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ISSUE 113 DISTRIBUTED WITH THE MALTA INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY

OCTOBER 2018

OCTOBER 2018 ISSUE 113

Beauty & Colour

Light up the darkness


ISSUE 113 distributed with the malta independent on sunday

OCTOBER 2018

Editorial I

n the darkest days of last October, working on Taste&Flair was a lifeline. Everyone in our family did what we could to make sure the next issue of the magazine was published on time and in the way Daphne wanted. We had no notes or archive to work with, but once we decided to publish, information and support poured in. The people who had worked with Daphne on the magazine from its early days – Ramon and Antoinette Micallef and Sean Ellul – anchored everyone’s effort. One regular contributor said, “I knew what Daphne wanted and the photographer and I have already done the shoot.” Another said, “I’m just editing the text and photos and will send them immediately.” Yet another said “I know how she liked an interior photographed. I’ll do her proud.” And so it went on, an intense scramble to pull together several disparate ends into a beautiful and coherent whole. Thanks to the determination and commitment of several people, we published Taste&Flair on time and exactly the way Daphne wanted, and have done so ever since, often following plans she had made and never lived to realise. This month marks a full year of impunity since Daphne’s death, but her legacy lives on. You can’t bury truth, and beauty and colour drive out the darkness – always. The next issue of Taste&Flair will be out on 4th November 2018

Beauty & Colour

Light up the darkness

is published by Proximus Publishing Dar Rihana, Bidnija MST 5015 - Malta

All communication about Taste&Flair magazine should be directed to Corinne Vella at corinne.vella@gmail.com PUBLISHER

Estate of Daphne Caruana Galizia, Dar Rihana, Bidnija MST50115 – Malta EDITORIAL BOARD

Paul Caruana Galizia Andrew Caruana Galizia Matthew Caruana Galizia EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Corinne Vella

ART DIRECTOR

Ramon Micallef +356 9949 1418 ram@box-design.net ADVERTISING MANAGER & EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTOR

Sean Ellul +356 7921 0705 or 21 345 888 ext 123 sellul@independent.com.mt ADVERTISING ASSISTANT

Christine Mifsud +356 21 345 888 ext 138 cmifsud@independent.com.mt PRODUCTION MANAGER

André Camilleri

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Conrad Bondin

PREPRESS & PRINTING

Print It

Distributed with The Malta Independent on Sunday*. The Malta Independent on Sunday is published by Standard Publications Ltd tel +356 21 345 888 *The surcharge on The Malta Independent on Sunday, or any charge for this magazine is retained by Standard Publications Ltd.

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ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

Michael Diacono’s Flabours of India See feature starting on page 18. Photo by Brian Grech

T&F EDITORIAL


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CONTENTS T&F

CONTENTS Food & Drink

18

Michael Diacono’s Flavours of India

33

AESTHETICS AND DESIGN

48 61 78

Claire Borg’s Bella Sicilia

A day in the olive grove

Colours of autumn

Memories of a childhood on a family orchard

54 88

Bird of beauty

Shangri La Doris Duke’s fabulous home in Hawai'i

105 112 120 129 144

Sublime walls

The private retreat

Silent space

Fizzing with delight

Nepenthaceae

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

11


T&F FLOWERS

‘Change Rose’ H

ydrangea flowers are produced from early spring to late autum. Nicknamed ‘Change Rose’, Hydrangea’s corymbs or panicles (flowerheads) are usually white but in some species, most commonly Hydrangea macrophylla, the colour can vary from light pink to dark purple, with shades of blue in between. In Hydrangea macrophylla, the flower colour depends on the acidity of the soil or potting mix. A pH value below 7 means higher acidity, typically producing flowers that range from blue to purple. Alkaline soils – typical of Maltese gardens – produce flowers ranging from pink to red. You can’t turn a pink flower blue, but blue Hydrangeas will produce pink flowers unless the potting mix’s pH value is kept low.

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ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018


QUICK OATS A healthy, nutritious start to the day Good Earth’s Quick Oats are quick and easy to cook, have that extra creamy flavour, are high in fibre and very low in salt. Quick Oats contain oat beta-glucan that can help lower cholesterol too! Add all your favourites like fresh berries and nuts or enjoy with just plain milk.

www.goodearth.com.mt

NOW AVAILABLE IN A CONVENIENT TIN


T&F SALAD

Penne, mango and feta cheese salad with herb dressing This quick dish is ideal to serve as a light starter. You just need to infuse the olive oil a day ahead.

INGREDIENTS:

400g penne 1 packet of corn nuts 1 mango 200g cubed feta cheese 2 pear or plum (zenguli) tomatoes or similar FOR THE HERB SAUCE:

a small bunch of basil a handful of dried oregano a sprig of fresh thyme a few peppercorns a chilli pepper (optional) 250ml extra virgin olive oil

1. Blanch the basil leaves by plunging

them first into boiling water and then into cold water. Dry them well, crush with the extra virgin olive oil and pour into a glass bottle. Crush the peppercorns and add to the basil-flavoured olive oil, together with the dried oregano and a sprig of fresh thyme. Leave to marinate for a whole day and you’ll have a herb-flavoured olive oil to use with a variety of dishes. 2. Peel and cut the mango into small

cubes. Peel, deseed and cube the tomatoes. Boil the penne, once cooked dress with the herb-flavoured olive oil. Mix with the cubed tomatoes and mangos, corn nuts and feta cheese. Hint: If you prefer, you can replace the pear tomatoes with halved cherry tomatoes. The herbflavoured olive oil is a highly versatile addition to your kitchen cupboard: you can use it as a salad dressing and on potatoes, meat, fish, etc. If you like to spice up your dishes, simply marinate a whole chilli pepper in the herb-flavoured olive oil.

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T&F PROMOTION

Sunday Lunch at Radisson Blu Resort & Spa, Golden Sands

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PROMOTION T&F

Sunday Lunch buffet is back on the 14th of October, offering a wide variety of cuisines from around the globe.

E

njoy excellent service and quality food at your favourite weekend getaway location. With a large variety of themed stalls from Mediterranean and Lebanese street food to sushi and a carvery, guaranteed to please anyone’s palate. Finish off your meal by stopping by the dessert stall and choose from a selection of perfectly handcrafted sweet treats.   Head down to Golden Bay or take a walk around the hotel’s countryside for the perfect end to your day. 

Adults - €34.00 Teens 13 to 17 years - €24.00  Children 0 to 12 years - 1 child eats for free with every 1 paying adult   For reservations tel: 2356 1000  fb.goldensands@rdbmalta.com  https://www.radissonblu.com/en/goldensandsresort-malta

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

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T&F CUISINE

FLAVOURS OF

INDIA “When I was asked to prepare something for the October issue that was slightly out of my comfort zone I chose to go Indian. One of the reasons was that I remember Daphne’s love for Indian fabrics, artifacts and jewelry. This is my small tribute to her.” M I C H A E L D I A CO N O chef patron, Giuseppi’s bar and bistro.

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CUISINE T&F

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

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T&F CUISINE

BEETROOT & CARROT

SHORBA

This is a delightful soup with a subtle taste and beautiful colour. Even better, it’s so easy to make. SERVES 4

2 tablespoons oil or ghee • 1 bay leaf 1 teaspoon cumin seeds • 2 cloves garlic 5cm piece ginger, grated • 2 carrots, peeled and diced 3 large beetroots, peeled and diced • chilli 750ml water • some fresh coriander stalks salt • yoghurt and nigella seeds to serve.

1. Heat the oil in a

4. Bring to the boil

pot and add the bay leaf, cumin seeds and garlic. Stir fry for 1 minute before adding the ginger. Cook for a further minute.

then reduce the heat and simmer gently for 30 minutes till the vegetables are tender. Use a stick blender to purée the soup. If the result is too thick, simply add a little water.

2. Add the prepared

vegetables and chilli (use as much or as little as you wish). Stir, and cook for 5 minutes. 3. Add the water and

coriander stalks. Season with salt.

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5. Serve with a

dollop of yoghurt, some finely chopped coriander stalks and a sprinkling of nigella seeds.


CUISINE T&F

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T&F CUISINE

Traditionally this is a one pot dish with the rice and chicken finished off together. I decided to vary this slightly and serve the rice separately. My apologies to all the purists out there. SERVES 4

6 boneless chicken thighs FOR THE MARINADE

250g thick, plain yoghurt 1 teaspoon salt • 1 teaspoon chilli powder 1 teaspoon garam masala chilli powder or flakes 1 teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon turmeric 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger MASALA

4 tablespoons ghee or vegetable oil 3 medium onions, sliced 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger 2 cloves garlic, chopped 1 teaspoon turmeric • 2 chilli peppers 2 fresh bay leaves • 1 cinnamon stick 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon salt • 6 cardamom pods 5 cloves • 2 tomatoes, diced

1. Mix all the marinade ingredients

together and rub into the chicken. Cover and leave overnight. 2. Prepare the sauce or masala by

heating the ghee in a large pot. Add the sliced onions and cook on a moderate heat for 20-25 minutes to caramelise and turn a dark golden colour. Remove a few to use later. 3. Add the ginger, garlic, bay leaves,

chilli, cinnamon, peppercorns, coriander and cumin seeds, cardamom pods, salt, and turmeric to the onions. Stir fry for a few minutes before adding the tomatoes. Cook down to make thick masala sauce. Add the marinated chicken. Mix in well and add a glass of water to loosen. Cover and simmer gently for 25 minutes till cooked. If the dish looks too dry add a little water. 4. Serve topped with the reserved

cooked onions and rice.

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CHICKEN

BIRYANI


CUISINE T&F

This is from the Kashmiri region. The subtle flavours and a warming sauce make this one of my favourites. The dish should contain asafoetida but that’s not easily found here so I have substituted it with garlic. SERVES 4-6

800g boneless lamb shoulder, cut into chunks• 2 tablespoons ghee 6 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped 1 teaspoon cumin seeds • 1 cinnamon stick 3 cloves • Chilli • 4 cardamom pods 1 teaspoon salt • 2 teaspoon ginger powder 1 teaspoon fennel seeds or fennel powder 4 tablespoons thick plain yoghurt Water • 1 teaspoon garam masala

1. Heat the ghee in a deep pot and

add the garlic. Stir fry for a minute or two then add the cumin, cinnamon, cloves, chilli, cardamom and salt. 2. Toast the spices to release

their flavours before adding the lamb and frying up till it turns a lovely brown colour. 3. Reduce the heat to lowest and add

the ginger and fennel. Add the yoghurt and enough water to loosen the sauce. 4. Cover and cook gently for 1

hour, checking often to make sure that the sauce does not dry out. Add water as necessary. 5. Add the garam masala

and serve with rice.

LAMB

ROGAN JOSH ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

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T&F CUISINE

FISH

PAKORA

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CUISINE T&F

Delicious little bites of fish full of flavour, to be served as a starter with refreshing mint chutney. I used lampuki since they are in season, but any firm white fish would do. SERVES 4 AS PART OF A STARTER SELECTION.

400g lampuki, filleted and cut into large cubes FOR THE MARINADE

1 teaspoon garam masala ½ teaspoon salt Juice from ½ a lime 1 tablespoon grated ginger 2 cloves garlic, mashed 1 finely chopped chilli FOR THE BATTER

100g gram flour 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cumin seeds one handful coriander leaves, chopped a little water oil to fry

1. Prepare the marinade by

mixing all the ingredients together to make a dryish paste. Place the fish into a glass bowl and gently rub the marinade all over. Cover well with plastic wrap and leave in the fridge for at least 2 hours. 2. Prepare the batter by sieving

Mint Chutney one large bunch of fresh mint 1 medium onion, peeled and diced 1 teaspoon salt chilli flesh of 2 lemons

We finely chopped all the ingredients together by hand for a more rustic finish, but you may use a food processor too.

the gram flour together with the baking powder and salt into a large bowl. Add the seeds and coriander together with just enough water to make a thick batter. Beat well with a whisk to aerate. 3. Heat oil in a deep pan or

fryer to medium heat. Dip the marinaded fish into the batter then gently transfer to fryer and cook for 3-4 minutes till golden and crisp. Drain on kitchen paper and keep warm while you fry up all the fish. 4. Serve with lime wedges

and a mint chutney.

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T&F CUISINE

CHANA

MASALA A wonderfully tasty and satisfying chick pea curry that can be enjoyed on its own with soft leavened bread or as a side dish to form part of a larger selection of dishes. SERVES 6-8 AS A SIDE DISH

2 tins chick peas, drained and rinsed • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds 4cm piece of fresh ginger • 1 green chilli • salt 2 tomatoes, cut into chunks • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 medium onions, sliced • 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1 teaspoon coriander powder ½ teaspoon garam masala • 1 tablespoon lime juice TO SERVE

fresh coriander • sliced spring onions

1. Toast the cumin

4. Stir in the ginger and chilli

seeds in a hot dry frying pan. Keep aside.

paste and fry for 2 minutes. Add the blended tomatoes and cook gently till slightly thickened.

2. Process the ginger and chilli

to make a paste. Keep aside. 3. Blend the tomatoes to

make a purée. Keep aside. 3. Heat the oil in a large pot.

Add the sliced onions and cook gently for 15 minutes till golden. Add the garlic and cook for a minute or two.

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5. Add the coriander powder and

toasted cumin seeds and stir well before adding the drained chick peas. Season with salt. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes to develop the flavours, adding a little water if needed. 6. Stir in the garam masala and lime

juice and serve topped with fresh coriander and sliced spring onions.


CUISINE T&F

CRISPYOKRA

IN Y O GH U RT & CO CON U T SA U CE

Okra – or ladies fingers, as some people know them – are considered to be quite an exotic vegetable, which is sad really as they used to be fairly common in Malta when I was a child. You will find them stocked in the larger supermarkets.

SERVES 6 AS A SIDE DISH

oil for frying • 800g okra, washed 1 tablespoon ghee • 180ml plain yoghurt 1 teaspoon mustard seeds • chilli ½ teaspoon cumin seeds • 8 curry leaves 1 cup grated dried coconut • salt 150ml coconut milk • juice of ½ lemon

1. Dry the okra well and deep fry for about 10 minutes till browned

and crisp. Transfer to paper towels and leave to drain. 2. Heat the ghee in a frying pan. Add the seeds and toast for a minute before

adding the coconut. Stir well and cook for 2 minutes. Add some chilli . Add the yoghurt and coconut milk together with the curry leaves. Season and simmer for 15 minutes before adding the fried okra and lemon juice. Mix well and serve.

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

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T&F CUISINE

SAMOSA These are fun to make but even more fun to eat. Prepare them in advance and freeze them, then simply fry up when needed. SERVES 4 A S PART OF A SELECTION OF STARTERS

FILLING

1 tablespoon vegetable oil or ghee 4 medium potatoes, boiled 50g peas, frozen are fine ½ teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon salt • chilli 2 teaspoon garam masala 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 2 tablespoons chopped fresh coriander FOR THE PASTRY

300g plain flour 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ½ teaspoon salt 150ml water (approx.)

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1. Prepare the filling first.

3. To make the pastry, sift

6. Cut pastry into small

Cut the cooled, boiled potatoes into 1cm cubes and put them in a bowl.

the flour and salt into a bowl. Add the oil and use your fingers to rub in. Add the water a little at a time, using enough to just bring the dough together.

lime-sized balls. Roll the balls in between your palms to smoothen, then flatten slightly. Roll out on a floured surface to create round side plate-sized discs.

4. Knead with damp

7. Heat up a flat frying

hands till the pastry is not sticky any more. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

pan on low heat. Place a disc on the pan and cook for just 8 seconds on one side only. Transfer to a board and cut in half.

2. Heat the oil or ghee in

a frying pan and cook the cumin seeds till sizzling, then carefully add the peas and stir fry for a few minutes to soften. Cool then add to the potatoes. 3. Add the ginger, salt,

some chilli, garam masala and chopped coriander. Stir gently to mix all together. Place in the fridge till needed.

5. Make up some flour

glue using flour and water to form a paste.


Coconut and tomato sambal 1 cup grated fresh coconut 1 tomato, quartered, deseeded and finely diced 3 tablespoons thick plain yoghurt 2 spring onions, finely chopped 1 tablespoon chopped coriander salt • chilli • juice of 1 lime

Simply mix all the ingredients together.

8. Place one semi-circle

10. Place onto a baking

on your hand with the cut edge at the top and the cooked side facing you. Brush the cut edge with some flour glue. Fold in the two corners so they meet in the middle, overlapping the edges, then press down to seal. You should have an upside cone in your hands.

paper-lined tray and pat down slightly to even out the filling. (You can open freeze the samosa at this stage )

9. Turn the cone over so

that the pointed end is now at the bottom. Use a spoon to fill the cone with the stuffing and seal using more flour glue to create a triangular pastry.

11. Fry in plenty of

hot, clean oil for about 4 to 5 minutes till the pastry bubbles and the samosa are golden. 12. Drain on kitchen paper

and serve warm. We served these with a coconut and tomato sambal.

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

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TRAVEL T&F

BELLA

SICILIA Claire Borg visits food markets in Sicily overflowing with colourful produce. Recipes and photography: Claire Borg

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

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T&F TRAVEL

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TRAVEL T&F

BELLA

SICILIA One word describes Sicily - vivid. Sicily is brightly coloured and bursting with taste. Sicilian markets are an amazing way to spend a few hours.

Courgette flowers can make a light snack or dress up a meal. Toss them in olive oil over a light heat and then stir the wilted flowers into a risotto. Or fill them with a herb and cheese mix and lightly fry them to serve with a crunchy green salad.

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T&F TRAVEL

Fennel, anchovy & Orange Salad SERVES 2

1 fresh fennel bulb 1 orange 6-9 anchovy fillets 6-8 baked olives olive oil

1. Slice the fennel very thinly

and segment the orange. 2. Arrange the fennel, orange, anchovy

fillets and olives on two plates and drizzle with good quality olive oil.

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BELLA

SICILIA The atmosphere feels very Mediterranean and market stalls brim with super delicious produce. At this time of year, autumn colours already dominate the scene - chestnuts, prickly pears, pomegranates, pistachios, pumpkins, baked olives and sun dried tomatoes.

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T&F TRAVEL

Sicilian Bowl SERVES 1

1 handful rocket leaves, washed and patted dry 2 heaped tablespoons sundried tomatoes 1 heaped tablespoon baked olives flaked toasted almonds 1 scoop of ricotta 1 small fresh fennel bulb

1. Fresh, quality ingredients are all you

need to make up a light but delicious and satisfying meal. Take a handful of washed and dried rocket leaves, a generous helping of sundried tomatoes and baked olives, a scoop of ricotta and a shredded fennel bulb. 2. Arrange all the ingredients on a colourful

plate, scatter flaked toasted almonds over the top, and serve at once.

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ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018


BELLA

SICILIA It’s always a struggle to stay within the limits of food shopping. There is plenty to bring home. I particularly love the sun-dried cherry tomatoes from Pachino, the baked olives, wild origano, pistachios from Bronte, almonds from Avola, the almond pastries from Modica, the peperoncino called fuoco dell’Etna, pasta di mandorla to make almond milk at home, and the pistachio brittle. And, having many friends, I always end up with a couple of litres of olive oil to carry back home.

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

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T&F TRAVEL

Peperonata SERVES 2

2 peppers • olive oil • salt 2 white onions, chunkily diced toasted flaked almonds

1. In about 5 tablespoons of olive oil,

cooked the roughly cut up peppers until nicely browned and starting to become soft. Remove them from the pan with a slotted spoon. 2. In the same oil cook the diced

onion until soft. When the onions are cooked, return the peppers to the pan, season and mix. 3. Leave the mixture to cool down. Then

divide it between two plates and serve sprinkled with toasted flaked almonds.

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ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018


BELLA

SICILIA Vendors chanting away and inviting the public to buy their produce, welcoming gestures to try their goods and tempting offers are all on the agenda in Sicilian markets. Each location is famous for one thing or another. There is something to discover in every season or location on the island.Â

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TRAVEL T&F

BELLA

SICILIA We are lucky enough to be very close to Sicily and that most of us can speak the language and have an appetite that can match that of any Sicilian. So, thumbs up for Sicily. I shall be coming back for more.Â

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T&F TRAVEL

Chicken with Capers SERVES 4

8 chicken legs 2 glasses white wine 12 large cloves of garlic, or enough small cloves to make up the same amount 3 tablespoons capers in salt 5 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon origano 2 teaspoons sugar 1/2 glass white wine vinegar

1. Marinate the chicken in one glass

of white wine and 3 glasses of water for at least 2 hours in the fridge. Remove from marinade and pat dry. 2. In a large pan, cook the garlic in

olive oil until just beginning to become golden. Add the chicken and cook until it starts to become golden. 3. Then add the capers, the vinegar

and 1 glass of white wine. Cover and simmer slowly for about an hour. Check the pan occasionally to see that the liquid does not dry up. If it starts to reduce quickly, add some water. 4. When the chicken is done, add

the sugar and origano, and turn up the heat to reduce the sauce. 5. Serve with a crunchy green salad

and rosemary roasted potatoes. 44

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018


HARVEST T&F

A day in the olive grove Harvest time brings people together in the best of ways, with food, laughter and company, and memories to last a lifetime. By Amy Mallia

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

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T&F HARVEST

O

lives aren’t everyone’s favourite food. You either hate or love them. I love them and have eaten them for as long as I can remember, starting from when I would take a few wobbly toddler steps into my grandparents’ kitchen and close the Western style saloon doors, thinking that I was hidden (I wasn’t, but I didn’t know it at the time), to open the fridge and reach up for the olives. I would then pull up a chair and nibble my contraband goods and I remember loving the saltiness that came with every bite. As well as those fond childhood memories, in recent months olives and olive trees have gained particular significance for me. Early in October last year, my aunt Daphne invited my sister and I to her home to help harvest the olives in her garden. As we arrived, we were greeted by the familiar barking of dogs, fresh air and Daphne smiling and waving. My other aunts soon arrived too and after a fresh, ice-cold glass of water, we all made our way down to the garden with my cousins, all of us decked out in our gardening clothes.

We spent the morning laughing and running around under the trees holding bags wide open above our heads, as my cousins balanced precariously on the ladders shaking the trees, creating a rainfall of olives. We only stopped for a quick lunch break and continued to pick the olives from the trees and off the ground, crawling under bushes to pick up the ones that had rolled out of sight, prying them from under the giant paws of the dogs. When the tiring work was over, we all settled down in the living room which was bursting with colour as usual, and were joined by my grandparents. I had a melancholy feeling and couldn’t help wondering why I felt that way, but I remember telling myself to enjoy the moment while most of our family was

together, talking and laughing as we feasted on tea and biscuits. We left my aunt’s home just as the sun was going down. Of course, that meant going through the twenty-minute departure, as my grandfather calls it. Yet somehow, that day, those twenty minutes felt like a mere few seconds. As we got into the car and drove off, I looked back towards the house, watching as Daphne smiled and waved goodbye, not knowing then that it would be the last time I ever saw her. This is why I decided to write about olives for this issue of Taste&Flair. They remind me of the last few moments and memories I have of Daphne, of a better time when I still had my aunt and when my family could be together as a whole. I have a different reason to love olives now. It takes just one bite for happy memories to come back to me.

Rameau d'olivier Riofrio, Spain

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T&F HARVEST

Focaccia with olive oil and olives Food and photography: Amy Mallia Styling: Megan Mallia INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil plus extra for drizzling 1 cup pitted kalamata olives or black olives 2½ teaspoons active dried yeast 1¾ cups warm water 2 teaspoons sugar 5 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon salt

1. Start by mixing the water and sugar

6. Towards the end of the rising time,

in a bowl, add the yeast and leave the bowl in a warm place for about 15 minutes. The yeast will activate and turn the mixture frothy.

set the oven to 200C to preheat. Remove the cling film from the tray and press your fingertips into the dough’s surface until it is dimpled all over.

2. In a separate bowl mix the flour, salt,

7. Drizzle the dough generously with

olive oil and yeast mixture together until it forms a dough. This is easier if you use a stand mixer with a dough hook, rather than a wooden spoon.

olive oil, allowing the oil to pool in the dimples. Put whole olives into some of the dimples, and sprinkle the surface with chopped rosemary leaves and coarse sea salt. Scatter whole rosemary tips across the dough as a garnish.

TOPPING AND GARNISH

fresh rosemary leaves, coarsely chopped rough sea salt tips of fresh rosemary sprigs

3. When the dough forms, increase

the mixer speed and knead the dough for another 5-7 minutes. The texture should be soft and smooth. If it becomes too sticky, add a little bit of flour and knead it in. 4. Turn the dough out into another bowl

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

the oven until it is lightly coloured on top. Well-made focaccia is light golden brown on the outside and a soft creamy-white on the inside.

ready-brushed with olive oil. Cover the bowl loosely with cling film or with a damp cloth to prevent the dough drying out. Leave the bowl in a warm place for about an hour or until it doubles in size.

9. Let the focaccia cool for a couple

5. When the dough has risen, brush

with some homemade tapenade.

a baking tray with olive oil, place the dough on the tray and pull and stretch it with your hands until it fills the tray. Loosely cover the tray with cling film and let the dough rise until it is double in size. This should take about an hour.

50

8. Bake the dough in the middle of

of minutes, then slice it into squares and serve it immediately, while the crust is still warm and crispy. 10. You can enjoy this on its own or


HARVEST T&F

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T&F HARVEST

Olive Tapenade

INGREDIENTS

200g pitted green or black olives 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ a tablespoon capers 1 small garlic clove, very finely chopped or minced 3 anchovy fillets

1. For a rustic finish, finely chop all

3. Using a spatula, scrape down the

the ingredients, mix them together, and then chop again or process using a pestle and mortar, adding a drizzle of olive oil every so often to soften the texture. Do not add any salt

sides of the processing bowl. Then add the second tablespoon of olive oil and process again until almost smooth and no garlic chunks are visible.

2. Alternatively, do this the easy way,

bread or freshly baked focaccia. Store the rest in an airtight container in the fridge – if there’s any left.

using a food processor for a smoother finish. Process all the ingredients together with one tablespoon of olive oil for about 15 seconds.

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4. Serve tapenade on fresh toasted


T&F CULTURE

A BIRD OF

BEAUTY Across cultures and centuries the peacock has symbolised prestige, luxury, beauty, protection, and everlasting life, and continues to inspire aesthetic creativity By Megan Mallia

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CULTURE T&F

R

esplendent, regal and the epitome of natural beauty, the blue peacock is not a common sight unless you are somewhere in India, where you may see one strut proudly through the rustling markets with their forests of busy and bustling legs, or flying across the emerald rice fields. The spectacular bird we picture when thinking of a peacock is in fact the Indian peafowl. The ‘peacock’ is the name given to the extravagantly decorated male of the species, usually an iridescent blue, or, very rarely, white, caused by a complete lack of pigment in its plumage. The much less extravagant and rather plain female is known as the ‘peahen’. In many cultures, the peacock has strong religious symbolism and legendary involvement. In India, and later in Iran, it was believed that the peacocks’ radiant wheel-like display of feathers represented the ‘all-seeing’ sun and the orbits of the many celestial bodies within the universe. This placed it in the realm of the divine. In 1963, India declared the peafowl its national bird, with symbolism deeply rooted in the country’s traditions. Emblematic of immortality, the Indian peafowl naturally became a popular motif within civilisations throughout the centuries, gracing the robes of India’s royalty in the 15th century and, later, in the 17th century, inspiring craftsmen to create the ‘Peacock Throne’ for Mughal emperor Shāh Jahān. The Mughal throne, which stood on golden feet, was ascended by silver steps set with jewels and had a back with representations of two open peacock tails, decorated with enamel, precious stones and metals, making it one of the most splendid thrones ever crafted – so splendid that it was stolen when the Iranian conqueror Nādir Shāh captured Delhi in 1739.

Above: Juno and the Peacock - Wenceslas Hollar Digital Collection Below left: Shah Jahan on the Peacock Throne - c.1635 - attributed to the Mughal painter Govardhan Below right: Six Peacock motifs adorn this facade in Jaipur, India

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T&F CULTURE

Still life with a peacock pie - Peter Claesz 1627

T

he peacock was a symbol of prestige and luxury in ancient Rome, where it was portrayed in mosaics and frescoes, and in Byzantium, where it was also portrayed in mosaics - there with the additional motive of it being an emblem of the Resurrection and paradise, stemming from the belief, eternalised in medieval bestiaries, that its flesh did not decay. It is no surprise that the peacock as a motif in art ascended in the late nineteenth century’s Gilded Age, which coincided with the era of the Aesthetic Movement, famous for the cry of ‘art for art’s sake’ and a love of extravagant display. It is often thought that the patterns of a peacock’s feathers look much like eyes, and they indeed were associated with the ‘evil eye’ in Egyptian culture, but the Greeks and Romans too had something to say about this apparent ocular likeness. Hera, the Greek goddess married to Zeus, had a watchman named Argus Panoptes whom she held very dear. Argus took on the role of guard exceptionally well due to his one hundred eyes. When Argus was slain by Hermes, Hera collected his hundred eyes, placing them on the feathers of her favourite bird, the peacock. Argus’ eyes represented heaven and the stars, a belief which seemed to have survived in India’s tradition. In Roman mythology, the story is the same, although Juno takes the place of Hera. Besides its aesthetic appeal in decoration and fashion, the peacock was famously appreciated by royalty for its gastronomical qualities. Both the meat and tongue were delicacies enjoyed by the wealthy in Roman times, and the dish seemed to have lasted well into the Middle Ages in Europe where the bird, after being skinned and roasted, was served in all its transcendent glory at the table of the privileged, dressed in its skin with its feathers still intact

Peacock and Peacock Butterfly, Archibald Thorbur

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Attard & Co. Food Ltd - Tel: 21 237555 · facebook.com/attardcofood


CULTURE T&F

Flying peacock, Haribabu Pasupathy

A

ll guests present at the meal would admire the bird as the host would have it brought in ceremoniously. However, actually eating it must have caused all admiration to remain with its aesthetics alone, for the meat was rather dry and nowhere near as succulent as the classic big bird we have on our tables at celebrations today. Today, the peacock is generally appreciated more for its aesthetic appeal than for its taste, though it is used as a means of inspiration in decoration as opposed to being itself used in ornaments, largely due to ethical issues and moral concerns. The peacock motif, which was popular in ancient civilisations, has not lost its charm in contemporary interior decoration. It looks gorgeous as a repetitive pattern on cushions as well as embossed singly, particularly when the vibrant hues of greens and blues are contrasted with just the right coloured sofa or armchair, such as fuschia or plum. If it isn’t the motif itself that tempts you, let its colours be your palette. Paint a wall deep, luscious peacock blue and repaint the cupboard or bookshelf in front of it a marvellous emerald green, draping an exquisitely embroidered Indian cloth over a much more affordable version of Shāh Jahān’s Peacock Throne, the rattan peacock chair (see Taste&Flair issue 110). Decorate the cupboard or fill the shelf with curios such as age-worn books, ceramic and glass animal ornaments and tiny potted cacti arranged to make not a perfect and organised display, but a beautiful farrago or tableaux, quite tantamount to the beautiful bird’s tail. n

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Good food is best enjoyed when accompanied by fine wine

Attard & Co. Food Ltd - Tel: 21 237555 facebook.com/attardcowines


DINING T&F

COLOURS OF AUTUMN

Cooler weather calls for warmer meals. Make the most of these slow-cooked, tasty dishes prepared by Matthew Bonsfield, sous chef at Medina restaurant. Photography and styling: Brian Grech

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T&F DINING

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DINING T&F

Rabbit papiri INGREDIENTS SERVES

4

240g slow cooked rabbbit legs 20 sundried cherry tomatoes 300 ml chicken stock 240 ml pea purée 1 tablespoon chopped parsley 300g dry papiri pasta Salt & pepper

1. Place the rabbit legs in an oven tray

with some stock and vegtables. 2. Slow cook the rabbit legs in

the oven at 130C for 3 hours. 3. When ready, flake the meat off the

bone and put it aside to be used later. 4. For the pea purée, cook the onion

and garlic until golden brown, add some of the peas and some chicken stock and cook until soft. 5. Place the mixture in a food

processor, add the remaining peas and blend together 6. Once the mixture is blended

into a purée, add some butter and salt. Mix again for a couple of seconds until smooth. 7. Cook the pasta in a pan

filled with boiling water. 8. For the sauce, bring to boil 140ml

chicken stock and simmer 9. Add 60gr flaked rabbit and

sundried cherry tomatoes. 10. Drain the pasta, place the cooked

pasta in the sauce, add the pea purée, chopped parsley, a knob of butter and season with salt and pepper. 11. Mix well and serve.

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T&F DINING

Cavatelli carbonara SERVES

4

INGREDIENTS

100g guanciale 50g bacon fat 1 tablespoon garlic 300ml chicken stock 100g Pecorino cheese 4 egg yolks 300g Cavatelli pasta Salt & pepper

1. Start by cutting

the guanciale into cubes and cook it in butter until crispy.

4. For the sauce,

6. Add the

add some chicken stock to the cooked guanciale.

grated pecorino and egg yolk.

2. Remove the

5. Once the pasta

excess fat.

is cooked, drain it and place it in the sauce.

season with salt and pepper and serve immediately.

3. Cook the

pasta in a boiling pot of water.

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7. Mix well ,


77, Three Churches Street, Balzan, BZN 1300, Malta

www.cosecasa.com (+356) 2144 7672


T&F DINING

Risotto with Braised Beef Cheeks INGREDIENTS

2 beef cheeks, trimmed, each weighing 150g 60g  chopped carrots, leeks and celery 2 garlic gloves 150g red wine 300ml beef stock 1 sprig thyme 1 tablespoons finely chopped celery 150g arborio rice 50g finely chopped raisins 50g rinsed and chopped capers 1 tablespoons chopped parsley 2 tablespoons mascapone cheese

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SERVES

1. Heat some

3. Add the stock,

5. Continue

6. Once the rice

oil in a pan, add the beef cheeks and cook to seal. Add the chopped carrots, leeks, celery, garlic and thyme and sweat till light brown.

bring to the boil and simmer in a 150C hot oven for 3 hours till soft.

cooking the risotto in traditional way, adding a ladleful of the braising stock from the beef cheeks and allowing the rice to absorb the liquid before adding more. Stir constantly.

is cooked, mix in the raisins, capers, parsley and mascapone cheese and mix well. Season with salt and pepper.

2. Deglaze the

pan with red wine and reduce the liquid by half.

4. Start the risotto

by sweating the chopped celery and the risotto rice for a couple of minutes, without colouring.

7. Serve the

risotto topped with braised beef cheek.

4


DINING T&F

SERVES

4

Stuffed calamari INGREDIENTS

4 calamari, cleaned 140g ricotta 80g tiger prawns 45g black olives 2 egg whites 60g breadcrumbs 1 tablespoon parsley 1 tablespoon chives zest of half a lemon

1. Clean the

4. Add two

7. Place the

calamari, remove and chop the tentacles.

egg whites, breadcrumbs and season with salt.

2. Chop the

5. Place the

calamari in an oven dish and bake for 7 minutes.

parsley, prawn, black olives and chives.

mixture in the cleaned calamari.

3. Add lemon zest

calamari in a sauce pan, add tomato sauce, basil and a knob of butter.

and crumbled ricotta to the chopped ingredients.

6. SautĂŠe the

8. Once ready,

serve the calamari sliced wth the cooked tomatoe fondue.

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T&F DINING

Baked Red Snapper al Cartoccio

SERVES

4

INGREDIENTS

4 fresh Red Snapper, each weighing around 400g, gutted and descaled 1sprig mint 1 sprig parsley 1 sprig dill 1 fresh lemon 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper

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1. Season the

3. Wrap each

5. Remove the

cleaned fish with salt and pepper inside and out.

fish in baking paper followed by aluminium foil to form a pocket.

fish from their paper pockets and drizzle with fresh lemon juice.

4. Bake the fish

6. Serve with

at 180C for 2025 minutes.

potatoes and mixed vegetables.

2. Drizzle the

fish with olive oil, then place the fresh herbs inside each fish.


Trade Enquiries: Red October Co. Ltd

Tel: 2147 0400 Email: info@redoct.net

/RedOctoberMalta


DINING T&F

Duo of Guinea Fowl SERVES

4

INGREDIENTS

2 whole guinea fowls 1 finely chopped onion 30g finely chopped carrots 2 minced garlic cloves 1sprig fresh rosemary 300ml corn oil 2 bay leaves 300g swede 300g turnips 100ml chicken jus 4 filo sheets 50ml unsalted butter

1. Remove the legs from the birds,

4. When the confit has cooled, lay the

place in a tray with the bay leaves, rosemary, and corn oil and cook gently in an oven at 100C for 4 hours.

filo pastry flat and brush with melted butter. Place the guinea fowl mix along one edge and roll the pastry into a cylindrical shape. Bake till golden brown.

2. Remove from the oven and allow

to cool, then remove the meat from the bones and chop it up. 3. Sauté the chopped onion, carrot

and garlic till soft, then mix in the chopped guinea fowl leg confit, set aside and allow to cool.

5. Remove the breast meat from the

bone, seal off in a hot pan with oil and cook thoroughly in a hot oven. 6. Serve the breast meat with

cooked leg pastilla, roasted swede and turnips and chicken jus.

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T&F DINING

Bitter Chocolate Pudding INGREDIENTS

100g unsalted butter 100g bitter chocolate, chopped 2 whole eggs 1 egg yolk 50g sugar 30g flour 100g crumble 150g caramel ice cream

1. Place the

3. Mix in the

6. Bake at 180C

unsalted butter and bitter chocolate in a bowl and place on a pot of simmering water to melt.

melted chocolate and butter.

for 11 minutes.

4. Fold in

crumble and caramel ice cream.

2. Beat the eggs,

yolk and sugar till fluffy and pale.

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ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

the flour. 5. Butter the

inside of pudding moulds and fill with the pudding mix till ¾ of the way up.

7. Serve hot with

SERVES

4


DOK Malta • DOK Gozo

Ensuring quality from vines to wines

Ripeness Checking quality parameters and sugar content using a refractometer

Vine C u l t i va t i o n Tending to and pruning the vine all year long

H a rv e s t Hand-picking the grapes

PRESSing Extracting the juice

F e r m e n tat i o n Converting grape juice to wine

Wines of Distinction DOK Malta • DOK Gozo IGT Maltese Islands dokmaltadokgozo dokmaltadokgozo.gov.mt

Brought to you by


T&F PROMOTION

B

Daniel Mercieca - Bacchus Winery

Interview Maltese and Gozitan Vintners

AN WITH

A year since the DOK Malta, DOK Gozo – Wines of Distinction Campaign was launched, it’s time to catch up with some of the vintners who are the key players behind the labels DOK Malta, DOK Gozo and IĠT Maltese Islands. Interviewed here are Daniel Mercieca for Bacchus Winery, Matthew Delicata for Emanauel Delicata WineMaker and Liliya Taseva for Montekristo Winery.

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ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

How long have you been in this sector? How did you get started in winemaking? Bacchus Winery is a family-run business which was established in 1862, inherited from father to son. I am the fifth generation and have been in this sector for over thirty years.

B

E

Having been born into a winemaking family with a tradition of over 100 years it was natural for me to follow in their footsteps. I officially started working in the winery during my summer holidays whilst I was still at university. I would help out in the laboratory during the busy harvest months. Then, after graduating I joined the winemaking team which I eventually started to head.

M

Montekristo winery was established in 2004.

As a vintner which is your favourite/ most challenging part of the winemaking process? Why?

B

The fermentation stage.

The harvest is both the most challenging yet my favourite time of the year. It’s a very intense time when you are constantly working to get the grapes to reach the perfect ripeness and turning them into delicious wine. It’s the time when all the hard work in the vineyard comes to fruition. It’s a wonderful sight watching a grower’s beaming face delivering a successful harvest. It is my responsibility to transform those high-quality grapes into premium wine.

E

Definitely the most favourite period is the harvest time. It personifies the beginning, the optimism, the energy – all positive feelings we have when we start something new. And although it is a yearly process, it is still a challenge.

M

Which is your favourite kind of wine?

B

Red wine.

This is similar to asking a parent to choose a favourite child! I love them all, and they all have their place especially with a good meal. The wonderful thing about Malta is that we are opting for various styles which is very rare for such a small region to do. It is a wine lover’s paradise to come here and have this vast spectrum of wines to enjoy.

E

As a winemaker working mainly with red varieties, it is not a surprise that my favourite wines are the red ones. The preparation of red wines always needs more attention and patience and when I taste a red wine I`m trying to discover the core and the character of the wine.

M


PROMOTION T&F

M

E

Liliya Taseva - Montekristo Winery

Matthew Delicata - Emanuel Delicata WineMaker

Which grape variety features most in your wines?

B

Merlot.

Our indigenous white variety Girgentina and the world-renowned Chardonnay are definitely the most dominant grapes. They give the perfect balance of sticking to our roots with our native varieties, while also giving the wines an international approachable dimension to them.

E

The two grape varieties presented in our wines are the Chardonnay – touched with the unique Mediterranean terroir, and the Syrah which gives rich wines with intense colour and flavours.

M

Is there any method/ specifications that characterises your wines?

B

The old traditional methods blended with the new technology.

A virtue of fine wine always gives an indication of the sense of place. Our wines have to evoke fresh sea breezes and warm summer nights. Our wines are always packed with bright fresh fruity aromas and we always prioritize drinkability and finesse which make them appropriate to thoroughly enjoy in our climate.

E

The method of the vinification depends on the varietal and the style of the wine but the balance is critical.

M

What does DOK and IĠT mean to you? For us, it’s the control process from the grapevine to the bottling of wine.

B

E

For me, this is a seal of approval that the wines we make are getting analysed and tested by an expert panel and getting the approval needed. It is also a tool to instil further confidence in our customers and having something to show that our products have been independently inspected and certified. Although the certification is still relatively in its infancy (just over ten years), it is slowly but surely gaining more exposure and will continue to do so in the future. DOK/IGT suggest controlled grapes and it is our quality guarantee for the clients.

M

Any future goals?

B

Our goal is to keep the family’s tradition of winemaking as a familybusiness and passing this passion to future generations. This is not an easy task!

E

My main future goal is firmly putting Malta on the world wine map and continuing my family’s legacy. Every person who discovers our wines is immediately impressed and surprised that we are capable of producing such good quality with a variety of wines. This shows we are on the right track and will create ambassadors for our industry worldwide. We must keep on striving to improve our wines in anyway possible, be it the vineyard or the cellar while also improving the way we communicate our virtues and the virtues of our beautiful islands. One of the most important goals we have for the future is to work in close contact with our clients, giving them the chance not only to taste our wines and visit the winery, but even to be present and participate in the winemaking process.

M

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T&F NOSTALGIA

Me (centre) with

Khalid Bilal Jamil

brother Ibrahim my sister Laila and

My daughter Daniah Hagul with one of our farm's melons

Me with my grandfa

ther

Farm Nr 49

Main photo: Hans Braxmeier

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My nephews Aymon Collins, Adam Collins (holding teddy bear) and my son Soufian Hagul


NOSTALGIA T&F

th My parents Anne Elizabemy h and Mohamed Jamil wit him siblings, Laila and Ibra

Farm No. 49, Bianchi

At farm no 49

Memories of a childhood in the orange groves Samira Jamil remembers an idyllic childhood with weekends spent on the family’s farm in Bianchi, a village near Tripoli. I would like to thank my father and uncle Kamal for their valuable input as well as my cousin Ghada Jamil for the photographs. Recipe photography: Amy Mallia Styling: Megan Mallia

date palm

Soufian and Daniah Hag ul

Our farm No. 49, Bianchi, was one of many farms which were part of a vast Italian colonising project to develop agricultural land in occupied Libya. The project, begun as soon as the resistance began in 1911, was subdivided by the early and mid-1920’s. Italy lost the Second World War, as well as its colonies in Africa, namely Libya, Eritrea and Somalia. When Libya became independent, its farmland reverted to Libyan ownership. My paternal grandfather became a pensioner when he was 60. Though most of his working life as District Governor was desk-bound, he had maintained a great interest in gardening and had a particular fondness for plants. An idle life in retirement was not for him, so he sold the family home in Janzour and bought an established farm in the village of Bianchi from an Italian farmer who had decided to move back to Italy. My grandfather’s decision was to prove idyllic: fresh air, organic produce and physical activity for all the family. In the 1950’s and 1960’s, Libya was an exporter of a number of commodities, mainly olive oil, citrus fruit, peanuts, potatoes, and livestock. Farming to cater for such exports flourished. Our farm and others like it catered for export demand, producing peanuts, potatoes, and citrus fruit, and tomatoes for local canning.

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T&F NOSTALGIA

Two tall palm trees, with heavy bunches of dates dripping like golden nuggets in the sunshine marked the end of one orange grove and the beginning of another.

Youssef Jamil

Over the years, orange production on farm No. 49 flourished, producing varieties such as: Calabrese, Sanguinello, Belladonna and Tarocco, the Italian names for fruit being widely used. Seville oranges were also grown to make marmalade. The fruit from the few lemon trees dotted around the farm were grown solely for the family’s consumption, especially for making fresh lemonade. [Taste&Flair note: see recipe on page 83.] Our family lived in Collina Verde, a suburb of Tripoli, and the highlight of our week was driving to Bianchi on Thursday evening and spending the weekend on the farm. The 1-hour drive from Collina Verde was full of excitement as we looked forward to a fun-packed time with our grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, who would all converge on the farm for our customary Friday lunch. I can still vividly picture my father turning our olive-green Volvo 145 station wagon into the Eucalyptus-lined driveway, a memory which will be forever etched in my mind. After lunch, while the adults indulged in a siesta, we children played hide-andseek among the orange groves, savouring the fresh country air. We spent the whole afternoon climbing the trees and gazing in awe into what, to a child, seemed to be an endless sea of orange trees laden with the most succulent oranges. Traipsing through the orange groves, we would stumble upon olive, peach, apricot, plum, pear, apple, and pomegranate trees. During spring, the blossoming trees would turn into an intricate and delightful patchwork of colour.

My uncle, Kamal has dedicated his life to the farm, toiling for years on the land with all the joys, trials and tribulations that go with this vocation. It is mostly thanks to him that the rest of the family continued to enjoy the fruit for many years. When chatting, his sentences would be peppered with Italian words such as pala, trattore, tubo, reminders of the Italian era. With my father’s steadfast support and guidance over the decades, the entire family is still able to enjoy this peaceful oasis. The farm covers 13 hectares of land; 4.5 hectares dedicated exclusively to the cultivation of orange trees. Each hectare contained 400 trees, so at the farm’s peak there were approximately 1,800 orange trees of several varieties. The best years for production of citrus fruit were from 1980 to 1990. Most of the time the entire orange harvest would be sold while still on the trees and we knew not to help ourselves to any of that fruit. However, my uncle would allocate certain trees for the family’s consumption, and we eagerly helped ourselves to those. We also enjoyed the sweetest watermelons and on one particular occasion I recall all of us children giggling as we took it in turns to try lifting a huge one which weighed a hefty 30kg. During the olive harvesting season, we would all help to gather the fruit. A rake would be used to shake the olives from the branches, dropping them onto a net spread out under the tree. Some would be kept for pickling. Most would be sent off to the local olive press for the most delicious and organic extra virgin olive oil.

Aymon, Farris and Adam Collins

Orange blossom water At dawn and sunset, the damp air in the orange groves would be permeated with the exquisite perfume of orange blossom. The flowers would be gathered and processed through steam distillation to produce a few bottles of concentrated orange blossom water which we would use for making pastries, sprinkling into couscous and adding a few drops to fresh lemonade. In the kitchen: Sliced oranges are transformed into something very special by adding a dash of cinnamon, a dribble of honey and a sprinkling of orange blossom water. Stir a teaspoon of orange blossom water into a mixture of mascarpone and whipped cream to top fresh strawberries. Sprinkle orange blossom water onto fresh fruit salad for an exotic touch and to enhance the sweetness of the fruit. Other uses: Use orange blossom water as a facial toner. Sprinkle a few drops to fragrance a bath. Add to the ironing water for delicately perfumed clothes.

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During the orange blossom season, the air would be permeated with a heavy, intoxicating perfume.


NOSTALGIA T&F

At farm NÂş 49

With every orange season, I feel deep nostalgia not only for Bianchi oranges but also for the carefree days in the land of my birth surrounded by family.

Two tall palm trees, with heavy bunches of dates dripping like golden nuggets in the sunshine marked the end of one orange grove and the beginning of another. A tree I found fascinating was my grandmother’s henna tree, Lawsonia inermis, also known as the mignonette tree. Grandmother would gather the leaves and pound them to a fine powder. At the slightest sight of grey hair, she would take a small amount of the powder, mix it with water into a fine green paste, and apply it all over her hair. A few hours later, she would rinse it off and her hair would shine a beautiful deep red hue, the colour of the Sanguinello oranges growing on the farm. The highlight of any visit was always a ride in the grey Peugeot 504 pick-up truck. All the children would pile into the back and an older cousin would take us for a ride around the farm. With each jolt and bump there would be bouts of hysterics as we tried to reach for more oranges from the dangling branches. During the orange blossom season, the air would be permeated with a heavy, intoxicating perfume. For me, this association will always trigger fond memories of my mother sitting under the shade of an orange tree, engrossed in a book among the fragrant blossoms. This was her private sanctuary, a multisensory oasis in the midst of the orange groves, feeling at one with nature in a land far away from that of her birth, where she found solace. In the shade of those orange trees, my young cousins joined her to sing along to nursery rhymes and listen attentively to the fairytales she told in her joyful and animated way, feeding their fascination for other cultures and places.

I have fond memories of my mother sitting under the shade of an orange tree, engrossed in a book among the fragrant blossoms

Grandmother would always make sure that everyone went back home with boxes of oranges to share with friends in the city, to either be juiced or eaten fresh. My mother used fruit from the farm in some of her recipes, which remain favourites to this day: home-made Seville orange marmalade, a classic orange and almond cake, a zesty lemon cake, and fresh lemonade with mint. [Taste&Flair note: see recipes starting on page 82.] It was rather special biting into something made with our own farm produce and savouring every mouthful. Even today, just one bite or sip takes me right back to our family home in Bianchi. Although the orange trees have dwindled in number and the farm, like Libya itself, has seen better days, I cherish fond memories of both places, of a bountiful and giving land and one which was so welcoming. With every orange season, I feel deep nostalgia not only for Bianchi oranges but also for the carefree days in the land of my birth surrounded by family. Earlier this year a Libyan orange peace festival was held in Warshefana, close to our farm, an area which has been caught up in regional clashes. The festival organisers wanted to show a positive side to life in the area, spreading a peaceful message and supporting local farmers, giving people much needed hope for a sense of normality to return. My own children, nieces and nephews who are now spread across continents, have a real yearning for this magical place where they have spent many memorable summer holidays. No doubt my grandfather would be happy to know that his farm has given so much pleasure to his great grandchildren and a real connection to their heritage. Hopefully, it will continue to do so for generations to come.

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T&F NOSTALGIA These recipes, full of zesty flavours always reconnect me with Bianchi and are reminders of my childhood on the orange groves.

This rich, moist and wholesome cake was a favourite of my mother’s. It may be served as a dessert too. The recipe was first featured in A Book of Middle Eastern Food published in 1968.

Orange & Almond Cake INGREDIENTS

2 oranges 6 eggs 8.8 oz ground almonds 8.8 oz sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon of butter and sprinkling of flour for the cake tin 1 teaspoon orange blossom water

Tip: instead of buying the ground almonds, I prefer to grind them to keep some of the crunch.

1. Wash and boil the unpeeled

6. Bake in a preheated moderately

oranges in water for about an hour and a half, ensuring they are always covered by the water

hot oven (190C) for about an hour

2. Let them cool, then cut

8. Once cool, remove from the tin

3. Purée them in a blender

Optional: In a blender, beat a tub of mascarpone, with 2 tablespoons icing sugar, a teaspoon each of milk and vanilla essence and when the cake is cool, cover it with the icing and sprinkle some orange rind to decorate.

4. Beat the eggs in a large bowl

well and pour into a buttered and floured cake tin, preferably one with a removable base to help you turn out the cake smoothly once baked.

ISSUE 113 OCTOBER 2018

the oven for a little longer

open and remove the pips

5. Add all the other ingredients, mix

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7. If cake is still wet leave it in


NOSTALGIA T&F

Mint Lemonade The classic Tunisian recipe for lemonade or citronnade is delicious and a refreshing take on the classic lemonade. INGREDIENTS

2 cups crushed ice 4 cups water 2 large lemons washed, cut into small pieces, and pips removed Juice of 3 lemons 1 bunch fresh mint leaves, stems removed (about 25-40 mint leaves) 1-2 cups sugar, depending on your liking 1 tablespoon orange blossom water (ilma zahar)

1. Place all the ingredients

in your blender. 2. Liquefy until you achieve the

desired drink consistency. 3. Taste and add more sugar

or mint leaves, according to your liking. Blend again. 4. Pour the lemonade into a serving

jug using a mesh strainer. 5. Add 1 tablespoon of

orange blossom water 6. Add fresh mint leaves to the jug. Cover

and refrigerate until ready to serve.

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T&F NOSTALGIA

Moist Lemon Cake This cake is fluffy, tangy and easy to make. FOR THE LEMON POUND CAKE:

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (190g) 1 teaspoon baking powder Zest of 1 lemon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup unsalted butter room temperature (115g) 1 cup granulated sugar (200g) 2 large eggs room temperature 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Juice of 1/2 lemon 1/2 cup buttermilk (120ml) FOR THE LEMON SYRUP:

Juice of 1 lemon 3 tablespoon icing sugar FOR THE LEMON ICING:

1 cup icing sugar sifted (120g) 1 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon milk

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1. Preheat oven to 177°C. Grease a

6. Scrape the batter into the prepared

9x5-inch (or 8x4-inch) loaf pan. 2. In a small bowl combine the

loaf pan and bake for 45-55 minutes until the cake is golden brown and a toothpick comes out mostly clean.

flour, baking powder, lemon zest, and salt. Set aside.

7. Let the cake cool for about

3. Cream the butter and sugar together at

medium-high speed until pale and fluffy. 4. With the mixer running on low-speed,

add the eggs one at a time, then beat in the vanilla extract and lemon juice. Beat on medium-high speed until combined.

10 minutes in the pan. Stir together the lemon juice and icing sugar for the lemon syrup. Carefully invert the loaf pan, and transfer the cake to a cooling rack, then brush the syrup on the cake while still warm. 8. Allow cake to cool completely.

5. Add about one-third of the flour

9. When the cake is cooled, combine

mixture and mix until almost combined, then add half the buttermilk and mix until just combined. Repeat with another third of flour mixture and then the last half of the buttermilk, ending with the last third of the flour.

all the icing ingredients, start with 1 tablespoon lemon juice and milk and add the remaining lemon juice as needed. The icing should be thick and not runny. Pour icing over cake and let dry before serving.


T&F NOSTALGIA

Moroccan mint tea The ingredients for Moroccan mint tea are simple, however the traditional process is quite elaborate and time consuming. This is an easy way of preparing the tea without deviating too much from the authentic way. Usually sugar is added to the pot with the tea to caramelise, but I prefer adding sugar or honey to each glass when serving, according to individual preference.

INGREDIENTS

3 cups water 3 teaspoons green tea leaves A handful of fresh mint, rinsed and drained Sugar or honey to sweeten

1. Pour a cup of boiled water

over the tea leaves in a stove-top tea pot and swirl it around. 2. After a minute strain the tea

leaves and discard the water. (By rinsing the tea leaves you remove some of the bitterness). 3. Add 3 cups of boiled water to the

tea leaves, simmer for 5 minutes and remove from the heat. 4. Place the mint leaves in the

pot and let them steep for about 7 minutes before serving. 5. Pour the tea into small glasses,

and sweeten with sugar or honey 6. Garnish with a sprig of mint

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T&F HISTORIC HOMES

Shangri La: Doris Duke’s Hawai'ian Utopia Doris Duke was fabulously rich and famously reclusive. Her home in Hawai'i, once an intensely private refuge, is now a museum where everything “lives forever in an environment of boundless beauty” B Y S A C H A S TA P L E S Photos: courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. This page: Jali Pavilion at Shangri La. © 2014, Linny Morris, courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

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Doris Duke and Sam Kahanamoku playing slide and acoustic guitars, 1939. Photo by Martin Munkácsi. Shangri La Historical Archives, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. Gift of Hope Cromwell Hopkins.

D

oris Duke was twenty-two years old, the heiress of an enormous American tobacco fortune – which she inherited at age twelve, earning her the nickname, “Billion Dollar Baby” – and a bonafide belle of Manhattan society. She had just walked down the aisle and was embarking on a ten month round-the-world honeymoon with her newly minted husband. The year was 1935. During their travels, the young couple visited places that most Americans at the time could only dream of: India, Iran, Egypt, Morocco, Syria, and Turkey. Duke was mesmerised by the ornate Islamic art and grand Mughal architecture that she encountered throughout North Africa, the Middle East and beyond – Mughal architecture being the Indian-Islamic style dating back to the 16th century which features such design elements as large domes, wide hallways, vaulted ceilings, internal courtyards, and intricate ornamentation. Duke was especially captivated by the majestic Taj Mahal mausoleum during the couple’s two months in India. She was awe-struck by the ivory marble masterpiece and she longed to recreate it, somehow, back home in America. At the time, the couple had just begun renovations on their Palm Beach estate and Duke sought out British architect Francis B. Blomfield, who was based in Delhi at the time, to discuss her plans for a master bedroom suite inspired by the marble and stone features of the Taj Mahal. The architect began works immediately, contracting craftsmen and artisans in India to work on the suite, which featured ivory marble inlaid with jade, malachite, and lapis lazuli. The couple corresponded with Blomfield throughout the remainder of their honeymoon travels. Duke was eager to see her dream come to fruition.

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HISTORIC HOMES T&F

Mughal Suite exterior. © 2014, Linny Morris, courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

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HISTORIC HOMES T&F

19th century necklace from Jaipur, India. Courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. (Photo: David Franzen, 2014.)

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Living room. © 2015, Linny Morris, courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

he commissioning of her master bedroom suite was the first chapter of Duke’s interest in, appreciate for, and patronage of Middle Eastern and Asian art, design, and architecture. While it was not a new practice for British aristocrats and wealthy Americans to design their homes in the style of exotic cultures – think of the popularity of the Chinoiserie style in Europe in the mid-to-late 17th century – American interest in ancient Islamic and South Asian decor in the 1930s was decidedly uncharted territory and Duke’s plans for her suite were novel, even eccentric. The newlyweds landed stateside in Hawai'i in August of 1935 to cap off their honeymoon after many months of travelling abroad. Upon arrival on the island, Duke felt as though she had stumbled upon a mythical utopia, falling under the beguiling spell of Hawai'i, with its rich indigenous history and lush, tropical topography. In 1930s America, with the Great Depression raging across the country, Hawai'i was quickly becoming a playground for the wealthy elite. Only those with unprecedented wealth could afford to fly there, let alone take up residence. Duke had grown up in New York from a little rich girl into an heiress, a debutante, and now a wife with a high-profile marriage, and she had spent most of life dodging the attention and responsibilities that her gilded cage had forced upon her. Hawai'i offered a salvation from her life in Manhattan and the couple decided to extend their stay by four months. In Hawai'i, Duke was able to escape the prying eyes and wagging tongues of her socialite circle, not to mention the ruthless gossip columnists who tracked her every move. Hawai'i, and the home that she would build there, would become the greatest loves of her life.

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Mughal Garden. © 2015, Linny Morris, courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

“It was perfectly true; he just rather liked being at Shangri-La. Its atmosphere soothed while its mystery stimulated, and the total sensation was agreeable” James Hilton, Lost Horizon (1933)

W

ithin a week of being in Hawai'i, Duke found a real estate agent and purchased five acres of land set on the Pacific ocean, on the island of Oahu. It was here, on these wild green acres, that Duke would build her dream home. She quickly wrote to her architect, Blomfield, in India, to inform him that the marble bedroom suite he was working on should be delivered to this new address in Hawai'i instead of Palm Springs. In her own words, and with the carefree attitude one might expect from a multi-millionaire, she explained to Town & Country magazine in a rare 1947 interview: “The idea of building a Near Eastern house in Honolulu must seem fantastic to many, but precisely at the time I fell in love with Hawai'i and decided I could never live anywhere else, a Mogul-inspired bedroom and bathroom, planned for another house, was being completed for me in India, so there was nothing to do but have it shipped to Hawai'i and build a house around it.” And so works began on the Hawai'i project – building a house around the Taj Mahal bedroom suite, that is – under the keen design sense of A-list architect Marion Sims Wyeth and the watchful eye of supervising architect H. Drewry Baker, along with Duke herself, who was intimately involved with every aspect of the design and

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construction process. Duke named the property Shangri La, inspired by the utopian paradise of James Hilton’s 1933 novel, Lost Horizon, where no one ever grew old and no evil could enter. The Shangri La compound included the main house, a guesthouse, gardens, terraces, courtyards, and a pool, covering 14,000 square feet. Construction took two years to complete and cost a staggering US $1.4 million (over €20 million by today’s equivalent), making it – by far – the most expensive and luxurious home ever built in Hawai'i at the time. Shangri La was not the easiest design and construction project, however, as it was not the typical holiday home, and yet that is precisely what it was. During the two years of construction, Duke and her husband continued to travel in the Middle East and would constantly be making changes or incorporating new elements to the Shangri La designs as they went along. Duke had a team of designers and archeologists scouting designs across many Muslim cultures. She spared no expense and sought out authentic design elements, styles, and specific pieces that she had made note of during her honeymoon and afterwards. As evidence of her commitment, Duke once imported an entire room from a 19th century palazzo in Damascus.


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T&F HISTORIC HOMES

It was here, on these wild green acres, that Duke would build her dream home.

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HISTORIC HOMES T&F

Playhouse, with Diamond Head in the background. © 2014, Linny Morris, courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

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Mughal Suite bathroom. © 2014, Linny Morris, courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

O

ne key element of Mughal design that Duke had appreciated during her honeymoon travels was the fortress-like quality of many of the private homes that she toured in Morocco, Syria, and Iran, among other places. She found that the unassuming exteriors would often conceal the grandeur and size of the home that stretched out from behind the entryway. It is no surprise that for someone who longed for privacy and protection, this feature would appeal to Duke, and so the Shangri La property was designed in this way. The stark white facade – which almost glows against the backdrop of the electric blue Pacific and the lush green hills of Oahu – might even be disappointing to visitors expecting something more palatial, but just as in those grand traditional Mughal homes, the splendour of Shangri La lies within. Despite valuing traditional Islamic design and craftsmanship, it was never Duke’s intention to create a carbon-copy of a traditional Mughal home in Hawai'i, but rather she sought to blend her personal modern style with ancient Middle Eastern and Asian details and treasures. She valued authenticity, but was prepared to mix things together that perhaps did not traditionally fit. Duke’s home became a scrapbook of her travels – a pastiche of genres and cultures. She would pair ancient Iranian mosaics and tapestries with an 1840s crystal Baccarat chandelier, alongside family heirloom silver and personal photographs. There was nothing left out or added to satisfy historical accuracy, but rather it was all layered together to reflect Duke’s nuanced aesthetic and

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unique personal tastes. At her Shangri La home, Duke created a new style that was multifaceted, surrounding herself with beautiful styles and pieces that inspired her and brought her immense joy. From the time of her honeymoon up until her death in 1993, Duke had collected and displayed 3,500 Muslim artefacts at her Shangri La home. Her treasures included Iznik tiles, marble mosaics, furniture from Damascus, mirrored columns, Moroccan ceiling frescos, the Taj Mahal-inspired master bedroom suite, gilded Ottoman scrolls, and mother-of-pearl bureaus from Syria. The crowning jewel of Duke’s collection is a towering prayer niche from a 13th century tomb in Iran. Nearly every window in the house is shielded by both wood and marble screens, featuring delicate patterns that filter in the bright Hawai'ian sunlight, and create a safe, womb-like atmosphere within. Despite Duke’s staggering assemblage of Muslim artefacts, Shangri La never felt like a museum. It was, after all, Duke’s beloved home and haven. The space had to be spectacularly designed, but also functional, while still possessing the comfort and warmth that one would expect from a private home perched on the edge of a hill overlooking the Pacific Ocean. It is easy to imagine Duke strolling through the gardens, entertaining guests at the Jali pavilion as the sun sinks into the water, or relaxing on the corduroy sofa in the living room, her arm draped elegantly across a cushion, cocktail in hand.


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HISTORIC HOMES T&F

Dining room. © 2015, Linny Morris, courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

Duke’s travels, her experiences, her interests and passions are forever preserved.

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he Shangri La house allowed Duke to uncover her passion for design and architecture, travel and North African, Middle Eastern, and Asian cultures, but also for antique collecting and art patronage. Without setting out to do so, her home became the largest private collection of Middle Eastern art and design in the United States and despite being a famous recluse throughout her life, Duke specified in her will that, following her death, the executors of her estate should open Shangri La to the public for the study and protection of Islamic art and culture.

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Syrian Room. © 2014, Linny Morris, courtesy of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

Although she was a private person, Duke wanted her life’s work, her home, to be enjoyed by others when she was no longer alive to do so. And like the fictional Shangri La of Hilton’s novel, where everyone lives forever in an environment of boundless beauty, Duke’s Shangri La has become her legacy. Her travels, her experiences, her interests and passions are forever preserved – her spirit lives on in her collection, in her island home. n


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INSPIRATION T&F

Mural painting transforms and extends space in ways limited only by the imagination. Borrowing a technique from the 16th century, large scale panoramic scenes in classic and contemporary designs are fashioned off site and delivered ready-made to transform an interior.

SUBLIME WALLS Eclectic, poetic and elegant panoramics Photography from Maison Pierre Frey's first collection of panoramic wallpapers: Galerie.

Karma is a contemporary acrylic art work on canvas, creation by Catherine Pierlovisi combining the artist’s favorite colours and textures.

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T&F INSPIRATION

When prehistoric painters at Lascaux in southwest France first decorated the walls of their grottoes, they couldn’t have known that they were starting a tradition that would evolve into a fine art. Depictions on the walls of the cave dwellings tell us much of what is known about the worldview of the people who lived there. And so it has continued throughout the history of civilisation. From the raw paintings on the walls of a rocky grotto in prehistoric times, to the rich and elaborate murals of ancient civilizations in Rome, Mesopotamia, and India, to the refined frescoes of renaissance Italy, wall paintings have distilled the stories, experiences and values of people in particular times and places.

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Top: In Aloe, cactus, succulents and luxuriant vegetation make up a contemporary vegetal fantasy by artist Carla Talopp

Above left: Accorus is a collection of grasses and herbs in black and white made using the cyanotype technique. This photographic process reveals the negative image of a large-format plant bouquet composed of sweet flags, pampas grass and ferns.

Above right: Fond Marin evokes the bottom of the sea as imagined by Carla Talopp. The painting plunges the viewer into coloured depths, where seaweeds dance, corals hypnotise and the blue of the ocean is everywhere.

Right: La Cible d’Amour is a reproduction of François Boucher’s original painting entitled LA CIBLE DE L’AMOU. Photo © RMN-Grand Palais (Louvre museum) - ©René Gabriel Ojéda.


INSPIRATION T&F

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T&F INSPIRATION

t Les Rocheuses (The Rockies) belong to an unreal, imaginary world, where nature is unchained. The design recalls seventeenth century engravings from northern Europe. x L’esterel is an idyllic, handpainted landscape from the south of France, where sunrise brings out the lights and shadows of stone pines, agave plants and the Mediterranean sea, with a brush painting technique that reveals the character and depth of this panorama. q La Serre, a trompe l’oeil greenhouse with tropical plants, banana trees and birds of paradise thrive in a hand painting by Cédric Peltier. The relaxing scene evokes far-away places with surprising realism.

Mural decoration is unique among pictorial art forms in that it is inherently linked to the architecture in which it is found. The style and form, its colour and design, and the theme of the art can change the feel of a space and the visual proportions of a building’s interior. It is a 2-dimensional art form with a 3-dimensional impact. Unlike framed art, mural art dissolves dividing walls and ceilings rather than marking their physical presence, the possibilities of the art form limited only by artists’ imagination and the available techniques. In classical antiquity, fresco – painting directly on wet plaster– was the traditional medium for mural painting. From the 16th century onwards, artists developed and used the technique of painting on canvas which was then attached to a wall surface. The technique was less durable than traditional fresco painting, but considerably easier to manage as the painting did not have to be executed on site and errors were far more easily corrected.

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FALL WINTER 2018 COLLECTION


T&F INSPIRATION

Inspired by a passion for art, Pierre Frey teases out those historical traditions in a new collection of panoramic wallpapers which echo the exceptional size of ancient frescos and landscapes hand-painted on walls in its first collection of panoramic wallpapers: Galerie. Artists were commissioned specially to produce an eclectic and elegant range of designs including classic masterpieces, trompe l’oeil art, contemporary painting, and old engraving. The panoramics can be repeated infinitely to create murals of exceptional proportion. All are drawn by hand by artists in the Pierre Frey studio or others known to the firm. From the contemporary canvas to the Portuguese azulejos, the handmade designs enhance walls, turning them into windows onto imaginary worlds. n

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Jardin d’Eden brings you fruit, passion flowers, vines and banana trees surrounding a waterfall in a hand drawn illustration created in a pointilliste monochrome – a delicate, painstaking technique which gives the drawing depth and charm.


T&F INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

THE EVERYDAY RETREAT

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INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE T&F

Careful detailing and close collaboration between designers and craftspeople turned two ordinary bedrooms into a magical space for children and a calming retreat for their parents. Design and text: Paula Agius-Vadala’ and Katja Abela of Atelier Maison • Photography: George Scintilla

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his project involved two rooms – the main bedroom and its walk-in wardrobe, and a nursery. It may have been only two rooms, but due to the attention to detail that was implemented, a small project ended up being a fairly complex one. When we first saw the main bedroom, it was large and cold, and the walk-in wardrobe was awkward and irregular. There was a large unused fireplace in the corner of the room, and the window overlooking the pool was small and did not allow in much natural light. The nature of the house and the design brief were discussed in much detail with the client. The look and feel that we wanted to achieve was almost ‘French chateau meets high end hotel’, where the client could actually enjoy spending time in the bedroom getting ready for a night out or simply winding down after a busy day of work. Our design was aimed at creating a sanctuary of calmness where the client could relax and escape from the pressures of everyday life. Functionality and aesthetics had to work together to ensure that the space is used efficiently while looking visually stunning and serene.

One of the first design decisions was how to redistribute the space to make the bedroom feel cosy and easier to heat and cool, and to create a well-sized walk-in wardrobe including a dressing area. To gain more space, the design incorporated part of the landing outside the bedroom, which was not being used anyway. A slightly smaller landing meant the design could increase the amount of storage space in the walk-in wardrobe. All the existing soffits were removed to expose the ceiling timber beams. We usually recommend leaving timber beams uncovered. When soffits are installed, you are unable to see any problems that could develop in the timber beams, so it is best to leave them exposed. Removing the soffits helped in adding a little extra height to the room. The gypsum boarding was used to create slender dividers between the walk-in wardrobe and the main bedroom. To make the space look larger, we washed the walls in a light minty gray. The TV unit, which was built in a way to ‘iron out’ the skewed walls and make the room shape look more regular, was also finished in the minty gray. This feature also provided a means of concealing services, including air conditioning, behind the gypsum lining of the TV unit

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he bed is positioned opposite the TV and next to the window which was opened up and turned into a door leading to a balcony. Custom-made panelling above the bed and an upholstered headboard follow similar proportions and colour tones. We considered using wallpaper behind the bed, but were lucky enough to meet Dominique Ciancio, a talented artist, whom we commissioned to design and install the intricate panelling above the bed. The different shades of powder blue, cool gray and white, together with the antique-style carvings which form part of the panelling, crown the bed and give the room a regal feel without overwhelming the design. The bed itself and the chaise longue were custom made using fabrics and muted colours selected to complement the panelling above the bed. A floral pattern in French blue and champagne threads through the runner draped over the bed. The same fabric is used for the curtain that frames the door leading to a balcony. The detailing of the overall design is carried through to the balcony. A contemporary design of leaf-shaped elements was laser cut through a sheet of metal which was then used as the railing of the custom-made balcony. A light fitting integrated in the base of the balcony provides lighting for the pool and outdoor dining area below. Throughout the bedroom and the walk-in wardrobe, the flooring is made up of a black Cardoso stone border surrounding limestone persiano slabs with a brass insert in between. Installing a flooring border disguised the irregularity of the walls, which is typical in this type of dwelling, adding a contemporary classic feel to the rooms.

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T&F INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

T

he biggest design-detailing challenge was in the walk-in wardrobe. The black border throughout the floor area needed to be equally offset from the custom-made wardrobes. The furniture was installed towards the final stages of the re-fit, which meant close team-work between the carpenter and the tile layer. The panelling in the walk-in wardrobe makes the awkwardly shaped space feel larger, more regular and richer. The contemporary colour paired with the classical appearance of the paneling gives the space a timeless feel. Small ivory-looking globes used as handles on the panelled doors and drawers include carved detail. Panelling was introduced in the doors of the wardrobes, the front panels of the drawers and on the cladding around the mirror. The ‘vanity area’ includes his-and-hers vanity units and is surrounded with large light bulbs and detailed carving. The interior of the jewelry showcase was finished by the artist Dominique Ciancio, complementing the panelling in the bedroom. A slender track light runs through the centre of the walk-in wardrobe, and the light fittings hanging from the track appear as though they are floating in mid-air. The space around the one window in the walk-in area was turned into a seating area with a bench below the window decorated with tea velvet cushions. More panelling was introduced to the landing. All internal doors throughout the sleeping quarters of the house were custommade and finished with classic moulding. Patterned glass was carefully selected for some of the doors. Brass handles and locks add to the classic contemporary feel of the space.

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T&F INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

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Photo: Atelier Maison

he nursery across the landing from the bedroom is a long and narrow room which did not get much light and which was awkwardly shaped. The renovation and design of the space had to give it an extended lifespan. Although the client had a young family at the time, the nursery needed to be suitable for eventual use by older children and teenagers. One of the two walls along the length of the room had two alcoves within its thickness. This wall was treated as a ‘light box’ in a design that acts as a night-light for young children and will also work well as a feature in a teenagers’ bedroom. An abstract line drawing of a tree carved out of sheets of marine plywood was then used as a lining over the long wall. Light fittings were installed behind the white lining. When switched on, their light glows through the perforations which form the shape of a tree with leaves and flowers appearing to fall randomly from its branches. The effect is magical. Within this wall lining, the alcove was made use of and hidden doors, which lead to a store cupboard, are incorporated within the wooden sheets. The floor of this room was finished with two different materials to make it feel wider. The half of the room nearest the door is covered in a geometric pattern of blueish-gray textured tiles. The rest of the floor is finished with small solid oak pieces of parquet. Although the project covered just two rooms, it involved much detailing and teamwork to create an enchanting interior. The seamless appearance of the design within the spaces could only be achieved through collaboration and a commitment to the same standard of detailing and precision. n


T&F DESIGN

“The best place to seek God is in a garden” George Bernard Shaw

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SILENT


S P A C E

DESIGN T&F

The Word is a meditation garden created in one of Malta’s noisiest areas. Inspired by scripture, it is home to plants which are mentioned in the Bible and which are indigenous to Malta. Photography: Alan Carville

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DESIGN T&F

Y

ou can be forgiven for missing it completely. The Word is a meditation garden tucked away on the rooftop of a building in one of Malta’s busiest areas. Invisible from street level and in an area crammed with buildings, choked with traffic both motor-driven and human, overhung with tower cranes and other construction paraphernalia, the garden is an oasis of calm. Both openly accessible and yet privately protected, the space welcomes anyone who wants to visit. To reach the meditation garden you must first arrive at WOW’s premises in Paceville, where a notice inside invites you to call at the reception area for an access code. “Ask for J”, this visitor was told. J obligingly walked to the lift, tapped a code into its control panel, and rode the lift to the top floor, pointing the way to the gardens. “To come back down, just press the ground level button,” he said, handing over a leaflet and then leaving discreetly, as one might wish when seeking quiet and solitude.

Set on the rooftops of the WOW premises adjacent to the Augustinian Millennium chapel, The Word is surprisingly serene. Though open to the sky, and within sight of the buildings – and construction cranes – that tower around it, the garden insulates you from the noise and activity in the area. It’s not that you cannot see or hear any of the noise and movement of a neighbourhood buzzing with nightlife. It’s more that the space is small, intimate, and designed to create a feeling of being in nature. Though you can hear the noise outside, you feel protected against it by the invisible cloak of silence that seems to hang over the space, broken only by the recorded sound of chirping birds. The Word consists of two split-level gardens, housing some forty trees and plants indigenous to Malta. They line the external walls of the two garden spaces, each backed by a plaque identifying the plant and quoting scriptural references. Moving from one to the next is a meditative act in itself. Their presentation is uniform, focussing the senses on the natural forms and scents, the sight of green in a concrete jungle soothing to tired eyes.

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Image: Light Design Solutions Ltd.

DESIGN T&F

Project contractors include: Lighting Design Solutions Ltd, HalMann Vella Ltd, Studio 7 Ltd, among others.

The project is the manifestation of horticulturalist Peter Calamatta’s dream of a Biblical garden, housing plants mentioned in the Bible and which are indigenous to Malta. Accompanied by the enthusiasm and vision of Fr Hilary Tagliaferro, the process of the realisation of Calamatta’s dream was in the hands of architect Richard England in collaboration with Duncan Polidano. Cassiciaco, the lower of the two gardens, is named after the Villa of the wealthy Milanese Verecundus, where Augustine met his family and friends for leisure and to meditate, and where he heard the famous words “take and read” which led him to ask Bishop Ambrose to baptise him in the Christian faith. Here you find olive, pomegranate, and fig trees, papyrus, levant cotton, and a date palm, among other species. Hippo, on the higher level, is named after the place now known as Bone (pronounced Boh Neh) in Algeria. It was in the garden of a villa in Hippo that Augustine built a new community of friends, with whom he prayed, and discussed and reflected of religious and social topics. Among the plants in The Word’s Hippo you will find acacia, mulberry and myrtle, sage, lavender and aloe, and Laurus Nobilis, the bay laurel tree.

The two gardens provide multisensory metaphysical prayer spaces to welcome visitors to meditate and pray in paradisiacal ambiances. They are designed specifically as enclaves of serenity and oases of contemplation. In their quiescence and quietude one can escape from the surrounding chaotic Paceville nightlife. Above all, they may be considered as spirit-laden antidotes to today’s secular Mammon-focused world. The gardens include two central metal sculptures by sculptor Noel Attard, ‘The Tree of Knowledge’ and ‘The Tree of Life’. Fashioned in metal, their seemingly harsh and rigid appearance is illusory. The twisted metal branches are hung with pendants that move slowly in the wind, the metal ‘leaves’ chiming as they brush against each other and the branches which support them, a pleasant accompaniment to the sound of chirping birds. The gardens are lit for night-time viewing and provide arenas to enrich the spirit and enhance the soul. They are specifically designed as loci where one can pause, be silent and unspoken to, while measuring oneself against the immeasurable. n

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BIBLE GARDEN LIGHTING Lighting forms an integral part of the atmosphere and experience of The Word. The lighting concept for this garden project came together after the lighting team at Light Design Solutions met with Prof Richard England to get a feeling and understanding of the project, his inspiration for the different elements and his vision for the garden. Since the idea behind this garden was for people to meditate, the lighting had to be subtle. Keeping this in mind the only projected light is found around the tree in the centre of the garden, while the rest of the garden has indirect light. The lighting strips which follow the underside of the benches represent a waterfall feeding four separate canals or ‘rivers’ which lead to the tree in the centre of the garden. The concept for this water or ‘flow of light’ is that since water represents life it gives people a sense of courage to be inspired by God, especially in this meditative space.  www.lds.com.mt

Photos: Alan Carville

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CRAFTED WITH PRIDE

This bitter India Pale Ale is brewed with high quality malt and traditional English hops. It has a strong, fresh character with a pleasant hoppy bitterness balanced out by malty sweetness as well as a rich biscuity taste.

5.7% ABV

Brewed with Passion since 1928


COCKTAILS T&F

F IZZ ING W ITH D ELIGH T

Pétillant-naturel wines are enjoying a renaissance. Add some sparkle to your day with pét-nat cocktails designed by Rodney Pisani, Food & Beverage Manager at Nori at The Villa. Drinks mixed by Daniele Russo, assistant bars manager, and Sdravko Mitev, bar manager. Photography & styling: Brian Grech, assisted by Stephen Azzopardi.

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ne of the oldest methods of producing sparkling wines is enjoying a renaissance. Pétillant-naturel (natural sparkling), known as pét-nat, covers any sparkling wine bottled before its primary fermentation is finished. The méthode ancestrale does not use added yeasts or sugars, unlike the méthode champenoise which is used to make the more famous Champagne and other sparkling wines. The wines produced by the méthode ancestrale have a simpler, more rustic finish. Traditionally, the wines are cloudy rather than clear, as they are unfiltered, and vary according to the time and place of bottling. The bottles are often sealed with a crown cap, much like a beer bottle, rather than with a cork, an unusual style of presentation for wine and one with particular appeal. These are not wines to be reserved for special occasions alone and can be served any time of day.

Pét-nat wines themselves can be red, white or rosé, effusively bubbly or mildly effervescent. They’re lower in alcohol than most still wines and pair beautifully with a wide range of foods. The low alcohol and light fizz make them an ideal day time drink which fits in perfectly at lunchtime. Pét-nat in the USA refers to specific bottle fermented wine and not to a style of drinks, but pét-nat is directly related to slightly fizzy, low alcohol content, carefree drinks - carefree as there is no regional designation or certification of origin. Other pét-nat recipes include coffee tonic and carbonated red wine, ingredients more suitable for the winter time, making the pét-nat drinks versatile enough to be enjoyed during any season. The method of preparation for pét-nat drinks consists of shaking all ingredients (excluding the bubbly wines) over ice and then hawthorn straining (not fine straining) into the pét-nat bottles and topping up with the bubbly ingredient accordingly. All pét-nat drinks here are served in a vintage chalice glass. If you’re serving these drinks at home, use any type of wine glass.

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T&F COCKTAILS

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COCKTAILS T&F

CA SA NOVA 2cl gin 1cl maraschino liqueur 4cl medium dry white wine 2cl fresh pink grapefruit juice Soda to top up.

Shake all the ingredients (except the soda) over ice, hawthorn strain into a bottle and top up with soda.

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T&F COCKTAILS

DEN DR O B IUM

3cl orchid syrup 4cl sake 2cl gin Soda to top up

Shake all the ingredients (except the soda) over ice, hawthorn strain into a bottle and top up with soda.

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T&F COCKTAILS

P ETILL A NT

4cl Shiraz & Cabernet 3cl Yuzu 4 dashes ginger bitters French sparkling white wine

Shake all the ingredients (except the French sparkling wine) over ice, hawthorn strain into a bottle and top up with French sparkling white wine.

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NEW INFINISSIM A

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DESIGNED FOR INFINITE COFFEE PLEASURES

The amazing Origins of our great coffee meet the infinitely stylish InfinissimaTM. Use our Augmented reality to snap it in your kitchen for a chance to win it! To start your AR experience visit our


T&F COCKTAILS

GAR O TA DE IPA NEM A

2cl Cachaça 1cl lychee 1cl fresh lime 2cl strawberry purée Sparkling rosé

Shake all the ingredients (except the sparkling rosé) over ice, hawthorn strain into a bottle and top up with sparkling rosé.

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T&F COCKTAILS

TANG DY NA ST Y

3cl lychee 4cl sake 2cl yuzu Prosecco to top up

Shake all the ingredients (except the Prosecco) over ice, hawthorn strain into a bottle and top up with Prosecco.

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T&F TRENDS

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6. Arrangements – FLOS. Arrangements is a modular system of geometric light elements that can be combined in different ways, creating multiple compositions into individual chandeliers. Each unit simply attaches onto the previous one as if resting, balancing perfectly as a part of a glowing chain. “I have always been fascinated with the parallel that exists between lighting and jewelry. Starting from the simple fact of how each piece relates to human scale: one is designed to be worn on the body whereas the other is made to decorate the space someone occupies,” says designer Michael Anastassiades. Available at Elektra Ltd.

5. 1. LEGACY LANTERNS. Bold contemporary designs in a choice of 5 striking colour combinations make these handmade Legacy Round Lanterns by Mdina Glass such a desirable addition to your indoor or outdoor living. Light them up with a candle of small lights and you will be treated to a wonderful warm ambience. For more information, call on +356 2141 5786, visit www.mdinaglass.com. mt or find Mdina Glass on facebook.com/mdinaglass

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2. TOM’S. A wide selection of unique figurines and decorative objects by the renowned Tom’s Company, available at HENRI Luxury Gift Boutique. The idiosyncratic creations make for ideal, original gift ideas for him… for her… or just for yourself! Outlets: Pjazza Tigné and Mdina (next to Palazzo Falson). Tel: 2010 6306 or facebook/henrimalta

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3. Bath with a view. Londonart has created a wallpaper collection expressly for the surfaces of showers, bathrooms, and the splashbacks behind basins and in kitchens: a decorative experience which goes beyond the usual tactile qualities of a tiled surface. It combines hard-wearing technical features with quality craftsmanship to give a personal touch to the most intimate spaces. Josies Bathroom Centre, Naxxar Road, Lija. Tel: 2141 0685.

4. Why buy an ordinary bed when you can customise your very own to match your style and personality. Enjoy Mattress Collection’s 30-Day Sleep Trial on the most comfortable memory foam mattresses ever made. Beautiful adjustable beds and a range of pillows and sleep accessories. Discover incredibly good sleep. Mattress Collection, Mdina Road, Zebbug, Tel: 2146 1961, Tal Balal Road San, Gwann, Tel: 2146 1962.

5. SCULPTURES. A collection of exclusive handmade glass sculptures by Mdina Glass, ranging from human figures, animals - like this stunning shark - and other objects. Available in various colour combinations, including gold leaf in some sculptures. Check out the options available at the Ta’ Qali outlet. For more information, call +356 2141 5786 or email onlinesales@mdinaglass. com.mt. Follow at facebook.com/mdinaglass

7. NATUZZI launch NEW Collection. Natuzzi don’t just design sofas, they design a complete lifestyle. They create and combine different pieces of furniture that work together in harmony, including bedrooms and dining areas. Thanks to years of experience, Natuzzi knows that comfort is not just about proportions and ergonomics. It also depends on the design of all the elements that make up an area and their ability to form part of a domestic project for a genuine home theatre. The NEW collection is now in store and certainly worth a visit. Natuzzi Store, Valley Road Msida, Tel 2144 6000.

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PROMOTION T&F

EDWARDS LOWELL OPENS MALTA’S FIRST ROLEX BOUTIQUE

Edwards Lowell and Rolex have opened a Rolex Boutique that is the first of its kind in Malta.

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Situated in Republic Street, Valletta, the Edwards Lowell Rolex Boutique features an innovative use of Rolex’s signature aqua pattern and a handcrafted stucco wall with a depiction of Valletta. The new boutique offers professional expertise in an elegant setting, one that promotes a sense of harmony, discretion and intimacy with the brand, which has been setting standards in watchmaking for more than a century. “This is an exciting new chapter in Edwards Lowell’s distinctive history. It is a singular and world-class project that aims to set new standards in Maltese retail and pave the way for future projects,” said Malcolm R. Lowell, Managing Director of Edwards Lowell.

ONE BOUTIQUE, A WHOLE ROLEX WORLD Every element of the interior design features the elegant Rolex aesthetic and radiates the values of the Rolex crown. Excellence, precision and attention to detail  emanate from the careful calibration of colours and patterns in the fittings and furnishings. Sensitive lighting accentuates the beauty of a wide selection of Rolex models in display cases lined with beige leather with bronze trims. A striking emerald aqua floor highlights Rolex’s rich heritage, its wave motif referencing the iconic Oyster, the world’s first waterproof wristwatch. Used as flooring for the first time, the aqua material draws the eye across the boutique towards handcrafted stucco panels that feature a view of Valletta from the sea. The intense green used around the boutique creates accents that harmonise a refreshed colour palette. The space also mixes textures from walnut-brown wood to beige coloured marble and leather, and includes notable marble counters with leather and wood detailing. 8. Quirky Dutch brands now at Form. This year Form have introduced two Dutch brands to their collection, both friendly priced and unique in their own way. Zuiver is an interior label with a large collection of trendy products that will make anyone feel at ease and comfortable in their surroundings. Already a hit in more than sixty countries, the design team constantly creates new designs and products for a contemporary collection that is well known for being on trend, fresh, young and original. They are products that easily blend with any lifestyle. Dutchbone is inspired by global interiors. The design team travel around the world to beautiful places like India, China and Indonesia, looking for the right product inspiration for your home. Warm southern tones inspire the collection. A touch Nomad with a splash of roughness, their products are the precise blend of handcraft and industry, affordable and always expanding.

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T&F TRENDS

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1. Nestlé MILO. A tasty natural malt chocolate drink that can be prepared with hot or cold milk or water. This nutritious beverage is packed with essential vitamins and minerals made from four simple ingredients: milk powder, malt barley, sugar and cocoa. It also contains calcium that is a vital ingredient for strong teeth and bones. For both adults and childen alike who are constantly on the go, Nestlé MILO provides the right recipe for that extra boost of energy and nutrition when it is needed the most. 2. NESCAFÉ Gold Blend. Your coffee break just got more refined, with the new NESCAFÉ Gold Blend. After all, it is more than your average instant coffee – way more. NESCAFÉ Gold Blend contains mountain-grown Arabica coffee that has been carefully roasted to perfection and finely micro-ground, for a richer, flavour-packed gulp. Plus, the revamped NESCAFÉ Gold Blend has been given a new look and taste, and is now available across the Maltese islands in all major retail stores. So go on, try the new NESCAFÉ Gold Blend and make your coffee break that bit more special.

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3. Yeo Valley Family Farm has been farming 1961, when the Mead family first bought the farm in Yeo Valley in Somerset, in the South West of England. Yeo Valley believes in organic farming not only because it produces healthier and more sustainable food, but also because it’s better for the world we live in. Today this is the largest family-owned dairy business in the UK, with 1200 acres of farmland and 420 award-winning British Friesian cows. Supporting family farms is at the heart of the company ethos, which includes buying all extra British milk from other farmer co-operatives. Yeo Valley Family Farm is the UK’s number 1 organic brand. 4. Delicata’s Girgentina Frizzante is a dry sparkler as light and ethereal as a spring day, with delicate effervescent citrus and apple flavours. The winery’s slightly sweeter Ġellewża Frizzante is a wonderful pink aperitif at any time, but makes a special meal even more so with its spritz and uplifting strawberry goodness. www.delicata.com

5. The Phoenix Restaurant, inspired by the grand cafés of Europe, is known for its elegant charm. The carefully crafted menu uses only the finest ingredients thus putting the joy of food at the centre of any dining experience. Here one can bask in the sun out on the Terrace with its sweeping garden views all the way to Marsamxett Harbour. Open for lunch and dinner, The Phoenix Restaurant eagerly awaits your visit. The Phoenicia Malta. Tel: 21225241, dine@phoeniciamalta.com, www.phoeniciamalta.com 6. Malta’s Most Exclusive Club. Crystal chandeliers, parquet floors and antique paintings are only the very beginning of what to expect from this spectacular venue located in the heart of Valletta. Originally built to serve as a treasury for the Knights, the glamorous Casino Maltese still retains most of its original 16th century features. Considered one of our most spectacular indoor locations, this versatile venue offers a number of palatial rooms of various sizes for your event. To view this venue, get in touch at corporate@corinthiacaterers.com

7. This Christmas experience Ta Marija festivities line-up. Awarded for over a decade as the Best Maltese Food Restaurant, Ta’ Marija is ideal to meet up with work colleagues, family or friends to enjoy a festive feast. Combining delicious food and drink with a friendly atmosphere and varied entertainment line-up, Ta” Marija has everything you need for a unique dining experience. All-inclusive extravaganzas at €27.50 per person on Saturdays and Sundays, and Folklore Dinner Shows every Friday and Wednesday. Ta’ Marija, Restaurant, Constitution Road, Mosta. www.tamarija.com, tel: 2143 4444. 8. Farsons Gold Label Pale Ale is an all-malt pale ale brewed using two different types of malt and hopped using a special blend of five different hop varieties, which together give this beer its characteristic and unique hoppy flavour profile. The overall result is an innovative combination of the hoppy basic notes with exclusively fruity characteristics. Dominant hints of apricot, passionfruit and red berries, coupled with a touch of grapefruit, complement a very pleasant malt character with hints of biscuit flavour in the after-taste.


TRENDS T&F

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9. Shop from Sicily with SendOn. SendOn is now operating from the popular Italian island of Sicily. This newly launched hub in Catania offers customers the possibility of shipping their online purchases to Malta within 5/7 working days. MaltaPost has introduced a pick-up service within its SendOn brand. SendOn Pick up offers buyers the possibility of purchasing products from retailers in Catania which do not offer a delivery service or charge premium prices for delivery. Visit www.maltapost.com/sendon for more information. 10. Introducing the NEW INFINISSIMA from NESCAFÉ Dolce Gusto. A good coffee is a little luxury that makes each day better, so why not share the love with a special person? The new Infinissima is surely a gift that they will love throughout the year. It’s perfect for the coffee connoisseur who appreciates amazing coffee origins and cannot live without our bold espressos, creamy lattes, frothy cappuccinos as well as heart-warming teas, indulgent hot chocolates and even iced cappuccino – all at the touch of a button.

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11. Simonsig Merindol Syrah. This terroir-driven Syrah from South Africa has a rich, velvet red colour boasting a masculine perfume with a white pepper and cinnamon twist. On the palate it exudes decadent layers of black forest chocolate cake, while tailored tannins capture the aroma of black fruit with hints of liquorice. Trade Enquiries: Attard & Co. Food Ltd. Tel: 2123 7555, facebook.com/attardcowines 12. Made exclusively from Malta-grown Vermentino grapes, Meridiana’s ASTARTE DOK has a straw yellow colour and is characterised by intense aromas of tropical and citrus fruit with hints of flowers. The palate is fresh with a pleasantly acidic finish. Distributed by S Rausi Trading Ltd, Gzira Tel: 2133 0447, 7909 3197, info@srausi.com www.meridiana.com.mt 13. Ferrari is Italy’s leading producer of Metodo Classico. Each Ferrari Metodo Classico undergoes a secondary bottle-fermentation in accordance with the regulations of Trento D.O.C. This is similar to the technique used by the finest Champagne houses, but profoundly Italian in craftsmanship. Its flavour is clean, restrained and wellbalanced, with a delicate and appealing background of ripe fruit - an intense, fresh and persistent bouquet, with broad fruity notes of ripe golden delicious apples and wild flowers. Distributed by Red October Co. Ltd., Facebook: RedOctoberMalta, www.redoctobermalta.com

14. Yogikids Yogurt Banana with Strawberry Flavour. Children need a variety of nutritious foods and regular exercise to stay healthy. Staying healthy is also essential for your child’s happiness. Yogikids is designed for children from one year of age. Special care has been taken in developing a nutritious and delicious healthy snack for your growing child with a good source of calcium which promotes the growth and development of bones and teeth. www.facebook.com/PascualMalta 15. Divini Ravjul. Divini brings wholesome, genuine products to Maltese households. Handmade in Gozo from fresh ingredients and traditional recipes, yet supplied in latest technology, high convenience packaging, Divini products are a wonderful fusion of the old and the new. Divini Ravjul come in two varieties – Irkotta and Irkotta with Parsley. Each ravioli packet contains two separate pouches of traditional tomato and garlic sauce (Zalza tal-Kunserva) which are conveniently portioned and packed in “boil-in bags”. Simply prepare a pot of boiling water and have a delightful meal ready in just a few minutes.

16. Discover the benefits and nutritional properties of La Molisana Integrale - whole wheat, unrefined pasta. Made from 100 % Durum whole wheat semolina, naturally rich in fibre, it contains more vitamins and minerals and over 14% protein content. This pasta stands up very well to cooking and is easy to digest. Trade Enquiries: Attard & Co. Food Ltd, tel: 2123 7555, facebook.com/attardcowines 17. Maldon Salt, available in natural and also smoked comes in packs and tubs of 1.5kg, which are ideal for catering establishments such as hotels and restaurants. Maldon Salt in packets available from leading supermarkets. Trade Enquiries: 2158 1109

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T&F PLANTS

NEPENTHACEAE Nepenthes (tropical pitcher plants) is a genus comprising 170 species originating from the “Old World” tropics. Many are from hot and humid lowland areas, but most withstand warm days and cold humid nights. Carl Linnaeus, the Swedish botanist who formalised the modern system of naming organisms, first published the genus name Nepenthes in 1737 in his Hortus Cliffortianus. The entry for Nepenthes references a passage in Homer’s Odyssey in which an Egyptian queen gives Helen the potion “Nepenthes pharmakon”. Literally, the name translates as “without grief”. In Greek mythology, Nepenthe soothes all sorrow and eases forgetfulness. As Linnaeus said of Nepenthes: If this is not Helen’s Nepenthes, it certainly will be for all botanists. What botanist would not be filled with admiration if, after a long journey, he should find this wonderful plant. In his astonishment past ills would be forgotten when beholding this admirable work of the Creator!

The next issue of will be out on 4th November 2018 with The Malta Independent on Sunday.

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For advertising, contact Sean Ellul on +356 7921 0705 or 21 345 888 ext 123 sellul@independent.com.mt


FP A4 Advert [VENUE]_taste&flair_325x235_OUTPUT.pdf

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AN ISLAND OF TREASURES THERE’S MUCH MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE

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Malta offers a myriad of hidden treasures, and our venues are a testimony to this. Corinthia Caterers offers a selection of exclusive and non-exclusive venues for weddings and events. Impressive and oozing charm, our venues will serve as stunning backdrops for your next memorable event. Whatever your style of event, you can trust us to serve cuisine of exquisite taste. OUR EXCLUSIVE VENUES CASINO MALTESE | CASTELLO ZAMITTELLO | LIMESTONE HERITAGE | SALUTING BATTERY | VILLA BOLOGNA

EXCEPTIONAL EVENTS T +356 2144 8800 INFO@CORINTHIACATERERS.COM CORINTHIACATERERS.COM


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TASTE&FLAIR OCTOBER 2018  

IT'S THE OCTOBER ISSUE OF TASTE&FLAIR! In this issue > Indian cooking, Bella Sicilia, olive harvest, hearty autumn cooking, memories of a ch...

TASTE&FLAIR OCTOBER 2018  

IT'S THE OCTOBER ISSUE OF TASTE&FLAIR! In this issue > Indian cooking, Bella Sicilia, olive harvest, hearty autumn cooking, memories of a ch...

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