rosendo Barruga Luna, Jr., ’79 MEd (Sept. 14, 2012; age 63)

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A graduate of the law school, David was a mentor to many and Frank David LaFazia, Jr., ’77 MEd (June 17, 2013; age 70) someone who loved to practice law. He also enjoyed going on Rick Steves’ travel adventures to Europe, playing golf and wine-tasting Born in Bremerton, Wash., Frank taught at Seattle’s O’Dea excursions. High School, working in the classroom and then as a counselor and vice principal. He also spent 13 years as a middle school 1977 counselor in the Aberdeen School District. His passion was Mary Deming Morrill Spens, MEd track and field, as he excelled in the sport in high school and (April 21, 2012; age 92) later worked as a coach. Mary was a self-described “cradle Episcopalian” baptized, confirmed and married at Epiphany Episcopal Church in Seattle. Growing up she attended Madrona Elementary School and St. Nicholas Girls Schools in Seattle. She cherished her large circle of friends and enjoyed attending her high school and college reunions. 44 / In Memoriam

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David N. Lombard (Aug. 22, 2012; age 62)

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1976

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Rosendo was a school educator who used his leadership, compassion and commitment to serve in various capacities as a principal, vice principal, English as a Second Language teacher and outdoor education instructor for more than 34 years with Seattle Public Schools. He ws also an administrator with the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

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A recipient of the Bronze Star for his service in the Army, (Ret.) Lt. Col. Daniel worked as a financial planner with Ameriprise, until his retirement.

Richard F. Buss, MBA (Feb. 8, 2013; age 67)

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(Ret.) Lt. Col. Daniel John Dempsey (April 10, 2012; age 68)

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Maj. Gen. Gregory, from 1989 until his retirement in 1999, served as Adjutant General of the State of Washington, during which he commanded the Washington Army and Air National Guard, consisting of more than 8,000 soldiers and airmen. His distinguished military career began in 1964 when he was commissioned as a second lieutenant through the ROTC; in 1966 he entered active duty. Gregory received numerous meritorious honors including the Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star Medal and Purple Heart, among many others.

A graduate of Bishop Blanchet High School and SU, Mary Jo had various positions in the financial and mortgage lending industries. In her free time she loved gardening, knitting and cooking for family and friends.

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Maj. Gen. Gregory P. Barlow, MA (July 4, 2013; age 74)

Mary Jo Klemens (Aug. 6, 2012; age 64)

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A 1951 graduate of Delphi High School, Kenneth attended Indiana University and SU. He served in the Navy from 195154 and earned a Korean Service Medal, China Service Medal and Good Conduct Medal. For 19 years he worked for ParkDavis/Warner Lambert Pharmaceuticals and owned various businesses.

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Kenneth Eugene Ward (May 24, 2013; age 79)

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Michael attended Lake Washington High School and had a love of sailing, water skiing, flying model airplanes and raising his three children Mike, Scott and Chris with his wife of 56 years Gail.

When he was 12 years old, Gerry and his family moved to Albuquerque and then Denver, finally settling in Yakima. Gerry served in the Army and first attended SU to earn a math degree. He would later return for a teaching certificate. With his partner Marilyn Stauter he opened the Couth Buzzard Bookstore in Seattle’s Wallingford neighborhood. A year later the bookstore moved into a larger space in Phinney Ridge, where it became a neighborhood staple.

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Michael R. Ogilvie (Jan. 29, 2013; age 77)

Gerry Lovchik, ’88 MEd (June 1, 2013; age 74)

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Following graduation from Elder High in 1949, Leonard joined the Navy where he served as an electronics technician. While working at Boeing he earned his degree from SU; he spent 39 years with the aerospace company. In retirement he enjoyed spending time at his lakefront home, sailing, gardening and golfing.

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At Seattle's Blanchet High School Barry developed his passion for English literature and wrestling. This passion would grow over time and significantly influence his life. Upon graduation from SU, he taught high school English literature and served as an inspirational coach to many wrestling teams. The majority of Barry’s 34-year teaching and coaching career was spent at Nathan Hale and Lake Washington high schools. For more than 25 years, he was a member of Northwest Sound Men's Chorus, the Bellevue chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society.

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Robert “Barry” Knott (May 31, 2013; age 66)

Self-employed for 47 years, Mary Anne was active in the commu-nity and the arts. She was a longtime volunteer with Seattle Opera and made an annual trip to Puerto Vallarta.

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Mary Anne Schmitt (Aug. 14, 2012; age 74)

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1968


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1971 Emile Wilson: SU’s First Rhodes Scholar

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Emile Wilson, Seattle University’s first Rhodes Scholar, died April 27, 2013, in California. He was 61. Emile was elected president of the university’s first Black Student Union in 1969 and wrote for the student newspaper The Spectator. He was a dedicated activist on campus and became involved in the opposition to the Vietnam War; student rights were important to him, which led him to strongly advocate for a student “Bill of Rights” on campus. He helped shape what became of the Office of Multicultural Affairs. During the late spring of 1970, Emile was one of five students suspended for staging a protest in the office of SU President Kenneth Baker, S.J., in response to the president’s issuance of an order that prohibited unapproved demonstrations and rallies on campus. The suspension was reversed by the Student Conduct Review Board, a move approved by James McGoldrick, S.J. Father McGoldrick (pictured above with Emile) was an important figure in Emile’s life, serving as a friend, mentor and tutor. Following Emile’s graduation from SU with a political science degree he went on to graduate school, on the urging of Fr. McGoldrick. In 1975 he earned two master degrees—education and philosophy—and was SU’s first Rhodes Scholar, attending The Queen’s College at the University of Oxford. Emile is survived by his daughter, a sister and two brothers, two nieces and four nephews.

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1980 Manuel Gaerlan Carrillo (Sept. 12, 2012; age 55)

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In 1998 Elizabeth married William J. Fisher and in April 2001 the couple had their daughter Michaela. Her greatest joy in life was her family and she cherished her roles of mother, wife, sister and aunt. She enjoyed volunteering, especially making sandwiches with “Martha’s Workers” at St. Anne Parish.

We ask readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@seattleu.edu or send via mail to: Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122–1090.

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Read more obituaries online at www.seattleu. edu/magazine/. Obituaries are edited for space and clarity.

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THINKING OF YOU

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Elizabeth Anne McKee Fisher, MPA (Aug. 3, 2012; age 53)

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A graduate of SU’s master’s program in rehab counseling, Mark had a long career as a counselor.

For more than 25 years Dan worked at SU. He began in 1983 as a computer operator in the Office of Information Technology where he managed the campus network infrastructure. When he left the university in February 2012, he was technical services and support manager in the School of Law.

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Mark Liberty, MA (Dec. 30, 2011)

Dan Janson (May 2012)

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1988

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A graduate of O’Dea High School, Manuel worked for more than 25 years as a human resources professional with Providence Medical Center. He was a talented musician and composer and played the keyboard with several Seattle area bands.

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The eldest of three brothers, David grew up in Yakima, where his family was in the orchard industry. He was an active part of the Squire-Ingham Orchard where he assisted his brother in handling the finances and managerial tasks of the operation. In 1989, he began working in Seattle University’s Controller’s Office and was director of accounting and information services at the time of his death.

For many years Kellie Ann practiced nursing in the Seattle area. Some of her happiest times were spent skiing the Shirley Lake run at Squaw Valley and riding the waves of Lake Tahoe.

David Richard Ingham, ’98 (June 4, 2013; age 71)

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Kellie Ann Murphy (May 8, 2012)

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For 37 years William worked in the Fine Arts department where he taught, was a director and administrator. He was a professional actor who worked locally and nationally on TV and film projects.

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William Dore, Jr. (March 21, 2012; age 79)

Following high school, Kevin worked for Beebe and Runyon as a warehouseman before his life was interrupted by kidney disease. He received a kidney from his brother Sean. During his recovery Kevin went back to school, earning his degree from SU. He had an accomplished career in education in Seattle schools.

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FACULTY AND STAFF

Kevin James Sullivan (July 20, 2012; age 60)

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THE LAST WORD

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The Last Word is a take on the arts/literature/academia/travel and more. B

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Whistling isn’t Work—It’s Art | By Annie Beckmann

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Whistling surfaced as an art form when Thibo was recovering from a nasty three-week flu bug in the winter of 2011. He had discovered dance, specifically ballet, the year before, but recognized his body needed a rest after he became ill. While others might recuperate with a good book or TV, Thibo chose to indulge his love of music by whistling his way through a collection of baroque and classical dances originally written for musical recorders. In a tunnel platform where Thibo would love to whistle for commuters is a quote from early 20th-century feminist Teresa Schmid McMahon that may well sum up this graduate student’s approach to art, perhaps even life. “If you follow the beaten path,” it reads, “life becomes somewhat monotonous.”

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Washington Hall. He also performed before a captive audience at Seattle University. People are apt to recall hopefulness when they hear music whistled, says Thibo. “People don’t whistle when they’re disappointed, unless maybe there’s irony,” he says. “Whistling itself embodies sunshine.” Think about it. “Whistling in the dark” is meant to keep your courage up. “Blowing the whistle” exposes a wrongdoing with the goal of ending it. “‘Whistling while you work’ is a way to bring enjoyment to what you do,” adds the whiz whistler. “Whistling is like a Braille map of our imagination,” he says. “It’s a whole lot easier to reproduce a symphony by whistling than by singing or playing a single instrument. It’s easier to be louder or quieter, easier to reproduce sound that resonates in spaces. And it comes back to us and sounds like we imagined.”

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Seattle’s noisy, bustling International District/Chinatown transit station might not be every performing artist’s idea of a dream concert hall. Campbell Thibo isn’t just any artist, though. The station’s amazing echo and Asian garden aesthetic are what appeal to the Fine Arts graduate student’s desire to touch something deeper in his audience. He considers the transit platform an underutilized performance venue. If only he could eliminate the ever-present, deafening roar of all those buses and trains, Thibo imagines the transit tunnel would be perfection for the joys of his whistling. That’s right—whistling. As accomplished a whistler as he may be—Thibo can whistle with aplomb classical music the likes of The Four Seasons by Vivaldi—his unusual musical talent hasn’t quite found its niche. Still, he perseveres. This past March, he took his performance art to the On the Boards production 12 Minutes Max at Seattle’s

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Fine Arts graduate student Campbell Thibo lifts spirits with his unique talent

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Whistling and dance are only two of Thibo’s many art forms. He sings alto and bass with the adventurous Seattle vocal group, The Esoterics, which performs the likes of a cappella opera based on Zoroastrian hymns more than 3,500 years old.

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One day last spring, he hauled a stationary bike and a bucket of cherry petals to a street corner on lower Queen Anne. The grinning, talking and singing pedaler asked passersby to toss handfuls of cherry petals at him. They giggled as they obliged and joined his impromptu performance art.

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46 / The Last Word

ICS# 130285 • Seattle University 2013 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 52 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL Epson

Visit www.seattleu.edu/magazine/ for an audio clip of the whistler in action.

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ICS# 130285 • Seattle University 2013 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 52 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL Epson

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SU Magazine Fall 2 013 / 47

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Arts Leadership MFA/Fine Arts

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CAMPBELL THIBO

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“Whistling is like a Braille map of our imagination.”

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR 6 5 4 Round 3 2 1 L/C


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Seattle, WA Permit No. 2783

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PAID

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Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

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2013 st. ignatius medal recipients

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Ginny & John Meisenbach

gala chairs

platinum sponsors $25,000

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30th Anniversary

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Lyanne & Bill Monkman Lisa & Bob Ratliffe

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ICS# 130285 • Seattle University 2013 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 52 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL Epson

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Individual tickets are $500 ($300 is tax deductible) All proceeds benefit student scholarships. For more information, call 206.296.6301 or visit www.seattleu.edu/giving/gala.

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Mary Jo and Rod Bench Costco Wholesale Gaye and Jim Pigott Riley & Nancy Pleas Family Foundation SABEY Corporation Tricia and Steve Trainer Washington Dental Service WFF Facility Services

Saturday, October 26, 2013 The Westin Seattle Featuring entertainment by The Company Men

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silver sponsors $10,000

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Maureen and Joel Benoliel

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gold sponsors $15,000

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Jeffrey and Susan Brotman Janet and Jim Sinegal


Fall magazine 2013