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international arts-learning consultant, author of The Music Teaching Artist’s Bible and The Everyday Work of Art

“Rapp . . . speaks easily and with authority, having successfully maneuvered through educational, civic, and grantmaking bureaucracies in order to gain consistent support for her own work.” Dr. Carol Fineberg, author, Creating Islands of Excellence: The Arts as a Partner in School Reform; editor, contributor, Planning an Arts-Centered School

In difficult economic times, arts programs are often at risk. Yet current Search Institute research has found a direct connection between arts programs and student success, community involvement, and reduction in juvenile delinquency. Furthermore, involvement in the creative arts is the passion that youth most frequently report. Incorporating a wide variety of compelling research, as well as her own experience running successful youth arts programs, author Kristin A. Rapp not only explains why arts education is vital but also provides resources to help develop and maintain sustainable arts programs. This practical guide provides arts educators and youth workers with solutions to withstand budget shortfalls, ways to create or maintain programs, and methods to enrich the lives of all participants. Keeping the Arts Alive also discusses art therapy, art as a tool for social change, and arts-integrated education as a means to cultivate necessary creative skills for the global economy of the future.

keeping the arts alive

arts matter!

“This is how a whole field evolves—it pulls together what it has learned and knows in clear and compelling ways to allow others to benefit and break new ground. Keeping the Arts Alive does this for arts learning. Thank you Kristin Rapp for pulling together so much disparate information into this excellent solid foundation, to support our speedier growth into next stages.” Eric Booth,

Rapp

E d u c a t i o n : Te a c h i n g M e t h o d s a n d M a t e r i a l s / A r t s a n d H u m a n i t i e s E d u c a t i o n : A d m i n i s t r a t i o n / Ge n e r a l

ARTS ALIVE creating and sustaining

youth programs that matter

Kristin A. Rapp, LMSW, founder and executive director of ArtPeace, Inc., in Rochester, New York, is a social entrepreneur with a passion for educating and employing youth through arts, technology, and creative entrepreneurship. She has more than 20 years of experience as a social worker, therapist, and teaching artist with children, teens, and families.

Kristin A. Rapp www. search-institute.org


ARTS ALIVE creating and sustaining

youth programs that matter Kristin A. Rapp


Keeping the Arts Alive: Creating and Sustaining Youth Programs That Matter Kristin A. Rapp The following are registered trademarks of Search Institute: Search Institute®, Healthy Communities • Healthy Youth®, and Developmental Assets®. Copyright © 2012 by Search Institute All rights reserved. No parts of this publication may be reproduced in any manner, mechanical or electronic, without prior permission from the publisher except in brief quotations or summaries in articles or reviews, or as individual activity sheets for educational noncommercial use only. For additional permission, visit Search Institute’s website at www.searchinstitute.org/permissions and submit a Permissions Request Form. At the time of publication, all facts and figures cited herein are the most current available; all telephone numbers, addresses, and website URLs are accurate and active; all publications, organizations, websites, and other resources exist as described in this book; and all efforts have been made to verify them. The author and Search Institute make no warranty or guarantee concerning the information and materials given out by organizations or content found at websites that are cited herein, and we are not responsible for any changes that occur after this book’s publication. If you find an error or believe that a resource listed herein is not as described, please contact Client Services at Search Institute. Printed on acid-free paper in the United States of America.

Search Institute 615 First Avenue Northeast, Suite 125 Minneapolis, MN 55413 www.search-institute.org 612-376-8955 • 877-240-7251 ISBN-13: 978-1-57482-274-8 Credits Book Design: Jeenee Lee Production Supervisor: Mary Ellen Buscher Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Rapp, Kristin A. Keeping the arts alive : creating and sustaining youth programs that matter / Kristin A. Rapp. pages cm Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-1-57482-274-8 (pbk.) – ISBN 1-57482-274-8 (paperback) 1. Arts—Study and teaching (Secondary)–United States. I. Title. NX304.2.R37 2012 700.71’273—dc23 2012012143 About Search Institute Press Search Institute Press is a division of Search Institute, a nonprofit organization that provides catalytic leadership, breakthrough knowledge, and innovative resources to advance the health of children, youth, families, and communities. Our mission at Search Institute Press is to provide practical and hopefilled resources to help create a world in which all young people thrive. Our products are embedded in research, and the 40 Developmental Assets— qualities, experiences, and relationships youth need to succeed—are a central focus of our resources. Our logo, the SIP flower, is a symbol of the thriving and healthy growth young people experience when they have an abundance of assets in their lives.


Contents

Introduction vii Part 1: The Why, What, and How to Keep Arts Alive

Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4

Real Reasons Why Arts Are Essential 3 Paving the Way: Steps for Making a “Pig Fly” 23 Now What? Developing Projects and Programs 86 Just Keep Swimming: Keeping Arts Programs Going 103

Part 2: Arts in Schools

Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8

Channels to Higher Thinking 119 Getting Started: Implementing Arts Programs in Schools 131 Lessons from an Arts- and Technology-Integrated Small School 158 Sustaining Arts-Based School Programs When Times Are Tough 176

Part 3: Arts as Communit y and Social Change

Chapter 9 The Art of Social Change 197 Chapter 10 Community Projects: A Myriad of Choices 207 Chapter 11 Learning from the Best: Models of Best Practice and Real Results 240 Conclusion : You May Say I’m a Dreamer 248 Bibliography 255 Index 261 Acknowledgments 269 About the Author 270


Introduction “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.”

pa bl o p icasso

Search Institute wanted to publish a book about keeping the arts alive in schools and the community after a set of studies showed that the creative arts were ranked as one of kids’ most frequently reported “sparks,” a personal passion or interest, but also the least-supported “asset.” As reported in the Insights and Evidences series, which disseminates Search Institute research, the arts have consistently been either first or tying for the number-one area of focus, or spark, that students are passionate about, giving further justification and a statistical reason for directing resources, support, and efforts toward preserving arts programs. In the book Sparks: How Parents Can Help Ignite the Hidden Strengths of Teenagers (Jossey-Bass, 2008), by late Search Institute president and CEO Peter Benson, a study was cited that showed that in a 2005 national online survey done with Harris Interactive, 54 percent of 11- to 17-yearolds identified the arts as their personal spark, while 25 percent identified sports as their spark. The Teen Voice Report, also collected with the help of Harris Interactive, shares findings from 2009 and 2010 that show the arts and sports are more closely comparable. In total, more than 7,000 youth throughout the United States were surveyed. The strongest group of young people rising out of this sample is driven to live a cre-

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ative life, and when their sparks are nurtured by at least three “champions” who care about them, they can move forward into adulthood with a sense of purpose, joy, and human thriving (Benson 2008). Keeping the Arts Alive explores the arts, how to use creative interventions with young people, and gives an overview of research that shows why it is important to engage youth through the arts. In addition, this book provides practical guidance about how to fund, develop, and keep arts programs in schools and the community, as well as how arts contribute to social change, with young people as leaders at the center of that charge. Innovative ways to develop collaborative partnerships and creative fund- and friend-raising will be explored. When the economic climate is unpredictable, it is often the most engaging things in a child’s life that are sliced away, including art, music, dance, and drama in schools, as well as visiting artists, art therapy, and creative after-school programs, if they were ever there at all. Arts are usually the first to go, with other important services to follow, including social work, counseling, librarians, “specialist” teachers, and other humanistic programs. These are still not universally viewed as “core” to school or after-school curricula, yet they are often what make environments humane, colorful, safe, fun, and lively, and beyond this, they truly grab learners and keep them interested. Even in the most challenging times, maybe more so, kids need avenues for expression and aesthetic appreciation. Creative activities are needed to tap into many essential Developmental Assets for young people. Arts are what bring life to life! Everyone is an “artist,” because all people are born creative and thus are in an ever-evolving process of finding their own unique ways of expressing that creativity. The concept of creation, a desire to understand our origins, and expressing creativity are universal and the common threads that tie together the rich diversity of many cultures, tribes of people, and religions. Creativity can be shared in so many ways: through fashion, hairstyles, cooking, baking, gardening, interior design, photography, writing, painting, making movies, sculpting clay, crafting jewelry, acting, dancing, knitting, or designing a website. You can creatively make a speech or send an e-mail with flair. Creativity is within everyone. Yet if you ask many people if they are artists, a majority will

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say no, especially those who are more than eight years old. Often they follow that up with, “I can’t even draw a stick figure,” as if drawing stick figures, or anything for that matter, is the way to measure innate artistic ability or creative impulses. Anything that is originally “produced” is part of a creative process. Innovation and ideas are the currency of the modern age—the ability to think and invent, to imagine and make a concept come to fruition. The creative process is nondiscriminatory and anyone can participate. All people, regardless of gender, ethnicity, size, fitness level, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, or political affiliation, can make a mark on a community, have a voice, contribute something of value, beautify, and learn something new in the process. Engaging in artful endeavors, be it in the form of a community mural or a concert featuring music that everyone knows the words to, can serve to bring people together with a greater sense of collective peace and unity. Art can also cause people to think, to question authority, to view a heated political debate from a new perspective, and to interface differently with a social issue, prejudice, or fear. Art can help us look at ourselves, face our humanity, or catalyze community change. Much like those involved in the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and 1930s, visionary artists, thinkers, and agents for social change—even in the poorest areas—can influence one another to rise up out of oppression with radically unique expression. Beautiful creations have emerged from the pain caused by the worst experiences, such as slavery, torture, or war. Even when the body is abused and the mind afflicted, the human spirit—the pure reflection of soul—cannot be pushed down. It can come out as art. In fact, it is often in the most oppressed communities that the arts bubble to the surface in natural ways. This is illustrated in many cities through guerilla street art, spontaneous dance moves on a playground, freestyle hip hop battles, “flash mob” art events in a public square, or synchronized beating on found objects. The rhythmic sound of basketballs dribbling on a hot concrete court is a soundtrack to girls braiding hair in colorful ways, jumping rope, and singing harmoniously together without even trying, while brick walls are painted every color under the sun. A thrilling, unplanned communal arts village dwells quietly

intr o d u cti o n

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beneath the exterior. Art as an element of connection provides common ground for people who may be quite different, and becomes a mirror that reflects a shared culture, individual and collective lives, and systems of belief. Art builds community. In a media-savvy world, youth can become active producers, rather than passive consumers, of media. Classes and youth programs can be exciting places of interactivity and discourse, where both students and adults are open to inquiry and learning from each other, growing together in an understanding of a rapidly changing education and technology landscape. It is essential not to turn away from the 21st-century demand to help youth develop media, visual, and technological literacy, as urgently as they need to read and write. They can be critical thinkers who analyze vast amounts of data streaming at them, rather than just absorbing it mindlessly and letting a world pass by. If used intelligently, media can engage students in other learning, which is starting to happen through innovative youth projects and in schools. Rather than view some new technologies as pesky distractions from learning, many schools are now embracing the media and technology used so readily by this “M� (Media) Generation. Schools are even finding ways to use cell-phone texting, video and photo sharing, social networking, and blogging to their educational advantage. Schools like High Tech High in San Diego, California, which was founded by a group of business leaders and educators, use technology for a wide array of inquiry-based, hands-on projects so diverse students of all learning styles are preparing for life in the 21st century (Rubenstein 2008, Edutopia). This means being action-oriented, flexible, creative thinkers with problem-solving skills, capable of making it as professionals in a modern, tech-savvy world, where many careers are brand new or have not yet been imagined. High Tech High and other progressive models are moving beyond the isolation of traditional education and are reinventing school design to create open, light-filled spaces that invite community involvement, focus on teacher learning as much as student learning, and let go of the outdated division between subjects, textbook, and traditional assessments. The school blends subjects. For instance, a two-teacher team

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part 1

The What, Why, and How to Keep Arts Alive


Chapter 1

Real Reasons Why Arts Are Essential “I’ve been a doodler from the beginning, over the years mastering the art of the curlicue and perfecting my swirl! According to Wiki, the definition of a doodle is: to scribble drawings or designs, to draw something aimlessly or absent-mindedly, usually while doing something else such as having a telephone conversation or attending a meeting. In situations where I fear death by boredom, I grab any one of my hundreds of blue pens or black Sharpies, the back of an old envelope, a crumpled napkin, the receipt for my morning coffee . . . and I am saved. Doodling is easily an art form, and I’ve heard your doodles can even be interpreted. No matter! Infer if you must. I will continue to scribble, sketch, swirl, and dot, dot, dot my way across any available surface, creating art and telling my story as I go.” R achel M artine z , high school administrative assistant , mom , crafter

What Is Art? This book is all about the arts, so before we jump into research and reasons to support the arts or arts programs, it is important to take a look at the what. What is art? This is a fun question to ask groups of

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adults and children. The answers are as varied as the people. Webster’s Dictionary calls art the “product of human creativity.” Dictionary.com defines art in 16 different ways, using descriptors such as “quality, production, expression, or realm, according to aesthetic principles, of what is beautiful, appealing, or of more than ordinary significance.” There can be collections of it, such as in museums or held privately. It can be a field in and of itself, such as the field of dance or literary arts, that uses skills or techniques. Art can be a word used to depict a printed visual image that is illustrative or decorative, for a magazine or other print document, as well as related to the principles or methods governing any craft or branch of learning, such as the “art of cooking.” Art can be the craft or trade, using the aforementioned principles. Art touches our humanity and affects us in colorful ways. It can shine a light on a social issue, elicit a strong response, and communicate a concept. Often artists are the thinkers of an age who are ahead of the general public in pointing out aspects of human nature, politics, society, philosophy, or morals. Artists have an interest in beauty and aesthetics, but beyond that, they care about truth and sometimes provide a social commentary on the times, such as the reality of war, which can be highly controversial. They challenge us to question reality and our perceptions or cause us to scratch our heads in wonder. Disciplines that encompass a whole range of human activities and creations are referred to collectively as “the arts,” and these activities and creations are as diverse as the cultures and people on the planet. The different modes of expression arose around 40,000 years ago during the Upper Paleolithic era of early cave paintings or petroglyphs, carvings, and drawings, using natural colors from clays or dust from rock. Primitive musical instruments were constructed at the time. Using the body to communicate or engage in rituals through dance and movement and depicting life through theatrical production has been with us for centuries and has continued on through the ages to include street art, mime, circus arts, puppetry, mask theater, vaudeville, storytelling through movement, and a variety of unusual public activities characterized as “performance art.” Modern “physical theatre” goes beyond a play with a script and strives to tell a story—sometimes abstract and

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other times literal—through physical bodies, with one actor or a number of players working interactively together. The culture evolved to include a wide array of practical and expressive arts, including traditional folk arts, such as weaving, woodworking and carving, pottery, hand sewing, mask-making, glass blowing, metalsmithing, furniture making, folk music, textiles, and baking artisanal breads. Printmaking, calligraphy, black-and-white photography, paper and bookmaking, and other visual arts, including painting, drawing, illustration, sculpture, design, early filmmaking, and decorative arts, are all the foundation upon which more modern art forms were built. Media arts using modern technology is now a category of art-making, including graphic design, two-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling and animation, web design, video game creation, digital photography, video, and photo manipulation. Other forms of multimedia include a variety of these art forms combined, as well as digital music, sound recording, engineering, and editing. There is so much to modern music that has spanned the centuries, from rhythmic drumming, singing, and playing an instrument to computerized music composition. Not to be overlooked are culinary arts, landscaping, light technicians, special effects, theatrical set design, makeup and costume design, industrial and interior design, fashion, hair styling, specialized illustration for medical or other fields, and architectural design. Descriptors of art forms could be perceived as value judgments, but they are also ways to understand what is really an expansive field. “Creative arts,” also called “fine arts,” expresses an artist’s creativity and engages an audience’s aesthetic sensibility for the “finer things.” A “craft” is the use of art skill in a common or practical way. “Commercial art” is art used for commercial or industrial purposes. “Applied art” contains crafts and design. An art “form” is the kind of expression, like dance or puppetry. A “technique” refers to how the “medium” is used, such as specific brush strokes used with the medium of paint or ways of developing photographs when using the medium of black-and-white film. The medium can also be the kinds of paint, paper, and other materials that are used. “Genre” refers to a set of styles within a medium, such as film genres like drama, comedy, or action adventure. A “style”

chapter 1 : real reas o ns wh y arts are essential

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Index

A

advocacy, suggestions for, 249–251 After School Matters, 240–241 Americans for the Arts, 152 art for art’s sake community opportunities, 11 philosophy described, 9 risk of losing, 141 in schools, 10–11 Artist and Musician Corps, 142 Artists Collective, 247 Artists for Humanity, 241–242 art networking sites, 112 ArtPeace Creative Entrepreneur program, 215–219 ArtPeace@East (AP@E) assessment, 163, 168–169 background of, 159–160 benefits, 162–163, 166, 167–168 collaborations, 164–165 examples of projects, 163–164, 165–166 family involvement, 166–167 lessons learned, 171–175 obstacles to success, 169–171 vision and mission, 158–159, 160–161 arts appreciation to understanding, 131–132 as core subject area, x, xiv, 122, 145 defining, 3–4 descriptors for, 5–6 as Developmental Assets, xvii disciplines encompassing, 4–5, 11 history in schools, xv importance of, ix–xii, xiii–xiv as preparation for future, 130

purposes and functions of, 6–7, 9–13 as representing different intelligences, 145–146 ArtScience Prize, 149 ArtsConnection, 126 arts councils grants, 61 arts disciplines grants, 63 Arts Education Partnership, 124 arts-in-education collaboration resources, 152 described, xiv–xv, 9 development of national standards, 141 importance of multimodel learning aspects, 130 national standards, 11 partners needed, 151–157 in themed curriculums, 122–123 timeline, 139–143 typical programs and staff, 10–13 values instilled, 106 arts-in-education benefits better student-teacher rapport, 125 enhanced educational environment, 144 stronger school-community relationships, 126 for students, 15–19 allows inner expression, 109 better class attendance rates, 35, 181 development of creative competencies in leadership, 198–200 development of higher level thinking skills, 119–120, 124 develops entrepreneurial skills, 121

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greater interest in education, 166, 167 higher academic performance, 9–10, 35, 123–126, 162, 163, 167–168, 181 higher levels of motivation, 36, 125 improved peer relations, 126, 128 increased competencies needed for academic success, 105, 124–125 increased creativity, 127 increased graduation and college acceptance rates, 35, 181 increased risk-taking, 121, 124 increased self-confidence, 35, 124, 126, 163 increased self-direction, 121 use of different intelligences, 146 for teachers, 128–129, 162 arts integration. See entries beginning with arts-in-education arts organizations, as collaborators, 91–92 assessments. See program/project assessment Association of Teaching Artists, 141 at-risk youth arts education engages, 105, 121 program examples, 41–43, 211, 222, 245–246, 247 See also economically disadvantaged learners audits, need for, 51–52

B

benefits. See arts-in-education benefits Big Thought, 192–193, 243–244 block grants, described, 54–55 Brave New Voices, 208, 209, 210 business leadership needs, 199–200

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as source of funding, 46, 47–48, 68–70 as source of supplies/equipment, 97, 187 See also entrepreneurial arts programs

C

capacity-building grants, described, 62–63 categorical grants, described, 55 The Center for Community Arts Partnerships, 245 Center for Creative Leadership, 198 charitable grants, described, 53–54 Chicago Arts Partnership in Education (CAPE), 125–126, 152 children with disabilities, 120 collaboration in ArtPeace@East, 161, 162 arts-in-education partners, 151–157 for assessments, 107 benefits, 91, 102, 173–174 with community, 164–165, 245 complementary strengths, 172, 173 demonstrate in grant writing, 79 establishing, 27 with existing programs, 168–169 funders value, 78 in generating program design ideas, 26 multidisciplinary teaching teams, 88–89 partnerships, 27 resources about, 152 resource sharing, 27–28 community-based programs Community MusicWorks, 104 evening, weekend, summer, 212–213 Galileo’s Universe, 101–102 Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, 38–41


Community MusicWorks, 104, 246–247 competitive grants, described, 55 conflict resolution, project example, 33–36 consortium grants, described, 55 constructivist learning theory, 134–135 consultants, staff as, 89–90 Creative Entrepreneur programs, 215–219 Creative Leaps, 169 creativity in arts proposal submissions, 75–77 forms of, x–xi importance of, x, 21 increased among program participants, 127 learning process and, 99 self-imposed barriers to, 25 cross-cultural understanding projects, 33–36 crowd funding, 190 The Cypher program, 219 CypherSound, 218

D

dance, 146–147 Dayton Regional STEM School, 149 decentralization grants (DECs)/ Decentralized Arts Funds (DAFs), 61–62 demonstration grants, described, 55 detention centers. See juvenile facilities Developmental Assets, xvi–xvii, 36 development grants, described, 54 digital media, 108, 111–112 direct costs, described, 56 direct grants, described, 54 discretionary grants, described, 54

E

earmark grants, described, 54 economically disadvantaged learners arts-in-education benefits, 17–19, 123, 124, 125, 181 examples of programs for, 38–41, 104, 241–242, 243, 245–246, 247 project environment importance, 39–41 See also ArtPeace@East (AP@E) economic impact studies, 19–20 education through arts teaching grants, 64 e-grants, described, 57 826 programs, 235–236 El Sistema movement, 142 empowerment zones, described, 57 enterprise zones, described, 57 entrepreneurial arts programs described, 12 examples of, 214–218 funding, 237 importance of, 213 skills development, 121 evaluations. See program/project assessment expressive arts, described, 132–133

F

Facebook, 205 Facebook Causes, 111, 189–190 FACT (Fine Arts for Children and Teens), 246 families commitment to programs, 172 engaging extended, 92–93 involvement at ArtPeace@East, 166–167 as partners, 155 federal government funding, 66–67 federated giving, described, 57 financial oversight, importance of, 60 financial records, importance of keeping, 60

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fiscal sponsorship, 52 501(c)(3) organizations, 51–52 flash mobs, 201–202, 205 Form 990-PF and Form 990, 52 foundations, 46–48 funding/funders available for community projects, 236–237 basics, 252 business as source, 46, 47–48, 68–70 commitment length, 172 continuing relationships with, 74 cuts, x, xiv, 153–154, 183–184 fighting cuts, 179–182 grassroots, 48 in-kind contributions, 97, 187 involving in project activities, 85 priorities described, 55–56 restrictions described, 56 for youth employment projects, 237 fundraising about, 45–46 basics, 111 from businesses, 46, 47–48, 68–70 event ideas, 112–113, 190–191 government earmarks, 48–49 grassroots, 48 myths, 58–60 need for ongoing, 58–59, 99 online, 111–112, 189–190 from within organization, 45–46 partnership demonstrations, 151– 152 registration of organization, 52 resources, 190, 191–193 source for organization administration, 64 traditional forms, 189 See also entries beginning with grant(s)

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G

Galileo Galilei, 101–102, 119, 134 Galileo’s Universe, 101–102, 134 general operating support (GOS), 64 Girlstories Leadership Theatre, 247 grants continuing fundraising and, 58–59 defined, 46 matching, 56 myths about, 58–60 sources, 46–48, 61–68, 189 grant writers, 59, 188 grant writing basics, 49–50, 70–74 help resources, 50 including samples when, 110 information to include (Logic Model), 78–83 as part of overall funding strategy, 58–60 terminology, 50–57 tips to stand out, 75–78 grassroots funding, 48 guerrilla advertising, 108

H

High Tech High, xii–xiii Homeboy Industries, 214–215

I

idea journals, 24–25 indirect costs, described, 56 in-kind, described, 57 innovation as American competitive advantage, 121 creativity and, xi importance to society of, 20–21, 121, 149 as leadership competency, 199–200 inquiry as process and product, 135 instrumental music education, 9–10 intelligences, different types of, 145–146


interdisciplinary education, 122–123, 130 interdisciplinary programs/projects partnership needs, 151–157 resources for, 152 teaching artists in, 153–155 See also ArtPeace@East

J

Jean Baptiste Dessaix Music School, 244 juvenile facilities arts programs as preventives, 105, 121 arts programs as therapeutic, 222 programs to allow expression, 211 project examples, 41–43, 246 project funding sources, 67

K

keepers of the vision, described, 26 Kennedy Center Alliance for Arts Education Network, 152 Kickstarter.com, 190 kinesthetic learning, 144

L

leadership characteristics of effective, 96, 199–200, 248–249 choosing, 93–94 development of creative competencies in, 198–200 development projects for teens The Possibility Project, 33–36 Young Leaders, 30–32 role in organizational health, 94–95 as role models, 94 Leonardo da Vinci, 134 Letters of Intent/of Inquiry (LOIs), 52–53 Lincoln Center Institute, 152 Literary Center, 41–43 local capacity building (LCB) initiatives, 64

local government grants, 64–65 Logic Model (grant writing), 78–83 longevity of programs, factors in, 92–93

M

Manchester Bidwell Corporation (MBC), 38–41 Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, 38–41, 241 marketing, importance of, 59 mastery, as result of art learning, 119–120 matching grants, described, 56 mathematics and music, 9–10 mathematics test score improvement, 9–10, 123, 124, 125 media promotion, 109–110 mentors, staff as, 92 mergers. See collaboration multimodel learning, 122–123, 130 See also interdisciplinary programs/projects

N

National Crime Prevention Council Online Resource Center, 67 National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) artists-in-schools program, 140 funding, 66, 183–184 National Funding Collaborative on Violence Prevention, 67 National Resource Center for Youth Services, 67 National Science Foundation (NSF), 148 not-for-profit/nonprofit organizations (NFPs/NPOs), described, 51–52 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA), 54

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O

online fundraising, 111–112 online giving sites, 112 organizational cultures, 94–95

P

parents. See families partnerships. See collaboration pass-through grants, described, 54 peace and protest art, 202–203, 204–206 Philadelphia Arts in Education Partnerships, 148–150 The Possibility Project (TPP), 33–36, 204–205, 223, 242–243 prisons. See juvenile facilities private foundations, 47–48 program officer, described, 53 program/project assessment ArtPeace, 217 ArtPeace@East, 163, 168–169 ArtsConnection, 126 Chicago Arts Partnership in Education Program, 125–126 economic impact studies, 19–20 examples of methods, 84 ideas, 107 importance of, 14 as inaccurate measures of success, 186 Manchester Bidwell Corporation, 40–41 methods, 15 of The Possibility Project, 35–36 regular, written, 93 resources, 18 survey preparation, 97–98 for sustainability, 107 Teaching Artist Research Project, 141–142 Transforming Education Through the Arts Challenge, 127 program/project examples after-school, weekend, summer, 38–41, 240–241, 245

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community-based, 104 for economically disadvantaged learners, 38–41, 104, 241–242, 243, 245–246, 247 to enable communication, 220 to explore social issues, 221–222 for girls, 104, 247 history, 133 media arts, 244, 246 music, 225–226, 244, 246–247 poetry, 208, 223–225 in prisons and juvenile facilities, 41–43, 211, 222, 246 to promote cross-cultural understanding, 33–36 science, 146–147, 148–150 in small communities, 101–102 for teen leadership development, 30–32 for very young children, 30 violence prevention, 214–218 writing, 208–211, 235–236, 244– 245 See also ArtPeace entries; The Possibility Project (TPP) program/project planning basics, 145, 251–252 design ideas, 23–27 detail decisions, 43–45, 86 location and space needs, 37–38 name choice, 79 researching community needs, 212–213 service area decisions, 36–37 service group decisions, 29–30, 32–33 See also funding/funders; fundraising; grant writing program/project setup individuals to involve, 96 ongoing fundraising provisions, 98–99 paperwork necessities, 97–98 participant recruitment, 98


supplies and equipment for, 96–97 timeline planning, 98 program/project sustainability, 107 Project Alerta (at University of Massachusetts), 245 proposals, defined, 51 public relations, 59, 107, 108–110 PUSH Physical Theatre, 101–102, 143–144

R

Rainbow Theatre, 221–222 reading test score improvement, 123, 124, 125 receptive arts, described, 131–132 ReImagining Futures, 41 relationships developing, 77–78 with funders, 46, 74 importance of, 40 improvement among peer, 126, 128 keeping school partnerships successful, 156–157, 167 maintaining community, 174 making and keeping supporters, 113–114 physical setting and, 233–234 showing appreciation, 78 using digital media, 111 See also collaboration religious use of arts, 13 reporting/reporting back, described, 57 research, 14–15, 18–19, 212–213 resource sharing, 27–28 reviews, described, 56–57 RFP (Request for Proposal), about, 50–51 risk-taking, 121, 124 The RiverzEdge Arts Project, 246 Rochester City School District vision statement, 177 Rochester Coalition for Common Sense in Education, 185–186

S

sanctuary model, 94–95 San Francisco WritersCorps, 245 Science Technology Engineering Arts and Math (STEAM) programs, 148–150 Science Technology Engineering Math (STEM) programs, 147–150 seed money, defined, 53 set-asides, described, 54 Slam High, 208–211 social justice and art, 200–204 social media, using, 108, 111–112 social skills improvement, 126, 128 sparks, arts as, ix sponsorships, described, 53 Spy Hop Productions, 244 staff ability to relate to youth, 90, 92 administrative, 89 buy-in from, 173 collaboration among, 88–89, 161–162 as consultants, 89–90 hiring, 87–88, 89 importance of, 89 multidisciplinary teaching teams, 88–89 program setup involvement, 96 self-selection, 172 teaching artists, 90–91 training, 87–88, 92, 174 Standards-Aligned Arts & Technology, 134–136 state arts councils, 63–64 STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Arts and Math) programs, 148–150 STEM (Science Technology Engineering Math) programs, 147–150 Strategic Opportunity Stipends (SOS)/Strategic Opportunity grants, 61 street artists, 203–204

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street outreach ideas, 98 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT) analysis, 27 Suddes Group, 192 sustainability, 57, 90–92, 107

T

tax-exempt status, 52 Teaching Artist Research Project (TARP), 141–142 teaching artists ability to relate to youth, 90, 92 in ArtPeace@East, 161–162 described, xiv–xv, 138 enhance education environment, 144 finding, 90–91 overview of, xv–xvi role in interdisciplinary programs/ projects, 153–155 skills needed, 173 See also entries beginning with arts-in-education Teaching Science with Dance in Mind, 146–147 teens. See youth therapeutic arts benefits, 220 case study, 227–229 examples of, 217–218, 220, 221– 222 overview of, 13 as profession, 230–233 Third Space (Arts Education Partnership), 124 Transforming Education Through the Arts Challenge (TETAC), 127 trustee/board director, described, 53

U

United Way, 47, 190 Urban Voices Global Action Project, 246

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keeping the arts ali v e

V

violence prevention arts employment programs, 214–219 nonviolent conflict resolution project, 33–36 volunteers, 114

W

Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts, 30

Y

Young Audiences (YA), 63, 120–121, 133 Young Leaders mural project, 30–32 Young Playwrights’ Theater, 244–245 youth arts education engages at-risk, 105, 121 employment, 214–219 emulation of leadership, 94 fundraising among, 190 importance of arts to, ix–xii, xiii–xiv involvement in project design process, 237–238 power of Developmental Assets for, xvi–xvii recruiting, 98 staff ability to relate to, 90, 92 Youth Achievement Productions, 217 Youth Program Quality Assessment (YPQA) Tool, 218

Z

ZUMIX, 243


About the Author

Kristin A. Rapp , LMSW, founder and executive director of ArtPeace

Inc., is a social entrepreneur with a passion for educating and employing youth through arts, technology, and creative entrepreneurship. She designs and oversees arts learning and youth development programs for children of all ages, in and out of the classroom, which tap into up to 32 Developmental Assets and the number-one spark or interest of youth: the arts! Kristin Rapp believes that community change can happen when young people are able to express their strengths and talents into fulfilling paths of learning, working, and living. She has more than 20 years of experience as a social worker, therapist, and teaching artist, working with children, teens, and families that have challenges in mental health, chemical dependency, and developmental disabilities, as well as those in the juvenile justice or foster care systems. Rapp has a degree in graphic design from Rochester Institute of Technology, a bachelor’s degree in psychology and special education from the State University of New York Geneseo, and a master’s degree in social work from Syracuse University. Rapp and her husband, David, live in Rochester, New York. When she is not providing church service, designing, writing, or occasionally singing with local bands, she enjoys her most favorite job of all—being mom to two children, Shealyn and Jesse.

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international arts-learning consultant, author of The Music Teaching Artist’s Bible and The Everyday Work of Art

“Rapp . . . speaks easily and with authority, having successfully maneuvered through educational, civic, and grantmaking bureaucracies in order to gain consistent support for her own work.” Dr. Carol Fineberg, author, Creating Islands of Excellence: The Arts as a Partner in School Reform; editor, contributor, Planning an Arts-Centered School

In difficult economic times, arts programs are often at risk. Yet current Search Institute research has found a direct connection between arts programs and student success, community involvement, and reduction in juvenile delinquency. Furthermore, involvement in the creative arts is the passion that youth most frequently report. Incorporating a wide variety of compelling research, as well as her own experience running successful youth arts programs, author Kristin A. Rapp not only explains why arts education is vital but also provides resources to help develop and maintain sustainable arts programs. This practical guide provides arts educators and youth workers with solutions to withstand budget shortfalls, ways to create or maintain programs, and methods to enrich the lives of all participants. Keeping the Arts Alive also discusses art therapy, art as a tool for social change, and arts-integrated education as a means to cultivate necessary creative skills for the global economy of the future.

keeping the arts alive

arts matter!

“This is how a whole field evolves—it pulls together what it has learned and knows in clear and compelling ways to allow others to benefit and break new ground. Keeping the Arts Alive does this for arts learning. Thank you Kristin Rapp for pulling together so much disparate information into this excellent solid foundation, to support our speedier growth into next stages.” Eric Booth,

Rapp

E d u c a t i o n : Te a c h i n g M e t h o d s a n d M a t e r i a l s / A r t s a n d H u m a n i t i e s E d u c a t i o n : A d m i n i s t r a t i o n / Ge n e r a l

ARTS ALIVE creating and sustaining

youth programs that matter

Kristin A. Rapp, LMSW, founder and executive director of ArtPeace, Inc., in Rochester, New York, is a social entrepreneur with a passion for educating and employing youth through arts, technology, and creative entrepreneurship. She has more than 20 years of experience as a social worker, therapist, and teaching artist with children, teens, and families.

Kristin A. Rapp www. search-institute.org


Keeping The Arts Alive