Issuu on Google+

ABC newsman Bob Woodruff visits ROTC

Top Legal Writing Program Goes Global

Students Paint Mural for Bailey Gatzert School

Ciscoe Morris Returns for a Garden Tour

The Magazine of SU Alumni and Friends

Seattle University FALL 2011

Father Jean Baptiste Ganza Jesuit priest, MBA student and survivor of Rwandan genocide epitomizes a life fully lived


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MOMENT OF REFLECTION President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., presides at the Baccalaureate Mass welcoming the class of 2011 as official alumni. The Mass, at St. James Cathedral, preceded graduation ceremonies. Check out photos from graduation on page 41.

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Seattle University Volume 35 • Issue Number 3 • Fall 2011 S TA F F Editor Tina Potterf Art Director/Senior Designer Terry Lundmark, ’82 Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor Editorial Assistant Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

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Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Jason Behenna, Shane Dir, ’04, and Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden

Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published quarterly in fall, winter, spring and summer by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

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Danila Rumold puts the finishing touches on a mural for Bailey Gatzert, page 18

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Seattle University THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

DEPARTMENTS

features 18 Out of Grief Comes Hope

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Letters

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Come Join Us

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Did You Know?

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On Campus Faculty Snapshot / 14

Father Ganza: Jesuit priest. Survivor of the Rwandan genocide. Source of inspiration to many.

28 Survival of the Fittest

Athletics / 16

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Alumni Voice In Memoriam / 36

Community-based program through the College of Nursing provides important basic health services to area homeless.

Bookmarks / 37 Class Notes / 38 Being Scene / 41

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The Last Word

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ON THE COVER A survivor of the Rwandan genocide, Jean Baptiste Ganza, S.J., is building a better future for the children of Rwanda.

Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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LETTERS

A MAKEOVER OF THE ONLINE MAG It has arrived. As you peruse the new and improved Seattle University Magazine online edition—www.seattleu. edu/magazine—I hope you like what we’ve done. The look is clean and crisp, the colors brighter, the top stories ever-rotating. There are more entry points into stories, simple forms for commenting, sending a letter to the editor and submitting obituaries and Class Notes. There are more ways to engage with and inform the stories we tell. In addition to serving as a complement to the print edition, the online site introduces a new Editor’s Blog— updated weekly—a question of the month called “Talking Points” where readers can weigh in on a chosen topic and web-exclusive content. The user-friendly navigation throughout the site supports a more dynamic display and A snapshsot of the newly designed site. interplay of words and images. Specific events to bring you to campus are given greater prominence. With this new iteration of the online edition, content will be added frequently (in between the three month span between print issues) and there is greater flexibility to build on a feature that is constrained by space limitations in print. Look for photo galleries and video clips, longer stories and more. Bookmark the site and follow us on Facebook and Twitter [http://twitter.com/#!/seattleu_alumni] for updates on when new content is added. The web icons throughout this issue alert you to extras available online only. Thanks to all who contributed opinions, feedback and ideas leading to the development of this site. As we continue to refine the online platform, your feedback is important. Visit the site, try it out and let me know what you think at sumagazine@seattleu.edu. We will be adding more design elements and robust content in the weeks and months ahead, so stay tuned. Tina Potterf/editor

The Real Story of SU Spirit

Seattle University Magazine welcomes letters to the editor on subjects raised within the magazine. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Please include a name, address and daytime phone number with all correspondence. Send to: Letters Editor Seattle University Magazine Seattle University 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090 E-mail: sumagazine@seattleu.edu

Your cover story in the spring edition [“Now That’s the Spirit”] doesn’t quite delve deep enough to reveal the true beginning of “spirit.” In 1960, the Chieftains had players like Eddie Miles (known as “the man with the golden arm”), John Tresvant, Ray Butler, David Mills and “Shotgun” Tommie Shaulz, who led the team to the NCAA Regionals for four consecutive years. In that 1960 season a group of overactive undergraduates gathered at the favored SU hangout, the Chambers Tavern on Pike Street (now the Wildrose), and formed a group called the Spirits to help promote SU sports in the student body. The founders were Bob Brown, Mike Collins, Jerry Lavelle, Jeff Pedersen, Mike “Buzz” McQuaid, Philip

Rogers and Walt Weller. We took the idea to the dean of students, Father Rehbahn, and he approved it if we would agree to control the section during the games at Seattle Center Arena. We invited anyone from the student body who would wear a red sweatshirt with “Spirit” stenciled on it and show up an hour before game time. For four years we had our own section (center court) to cheer on our beloved Chieftains to victory after victory. Maybe now that we are major league again, the undergrads could reinstate that fine tradition. All it takes is some leadership and enthusiasm on the part of the students. Go Chieftains! Errr, “Redhawks” … Michael M. McQuaid, Sr., ’63 Bellevue, Wash.

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Reunion



september  12TH ANNUAL COSTCO SCHOLARSHIP FUND BREAKFAST

Thursday, September 22 7 to 9 a.m., Meydenbauer Center, Bellevue Plan now to attend the annual fundraising breakfast to benefit the Costco Scholarship program featuring alumni and current student scholars of the past 12 years. The Meydenbauer Center is located at 11100 NE 6th St. in Bellevue. Information: (206) 296-6106 or visit www. costcoscholarshipfund.org/.

Scholarships

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october Q SCHOOL OF LAW ANNUAL RED MASS AND RECEPTION

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Thursday, October 6 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius and Sullivan Hall Seattle University School of Law invites judges, lawyers, legislators, alumni and students to attend Red Mass honoring members of the legal profession. Red Mass is a tradition dating back to 14th century England, where it was held before the opening of each term of court and attended by all members of the bench and bar. The Mass is an invocation of guidance for all who pursue justice and is an opportunity to reflect on the power and responsibility of the legal profession. Information and to RSVP by Sept. 27: (206) 398-4600 or e-mail: rsvplawalumni@seattleu.edu.

FILIPINO ALUMNI CHAPTER 4TH ANNUAL FALL REUNION Saturday, October 8 6 to 10 p.m., SU Campus The SU Filipino Alumni Chapter invites all alumni and friends to the annual reunion in celebration of Filipino American History Month. The reunion will feature authentic Filipino cuisine and drinks, music and dancing, group photos and a brief program. RSVP by Sept. 30. Information: (206) 296-6127.

MCGOLDRICK SCHOLARSHIP RECEPTION Friday, October 21 5 to 7 p.m., SU Student Center, Room 160 Student recipients of the James B. McGoldrick, S.J., Alumni Scholarship, their families and scholarship donors are invited to attend a special reception to celebrate the family legacies at Seattle University during Family Weekend 2011. Information: (206) 296-6127.

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COME JOIN US

CATHOLIC HERITAGE LECTURE SERIES Thursday, October 27 7 to 9 p.m., SU Pigott Auditorium Seattle University Mission and Ministry presents the first of the 2011–12 Catholic Heritage Lectures with Patricia O’Connell Killen of Gonzaga. This is the second year for this series, which explores the intersection of Catholicism and culture. The lectures engage the intellectual and religious communities of the Seattle area, as well as Seattle University faculty, staff, students and alumni. Information: (206) 296-2176 or www.seattleu.edu/ missionministry/chl/.

28TH ANNUAL GALA Saturday, October 29 Begins at 6 p.m., The Westin Hotel, Seattle Enjoy a dazzling evening of dining, dancing and entertainment at Seattle University's signature black-tie event, including live swing music by Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. Proceeds from this special event support student scholarships. Information and tickets: (206) 296-6965 or visit www.seattleu.edu/gala/. HONORARY DEGREE

MARK PIGOTT HONORARY DEGREE CEREMONY Wednesday, October 26, 2011 4:30 pm, Pigott Auditorium Seattle University confers a Doctorate of Humanities on Mark Pigott, in honor of his community leadership, business accomplishments as CEO of PACCAR Inc, and his passionate support of the fine arts. Alumni and friends are invited to campus to celebrate this prestigious occasion. Reception to follow in the PACCAR Atrium. Information: 206-296-6100.

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ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS EXECUTIVE SPEAKER SERIES Thursday, November 3 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., SU Pigott Auditorium Join a discussion with Tod Nielsen, co-president for Applications Platform at VMware. Nielsen is a guest of the Albers Executive Speaker Series. Information: (206) 296-5700.

For more information on alumni events, contact Alumni Relations at (206) 296-6127 or visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/.

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A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU.

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Journalist Bob Woodruff chats with SU’s Barry Mitzman and guests during his visit to campus.

ACCLAIMED ABC NEWSMAN BOB WOODRUFF VISITS ROTC Award-winning television journalist Bob Woodruff visited Seattle University in July to address the importance of adequately meeting veterans’ needs. Woodruff has a unique perspective on the subject as someone who covered the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq for ABC News. In 2006, Woodruff suffered critical injuries including a traumatic brain injury in a roadside bombing while on assignment in Iraq. After a long road to recovery, he and his family founded the Bob Woodruff Foundation to raise awareness and money to assist members of the military with cognitive rehabilitation and other care needs following traumatic brain injuries suffered during service to their country. While in town Woodruff spent time with veterans among SU faculty, staff and students then led a panel discussion at Seattle’s Town Hall that evening.

SERVICE IN ZAMBIA Recently, several SU faculty, staff and students were in Zambia working on service projects through their involvement in Professionals Without Boundaries. Projects included the completion of a large rural medical clinic; a special collections area for the regional cultural center; and construction and deployment of a 1,000-watt wind power generator demonstration project. The wind power generator is supported by SU’s computer and electrical engineering program under the leadership of Professor Henry Louie. Franklin Tembo, Jr., of ZNBC in Zambia interviews Audrey Hudgins (College of Arts & Sciences), Kat Cuevas (Athletics/Student Development) and Renee Vandermause, ’12 (civil and environmental engineering), who performed with a local dance ensemble at the Tonga Gonde Dance Festival.

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THE GOOD WORD

CELEBRATING MASS Here is an excerpt from the latest Good Word column, penned by Mike Bayard, S.J., director of Campus Ministry:

“It is that real presence—the Body of Christ—that we celebrate in the Chapel of St. Ignatius. ...Christ’s presence becomes part of us as we are sent out the front doors of the chapel into the realities of our daily lives.” Read the Good Word in its entirety and weigh in at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

FUN FACT

59%

The percentage of high school students who research colleges with their parents, according to the 2011 E-Expectations Study.

SUPPORTING YOUTH Rep. Jim McDermott, D-Seattle, visited Seattle University to attend a meeting of the Mockingbird Society, an advocacy group for foster care reform. McDermott is a recognized leader in support for foster children. Escorting Rep. McDermott are Linda Diep, junior Criminal Justice major, and Casey Corr, director of strategic communications. Learn more about the Mockingbird Society at www.mockingbirdsociety. org/ and SU’s Fostering Scholars program at www.seattleu.edu/sas/fosteringscholars/.

Read more about the honor at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

PHOTO BY ILSA BRITT CHAPPLE

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Escorting Rep. McDermott are Casey Corr, director of strategic communications, and Linda Diep, junior Criminal Justice major.

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ON CAMPUS

Mural, Mural on the Wall | By Annie Beckmann Students bring public art to life at Bailey Gatzert The neighborhood around Seattle University was a blank canvas when Danila Rumold went in search of just the right site for a community mural. “This might be a good spot,” she remarked more than once as she toured the area last December. Rumold, who taught in SU’s Fine Arts program, pondered several locations before she met Greg Imel, principal at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School. Imel told her he’d welcome a new mural and an opportunity for community collaboration. “It takes an invitation for a collaboration to begin,” Rumold says. “I thought art would be another nice element to bring to Bailey Gatzert and continue to build that relationship.” The mural is the latest symbol of the partnership between SU and Bailey Gatzert, says Imel. It’s a partnership inspired by the Seattle University Youth Initiative. With a home for the mural in her sightline, Rumold geared up to teach her spring class called Community Art and Mural Painting Techniques. It’s a new spin on service-learning projects at SU, one of dozens the university offers students for greater community engagement. Thirteen SU students participated in Rumold’s 11-week course last spring. Sophomore Andy Vanderbilt did some of the early legwork for the project. He scouted the neighborhood just south of campus, photographing buildings and sights to capture the colors and mood of the area that could be conveyed in the mural. Much research went into the finished

work. As they learned about the history of mural making, the SU students visited murals around the city and discovered public art involves a collaborative, community-driven process. They participated in a meeting of the Central District Public Art Project for a glimpse at how that group planned art for the Central District. Vincentian Brother Mark Elder, a visiting muralist from Chicago’s DePaul University, spoke to the students about the role of the artist as peacemaker in community art. He talked about creating public art with socio-political, community and religious themes and the dialogue it can produce. Bailey Gatzert students, their parents and teachers became the driving force for the mural class. “What do you like about school?” and “What do you want to be when you grow up?” were among the questions the students asked Kathleen West’s K–5 art classes. “One wanted to be a minister. Another an artist and another a nurse. It was great to see them draw their hopes and dreams for the future and include them in the mural,” says West. Early on, Rumold’s students taped hundreds of Bailey Gatzert drawings to their SU classroom walls for inspiration.

Four themes emerged: community, curiosity, creativity and ambition. The mural makers chose to present the themes in numerous languages to reflect the multilingual neighborhood. Artist renderings depicting tetherball, four square and kickball, which resonated with the students, are found on the mural along with jumping rope, hula hooping, flowers and sunshine. Strong core values, popular teachers and local heroes offered considerable inspiration for an outdoor mural that gives Bailey Gatzert a fresh splash of color and pride. The mural features cameos of respected leaders Wing Luke, the Vietnamese Trung sisters, Roberto Maestas and Chief Sealth, along with Principal Imel and several popular Bailey Gatzert teachers. It was no small feat to build the 8-by-28-foot mural. The class constructed seven canvas panels made of marine plywood to keep the project manageable. Once transported to the school, youngsters could watch the mural artists at work and have a chance to use handcarved rubber stamps to add flowers to a blooming cherry tree, a symbol of growth and hopefulness. In late June, Bailey Gatzert hosted a celebration in the school garden where the community mural, titled “Lifting Up Our Children,” now lives. “I’m very pleased with the result,” Imel says. “I’m impressed with the work of those who collaborated on the mural and the collective impact it will have on the students at Bailey Gatzert.” “What I like most is that the kids love it,” Imel adds. “They see images they can relate to in it.”

Read more about the Seattle University Youth Initiative at www.seattleu.edu/suyi/.

SU students work on the mural before it is moved to its permanent home outdoors at Bailey Gatzert.

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Leader of the Pack | By Annie Beckmann Meet the first female ASSU president in more than a decade Katie Wieliczkiewicz, the new president of the Associated Students of Seattle University (ASSU), aims to stir up the way the campus community thinks and operates. Wieliczkiewicz knows how to both breathe fire and tame the flames. Yet she is quick to add that she doesn’t want to overstep bounds. “I’m lucky I can figure out where that line is,” she says. With Katie W. at the helm of ASSU, it’s going to be a lively ride, the kind where the unexpected lurks around the next curve. This active student and rugby player is part stand-up comic with serious insight and plenty of sass. “I chose this university because it’s liberal in terms of its Catholicism, but I think we’ve strayed from that. It shocked me that Catholic students at SU can be uncomfortable about their Catholicism. “I want to bring back the core values,” Wieliczkiewicz continues. “I’m not talking about sitting around and saying the rosary, but showing your identity in your Catholicism. Why not say, ‘I’m Catholic and…’ instead of ‘I’m Catholic, but…’?” Mike Bayard, S.J., got to know Wieliczkiewicz a couple of years ago through Campus Ministry and her involvement in the Sunday evening liturgy. “I appreciate Katie’s leadership. She is bold. She holds to what she believes. She has a vision for an engaged campus at SU,” Father Bayard says. “I saw this vision actualized with her hard work last fall in organizing a very successful Hallympics.” The Hallympics is a competition among campus residence halls that features a range of activities to test various forms of “athleticism,” from

a Frisbee toss to a pie-eating contest. During the last event she cajoled Fr. Bayard and Pat Kelly, S.J., to a game of Mario Kart Wii in the Bellarmine Hall lobby and convinced Eric Watson, S.J., to play volleyball. Wieliczkiewicz has an uncanny knack for evoking hearty laughter from the campus Jesuits. “That is not an easy feat to pull off,” Fr. Bayard concedes. The new ASSU leader is one of 14 SU students invited to the Ignatian Leadership Honor Society for the 2011–12 academic year. The honor society recognizes students “for their demonstrated integration of personal, spiritual and academic leadership during their SU career.” Another noteworthy aspect of Wieliczkiewicz’s presidency: she is the first female ASSU president in the past 13 years. (Coincidentally, the last one also was named Katie.) On the agenda for Wieliczkiewicz as the leader of ASSU: student engagement, a revamped social media plan and more involvement in student-run clubs. She knows something about the value of being active on campus. Prior to becoming ASSU president, she served as Residence Hall Association (RHA) president the past two years. Alvin Mangosing, former associate director for residential education who served as the RHA co-adviser, says Wieliczkiewicz balances fun, professionalism and assertiveness in her work.

“She is very upfront with her opinions and at the same time values the ideas that others bring to the table,” he says. “Katie has rebranded RHA and strengthened the development of the Hall Councils under her leadership.” Politics has been a part of Wieliczkiewicz’s life before she was elected president of ASSU. In 2008, she was a summer intern for the late Sen. Ted Stevens (R-AK), the year he was indicted for corruption. She recalls how he gathered his staff and professed his innocence. “I’ve never forgotten how honest he was with his staff,” she recalls. “A lot of people didn’t like him, but you knew Ted Stevens was looking out for Alaska. It was Ted Stevens who shaped me to be a public servant and not a politician.” No stranger to hard work, she has spent two summers in Alaska at a job sealing road cracks. Buzzwords such as “rebranding” that Wieliczkiewicz drops in conversation are a clue she’s a major in strategic communications, with a second major in public affairs. Wieliczkiewicz spent the summer in a paid urban planning internship in Palmer, Alaska, near her hometown of Wasilla, Alaska, home of former governor and vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin. Post SU, she is eyeing possible grad schools on the East Coast. She says she hopes to return to her home state for a career as a public servant after graduate studies. Both her parents are originally from Boston, so living on the East Coast for grad school holds magnetic appeal. “I want some of that East Coast, TypeA hustle and bustle before I go back to Alaska,” she says.

Hear Katie pronounce her last name online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine.

Katie Wieliczkiewicz is the first female ASSU President in 13 years.

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“I want to bring back the core values. I’m not talking about sitting around and saying the rosary, but showing your identity in your Catholicism.” KATIE WIELICZKIEWICZ

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Legal Writing Goes Global | By Tina Potterf School of Law professors take program to legal professionals worldwide Laurel Oates and Mimi Samuel of the School of Law have gone global with the top Legal Writing Program in the United States, as consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

who are non-native English speakers. Practicing attorneys are generally more interested in learning how to be more effective in communication, The Legal Writing Program, which law professors who wanted to write in whereas magistrates may have a session focuses on effective, concise and a manner removed from the rigid and that offers tools to write for different compelling writing for legal cases— stodgy style that had predominated. audiences. Sessions on grammar, following grammar and punctuation Two trips to Uganda led to sevenpunctuation and persuasion, for rules, naturally—continues its month stays in India, East Africa and example, are pared down to the basics international expansion that began South Africa to teach workshops and but are still interactive. in 2003. That year Oates, professor of courses. In 2007, a conference in East “This is not about us coming in law and director of the Legal Writing Africa showcased best practices for and saying, ‘this is the American way Program, teamed up with colleague legal writing professors in Africa and of doing this,’” Samuel says. “We are Mimi Samuel, associate professor of the United States. making it work within their existing lawyering skills at the law school, to “We are trying to make the law [legal] system.” replicate the success of the program accessible,” Oates says. Flexibility is key, Oates and Samuel spearheaded by Oates and School In December, Oates, Samuel and concur, to adapt the program to of Law Professor Anne Enquist and legal writing instructor Janet Dickson changing countries and cultures. Christopher Rideout, associate director will take the program to the University Resources readily available in Seattle— of legal writing. of Zululand, near Durban, South textbooks and Internet access, for Law professionals overseas learned Africa, where they will train faculty and example—may be extremely limited about SU’s program through the Legal others in the legal community who or nonexistent in a classroom or Writing Institute, which Oates helped want to acquire the skills necessary to courtroom in Africa. Legal writing establish in 1984. Comprised of 2,500 train within their own countries. books can be dense and expensive to legal academics representing more “Working abroad we get to see travel with so Oates and her colleagues than 200 law schools nationwide, the things and meet people we never put together a compact legal writing institute is the second largest group of would as tourists,” Samuel says. guide. The guide covers subjects such legal academics in the world, according The pair has led sessions on effective as writing structure so law students to Oates. Its aim is to improve how writing for magistrates in Uganda and can write like lawyers and lawyers and legal writing is taught; every two governmental lawyers in South Africa judges can write for diverse cases. years the institute offers a national and Botswana, to name a few. In recent The success of the Legal Writing conference, with regional conferences years, they taught at a law school in Program at home and afar is credited held year round. Shanghai and led legal writing sessions not only to the work of Oates and Soon Oates and Samuel were fielding on methodology and active learning in Samuel but also to law students, faculty requests from colleagues abroad. They Afghanistan. Through the years, Oates and deans, past and present, who have started in Uganda, organizing and and Samuel streamlined and tailored supported their efforts along the way. leading training sessions on effective their teachings based on the needs Says Oates, “We have this great legal legal writing for judges, lawyers and of the participants, including many writing community and faculty here.”

“We are trying to make the law accessible.” LAUREL OATES, LAW PROFESSOR/DIRECTOR, LEGAL WRITING PROGRAM

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MIMI SAMUELS

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Mimi Samuel and Laurel Oates with participant, Kapeko Kapeko at a training in Botswana.

SOUTH AFRICA LEGAL PROGRAM OPEN TO ALUMNI Have you always wanted to visit South Africa? If so, this may be your chance while earning 20 CLE credits. Beginning in 2012, the first week of Seattle University’s South Africa Study Abroad Program at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg will be open to Seattle University alumni and members of the bench and the bar. Each morning, participants will join U.S. and South African law students for lectures on South Africa’s history, politics

and legal system. Afternoons will be spent on field trips, including to the magistrate courts, the Constitutional Court, the Apartheid Museum and a legal clinic, in addition to cultural activities. The tentative dates for the program are June 3–9, 2012. For more information, contact Roxanne Mennes at mennesr@ seattleu.edu.

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Gardening Guru Brings Oh, La, La Back to SU | By Annie Beckmann Former grounds manager Ciscoe Morris leads tour of campus greens and gardens When celebrity gardener Ciscoe Morris returned to Seattle University recently, a gaggle of gardening enthusiasts followed him around campus to soak up his unabashed joy for trees and plants, snails and bugs and—oh, la, la!—hummingbirds. “Male hummingbirds do nothing but protect their territory and mate. My kind of job,” he said, with a laugh. Morris, who spent nearly 24 years as SU’s gregarious garden guru, led a group of 20 campus and community members on a colorful historical tour of the stomping grounds he left in 2002 to pursue his successful multimedia career, including hosting his own local radio and television shows. It was 2½ hours of nonstop Morris vignettes, with lots of gardening tips thrown in, all in that native Wisconsin dialect his fans love. The event was a sell-out fundraiser for Professionals Without Boundaries, a group of SU students, staff and faculty dedicated to leading service projects locally and globally. “Those jade plants?” he said, pointing in the corner window of the Bannan Building, “they were 99 years old when we got ’em. They were given to the university by the Pigotts.” He rhapsodized about the seeds the late Fujitaro Kubota (of Kubota Garden fame) brought in his pocket from Japan in 1907, and called out many of the rare trees Kubota planted around campus in the years before Morris arrived.

“This Japanese pine,” he said, as he directed eyes to a tree near Bannan, “it came from seed from Fujitaro Kubota’s pocket.” The lively gardener blithely boasted about climbing the giant sequoia alongside the Pigott Building on several occasions, once to save its very top. As the tour continued, Morris stopped abruptly in front of the Administration Building to remark on a Blue Atlas Cedar with double trunks that he cabled up high when he was worried it might topple. He shared his pride that under his watch SU was the first university in the state to be designated a backyard Wildlife Sanctuary. In the years he was on campus, Morris was pleased to report only 10 trees came down. The group marveled at how he had the foresight to garden without pesticides, a campus-wide policy that continues today. “When I first came here, there were almost no birds. I hated the thought of spraying poisons,” he said. When someone asked about slug bait, Morris suggested iron sulfate as an alternative. Northwest snails, he added, are actually edible escargots brought here by the French. “The only way to get them to leave is to get French people to move into your neighborhood,” he suggested, with a bit of a blush. “I can’t lie worth a poodle.”

Ciscoe Morris pulls from his vast gardening expertise as he leads a tour of SU’s lush grounds.

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“When I first came here, there were almost no birds. I hated the thought of spraying poisons.”

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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CISCOE MORRIS Former grounds manager at SU

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ON CAMPUS

Faculty Snapshot / Barry Mitzman | By Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 Meet Barry Mitzman, director of SU’s Center for Strategic Communications Professor Barry Mitzman is an expert in every sense of the word. The director of Seattle University’s Center for Strategic Communications has a long history in, well, communicating strategically. Mitzman’s varied talents have allowed his career to evolve in unexpected ways. Since arriving in Seattle in 1979, he has established himself as a force in the communications industry. Initially, he started out as a journalist in town, writing for Seattle Weekly before being promoted to the editor. His interest in covering local issues eventually lead him to television, where he worked as a reporter, producer and show host at Seattle public television station KCTS. A shift into marketing and communications came after he left KCTS to take the job of vice president at SS+K, one of the country’s premier marketing and communications agencies. From there he was at Microsoft, serving as director of strategic communications, managing public relations and advertising on behalf of the company.

It wasn’t until fall 2007 that Mitzman joined the Seattle University faculty. Professor Soon Beng Yeap, former assistant vice president of Marketing Communications and founder of SU’s Center for Strategic Communications, knew of Mitzman from his work in public television. “I met Barry when he was hosting a show on PBS called Serious Money,” Yeap explains. “Any businessman worth his salt wanted to be on Barry’s show.” Yeap asked Mitzman to oversee the then-fledgling program through the College of Arts & Sciences. And the rest is history. Since he began at SU, strategic communications students have reveled in Mitzman’s real-world teaching style. Senior strategic communications major Richard Kaiser says Mitzman’s classes have helped prepare him for the workforce. “Barry consistently engages with students in a way that not only pushes us to a higher performance level, but also allows us to feel like professional peers.” Giving students real world experience in the classroom is precisely what

Mitzman works for as a professor. “I try to draw lessons from how strategic communications is actually done in the real world,” he says. Miztman’s role at SU has given him the opportunity to pursue a critical social justice initiative, the Project on Family Homelessness. Working with SU students and local media outlets, the project works to raise public awareness of family homelessness in the Seattle area and explore how the media reports on issues around homelessness. The project recently received a second major grant of more than $180,000 from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. At SU, he is looking to broaden the strategic communication’s curriculum, with more courses related to social media, advertising and public relations writing. “Public relations studies should prepare students to take on roles from Paris Hilton’s publicist to White House press secretary,” Mitzman says. “We want our graduates to be able to take on careers like these and everything in between.”

news & notes FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS Ryan Adamson, associate professor at the School of Law, wrote an article that will appear in Volume 47:1 of the Gonzaga Law Review. The article is titled, “The Homeowners’ Illusory Safety Net: Mortgage Broker Surety Liability.” Heidi Sacha Bond, assistant professor at the School of Law, had her article, “Many-to-Many Contracts” accepted by the Tulane Law Review. It will be published as the lead article in the February 2012 issue.

Emily Butler, nurse practitioner in the Student Health Center and College of Nursing alumna, was named Distinguished Practitioner by the University of Washington School of Nursing. Butler received her bachelor of science in nursing from SU in 1996, and went on to graduate from the advanced registered nurse practitioner program at the University of Washington. She has served in the Student Health Center since 2003.

Gary Chamberlain, professor emeritus in theology and religious studies, delivered a keynote address at the annual Science Symposium day at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minn. Chamberlain's address was titled, "Water and Spirit.” Professors Elaine Gunnison and Jacqueline Helfgott of the Criminal Justice department published on the topic, “Factors that Hinder Reentry Success: A View from Community

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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“Public relations studies should prepare students to take on roles from Paris Hilton’s publicist to White House press secretary.” BARRY MITZMAN director, Center for Strategic Communications

Barry Mitzman lends his considerable media and public relations expertise to the center he runs.

Corrections Officers” in the April 2011 International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology. The article is the third in a series of articles reporting results from a study of state and federal community corrections officer perceptions of ex-offender reentry needs and challenges. Jean Tang, PhD, MS, APRN-BC, was recently awarded a post-doctoral research fellowship on the National Institute of Nursing Research-sponsored

program, Individualized Care for At-Risk Older Adults. Her research is titled, “Multi-Faceted Audio-Relaxation Program for Older Adults with Comorbid Hypertension and Insomnia.” Tang will be working with the internationally renowned cardiovascular health researcher, Barbara Riegel. Tang has been an assistant professor of nursing at Seattle University since 2005. Rubina Mahsud, assistant professor of management, and Greg Prussia,

Compiled by Mike Thee, online editor, and Seattle University Magazine staff.

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professor of management at Albers, wrote an article that has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies. The article, “Human Capital, Efficiency, and Innovative Adaptation as Strategic Determinants of Firm Performance,” was co-authored with Gary Yukl (SUNYAlbany). Read more faculty and staff achievements at www.seattleu.edu/commons/.

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AT H L E T I C S

A Step Closer to the Big Dance | By Jason Behenna Seattle University accepts invite to join the Western Athletic Conference PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., women’s basketball coach Joan Bonvicini and men’s coach Cameron Dollar celebrate SU joining the WAC.

T GET IN THE GAME AND GET TIX FOR UPCOMING SEASON Fall signals a change in the weather and basketball season soon to begin. Don’t miss out on the action at KeyArena at Seattle Center and Connolly Center. For tickets and schedules visit goseattleu.com.

he Redhawks will soon be eligible to compete for conference championships and automatic bids to NCAA post-season competition. Beginning in the 2012–13 season, Seattle University will officially be a member of the Western Athletic Conference (WAC). The university was invited to join and accepted in early June. “We are honored by the invitation as it reflects the strides and achievements we have made in Division I intercollegiate athletics,” President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., says. “The WAC has provided some of the nation’s best intercollegiate competition for nearly a half-century.” With the university’s membership in

the WAC, athletics moves closer to the goal of building championship-caliber programs, especially with basketball. “By taking this step, we are providing our fans outstanding rivalries and we give our teams a direct path to conference championships and NCAA Division I postseason competition,” Father Sundborg says. SU will begin competing in the WAC in sports including: baseball, men’s and women’s basketball, cross country, golf, indoor track and field, outdoor track and field, women’s soccer, softball, women’s swimming, tennis and volleyball. It’s a move that was heralded in a Seattle Times editorial, where it was written, “Seattle University’s move to

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“Seattle University’s move to the Western Athletic Conference is appropriately greeted as a milestone as an excellent school becomes great.” SEATTLE TIMES EDITORIAL

the Western Athletic Conference is appropriately greeted as a milestone as an excellent school becomes great.” The university is the 10th school in the WAC, joining University of Denver, University of Idaho, Utah State University, San Jose State University, University of Texas-San Antonio, Texas State University, University of TexasArlington, Louisiana Tech University and New Mexico State. “We are pleased that Seattle University is joining the WAC,” says Karl Benson, WAC commissioner. “Seattle’s tradition and history, along with a strong commitment to its pro-

gram and facilities, make the university and its top-15 media market a great fit for the WAC. We look forward to a beneficial and successful relationship.” Membership in the WAC is in the best interest of students and the university as a whole, Father Sundborg says. “The WAC’s vision is to be recognized as one of the premier conferences in the country, distinguished by integrity, success in both academics and athletics, and sportsmanship,” he says. “Holding to these very same ideals, Seattle University is enthusiastic to partner with the WAC.” The two sports sponsored by SU but

not by the WAC, men’s soccer and men’s swimming, will remain in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. The other sports currently enjoying a conference home will remain in their current conference for the 2011–12 academic year before moving to the WAC. This fall, SU heads into year four of the NCAA Division I reclassification process, the final year before gaining full Division I membership. Stacy Howard, media relations specialist, contributed to this story. Link to the Seattle Times editorial from this story at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

Manchester U at Seattle U One of the most famous—if not the most famous—soccer clubs in the world, Manchester United, practiced on the turf at Seattle University’s Championship Field in July. The team was here in advance of a game against the Seattle Sounders FC and held a clinic to benefit the Special Olympics. On hand was star player Wayne Rooney, regarded by many as the best player in the game today. Players from the Seattle University men's and women's soccer teams along with coaches representing Seattle Sounders FC helped guide the youngsters through soccer drills and games. Manchester United chose Championship Field as a training site because the natural-grass pitch closely matches the temporary field at CenturyLink Field, home field of the Seattle Sounders FC.

Players from SU, the Special Olympics and guests with soccer great Wayne Rooney (in black).

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Grief Comes

Hope FATHER GANZA

IS DOING HIS PART TO BUILD A BETTER, BRIGHTER FUTURE FOR THE PEOPLE OF RWANDA STORY BY TINA POTTERF PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

Fr. Ganza holds photos of his family, most of whom were killed in the 1994 Rwanda genocide.

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It is a moment that lingers, as if suspended in time, in Jean Baptiste Ganza’s mind. He was a young man leaving home to embark on a life-changing journey while his mother was struggling to let him go. On the day of his departure, bound for the Congo in Central Africa to follow his calling to become a Jesuit priest, Jean Baptiste’s mother, with tears in her eyes and a heavy heart, kissed and hugged her son goodbye. Little did he know at the time but that would be the last time he would see his mother alive. Within six months she would be murdered, along with five of Ganza’s siblings and nearly 80 extended family members, all among the 800,000 killed in the 1994 Rwanda genocide. Losing his mother and much of his family 17 years ago in his homeland of Gisenyi, Rwanda, set in motion a particularly dark period for Ganza who, though alive, was struggling with survivor guilt. He was going through the motions of life but not really living it. A man so rich and convinced of his faith had suddenly lost faith in humanity and was questioning everything, including his belief in God as he grappled with bouts of heavy grief and anguish entwined with anger. “You die with those who are killed,” he says. “At the time I was angry with God because I felt he didn’t follow through. I started to ask why I survived,” he says. “In my situation, my faith played a key role in something that led me to choose to leave my parents, siblings and cousins that day.” Suddenly he was without the core of his family—his father died 10 years earlier. “Why save me and not my brothers and sisters? But then I saw my leaving for the Congo as a sign that God wanted me to get out in time, that he had a mission for me.” That sense of mission led him to Seattle University, where within two years he’s made a name for himself. He is recognized around campus as not only a young Jesuit—he’s 42 years old—with a warm and affable presence but also as an SU student and soon-to-be-

alumnus when he graduates with an MBA early next year. He lives the mission of Seattle University through his dedication to the people of Rwanda and commitment to social justice. Many have come to know him through his openness in sharing his story, a story that is ultimately one of hope, faith and survival. Following the deaths of much of his family, he found some measure of comfort when survivors who were there with his mother in her last moments of life relayed a message to him. “When death came for her, she said she was happy I wasn’t [in Rwanda] and that I could live,” he says. Time has brought healing to Ganza, who now dedicates his life to help in the healing of those who continue to suffer and live with the aftermath of the genocide. Top of mind are his efforts for social reconciliation between the Hutus and Tutsis, the best means to a brighter future for the people of Rwanda, he says. The genocide was a result

“ You die with those who are killed.” killed.” Jean Baptiste Ganza, S.J., on the 1994 Rwanda genocide of ongoing conflict between the Tutsis and Hutus. Ganza is a Tutsi. He acknowledges the troubled history and tensions that continue to exist between the two and that his work— and the efforts of those who follow him—in reconciliation will take time. But when it’s your life’s mission, you do what it takes. “If you are convinced that God saved you then you have to be convinced that he has a mission for you. I couldn’t see that at the time but I knew I had to continue with my mission of becoming a Jesuit,” he says. “It was when I became a priest that I saw clearly that mission.”

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Jean Baptiste Ganza listens in with his study group as he works toward an MBA at Albers.

e ”

Becoming a Jesuit aided in the healing process and restored his faith, Ganza says. The Jesuit ethos coupled with support for continuing his education and travel drew him in. “When I read the biography of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder, I fell in love with his journey,” Ganza says. “His journey was similar to my own.” Sitting in the library at Arrupe House, the Jesuit community on campus, Father Ganza exudes a warmth and quiet calm as he offers glimpses into his life. He speaks with purpose but in a voice that is pleasant and inviting. Casually dressed in a gray sweater pulled over a long-sleeved shirt and khaki pants, he looks every bit the student. Revealing his very personal story has with time become easier for Ganza. “There was a time when I didn’t want to share,” he says. He holds onto pleasant memories spending time in the countryside of Kibuye with his siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, and of the special traditions and moments that wrapped around the family’s Christmas and New Year celebrations.

He remembers his family’s house filling up with neighbors who would drop in to welcome the birth of Ganza’s younger siblings and congratulate his parents. “I feel very privileged to have had a dad and mom who were there for me. I was loved, loved by my family and loved by God,” he says. He says God wanted him to come to SU. But like any new student or individual in a new city and new environment, there were challenges. His early days and weeks at the university were tough. There were cultural and age differences. The self-professed extrovert had trouble connecting and making friends during his first quarter as a student. Among his classmates at Albers, Ganza says he was reticent, at least at first, to disclose he was a Jesuit as he knew it could change their willingness to open up to him or treat him as they would just another student, not as a priest. That soon changed. By his second quarter, he started to make friends and was soon actively participating in study groups and opening up, sharing more of himself. Outside of class he was exploring the city while he indulged his range of interests.

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Jean Baptiste Ganza S.J., chats with Patrick O’Leary, S.J., before Mass.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JEAN BAPTISTE GANZA, S.J.

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Father Ganza was instrumental in the building of the Ecole Primaire Saint Ignace elementary school in Kigali, Rwanda.

As an outdoor enthusiast, Ganza is in the right part of the country to partake in one of his favorite pastimes, cycling, whether it’s at Alki Beach or around Greenlake. When he wants to escape the hustle and bustle of the city, he hops a ferry over to Whidbey Island for reflection and “to get in touch with nature,” he says. Daily prayer and saying Mass at the chapel in the Arrupe House or at the Chapel of St. Ignatius energizes him. “Seattle changed to me. It today is my home,” Ganza says. “I feel fully integrated in the community here on campus and outside of campus.” Off the field he is, to put it mildly, an avid and ardent fan of European football—soccer—and plays regularly in pick-up games at Cal Anderson Park near campus. He enjoys the cinema, particularly comedies, and dancing, both as a spectator and participant, although Ganza hasn’t put on his dancing shoes as much recently as he has in the past. Perhaps surprisingly, he also enjoys country western music and can be spotted on occasion

soaking up the sounds and the ambience at the Little Red Hen in Seattle’s Greenlake neighborhood along with Dave Anderson, S.J., alumni chaplain. They go there to play pool, listen to country music and have a beer. Father Anderson met Ganza five years ago during a retreat for lay students at the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley. The two clicked right away. “We shared many stories during that time,” Anderson says, “and I learned about some of the realities of his country, Rwanda and Africa.” When Ganza arrived in Seattle on his way to SU, it was Anderson who was waiting for him at the airport to transport him to campus. During Ganza’s first year he lived with about a dozen Jesuits at Arrupe House (he now resides in Bellarmine Hall.) The two started a tradition where they would have a glass of wine and watch soccer or country music videos in the TV room. “This was a great time for us to catch up on the day and support each other in our daily joys and challenges,”

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Anderson says. “ … Even though he is my brother Jesuit, he is also a very close friend and confidante who knows me as well as anyone does.” Anderson says Ganza is “such an effective preacher and teacher of God’s word.” “One evening we were watching TV and someone came on and asked the question, ‘what are you passionate about,’” Anderson recalls. “I asked him the same question and without missing a beat he said, ‘I’m passionate about preaching and teaching Jesus Christ. Nothing gives me more joy than that.” When it came time to pursue an MBA, Ganza—who holds a master’s in social sciences from the Catholic University of Central Africa in Yaounde, Cameroon, and a master’s in social ethics from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, Calif.— applied to many schools. He found SU’s MBA program the best of the bunch. The MBA program was challenging in the beginning but Ganza says the education he has received confirms for him that he made the right choice. Albers Professor Bill Weis has taught Ganza and says his presence and contributions in class enhanced the educational experience. “His manner, his caring, his equanimity, these special gifts brought out the best in everyone around him,” says Weis. In the Albers Emotional Intelligence course, Weis says Ganza “modeled how to genuinely be interested in your colleagues, how to show genuine curiosity and caring, how to truly ‘see’ the other’s essence and to see the world from other’s eyes.” He adds, “Ganza’s story is inspiring as well as heartbreaking. His transparency in sharing his life helped his class colleagues be transparent in sharing their own stories …” Carly Cannell, an SU staff member at Albers, got to know Ganza as a facilitator for two of his business courses. Working with him in class and professionally has been “a privilege,” she says, citing Ganza’s gentle demeanor and thoughtful way of engaging and accepting others. “I think it can be intimidating for students to take an Emotional Intelligence class with a Jesuit and it’s only amplified when that Jesuit is also a survivor of the Rwandan genocide,” Cannell says. “Yet his humility and ability to connect and relate to others helped everyone feel safe to work with and learn from him. He sees the best in others and knows how to bring that out in them.” Getting an MBA was a logical choice for Ganza, who

felt he could do more good by having the business smarts around finances, entrepreneurship and fundraising that can be leveraged in future endeavors. His latest initiative is an important one: the construction and operation of a secondary school run by the Jesuits in the capital of Kigali. Before he arrived in Seattle, Ganza and other Jesuits were instrumental in setting up and operating an elementary school on Jesuit-owned property in the country. Today, the school educates 370 children and fits

“ Before you forgive you will suffer. Hatred is heavy on you and toxic in your life.” life.” Jean Baptiste Ganza, S.J. with Ganza’s aim for reconciliation there. “I came to the conclusion that helping people start projects, to have a better life and access to food and healthcare are other ways to strengthen reconciliation,” Ganza says. “I want to bring the Hutus and Tutsis together with common goals.” A special moment came in summer 2010 when Ganza visited the school after it had just opened. “This was the first time I saw the school with the kids in it. It was alive with the children in their uniforms, dancing,” he says. “It was a big party and so moving. They were happy. I saw the Tutsis and Hutus together. This is a big thing for the future of Rwanda.” The need for a secondary school is longstanding. A former high school in the northern part of the country was heavily vandalized during the genocide. The new school will open in early 2012 and will be located next to the existing elementary school. Ganza is leading the charge to raise additional funding to complete the school. This past summer he spent several weeks in Rwanda, visiting the children at the elementary school, checking progress on the new school and spending time with family and with visiting guests from Seattle.

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Father Ganza is an avid soccer fan—he’s a big follower of European football, with the Arsenal Football Club one of his favorite teams—and plays the game himself.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JEAN BAPTISTE GANZA, S.J.

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Father Ganza does a blessing at a baptism during a recent trip to Rwanda.

In his time at Seattle University, Ganza and his story have inspired many. Last year, he was nominated by his peers to be represented in the Hall of Leaders, a gallery of framed photos adorning a wall in the James C. Pigott Pavilion for Leadership that showcases leaders, as selected by a committee of students. In describing the Hall of Leaders, Michelle Etchart, director of leadership development in Student Development, says that it “highlights ordinary people who let their better

How You Can Help To learn more about Father Ganza’s work in Rwanda and to support his efforts in building a Jesuit secondary school or to make a donation, e-mail ganzaj@seattleu.edu.

angles shine and did extraordinary things with their circumstances.” To be included among an impressive group was humbling, Ganza says, but it was all the more special because the selection was made by peers. “My first reaction was to turn it down,” he says, with a laugh. “I don’t like to be in the spotlight as sometimes I wish to be anonymous. But I thought if my story can inspire people, then it’s worth it.” Getting to the place where he is today took time—time to reflect, to pray, to heal and to forgive. “Before you forgive you will suffer. Hatred is heavy on you and toxic in your life,” he says. Following his recent trip to Rwanda he was back in Seattle in August, preparing to pick up his studies again as a student. When he completes his degree, Ganza says he will return to Rwanda. “This school we have started will need me,” he says, “for fundraising and day-to-day management. Not only the school but other projects in Rwanda and Burundi.” The future beyond that? “It’s in God’s hands,” he says.

Read more of this story at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Survival of the College of Nursing program addresses medical issues facing area homeless Photos by Chris Joseph Taylor

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Story by Annie Beckmann

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Graduate nursing student Natalie Sloan monitors the blood pressure of a client.

Seattle University’s College of Nursing is addressing concerns of the homeless who are medically fragile. As part of the Sinegal Nursing Initiative, a new program of the CON focuses on King County with an emphasis on Lake City, eight miles northeast of downtown Seattle. Lauren Lawson, a clinical nursing instructor at SU and community/public health nursing expert, describes the high mortality rate of the homeless. Threats, intimidation and traumas greatly challenge the survival of this vulnerable population. “The ups and downs of being homeless beat the body down,” says Lawson, who oversees community assessment for the program. “Statistically, the homeless die 30 years younger than the rest of the population—in their 50s rather than 80s."

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It took about a year to determine the best approach to meet the needs of the homeless population in Lake City, according to Bonnie Bowie, assistant professor of nursing and the initiative’s principal investigator. Bowie and Lawson chose to direct their attention to Lake City where the Seattle Mennonite Church (SMC) created a community ministry to respond to neighborhood homelessness. Jonathan and Melanie Neufeld, SMC’s community ministers, led the development of the Lake City Taskforce on Homelessness and expanded the services of God’s Lil Acre, what had been a limited resource for the homeless and is now a busy drop-in center just a block off Lake City Way. About 30 people circulate through each day, say the Neufelds.

Previous page: Lauren Lawson, SU clinical nursing instructor, talks with Niko B. Rabuku, a regular visitor to God’s Lil Acre.

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“I’ve learned the power of listening. It’s profound how people hearing themselves talk out loud can be life changing. Natalie Sloan/nursing grad student

“It’s a place of community even for those who are no longer homeless,” Jonathan says. It was fall 2008 when SU undergraduate nursing students discovered God’s Lil Acre and the collaborative partnership between the College of Nursing and the SMC developed. SU’s nursing students now spend time at God’s Lil Acre taking blood pressure, dressing wounds and discussing overall health. It wasn’t long before Bowie and Lawson realized Band-Aids wouldn’t do much to address the health needs of the homeless, however. Obesity, congestive heart failure, chronic hypertension and diabetes are some of the most common health problems they face. “We wanted something with a meaningful community relationship that would have long-term potential,” Bowie says. “The idea for medical respite care came from the Lake City community. We realized there were no services of this sort there that would offer homeless adults a safe place off the streets to recuperate after hospitalization. We hear and suspect this population doesn’t feel safe in downtown Seattle. Our plan now is to use a process called community-based participatory research to work through the community to design a model that meets their needs.” The emphasis on social justice and community outreach among the Mennonites is not unlike SU’s Jesuit Catholic character and mission, both Bowie and

Lawson suggest. “God really brought us together,” Bowie says. “Our research base comes out of community leadership. The Mennonite Church serves as facilitator along with the taskforce, other churches, agencies, merchants and all the other stakeholders. Melanie [Neufeld] has done a wonderful job of inviting key people from the community to join us in this planning process.” As a graduate research assistant and student in SU’s community health nursing program, Natalie Sloan is now interviewing those who come through the drop-in center to determine how a respite care center can best serve them. She also assists Bowie and Lawson with community assessments as they prepare to develop this new resource for the homeless who are recuperating from major illnesses and surgeries. They hope to better understand where homeless individuals go when they’re discharged from hospitals and where they get care. “God’s Lil Acre is a safe and respectful place to talk to someone as a human being,” says Sloan about the work ahead of her. “I’ve learned the power of listening. It’s profound how people hearing themselves talk out loud can be life changing. “Nobody starts out life thinking this is where they’ll end up. I want to learn how to use my voice and skills to share their stories. How do you tell the stories of others so they’re heard in a fair way? That’s what I’m here to learn.”

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Stepping Up to the Challenge | By Tina Potterf Alumni contribute to success of 600+ Challenge campaign Alumni, once again you’ve stepped up to the challenge—the 600+ Alumni Challenge, that is. The challenge, put forth by SU Trustees Carol Nelson, ’78, and Allan Golston, ’99, and former Trustee Carolyn Kelly, ’85, was as follows: If 600 news donors give to Seattle University between May 1– June 30, 2011, they would collectively donate $15,000 to SU’s Annual Fund. Contributions exceeded the goal, as 923 new donors gave during the time frame, raising $46,823 and bringing the total, with the $15,000 challenge gift, to more than $61,000. “A huge thanks to all for doing their part to make the 600+ Challenge a success,” says Maggie Keelan, director of Annual Giving. “Your gifts support our schools, colleges and programs that are most meaningful to you. You made a big impact on the lives of Seattle University students.”

Katy O’Callaghan, ’93, ’96 MPA, is a fundraiser and understands the value of giving. This is the first time she has donated to the university. “I thought about it many times but it was easy to misplace the request letter,” she says. The desire to give coupled with encouragement from Rudy the Redhawk—via a popular video campaign launched on Facebook—made her choice easy. “I truly appreciate the quality of education I received at Seattle University,” she says. “I would encourage other alumni to support Seattle University to make sure this level and quality of a well-rounded education are available to the next generation so they may become better citizens of the world.” Like O’Callaghan, Audra Query Lawlor, ’01, was eager to participate. Contributing to

the 600+ Challenge is a way to say thanks for all that her SU education has given her, she says. “It is insufficient to say that my path was shaped by my experiences at SU and the relationships I developed while there,” she says. “Giving to the alumni challenge was a small way to say thank you to a community that has meant so much to me.” Annie Katrina Lee, ’05, a graduate of Albers and a member of the Alumni Board of Governors, says it is important to give back to show a commitment to Seattle University and to current and incoming students who benefit from financial aid that these funds support. “Without the support of my fellow alumni, I would not have received the education to become the first generation graduate in my family,” Lee says. “A small contribution together as a community will go a long way and have a great impact.”

“Giving to the alumni challenge was a small way to say thank you to a community that has meant so much to me.” seattleu.edu/challenge

• GOAL / 600+ NEW DONORS IN 2 MONTHS • RESULTS / 923 NEW DONORS RAISING $46,823 • TOTAL / $61,823

Watch Rudy the Redhawk Challenge videos at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

AUDRA QUERY LAWLOR, ’01

Putting up the challenge was a way to pay forward the positive impact Seattle University has had in the lives of the contributors, says Nelson. “By supporting the 600+ Challenge,” she says, “we hope to open doors for students who follow in our footsteps and contribute to the development of the next generation of leaders.”

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Guest column by Shane Dir, ’04

Our Time is Now PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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“There have been few times in our history when alumni have been this excited about sports and what it is doing for the awareness and morale of the university community as a whole.” SHANE DIR, ’04 Shane Dir, ’04, encourages alumni to show their Redhawks pride.

Well, I have to admit the excitement in and around Seattle University lately is at a feverish buzz. As one of the more exuberant fans, Dan Kelley-Petersen, recently told me it is our destiny to win another national championship at Seattle University. As most of you have probably heard, Seattle University has joined the WAC (Western Athletic Conference) and will begin competing in 2012. Growing up in Visalia, Calif.—and yes, I'm one of the transplants—I watched the WAC because Fresno State, our new rival, is a member. Let me tell you I can't wait to beat them in every sport we play, especially at KeyArena at Seattle Center. There have been few times in our history when alumni have been this excited about sports and what it is doing for the awareness and morale of the university community as a whole. At the press conference in June, when the university announced its invitation to join the WAC, Joan Bonvicini, head coach of women’s basketball, said that the women's team would be the first to bring home the title. The competition and camaraderie have officially begun in the race to dominance. I encourage you to take the time to join the growing alumni support for our athletes.

I am embarrassed to say that as a student I never realized the broad sports program Seattle University has to offer. We now compete in 19 sports at a Division I level and many teams are nationally and regionally recognized. This past season our teams took several steps forward as we began notching wins over our cross-town rival, the University of Washington. If you haven't taken the time to attend a sporting event lately, do so. Stop by the alumni office and get your bookstore discount coupon to purchase attire to wear at a game and show your Redhawks pride. There are so many great things to be proud of as alumni of Seattle University: the Seattle Youth Initiative, the presidential recognition of our community service programs, the continued dedication as a leading sustainable university, a commitment to diversity of faith and the success of the 600+ Challenge. All of these and more make us proud of where we have been, where we are and where we are going at Seattle University. Go Redhawks! Shane Dir is president of One Strategic Capital, Inc., and is a member of the Alumni Board of Governors.

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ALUMNI VOICE

First-person essay by John McCarthy, ’71

Paddling Upstream The 14th Va’a World Sprint Championships were to be held in New Caledonia, May 19–25, 2010, and I was on my way. I had trained all winter.

in sync, driving downwind in this race and accelerating faster. We settle into a pattern of approximately 15 strokes per side depending on the waves, wind and As a member of a Hawaiian OutCanada, Oregon and Washington. We other conditions. This is the third World Outrigger Sprint rigger Canoe Club in the Pacific share a common passion and vision race in which I have competed. They are Northwest, I was going to this distant quest. held every other year, the first in 1984. French territory located northeast of The sun brilliantly reflects off the Australia, northwest of New Zealand water. I stay focused on the paddler in I went to the World Championships in New Zealand in 2006 and in California and east of Fiji, with a team of six front of me in my boat, Shane Baker, in 2008. The championship races in New paddlers to compete in the Golden of New Zealand. Caledonia historically attract the best Master division of the World Sprint My head is in the boat, physically paddlers from the Pacific Islands. races. At 60 years old, I may not fit the and mentally. I don’t look at any of In New Caledonia, more than 320 typical profile of a paddler. the other boats to my right or left. We Va’a is a Polynesian term in the Pacific are in lane four of eight lanes, directly races are run over a period of five days cultures used to describe the original in the middle of the field of eight elite after two days of practice. We started fast off the line, knowing we would struggle outrigger canoes for travel within the teams on the starting flag of the final at the halfway point. islands. A va’a owes its stability to a championship race. As we approached the three-quarter single float or outrigger fastened to the I have visualized being here before. point and for the last 125 meters of the hull. Va’as are propelled by a paddler The race will be over in roughly 2½ 500 meter race, I could hear the public using a single blade paddle. minutes after it starts. The Golden address system and the muffled English I remember the race as if it was Master World Championship will be and French play-by-play announcers yesterday. decided with seconds separating the calling the race from the shore. The beach I’m at the starting line of the final top boats. race of the V-6 Golden Master division I am like a gunfighter, locked, loaded had 10,000 screaming fans as the race was close. We drive on, fighting for our kapuna 500-meter at the World Championships and ready to draw. I am Kurt Russell lives against the best from Tahiti, New in Noumea, New Caledonia, in a in Tombstone, Clint Eastwood in The Zealand, Australia, Canada and Hawaii. V-6 (six-person outrigger), with a Outlaw Josey Wales. I am clear, cold, This was our shot to be champions of the select crew representing the Pacific focused and prepared to make every world. What a moment. Northwest. I have a chance to be the second deliberate, strong and the best When we crossed the finish line, all best in the World at 500 meters. This is a 60-year-old body can offer. I am pure was spent. But it was not to be on that the premier event of outrigger races for of heart. Water drips off my nose, my day as our time of 2 minutes, 18 seconds any men’s or women’s division. feet are planted on the bottom of the put us nine seconds out of medal More than 1,000 paddlers from 18 boat, ready to shift when we alternate position. We finished sixth. countries had made it to the island. paddle strokes from side to side. Later that evening I expressed my They have been battling it out in the My consciousness is focused on the disappointment at a bar in Noumea world’s largest lagoon that surrounds moment so I can seize the enjoyment to a French-speaking resident. He told New Caledonia on a beach called Ansa it has to offer. me, “Congratulations, you are the sixth Vasta in Noumea. We have paddled The race begins and we are off. best in the world, in a world of lifetime and raced through two days of practice I pull, recover with a quick feather paddlers.” I hadn’t looked at it like that and five days of competition in three move, reach, plant, breathe and pull, until he said it and he meant it with a different divisions and are here on the every stroke in perfect harmony with tip of his glass to our crew. start line for the event in the finals for the three paddlers in front of me and our age division. There are eight boats the two behind. We alternate paddling John McCarthy, ’71, is a Superior Court representing the best in the world. from side to side to keep the boat Judge in Tacoma, Wash. He has been a judge Our crew has a cast with birth ties upright, our path straight and our for 19 years and a lawyer for 36. to Hawaii, New Zealand, California, strength at maximum. We are totally Read more about McCarthy’s journey, the crew and where his passion for paddling comes from, along with more photos, at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

34 / Alumni Voice

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN McCARTHY

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For 20 years judge John McCarthy, ’71, has been a competitive paddler in kayaks, dragon boats and outriggers.

YOUR OWN WORDS Got a story to share? Send ideas and first person essays for consideration to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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IN MEMORIAM

Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community whom we’ve lost. Share your memories of those we honor by visiting In Memoriam at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/ where you will find full obituaries. 1952

Flavia Marie Lagerquist (May 30, 2011)

1980

Carl Ervin (June 25, 2011) A standout on the court as a player on the men’s basketball team and a standout individual, Ervin was inducted into Seattle University’s Athletic Hall of Fame. Bill Hogan, director of athletics, said of Ervin, “He was true to Seattle U to the very end. Carl spoke with Ed O’Brien the day before he passed, remarking how wonderful it was for Seattle U to return to Division I after a 29-year absence.” He is survived by his wife, Penny, and daughter,

1943

Michael Francis Hardiman, Jr. (June 27, 2011) Ruth Helen (Butler) Vandenberg (April 2, 2011)

1944

1954

Patrick Lynch (July 4, 2010)

1959

Thomas O’Neil (Aug. 12, 2010)

1961

John Joseph Merlino (April 26, 2011)

1963

Joel Allen Barber II, MEd (April 8, 2011) Imelda Aquino del Carmen, MEd (April 23, 2011)

1965

Charles “Chuck” George Dynes (June 24, 2011)

1966

Margaret Passanisi (May 6, 2011)

Robert I. Odom (March 17, 2011)

1949

1968

John Wilkens (Feb. 12, 2011)

Sigurbjorn “Sig” Johnson (June 6, 2011) Sister Rita Mary Lyons, CSJP, MEd (June 3, 2011)

1969

Kathleen McCaffery (April 3, 2011) THINKING OF YOU

We rely on readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@ seattleu.edu or send via mail to Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. (Obits may be edited for space and clarity.) Seattle University Magazine now publishes full obituaries online only at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

1970

Joalene Santos (Jan. 19, 2011)

1971

Francis Bernard Lally, MS (June 12, 2011)

1984

Sister Joan Martin, MA (May 10, 2011)

1986

Anne Rebecca Fidler (June 9, 2011) Eleanor Biddle Wagner (March 24, 2011)

1989

Kathleen Maria Kuechenmeister (June 10, 2011)

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BOOKMARKS

Growing Up in New York’s Italian South Village | By Tony Vivolo, ’66 Reviewed by Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 In his memoir, Growing Up in New York’s Italian South Village, Tony Vivolo paints a vivid picture of a time and place rich with culture. Readers are invited along for a nostalgic journey through his childhood and family history, transporting them to 1950s New York City. Before the dawn of corporate storefronts and astronomical living expenses, New York City was home to vibrant immigrant communities such as the one that shaped Vivolo’s boyhood. He fondly remembers the grocery stores, cafés, restaurants, bakeries, bars and candy shops where his family and neighbors hung out, socialized and conducted business— “the Starbucks of yesteryear,” as he calls them. Central to the narrative of his early years are Vivolo’s numerous family members. He was raised in the top floor apartment of a five-

story tenement on Sullivan Street; his grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins occupied the units below. Of living in such close quarters with family, Vivolo writes, “As a child, I always had somebody nearby to love, someone to love me, somebody to get in trouble with and someone to be forgiven by.” The chapters of Vivolo’s memoir are centered on his family, neighbors and places, all characters in scenes that paint a charming childhood. Vivolo takes great care to give detailed descriptions of each relative, yet it isn’t hard to see one’s own extended family members in the illustrations of Vivolo’s kin. In the chapter titled, “Uncle Joe,” Vivolo remembers admiring his uncle’s wild imagination and unpredictable sense of humor. In a chapter about his mother, Vera, Vivolo reflects on her tireless dedication to running her household, even joking that she

graduated with a “master’s degree in hard work.” The section Vivolo dedicates to his Aunt Helen, or “Head Aunt,” as he calls her, speaks to her role as the family’s director, always ensuring her relatives’ respect for one another. The family pictures Vivolo placed throughout the book help put a face to this wonderful cast of relatives and those important in shaping his life. The images are a complement to Vivolo’s evocative descriptions of names and places that provide powerful visual clues. Vivolo divides his memoir pleasingly between humorous, heartfelt memories and family history, an element of the book that helps provide context for his multitude of stories. Growing Up is made all the better thanks to Vivolo’s skilled writing that provides a look into his past and may conjure up fond memories of readers’ own childhoods.

“As a child, I always had somebody nearby to love, someone to love me, somebody to get in trouble with and someone to be forgiven by.” EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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class notes

REBUILDING SEATTLE (left to right) Gustavo Miracle, ’07, Jay Bautista, ’06, David Leigh, ’07, Jennilee Kho, ’07, Kevin Keith, ’06, and Jeannette Keith volunteered for the Rebuilding Together Seattle project this past spring. Rebuilding Together Seattle donates repair services for homeowners in need and helps rehabilitate nonprofit facilities.

Fran (Kohls) Hall, ’58, and her husband, Dr. Walter Hall, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary and renewed their vows on Aug. 20, 2011. The couple renewed their vows at St. Hilary’s Church in Tiburon, Calif., just north of San Francisco. Fran and Walter were married by Fran’s uncle, Harry Kohls, S.J., who also renewed the couple’s vows 25 years ago in Spain and Rome, Italy, at the Vatican.

Kate (Dubik) Schwarz, ’98, and her husband, Jonathan, welcomed Kiefer Jon Schwarz on May 17. Kiefer joins big brother Ben and big sister Lorelei, who had the chance to hold their new baby brother at the hospital.

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Margo Souza recently completed the book, Million Dollar Conversations with several other female authors. The book shares the strategies of women entrepreneurs for mastering business and relationships. Souza’s contribution to the book, a chapter titled “Straying from the Herd,” discusses her return to the family dairy business.

1966

Tony Vivolo presented his historical memoir, Growing Up in New York’s Italian South Village at a Greenwich Village Society for Historical Preservation event in New York City on May 25, 2011. (See Bookmarks for a review, page 37).

1976

Katherine Zappone was elected in May 2011 to the upper house of the Irish Parliament. A member of the Human Rights Commission, Zappone is a noted academic and civil rights campaigner.

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1979

Tom Phelan, MRE, recently published the novel, Nailer, about a man determined to get justice— or revenge. The tale is set against the backdrop of Ireland’s abusive industrial schools and the collusion between state and church that allowed them to flourish. Born and raised on a farm in Strahard, Mountmellick, County Laois, in the Irish midlands, Phelan now makes his home in New York.

1988

Mike Ciacciarella was re-elected to a second term as second deputy mayor of Naugatuck, Conn., in the May 2011 election. He works full-time as an electrical engineer for ABS Pumps in Meriden, Conn. He and his wife, Anne Cretella Ciacciarella, reside in Naugatuck with their 12-year-old quadruplets, Michael, Vincent, Sofia and Anna.

2006

Colton Michael Carothers graduated from the University of Washington School of Law with his Juris Doctor in June. He will be relocating to Minneapolis to practice law in the home office of international law firm Dorsey & Whitney LLP.

2008

Wendy R. Ellis received her Master in Public Health at the University of Washington this past spring. She will be moving to Washington, D.C., to complete a certificate in legislative studies at Georgetown University this fall, while continuing health services research. Recently, she presented the findings of her thesis research, “Identifying Factors Associated with Regional Variations in the Utilization of Mental Health Care among Medicaid-Eligible Children in Washington State” at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting.

2005

Matt Iseri, ’05, MBA, and wife, Shauna, welcomed daughter Alice Rose Iseri on June 11. Alice joins big sister Mattie.

Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

ORIENTATION COORDINATORS REUNITE Seattle University’s New Student and Family Programs, along with the Office of Alumni Relations, hosted a first reunion for former Orientation Coordinators in late spring. Many OCs, as they are known, from 1996 to the present were in attendance, along with members of the university community. The event was also a time to reminisce, share memories and pay tribute to the late Father Roger Gillis.

Eugene Ploch, ’00, received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree in May from the University of Houston College of Pharmacy.

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ALUMNI VOICE

Jennifer (Sullivan) Nunn, ’ 98, ‘05 MIB, shared this recent note in response to our winter 2010 story on couples who met at SU, fell in love and married. Here’s what she writes: “I met Jeremy Nunn, ’09 MBA, in 2003 in MBA 510 with Professor Bill Weis. It was a great class to meet in because it was so interactive, including a weekend retreat, giving us lots of opportunity to talk and get to know one another. We started dating soon after the class ended and were married in July 2005.” They have two children, Isabella and Jacob.

HALL OF FAMERS The Seattle University Athletics Hall of Fame, Class of 2011, is joined by those already enshrined in the Hall of Fame at an annual dinner and induction ceremony earlier this year. This year’s class consisted of 14 individuals and two teams representing seven sports and spanning six decades of athletics excellence, history and tradition at SU.

PHOTO BY JOHN ARONSON

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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BEING SCENE COMMENCEMENT CEREMONIES

CLASS OF 2011 KeyArena at Seattle Center was at-capacity Sunday, June 12, as family and friends gathered to celebrate the graduation of the Class of 2011. It was an ebullient and celebratory scene that began the day before with the baccalaureate Mass and brunch. There were 1,206 undergraduates and 864 graduate students who received their degrees this year. At the undergraduate ceremony, Japanese American students who were forced to leave the university during World War II were awarded honorary degrees. Internationally known landmine activist Tun Channareth was awarded an honorary degree at the graduate ceremony.

The Class of 2011 celebrate the big day in style, donning colorful get ups and accessories as they set off to write the next chapter in life, with words of wisdom from President Sundborg (top right). Tun Channareth (bottom left), internationally known landmine activist, was given an honorary degree at the graduate ceremony. View a photo gallery of commencement at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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The Last Word is an interesting take on the arts/literature/academia/travel and more.

Soaring Sounds | By Tina Potterf Chapel of St. Ignatius home to new organ The mellifluous musical sounds emanating from the Chapel of St. Ignatius during a concert or Mass are now enhanced with the addition of a new instrument in the music arsenal.

finished piece, with its intricate design and immense detail, is a sight to behold and generates sounds that “brighten the whole chapel,” McNamara says. Visitors will In late spring, the chapel received occasionally at Masses, McNamara says. likely notice the distinctive carvings on the an Opus 5 organ, a distinctive and “While the organ will connect us cabinet of the organ, which were created handcrafted work of beauty constructed with the great tradition of liturgical with St. Ignatius in mind. by David Petty and Christopher Fralick music in a new way and open up Funding for the organ was contributed at Petty’s shop in Eugene, Ore. It took some new possibilities for solo works by members of the Krsak family, which roughly 1,100 hours to build the organ, and instrumental ensemble, I'm most has a long legacy at Seattle University which has a 51-note transporting looking forward to hearing how it beginning with George and Rita Krsak, keyboard and ornate carvings designed supports the sung prayer of the people who attended the university in the and completed by artist Mark Andrew. gathered for worship in the chapel,” 1940s. Rita, who passed away in 2003, Banish from your mind the mammoth he says. was a music major. She and George baroque-style pipe organs popularized The move to land an organ for the were involved with musical productions as symbols of a bygone era—and in chapel was initiated by several SU folks while students at SU. Their passion for spooky movies. including Jerry Cobb, S.J., McNamara, music has been passed down through the Sure, this organ has its share of bells choral music director Joy Sherman generations. and whistles—and pipes, naturally— and former College of Science and The organ’s builder, Petty, said of his but there is an understated quality Engineering Dean George Simmons. work, “This is the nicest thing I’ve ever packed into a relatively compact and The group looked at organs throughout built. …The greatest joy was having it wholly portable instrument. the region in search of the perfect come together and be playable.” But how does it play. Quite well, instrument for the chapel. They knew “Organs connect with a sound thank you very much, says Bill the instrument needed to be fairly that says ‘church’ to a lot of people,” McNamara, campus minister of compact in size to fit the space and McNamara says. “There’s something liturgical music and the person behind be portable so it could be moved with about organs that is a connection to the the keys of the chapel’s Steinway piano ease. After seeing the work of David past, to tradition and history.” and now, its organ. It will be played Petty and company, they commissioned Mike Thee contributed to this story. at weddings, SU Choir concerts and the custom-built continuo organ. The

HEAR FOR YOURSELF The organ is played at certain Masses and other special events at the chapel, including the winter concerts by the SU Choirs. Can’t wait to hear it? Check out a video clip at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

42 / The Last Word

ICS# 110422 • Seattle University 2011 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 48pg PAGE 42 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 Gracol • 80# Nature Web Matte

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

L/C

Bill McNamara, a skilled pianist, is looking forward to more playing time with the organ.

“There’s something about organs that is a connection to the past, to tradition and history.” Bill McNamara, campus minister of liturgical music

SU Magazine Fall 2011 / 43

ICS# 110422 • Seattle University 2011 Fall Seattle U Magazine - 48pg PAGE 43 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 Gracol • 80# Nature Web Matte

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Seattle University Magazine Fall 2011