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Se S e eat at a tt tl le U Un niv iver ersi sity ty Pr re e esi side si den nt t’s ’s Re ep po or rt


CONTENTS What it Means to be Jesuit Educated.......... 2 Year in Review .............................................. 10 University Leadership .................................. 12


“In its 120-year history, Seattle University has played an important and indispensable role in providing jesuit

education to

our city, our region and beyond.” —President Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J.


2012 Seattle University President’s Report

I enjoy my leadership role as president of Seattle University. I am now in my 15th year in this position of leadership in higher education and in service to the region. In this job I love, I have had many opportunities to convey to the wider public what we do. Yet it strikes me that, while there is widespread recognition of our university’s religious values, its service to the community and commitment to social justice, for many there is less understanding of our central, unique purpose. That is, providing a Jesuit education, a tradition that began 463 years ago when the Society of Jesus opened its first school in Messina, Italy. There are 28 Jesuit universities in the United States. Many are able to

But what does a Jesuit education really mean and what does it mean

identify themselves as the “Jesuit university” in cities such as New

at Seattle University? In its 120-year history, Seattle University

York, Philadelphia, Boston or Chicago. The New York Times will often

has played an important and indispensable role in providing Jesuit

refer to someone as “Jesuit-educated” as in “the late Tim Russert, the

education to our city, our region and beyond.

Jesuit-educated anchor of Meet the Press”… or “Denzel Washington,

WHAT IS JESUIT EDUCATION? the Jesuit-educated Academy Award-winning actor” and the like. The assumption is that people understand what is meant by this phrase.

While today the Jesuits are perhaps most widely associated in people’s minds with the colleges and universities we founded, the earliest

Jesuit education has played a major role in teaching, learning and

Jesuits actually began their work with a much simpler calling—“to

scholarship throughout the world, including in the United States.

help souls,” in the words of our founder St. Ignatius of Loyola. It didn’t

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take long for Jesuits to recognize that if they were going to form

JESUIT EDUCATION AT SEATTLE UNIVERSITY

leaders capable of “helping souls,” an intensive education was needed.

What does it mean specifically to be Jesuit-educated at Seattle

From this, a global network of Jesuit schools emerged. Today, Jesuit

University? Above all, it means being a part of the most rigorous

institutions are known for forming in our students the professional

and intellectually challenging learning environment possible for all

competence, imagination and passion they need to be catalysts for

students. This way of learning is based on a strong core curriculum,

change in the world.

with professors who are experts in their fields of study and passionate

A Jesuit education is a rigorous one that intellectually prepares students for lifelong learning and leadership. Through a process of exploration and discovery, it challenges students to reexamine their

and committed to research and innovative learning. Out of our Jesuit tradition we push our students to the limits of their intellectual possibilities.

goals and aspirations, their principles, assumptions and views. It takes

To be Jesuit-educated at Seattle University also means to be formed

students apart—intellectually and spiritually—then exposes them to

in the rich Catholic intellectual tradition. This tradition impels us to

deeper values and provides the means for them to put themselves back

be inclusively Catholic, having an ecumenical and interfaith mindset.

together again. Jesuit-educated alumni emerge with a clarity on who

At SU, the School of Theology and Ministry, for example, models that

they are, what they are committed to and why.

commitment of the whole university by drawing in and learning from

“I didn’t fully understand what a jesuit education meant before I came to SU. I have come to find that a holistic education is a reality for students at Seattle University and more than something we just talk about—we live it. Not only do we graduate with a degree, but we also graduate with an education steeped in Jesuit traditions.” —Katie Wieliczkiewicz, ’12, ASSU President, degrees: strategic communications/public affairs

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a multiplicity of worldviews and religions. We expect our students to

this exploration from our students, but also we urge that they freely

explore their spirituality and faith both intellectually and personally.

adopt their own values and support them with their own analysis,

A Jesuit education always asks students how they will use their education in service to others. Seattle University provides countless

understanding and application. In the process, students strengthen and enliven their belief systems. This is Jesuit education in action.

opportunities for hands-on service in the community and thoughtful

Being Jesuit-educated means helping students learn what they need as

reflection so our students can embark on a lifetime commitment

professionals who can think, write, speak and work with others. This

to building a more just and humane world. Being Jesuit-educated

tradition of education produces individuals who are highly in demand

calls forth a special reverence for the planet, a commitment to

in our economy and in society.

environmental justice and a concern for how global environmental

The professor-student relationship at SU is what students most value.

changes especially affect the poor. We also live this by stewardship of

Our professors are highly accomplished scholar-educators who

what is widely recognized as the greenest campus in Washington state.

challenge and support each individual student and his or her learning

Jesuit education encourages students to learn by doing and this is

as a whole person. We encourage students to observe and follow the

evident in mentorship programs, internships and partnerships we offer

intellectual passion of their professors until they find their own. With

through our Entrepreneurship Center at the Albers School of Business

great energy and verve they search, question, challenge, reenvision and

and Economics, the Center for Service and Community Engagement,

reformulate. This way of learning is the strength of Jesuit education at

the Korematsu Center in the School of Law and many more. We believe

Seattle University.

that students learn as much by contact as by concept.

One of the things I love most about our students is their passion and

As an independent university, our students and faculty are free to

courage of commitment. When I stand back and look as objectively

explore whatever subject matter interests them and any and all values:

as possible at the Jesuit education Seattle University delivers, I am

humanistic, religious, moral, social, personal. We not only require

heartened by what I see and hear. What students tell me is, “We

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came to Seattle U with our goals, but we come out with different

is internationally recognized for his research and clinical work for

goals, whereas our friends at some other universities go in with their

the prevention of viral hepatitis among Native Alaskans. We see our

goals and come out with the same goals.” Others will say they never

mission fulfilled in Ret. Gen. Peter Chiarelli, ’72, who was Vice Chief

imagined how much reflection and analysis—what we Jesuits call

of Staff for the U.S. Army and a leader in caring for veterans dealing

“discernment”—would be required in their courses. While clearly

with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Our mission is evident in Ruth

knowing the informed views, values and dedication of their professors,

Tressel, class of 1984, whose law practice specializes in technology

our students speak of how nothing is imposed by professors in terms of what they should think, but that they need to know and be able to articulate why they think the way they do.

and intellectual property and who works with the Powerful Voices program as an advocate for adolescent girls. It also is clear in Cashel Toner, ’00, one of the youngest principals in the Seattle School District.

JESUIT EDUCATION FOR OUR REGION

These are among the 67,000 alumni of Seattle University who are

How do we truly know whether our distinctively Jesuit education is

outstanding professionals, thought leaders and change agents. What

really working at Seattle University? I love to say, “Only our alumni

better way to understand the richness of a Jesuit education than to

can tell us whether we are fulfilling our educational mission.” It is

encounter graduates like these who are making a difference? They are

apparent, for instance, in Dr. Brian McMahon, a 1967 graduate who

examples of how, from the moment they were founded as a religious

“I came to Seattle University largely because I fell in love with jesuit values of academic excellence, service and individual growth. Receiving a Jesuit education at SU means that what I’m doing outside the classroom, in the community and what I learn in my classes are deeply connected.” —Shandra Benito, ’14, Sullivan Scholar, degree: social work

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order, the Jesuits have actively gone out to meet the world. Not only to rejoice in its beauty—as in “finding God in all things”—but also to engage and confront it in all its grittiness. Seattle University clearly has come into its own and is recognized for its place of influence in the region for service to society, work on behalf of justice and spiritual and religious animation of the communities in the Northwest. We are proud of these accomplishments. I believe the future increasingly will mean that Seattle University will be recognized for educating leaders with values, serving in professions, communities and businesses, health and science institutions and government. Jesuit-educated individuals will be called upon to lead, and the men and women who graduate from Seattle University will show time and again that they are more than up to meeting the challenges facing our region and our world.

“Seattle University has done so much over the years to make Boeing a better company. The numbers really tell the story: about 2,200 Boeing employees have attended SU . . . Over the last five years, we’ve spent more than $20 million sending our folks to SU. Money well spent, I must say. I see the results of that investment every day.” —Jim Albaugh, executive VP of The Boeing Company and president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, said during a visit to SU as part of the Albers Executive Speaker Series (Jan. 20, 2011)

President Stephen Sundborg, S.J.

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JESUIT EDUCATION: a look back through history and . . . The history and tradition of Jesuit education run deep. What started with one Jesuit-run school in Italy in 1548 today includes more than 3,700 Jesuit educational institutions worldwide—including 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States alone. Here’s a brief look at some of the key periods in Jesuit education:

1491

1540

Ignatius of Loyola was born.

1548

Pope Paul III approved the founding of the Society of Jesus. Ignatius was elected as General Superior.

1891

The first Jesuit school opened for lay students in Messina, Italy.

2011

Seattle University opens.

NATIONAL HONOR FOR ROTC Seattle University’s Army ROTC program received the Outstanding Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps Award. Our ROTC was selected best in the nation from among 273 Army ROTC programs.

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SEATTLE UNIVERSITY YOUTH INITIATIVE LAUNCHES The Seattle University Youth Initiative is a long-term commitment by Seattle University and community partners to promote educational success for low-income students in the Bailey Gatzert neighborhood, south of campus.


. . . 2011 highlights at seattle university At Seattle University, 2011 was a year of notable achievements, capped with the selection of Chemistry Professor Vicky Minderhout as Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. During the year we launched the Seattle University Youth Initiative, a university-wide commitment to building a better future for today’s children. It was a year of high rankings for the ROTC program and for the university as a whole, again in the top 10 in the West in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Colleges” edition. Seattle University brought some notable names to campus, including Bob Woodruff of ABC News and U.S. Sen. Patty Murray. And in the fall, the university took wellness to the next level with the opening of the William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center.

ALUMNA OF THE YEAR: BETTY PETRI HEDREEN Betty Petri Hedreen, ’57, was named the 2011 Alumna of the Year for her contributions to the university and the arts.

COMMENCEMENT: HONORING JAPANESE AMERICANS AND TUN CHANNARETH Seattle University conferred honorary degrees on Japanese Americans who were forced to leave the university during World War II. A graduate honorary degree was given to landmine activist Tun Channareth.

DIVISION I: SU JOINS THE WAC

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT RANKINGS

FITNESS CENTER OPENING

In June 2011, Seattle University was invited to join the Western Athletic Conference (WAC). Membership strengthens the university’s academic and athletic programs and provides a pathway to post-season play.

U.S. News & World Report ranks Seattle University 6th in the West in its “Best Colleges 2012” guide. This is the 11th consecutive year SU has achieved a spot in the top 10 rankings.

In the fall, SU opened the new William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center. Just as the Chapel of St. Ignatius is the spiritual center of campus and the Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons the intellectual heart, the fitness center fulfills the wellness aspect.

PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR: VICKY MINDERHOUT Chemistry Professor Vicky Minderhout is named Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She is the first SU faculty to receive this honor.

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UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

PRESIDENT

CHAIR

Stephen Sundborg, S.J. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Timothy Leary PROVOST

Isiaah Crawford VICE PRESIDENT, ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

Marilyn Crone VICE PRESIDENT, STUDENT DEVELOPMENT

Jacob Diaz VICE PRESIDENT, PLANNING; VICE PROVOST

Robert Dullea VICE PRESIDENT, MISSION AND MINISTRY

Peter Ely, S.J. VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT

Victoria Jones ASSOCIATE PROVOST, ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Charles Lawrence

EX OFFICIO/SU PRESIDENT

DEAN, ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

Stephen Sundborg, S.J.

Joseph Phillips DEAN, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

David Powers DEAN, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Sue Schmitt DEAN, COLLEGE OF NURSING

Azita Emami

DEAN, MATTEO RICCI COLLEGE

Michael Quinn

Mary Kay McFadden

Jodi Kelly

VICE PRESIDENT AND UNIVERSITY COUNSEL

DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW

Mark Niles DEAN, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY

Mark Markuly UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN

John Popko

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SECRETARY

Jacquelyn Miller

VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT

James Adolphson

Stuart Rolfe Maureen Lee

DEAN, COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE AND BUSINESS AFFAIRS

VICE CHAIR

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, FACULTY AFFAIRS

Gerald Huffman

Mary Petersen

Betty Woods

BOARD MEMBERS

Mohamed Alabbar Michael Bayard, S.J. Mark Bosco, S.J. David Burcham Gen. Peter Chiarelli (Retired) Scott Coble, S.J. Theodore Collins Marta Dalla Gasperina Thomas Ellison Patrice Fersch Allan Golston Donald Horowitz Patrick Howell, S.J. Craig Jelinek Kent Johnson Patrick Kelly, S.J.

Michael McCarthy, S.J. Gordon McHenry, Jr. Carol Nelson Nicole Piasecki Robert Ratliffe Rick Redman Pete Rose Dave Sabey Mick Schreck Stevens Trainer Jill Wakefield EMERITI

Rhoady Lee, Jr. Ann Wyckoff


Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services, and Equal Opportunity Officer at (206) 296-5870. Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and its implementing regulations, Seattle University has designated three individuals responsible for coordinating the university’s Title IX compliance. Students or employees with concerns or complaints about discrimination on the basis of sex in employment or an education program or activity may contact any one of the following Title IX coordinators: Gerald V. Huffman, vice president for Human Resources and University Services, Equal Opportunity Officer, Rianna Building 214, (206) 296-5870, huffmaje@seattleu.edu; Dr. Michele Murray, associate vice president of Student Development, Student Center 140C, (206) 296-6066, mmurray@seattleu. edu; Dr. Jacquelyn Miller, associate provost for Faculty Affairs, Administration 104, (206) 296-5446, jcmiller@seattleu.edu. Individuals may also contact the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education.


office of the president 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122–1090 (206) 296-6000 www.seattleu.edu


2012 President's Report