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Rotted ends of the China's deckbeams and missing sections of the starboard bulkhead are being worked on here.

Exposed structure of the after bulkhead.

set within the side walls at the corner posts, has made the structure sound and square. As removed paint exposed rotted wood, it was cut out, and along with any damaged sections, was replaced with artfully spliced-in new wood. New panels have been made for the missing section of the east wall, and that whole restored wall will be in place by April. Many layers of paint are being stripped from the interior walls to again reveal the delicate capitals of the walnut pilasters between the panels, and on those panels, some thirty different patterns of intricate mouldings and trim. Of the eighty clerestory and main windows, twenty of the originals with etched glass and walnut frames remain. New ones with frames and hand etched, floral designs to match the originals are being made, and repairs to existing windows plus installation of the new ones comes to some $300. each . These, together with the main exterior wall panels, are scheduled for installed completion by early April of this year. Besides the saloon itself, there were two "staterooms" at the original forward end of the salvaged structure. These are being rebuilt, the one which was the Chief Engineer's room will now house all servicing facilities including the toilet, while the other, which was for the ship's surgeon, will be restored as a ship's dispensary of the period with typical medical equipment of the nineteenth century. Already donated is the kit of Dr. B.H. Baumeister, class of 1882, University of California Medical School at San Francisco, and Dr. Gert Brieger, Chairman of the Dept. of History of Medical Sciences, U.C., S.F., is Technical Advisor for that restoration. Since China ran before the days of electricity-and to reduce the fire hazard-the soft, warm glow of oil lamps will be more or less simulated by indirect electric lights . SEA HISTORY, SUMMER 1981

The question of what to do with the hole in the roof for the main mast brought up several suggestions besides recreating the visual aspect of a large mast in the middle of the room. From making it a skylight to making a small hanging plant solarium to the final decision of covering the hole and putting in a hanging lighting fixture . Considering the future use of the room, a four foot diameter "mast" was thought to take up too much space. For installation around the perimeter Karl Kortum has loaned an iron rail stanchion of the period for copying. A mold and castings have been made, and are now in work so an authentic hand rail to suit the China's saloon can be installed. But much is still to be done before completion. Plumbing and wiring have to be installed before restoration can be completed and the interior finished. A grant of $62,500 from the National Trust, with matching funds from the Society, will cover only structural repairs, exterior restoration and electrical work. The estimated cost to complete the interior is $225,000, to be raised by the Society. This will include the cost of making molds and casting sections to repair damaged or replace missing parts of the decorative trim, which is estimated at$75,000. All this intricate trim was originally gilded, and redoing this with gold leaf is estimated at some $30,000, half of which would be for labor. While all this expense and work will put the physical structure back toward its original condition, fine details and information is still desired-and required-to complete all the "nitpiCkfo'" minutiae. Some good material has already come to light, but still wanted are any sort of photographs, diaries, letters or other data on S/ S China and her Social Saloon. From such records, the Society can learn how the

room was furnished, and get on with the next hard part of acquiring by gift or purchase, the proper chairs, tables, sofas and other equipment for the passengers' pleasure and comfort on a 20 day passage across the Pacific Ocean in the 1880s. While the exterior of the building is easily seen from boats in the water or from Beach Road, anyone wishing to visit the interior should make arrangements with the Landmarks Society beforehand. And whether or not you make a pilgrimage to Belvedere to see this authentic restoration, donations (which are tax deductible) in any amount are not only necessary to carry on the work, but are most welcome and greatly appreciated. If in the amount of $500 or more, the donor's name will be inscribed on a permanent plaque displayed in the saloon, and donors of $100 or more will receive, along with a note of thanks, a limited edition reproduction of an original lithograph of the vessel. The address for all communications is: Belvedere-Tiburon Landmarks Society, P.O. Box 134, Belvedere-Tiburon, California, 94920.

Philip Molten, a resident of Tiburon, Ca., is a member of the Board of Directors of the Belvedere-Tiburon Landmarks Society, a member of the China Cabin Committee, serving as Curator of Collections. Robert Herbert, a resident of East Northport, N. Y., is a retired mariner ofsail and steam, with experience in ship design and construction, and latterly in heavy building design and construction, and is a Member of the Advisory Committee ofthe National Maritime Historical Society. 21

Sea History 021 - Summer 1981  

7 WE COULD DO NO LESS: JOHN M. WILL REMEMBERED • 12 TOWING IN TIME WITH McALLISTER, Oswald L. Brett • 18 A MATTER OF RESTORATION: THE CHINA...

Sea History 021 - Summer 1981  

7 WE COULD DO NO LESS: JOHN M. WILL REMEMBERED • 12 TOWING IN TIME WITH McALLISTER, Oswald L. Brett • 18 A MATTER OF RESTORATION: THE CHINA...

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