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A CENTURY OF CELEBRATING

Special

CENTENNIAL

SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL


Dear Friends,

You made the San Diego Zoo’s 100th birthday unbelievably special in

2016! We all came together—our donors, members, guests, and staff—to

celebrate the Zoo’s centennial year. There was a spectacular public event

on May 14 in Balboa Park, where thousands of San Diegans joined us in the

festivities, and Mayor Faulconer proclaimed 2016 the “San Diego Zoo Year.” And remembering the lion's roar from 1916, we rededicated the Zoo to the children of the world.

Thanks to you, our organization has truly become much more than

a zoo over the past century. San Diego Zoo Global is now home to the

world's finest science-based conservation center, which is supported by

two trusted and renowned sanctuaries, the Zoo and Safari Park. We know we have the science and the dedication to save endangered species, but

most of all we have you, our loyal friends. Thank you for your passion and support as we lead the fight to end extinction. Sincerely yours,

Robert B. Horsman Chair, Board of Trustees

Richard M. Hills Chair, Foundation Board of Directors


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Mammal news FROM THE s a fa r i pa r k C e l e b r at i n g c o n s e r vat i o n

Mammal news FROM THE sa n d i eg o zo o

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San Diego Zoo

Safe haven for more than 3,700 rare and endangered animals representing approximately 660 species and subspecies. Prominent botanical collection that includes more than 25,000 species and approximately 700,000 plants on grounds. An accredited museum: 8 accredited plant collections as well as an accredited library and photo archive and the world’s largest accredited wildlife tissue archive. The San Diego Zoo was voted #1 zoo in the world.

San Diego Zoo Safari Park

1,800-acre wildlife sanctuary for many of the Earth’s rarest animals that roam in expansive habitats. Home to more than 3,000 animals representing nearly 300 species and subspecies. 4

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SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL IS COMMITTED TO LEADING The FIGHT AGAINST EXTINCTION.

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s t h e wo r ld ’s p re m i e r, n o n p ro f i t z o o l o g i c a l organization, we a re a t t h e ve r y top of our field, with conservation efforts around the world.

Renowned botanical collection includes 3,500 species and 1.7+ million plants on grounds, including 3 accredited collections: Baja Garden, Conifer Arboretum, and California Nativescapes Garden. Unique adventure-oriented experiences.

San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research

The team works on more than 140 local, regional, and global projects in nearly 35 countries on 6 continents. Helped reintroduce more than 14,000 individuals belonging to 43 species back to the wild. The Institute is the leading innovator in applying conservation science to endangered species recovery. The team works with more than 300 conservation partners to bring endangered species back from the brink of extinction.

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Home base is the 50,000square-foot Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center for Conservation Research, located near the Safari Park entrance. The Beckman Center is one of the largest, most comprehensive, and best-equipped conservation science centers in the world.

One of the largest zoo-based, multidisciplinary conservation science teams in the world.

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A Year to Remember

an Diego Zoo Global’s centennial year was a time to look back at 100 remarkable years. We remembered how the Zoo grew from a motley collection of cages along Park Boulevard, to a nationally respected zoo, to a forward-looking organization with three world-class facilities, to a conservation organization known worldwide for gold-standard animal care and conservation science expertise. In 2016 we committed to our vision of leading the fight against extinction.

THIS YEAR WAS ONE FOR THE HISTORY BOOKS AT SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL, AS WE CELEBRATED OUR CENTENNIAL BIRTHDAY AND PAID TRIBUTE TO A CENTURY OF ANIMAL CARE AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION.

Visit endextinction.org

1 9 1 6 - 1 9 2 6 Beginnings 1916

San Diego Zoo begins with animals left over from 19151916 PanamaCalifornia Expo.

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Ellen Browning Scripps, the Zoo’s major benefactor in the early days.

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n May 14, 2016, San Diego Zoo Global welcomed more than 15,000 San Diegans to a musical and theatrical extravaganza in Balboa Park's Spreckels Organ Pavilion, featuring larger-than-life puppets created just for the event.

Party on the Plaza

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or our centennial year, the Zoo’s Wegeforth Bowl was remodeled and a brand-new show premiered. It opened with a lively film counting down 10 reasons to celebrate the San Diego Zoo’s 100th birthday. Guests were invited to join the Zoo’s costumed characters at a gigantic birthday cake stage on Centennial Plaza, where kids sang a chorus of “You Belong in the Zoo.”

1 9 2 7 - 1 9 3 6 Tenacity

Dr. Harry rode one of our first elephants to the Zoo when they arrived by train.

1927

The Zoo’s first buses brought children to the Zoo for field trips.

A Spectacular Centennial Community Celebration

1928

Sea lion shows first took place, with trainer Captain Jensen.

First hired as a bookkeeper, Belle Benchley became the Zoo’s director in 1927.

1937

Puddles the hippo drew big crowds during WWII.

1 9 3 7 - 1 9 4 6 War Years Zookeeper Howard Lee was the first to be called up for the WWII draft.

1 9 4 7 - 1 9 5 6 Growth 1951

King Tut the salmon-crested cockatoo became the official Zoo greeter.

Sally, the Zoo's first rhino, arrived in 1952.

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The Zoo’s first woman zookeeper was Georgia Dittoe.

Gorillas Albert, Bouba, and Bata arrived and were hand raised.

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e also partnered with the San Diego History Center to create their exhibition, “The Lore Behind the Roar.” This one-of-a-kind experience was filled with rare historical objects from the Zoo and Safari Park, photos, multimedia exhibits, and interactive elements.

he Spreckels Organ Pavilion stage, lit up with special effects, had a gorgeous series of projected images as a backdrop. Giant puppets—including Prince the lion at 11 feet tall and 15 feet long—were accompanied by operators and dancers and wowed the audience.

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e created an extensive website, “100 Years of the San Diego Zoo,” that chronicled the animals, people, events, struggles, and successes with historical photos and facts from each of our 100 years. sandiegozoo100.org

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efore the official program began, 508 enthusiastic participants helped San Diego Zoo Global set a record for the most people putting on a puppet show at the same time, officiated and authorized by Guinness World Records.

1 9 5 7 - 1 9 6 6 Innovation

1972

First Galápagos tortoise hatching in 1958 was big news!

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The innovative Children’s Zoo opened in June.

1 9 6 7 - 1 9 7 6 New Era

The San Diego Wild Animal Park opened in May, 30 miles northeast of the Zoo.

Joan Embery made her first appearance on “The Tonight Show” with host Johnny Carson in 1971.

1 9 7 7 - 1 9 8 6 Conservation 1978

Endangered Arabian oryx were bred here, then reintroduced to Oman.

1 9 8 7 - 1 9 9 6 Expansion

Arusha the cheetah and Anna the golden retriever became the Zoo’s first animal ambassadors in 1981.

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Alvila, the Zoo’s first gorilla birth, made headlines and was raised in our nursery.

Caption: The Spreckels Organ Pavilion stage, lit up with special effects, had a gorgeous series of projected images as a back-

drop. Broadway star Heather Headley wowed the audience with an inspiring song, and 508 participants helped San Diego Zoo Global set a record for the most people

In 1975, our research arm was created by Dr. Kurt Benirschke, who began the Frozen Zoo®.

Sisquoc was the first endangered California condor to hatch at the Zoo.

1987

Last condor in the wild, AC9, is brought to the Park for a breeding program to save the species.

Karen the orangutan has openheart surgery that saves her life.

1993

Zoo begins working with partners to save endangered Hawaiian birds.

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Big Dreams, Bigger Hopes

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an Diego Zoo Global was created from one man’s dream when Dr. Harry persuaded San Diegans that they needed a zoo, and his wish came true. The Zoo quickly became “world famous” with its innovative moated exhibits and species rarely seen in zoos, like koalas and gorillas. Over the decades, we celebrated with many stories of hope as endangered species were born at the Zoo and thrived, all leading to our vision to lead the fight to end extinction.

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We celebrated this year when giant pandas were downlisted from Endangered to Vulnerable. For more than 20 years, our research team has worked with Chinese colleagues to save this endearing bear. Now their population is growing, doubling to nearly 2,400, and more than 60 protected reserves have been set aside in China. The giant panda’s story is one of hope!

1 9 9 7 - 2 0 0 6 Vision

1999

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Bai Yun gives birth to first giant panda cub in U.S. that survives.

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Seven African elephants saved from culling in Swaziland came to the Wild Animal Park.

2011

We launched the Wildlife Conservancy to support worldwide conservation projects.

Saving a local endangered species, mountain yellow-legged frogs, began in 2006.

San Diego Zoo Global created San Diego Zoo Kids, a hospital TV channel, to help kids heal.

2015

Nola the northern white rhino, one of only 4 left in the world, called attention to the poaching crisis.

am filled with optimism at all that was accomplished in 2016 to ensure a brighter future for endangered species worldwide. With San Diego Zoo Global’s bold vision to lead the fight against extinction, our scientists, veterinary professionals, educators, and plant and animal care staff are integrating our passion and expertise to address complex challenges. We are grateful to the valuable network of supporters and partners who help us make a difference for so many species, such as rhinos, Tasmanian devils, and Hawaii’s forest birds, all reminders of what can be accomplished when we work together on behalf of wildlife. –Allison Alberts, Ph.D., Chief Conservation and Research Officer

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MADAGASCAR Aye-aye Diademed sifaka Indri SAHARA DESERT REGION Addax SOUTHERN AFRICA African elephant African penguin Black-footed cat White rhinoceros

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COLOMBIA Andean condor ECUADOR (GALÁPAGOS ISLANDS) Mangrove finch Pink land iguana PERU/AMAZON REGION Andean bear Paca Giant otter Jaguar Uakari White-lipped peccary Woolly monkey

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California condor Peninsular pronghorn Vaquita YELL OW-LEGG CANADA IA N E T O RTO IS Polar bear S E RT E DE COLORADO Canada Boreal toad TUS W REN CAC MOJAVE DESERT Desert tortoise SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Burrowing owl R OC K IGU F O R NI A C O N DO ADA A ALI Cactus wren EG California condor Kangaroo rats Least tern Light-footed Ridgway’s rail Mojave Desert Mexican flannelbush Riverside County, CA Mountain yellow-legged San Diego County, CA Kauai, HI Sonora, Mexico frog Maui, HI - B I L L E D PA R R Orcutt’s bird’s-beak Baja California, Mexico Andros Island, The Bahamas IH C K Big Island, HI Turks & Caicos Islands Otay tarplant Cayman Islands Anegada Pacific pocket mouse Jamaica H O RN S H E E P Patch-nosed snake B IG Quino checkerspot butterfly Colombia Ringtail Salt marsh bird’s-beak Ecuador San Clemente Galápagos loggerhead shrike Islands Peru/Amazon U I PA R R O T B I L L San Diego ambrosia Region MA San Diego thornmint Short-leaved dudleya ‘A L A L A Snowy plover T OTTE R G IA N Tecate cypress N B A EAR E Western pond turtle AND Willowy monardella WYOMING Black-footed ferret

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BOTSWANA Cheetah CAMEROON Chimpanzee Drill Forest elephant Western lowland gorilla DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO Bonobo Okapi KENYA African elephant African lion Black rhinoceros Grevy’s zebra Hirola antelope Leopard Reticulated giraffe Vultures

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BHUTAN White-bellied heron CAMBODIA Sun bear CHINA Chinese pheasants Dhole Giant panda Giant softshell turtle Guizhou snub-nosed monkey HIMALAYAS Snow leopard Western red panda INDIA Greater one-horned rhinoceros Sloth bear INDONESIA Gibbon Orangutan Sumatran tiger KAZAKHSTAN Przewalski’s horse THAILAND Asian hornbills VIETNAM & LAOS Douc & Francois langurs Saola ox Tonkin snub-nosed monkey

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FIJI Fiji iguana GUAM Mariana crow PALAU Micronesian cycads Orchids PHILIPPINES Visayan warty pig 13


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Developed new techniques at the Nikita Kahn Rhino Rescue Center to save critically endangered northern white rhinos.

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Joined the Cheetah Breeding Coalition to save the world’s fastest land animal from extinction.

Thanks to your help

Bred more than 60 Panamanian golden frogs, which have been extinct in the wild for 10 years.

Celebrated the successful recovery of the California condor—once on the brink of extinction.

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Began release program for 'alala, which have been extinct in the wild since 2002.

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was our year 2016 best ever.Your support made it possible to protect and save countless species around the world!

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After the rediscovery of a lost species, the Lord Howe Island stick insect—we hatched and cared for 92 nymphs!

Raised and prepared endangered mangrove finches for release in the Galápagos Islands.

Supported communitybased lion conservation with our Kenyan partners, Ewaso Lions and the Northern Rangelands Trust, to reduce human-lion conflicts.

Helped a community-owned elephant orphanage in Kenya rehabilitate orphaned elephants and introduce them to new herds.

Provided artificial nest boxes for penguin families, hand raised chicks from egg to release, and around-the-clock care for injured penguins. 15


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Zoohackathon: Calling All Programmers and Designers!

Still Tracking Koalas

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oalas are a flagship species for Australian conservation and one we have focused on for years, both in San Diego and in native habitat. In 2016, we joined a field study in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area

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during koala breeding season, deploying GPS collars to track koalas and performing health checks. Once researchers know which areas koalas prefer, they plan reintroduction programs where numbers are declining.

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hen 40 technology experts gathered at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, they were on a weekend mission to help conservationists. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums partnered with the

U.S. Department of State to develop tools to end the cycle of selling wildlife products. The winning project was WildTrack, an app that lets the public alert authorities to trafficking activities as they occur.

Protecting Where Polar Bears Roam

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e’re partnering with Northrop Grumman Aerospace to build and test an autonomous system to track polar bears and see what they need to survive in a rapidly changing Arctic. A team of 10 scientists successfully tested the system in Churchill, Canada, launching and landing it on ice. Our team plans to further develop these systems for future projects in remote settings—the possibilities are endless.

Even in the high Arctic, human activities that include icebreakers and oil drilling can disturb mothers and cubs. In the Svalbard Archipelago, we’re monitoring maternal dens with cameras to see how young polar bear families cope with noise.

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species raised at our Institute, in Hawaii, and in the Caribbean. These species, regardless of size, are critical, keystone species for their ecosystem and essential to their habitats' survival.

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2016 was a record year for releases of critically endangered

Pacific Pocket Mouse: Making History

Jaguars are identified by their unique spot pattern, so individuals can be tracked over time to note movements and survival rates.

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he Amazon is a region where collecting data on elusive animals like jaguars and monkeys is challenging. We teamed up with Rainforest Expeditions in Peru on a research initiative, AmazonCam Tambopata, installing “The Big Grid,” a trail system over hundreds of square kilometers of rain forest along the Tambopata River. Now we have access to remote areas with 200+ camera traps on the ground and in trees. For the next five years, these observations will reveal unique information.

Camera Trap Image

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nown affectionately as PPMs, this smallest North American mouse was declared extinct in the 1980s, then rediscovered in 1993. Back in 2012, our scientists began a breeding program with 30 adult mice, and this year they were able to release 50 in a protected coastal reserve north of San Diego, where our team monitors them closely with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) staff.

Puaiohi: Bittersweet Success Succes

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ur Hawaii Endangered Bird Conservation team on Kauai is ecstatic when a breeding program for an endangered species is successful and the birds are all released—but they also miss seeing them every day! The USFWS notes that “the puaiohi is an example of how strong partnerships in Hawaii’s conservation community and lots of hard work can change the outlook for a species.” Today’s wild population is close to 500 birds, with 240 puaiohi released since 1999.

Frozen Zoo®: 1,000 Species and Counting!

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everal new species were added to the Frozen Zoo® by the Conservation Genetics team in 2016, the first of which was a humpback whale. Next, living cell lines from 28 additional species were added, including the critically endangered flat-tailed spider tortoise, Andean condor, Gila monster, and Mojave rattlesnake. The final tally: 270+ living cell lines frozen this year!

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Jamaican Iguana: Road to Recovery

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ndangered species recovery programs aren’t quick fixes. It took 25 years to protect, breed, and reintroduce this iguana to its native habitat. Thought to be extinct in the 1940s, a tiny population was discovered in 1990. With guidance from San Diego Zoo Global, our partners hand raised and released 315 iguanas. In San Diego, an assurance population thrives at the Griffin Reptile Conservation Center.

CONSERVATION CONSERVATION PARTNERSHIPS: Taronga Conservation Society Australia Cameron Kerr, Director and CEO, Taronga Zoo and Taronga Eastern Plains Zoo

Working with Supercomputer Gordon

Supercomputer Gordon

Mountain Yellow-legged Frogs: Banner Year

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rom just 80 tadpoles rescued by the U.S. Geological Survey 10 years ago and brought to the Institute, our team

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has bred thousands—and this year we released almost 1,200+ tadpoles and 160+ froglets back into their mountain homes northeast of San Diego. We hope the 2017 breeding season surpasses this one.

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ince the Guam kingfisher is extinct in the wild, we hope to learn how disease infects it. By aligning massive DNA sequences from avian mycobacteriosis using Gordon—a supercomputer housed at UCSD—our Wildlife Investigations team will see if the birds are transmitting the disease or acquiring it from soil and water. This will help save the species, thanks to Gordon.

MEDALISTS 2016

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an Diego Zoo Global fosters a deep commitment to saving wildlife that extends to partnerships with other zoos and conservation organizations. Two zoos that have been our closest partners are in Australia: Zoos Victoria in Melbourne and Conservation-In-Action Taronga Zoo in Sydney. We were Award honored to award them our 2016 Conservation Michael Chase,Partners Medal, Ph.D., Founder, recognizing their unique strengths Elephants in collaborating with organizations Without worldwide as well as maintaining Borders the highest standards in animal

welfare. Together, we are helping save endangered species from extinction.

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s the San Diego Zoo celebrated its centennial, we also celebrated our sister zoo’s 100th year: the Zoo was founded on October 2, 1916, and Taronga Zoo opened on October 7, 1916. Our close ties date to 1925, when they sent us our first koalas, Snugglepot and Cuddlepie. This began a friendship that is still as strong as ever. Taronga Zoo supports scientists working on nutrition, behavior, reproductive sciences, and animal health and welfare. Their conservation mission is clear:“Our cause is the wild. We believe that we all, humankind and animals, have a future together.

“Our cause is the wild.”

We believe in a world that we can share, a world where all our wild species can make a comeback.

L e a d i n g t h e way t o e n d e x t i n c t i o n And we believe that for this future to become a reality, one species must lead us there . . . ours.”

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difference. She says that “we are conservation organizations based at zoos, not simply zoos.” Their mission is to “galvanize communities to commit to conservation and wild places,” and their slogan is “Fighting Extinction!” With a robust research program spanning more than 50 projects, their team works in the field and partners with organizations worldwide.

ur long association with the Melbourne Zoo began in 1949, and we still maintain a close relationship today. With its three campuses, Zoos Victoria’s programs include conservation, animal welfare, Zoos Victoria education, Jenny Gray, Ph.D., veterinary care, CEO, Melbourne Zoo, Werribee Open Range and research. Zoo, and Healesville Dr. Jenny Gray Sanctuary believes that zoos offer two unique capabilities: skills and resources to care for and breed animals, and millions of visitors who absorb messages about how they can make a

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brought more than 5 million visitors to the Zoo and Safari Park, giving guests unique opportunities to connect with wildlife. Nothing exemplifies this more than the story of Nola and our efforts to save northern white rhinos. Her legacy inspired people everywhere to join our cause and invest in our dreams for the Nikita Kahn Rhino Rescue Center. At San Diego Zoo Global, we

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extinction each day!

Roaring Forward

The Centennial Campaign for San Diego Zoo Global

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s San Diego Zoo Global celebrates its first 100 years, we are approaching the end of our largest fund-raising campaign in our history. The goal is to raise $400 million by the close of 2017, supporting our vision to lead the fight to end extinction—and we have already surpassed $341 million! To learn more, please visit

roaringforward.org.

City of San Diego Proclamation Honors San Diego Zoo Centennial

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n May 1, Mayor Kevin Faulconer declared that 2016 was “San Diego Zoo Year” in our city, in honor of the Zoo’s centennial.

Dickinson Family Lifelong Learning Center

Association of Zoos & Aquariums Marlin Perkins Award: Charles Bieler Accepts Honor

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s Director Emeritus and our 2014 Conservation Medal Advocate, Charles Bieler’s zoo career spans 40+ years. He advanced the role of zoos to become conservation leaders and built partnerships worldwide. Chuck oversaw the Wild Animal Park’s opening and led efforts to create the Institute for Conservation Research. This award is for “his progressive leadership that made an invaluable mark on the zoological profession.” Chuck still inspires us with his passion to save the world’s wildlife.

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hanks to the Donald C. and Elizabeth M. Dickinson Foundation, we expanded classrooms, renovated our auditorium— where many of our education classes are held—and created new courtyard gardens in the ADA-accessible Dickinson Family Lifelong Learning Center. It’s our

education headquarters, with 40 educators and 100+ innovative programs, and it welcomes 250,000 students annually, including new generations of learners. We hope it continues to be a place that inspires future conservationists as they discover a deep appreciation for the natural world.

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A Sanctuary for Conservation

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Our generous donor, Nikita Kahn, meets her namesake.

Six Big Beauties

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ikita, Livia, Victoria, Wallis, Helene, and Amani are making themselves right at home at the state-of-the-art Nikita Kahn Rhino Rescue Center. As the future of rhino conservation, this special group of southern white rhinos will serve as surrogate mothers in our recovery efforts to save the most critically endangered animal on Earth—the northern white rhino.

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Ultrasounds for Rhinos

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ith an animal as large as a southern white rhino, coaxing it to stand still for a pregnancy ultrasound takes patience. Safari Park keepers and our Reproductive Sciences team began working with the six females as soon as they arrived at the Nikita Kahn Rhino Rescue Center last November. Within a few months, they were trained to stand comfortably in a chute for a regular ultrasound, letting us determine if they are ovulating after hormone therapy. With artificial insemination as the next step, we hope the surrogacy program to save the northern white rhino will succeed with help from their southern white cousins.

he Nikita Kahn Rhino Rescue Center at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park officially opened on May 18, 2016. At this one-of-a-kind safe haven, San Diego Zoo Global scientists, veterinarians, and animal care staff are joining partners worldwide to discover alternative methods of assisted reproduction and create the cutting-edge technology that will be nec-

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essary to save the northern white rhino from extinction. Many of the techniques we are developing have never been attempted. But as an organization on the forefront of saving species, we know that with the generous support of friends like you, we can save these iconic animals from the brink of extinction. Visit endextinction.org/rhinos.

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n September 8, dozens looked on at the Safari Park as more than $1 million worth of confiscated rhino horn was destroyed in the first-ever rhino horn burn in the U.S. Joined by our conservation partners—the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and U.S. Department of State—it was a strong message to consumers and poachers that wildlife trafficking won’t be tolerated. We are determined to end the relentless and senseless killing of rhinos, because only a rhino needs a rhino horn.

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Seeing Red . . . Ruffed, That Is

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xcitement was in the air on May 18 when Morticia, a red-ruffed lemur, gave birth to her first baby— and the first red-ruffed lemur born at the Zoo in 13 years! For a week after his birth, keepers took daily weights on the little male, to make sure he was growing and gaining weight. Morticia was willing to let keepers “borrow” him in exchange for some of her favorite fruits. But she is also an excellent mother, eager to get him back.

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ith close to 4,000 animals in our care from hundreds of species, we always anticipate births at any time of year. From keeper staff to nutrition specialists and veterinary teams, everyone is prepared each day to help newborns thrive.

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here was much excitement at the Zoo when a tiny Speke’s gazelle was born on May 16, a rare birth in zoos of an extremely endangered species. Native to northeastern Africa, these gazelles are threatened by drought and decreasing habitat and food sources.

Two tiny Sulawesi babirusa piglets made news on September 6: they were the Zoo’s first-ever birth of this species!

A Victorious Arrival

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nimal care staff kept a close eye on Kesi, a female mandrill, because she was due to give birth. When they came in to work on November 28, there was a wonderful surprise: Kesi walked out of her bedroom holding her newborn baby boy! She came in so quietly, keepers said, just like a typical morning, but she

just happened to have a baby with her. Ajani, whose name means “victorious,” was the first mandrill born at the Zoo in more than 14 years, and everyone is thrilled watching first-time parents Kesi and Jasper caring for him. Ajani’s birth was a welcome addition to the Species Survival Plan (SSP) that San Diego Zoo Global participates in for mandrills.

San Diego Zoo Global partners with Save the Tasmanian Devil Program in Tasmania and collaborates with research institutes and zoos around the world to save this unique marsupial species.

Playful Piglets Fixing a Tasmanian Devil’s Ticker

W

hen Nick, a Tasmanian devil at the Conrad Prebys Australian Outback, was diagnosed with an abnormal heart rhythm, Zoo veterinarians stepped up to help him out. They consulted with a veterinary cardiologist from the University of

California, Davis, and decided to improve Nick’s quality of life by surgically implanting a pacemaker to regulate his heartbeat. This would be only the second time this procedure has been performed on a Tasmanian devil. Happily, Nick made a full recovery and is now back in his 27 Zoo home.


Along for the Ride

C

onsuelo, a Linné’s two-toed sloth in The Harry and Grace Steele Elephant Odyssey, gave birth to her second baby on October 12. Baby sloths cling to their mothers and ride along wherever they go. They nurse until they are about four months old, but they start trying solid foods pretty quickly. Keepers say that this youngster has a taste for apples.

Panda Party

O

n July 29, giant panda cub Xiao Liwu—Mr. Wu to his many fans—celebrated his 4th birthday. Volunteers and keepers filled gift boxes with enrichment items.They also created an ice cake with yams, carrots. apples, and honey.

28

Three’s Company

T

he Zoo’s silvered leaf langurs welcomed a new baby on July 21, making a total of three infants born here this year. In stark contrast to the adults’ dark coats, the youngsters are bright orange for the first three to five months of life—perhaps helping the troop quickly spot them if there’s trouble.

Newcomers Spotted

T

he Asian leopard exhibit welcomed some beautiful new cats this year. Oskar, a male Amur leopard, began prowling his new digs in May, and two sisters, Satka and Liski, joined him in November. Amur leopards are critically endangered, and the Zoo participates in the Association of Zoos & Aquariums' (AZA) breeding program to boost the population of these extraordinary cats.

29


Little Leslie

From

The

ammal NEWS

SAFARI PARK

W

hen keepers arrived on October 19, they discovered another gorilla had joined the troop overnight: Kokamo was nursing a baby girl! Keepers checked to make sure all was well, then the gorillas went out together as usual. Kokamo is an attentive and expert mom—Leslie is her 6th baby.

A Terrific Trio

O

n January 28, Sumatran tiger Joanne became the mom of three rambunctious cubs: sisters Cathy and Debbie and brother Nelson. The cubs made their debut at the Tull Family Tiger Trail in April, where they launched into stalking branches, playing hide-and-seek, chasing each other, pestering mom—and growing into those huge paws!

T

he Safari Park, with its expansive exhibits, is famous for breeding endangered species since 1972. We also work with our conservation partners to reintroduce animals into native habitats worldwide.

30

Brave Baridi

F

ebruary 24 was a big day for Baridi: after surviving a serious illness, he was finally strong enough to join the other giraffes. When a severe infection had made it impossible for him to stand, he was quickly admitted to the Park’s hospital and received around-the-clock care. Baridi rallied and is back with his herd!

Great Leap for Dholes

T

here was celebration when one of the Safari Park’s family groups of dholes, which numbered 6, jumped to 16 in one day—fittingly, on Leap Year Day, February 29. Alpha female Tikka gave birth to a litter of 10 pups! At first, Tikka took care of the pups’ every need. But as they got older, she was happy to let the rest of the pack help out. 31


See Ruuxa Run!

R

uuxa the cheetah made his debut at Cheetah Run this year—quite a feat, since he had surgery for a growth abnormali-

ty in his forelegs as a young cub. Given his early health issues, trainers didn’t know if Ruuxa would ever be able to run. But

Mabu Returns

F

he’s lived up to his name—in Somali, Ruuxa means “spirit”— and has amazed everyone with his determination.

ans of the Park’s African elephants—and our Elephant Cam— happily welcomed Mabu back, a male that spent several years on a breeding loan in Tucson. His visit was successful, and he fathered a calf named Nandi. Now Mabu is back, with hopes he’ll become a dad here, too.

Rhino Joy

G

A Diet Reaps Rewards

O 32

n April 2, eight years of a rhino research study had a happy result: southern white rhino Holly gave birth to a little male named Masamba. We wanted to understand why southern white rhino females born in zoos don’t reproduce as often as their wild cousins. Our

scientists found the cause in plant compounds occurring naturally in the zoo diet, which mimic estrogen and upset the reproductive cycle. When the diet was changed, Holly and another female became pregnant and had their first calves.

Endangered Equids

T

he Park has long supported conservation efforts for wild equine species by participating in Species Survival Plan breeding efforts. This year, the Park was pleased to welcome foals from three “horses of different colors”: a Somali wild ass (pictured), a Przewalski’s horse, and two Grevy’s zebras. These are all significant additions to their populations.

reater onehorned rhino calf Anandi— “joyful” in Hindi—kicked up her heels when she and mom Alta rejoined their group in April. Anandi’s brother, 2-year-old Parvesh, was immediately interested in his new sister, especially when she challenged him to a game of chase. 33


Fit for a Bee-eater

BIRD s w e N T From

he

SAN DIEGO ZOO

T

he San Diego Zoo’s bird collection is admired by avian experts around the globe. Our Bird Department cares for some of the rarest bird species in the world and has tremendous success breeding endangered species. 34

I

n the wild, white-fronted bee-eaters nest by excavating tunnels into the sides of cliffs. The new bee-eater aviary in Conrad Prebys Africa Rocks will

Malayan Long-tailed 3 chicks hatched. Parakeet Ours is the only 7 chicks hatched. zoo in the world Rare in zoos, to breed this we are the only truly superb bird. zoo in the world breeding them. Superb Bird of Paradise

Success in the Outback

T

he aviaries in Conrad Prebys Australian Outback were busy. Australian birds that raised chicks there included Gouldian finches (pictured), wonga pigeons, long-tailed finches, and double-barred finches.

African Birds Rock!

A

s the Zoo began preparing for the new aviary in Conrad Prebys Africa Rocks, some amazing avian species joined the collection in 2016. One is the black-headed weaver, which builds spectacular hanging nests and lives in colonies.

include a wall with tubes of sandy soil constructed in it, which the birds can dig into with their feet and beak to create their nests.

Fawn-breasted Bowerbird

C

elebrating three chicks hatched, the San Diego Zoo is the only zoo in the world that breeds this fascinating species. Males court females by building an elaborate bower, a stage they decorate and on which they show off— each species has its favorite color scheme!

Indian Pygmy Goose 2 goslings hatched.

Great Blue Turaco 4 chicks hatched.

A Wave of Fun

P

enguins are back after 35 years! Six African penguins charmed visitors in the Children’s Zoo as their spectacular exhibit is being built in Conrad Prebys Africa Rocks.

35 35


T

R D I B

s w Ne

he Safari Park cares for a wide variety of birds, including many endangered species. The expertise of the dedicated keeper staff contributes to the ongoing success of breeding programs, especially for species that have not bred well elsewhere. Saving birds from extinction is the goal.

he Fr o m T

SA

FAR

R I PA

K

Vulture Appreciation

S

ome species that usually don’t get much love were celebrated during the Park’s first Vulture Appreciation Day this year. Visitors learned about the vital role these birds play in the environment— they’re called “the soap of the savanna” and “nature’s cleanup crew”—and discovered that vulture species are in decline and need our help.

Flamboyance of Flamingos

T

he Park’s flock of greater flamingos had a great breeding season this year: 29 chicks hatched, bringing the Park’s breeding program total to 198. With its expansive habitat areas, the Park can care for large groups of animals in enclosures that closely resemble their wild habitats, allowing for the natural social interactions that encourage breeding.

Hooded Vulture

2 chicks hatched of this critically endangered species, for a total of 11 raised at the Park.

Ru ¨ ppell’s Vulture

Gray Crowned Crane 4 chicks hatched. The Park has now

raised 69 of these endangered cranes.

36

The Buzz on Bee-eaters

T

he Safari Park’s custombuilt, white-fronted bee-eater aviary was all abuzz during hatching season: 16 chicks hatched this year.

A total of 112 chicks have been raised since the Park’s breeding program began, the only one for this species in North America.

1 chick hatched. The breeding program has now raised 26 of this critically endangered species.

37 37


Fijian Iguana

Lizards in Trees

R

S

an Diego Zoo has a remarkable collection of reptile and amphibian species in the Klauber-Shaw Reptile House, Reptile Walk, and many areas throughout the Zoo. Our staff has been exceptionally successful in breeding rare and endangered species.

3388

1 hatched. Endangered.

eptile keepers were thrilled to welcome four black tree monitor hatchlings, the first ever at the Zoo. This rare lizard is only found on the Aru Islands, off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Because they live in trees and depend on the forest, they are threatened by habitat loss.

Panamanian Golden Frog

N

Reptile &

AMPHIBIAN

News Fr om T he

New Kid on the Block

T

he hatching of 14 Panamanian golden frogs at the Reptile House was another success that increased the numbers of this critically endangered species, which is now considered extinct in the wild. The San Diego Zoo’s breeding program for these frogs began in 2003, and more than 500 have hatched since then.

ew to the Reptile House was a young Gray’s monitor lizard, an extremely rare species native to only a few islands in the Philippines. He hatched at the Los Angeles Zoo, where his parents went after being confiscated from the illegal pet trade. This species is very uncommon in zoos.

Radiated Tortoise

2 hatched. Critically endangered.

Caiman Lizard 4 hatched. Threatened.

Chinese Striped-necked Turtle 1 hatched. Endangered.

39


Saving Spiders

B

ecause arachnids face the same threats as other animals—including illegal smuggling—the San Diego Zoo has established the Arachnid Rescue Center to help. The center, which Zoo visitors can see through a viewing window, cares for more than 65 individual animals, representing 19 species. Most are tarantulas, which authorities have confiscated from wildlife trafficking.

Pollinator Garden in Elephant Odyssey

here’s a lot of buzz about San Diego Zoo's newest animal care division, Entomology, established in 2012. With its variety of insects and arachnids, visitors discover how vital these amazing species are to habitats around the world.

Tree Lobsters

T

T

40

Power to the Pollinators

B

ees, butterflies, beetles, and other pollinators face many challenges—and they are vital to

plants, ecosystems, and agriculture.The Zoo is helping pollinators recover by sharing how important they are and by giving them their own place in the Zoo: the Pollinator Garden in Elephant Odyssey. This beautiful space provides a steady supply of pesticide-free nectar plus suitable living quarters for native bees.

Beautiful Butterflies

O

ne of San Diego County’s native butterfly species is receiving help from the Zoo. The Quino checkerspot butterfly is critically endangered, so our entomology staff cared for eggs and caterpillars, then released caterpillars back to native habitat. Adult butterflies should be emerging in spring 2017.

he Zoo’s Lord Howe Island stick insect breeding program had a big success: females that arrived in January laid more than 500 eggs during the year! Once thought to be extinct, this critically endangered insect species is making a comeback, with the help of four zoos, including the Melbourne Zoo and San Diego Zoo. 41


Caring for a Historical Tree

tree a few inches each day. Nothing is wasted because many animals love ficus browse. We’re told the Big Fig is good to go until 2020!

SAN

BAL

A c c r e d i t e d

PO

IN

AYS E N R I C H I N

TS OF PR

Fig (Ficus) Trees – 97 species

Bamboo – 90 species

Orchids – 950 species

Coral Trees

Palms – 259 species

60 species

O u r

A c c r e d i t e d

IEG

IN

Baja Garden Conifer Arboretum

O ZOO G

GARDEN Collections

E

D

(Erythrinas) –

ID

he Zoo’s browse program is always expanding: every week, we add bamboo, eucalyptus, and other plant materials to our large, walk-in browse cooler. These are used to make enriching items for many animals, like primates, elephants, pandas, and koalas. When needed, we also ship ficus and bamboo to other zoos.

Aloes – 95 species

BAL

T

Cycads – 108 species

LO

Browse Highlights: We’re Ready to Help

Acacias – 25 species

PO

n creating lushly planted exhibits, horticulture staff also plays a key role in providing enrichment for Zoo animals, which benefit daily from browse to nibble on, large fronds to play with, or tree limbs to climb. Landscaped habitats are now an essential element of our Zoo, emphasizing unique connections between plants and animals.

SAN

I

42

Plant Collections

G

A

LW

O ZOO G LO

O u r

IEG

E

centerpiece of Monkey Trails, where it was moved from the front plaza in 2002—a tremendous feat that took several weeks, moving the 250-ton

ID

very few years, our tree crew prunes the Big Fig, removing branches and reducing weight. At 65 years old, this mighty ficus is the healthy and happy

D

ticulture: r o H

E

TS OF PR

California Nativescapes Garden 43


A Helping Hand for Cactus Wrens

Coastal cactus wren

W

e’ve worked for several years to restore coastal cactus wren numbers in our area, which need cactus as nesting habitat. Partners like ZooCorps, Conservation Corps, InternQuest, UCSD, and local high schools all helped us plant 1,000 cacti at Lake Hodges and distributed 3,000 more for planting near Camp Pendleton and the San Pasqual Valley.

A Remarkable Native Seed Bank

Wonderful and bizarre, bottle trees are found in Australia and Africa, depending on the genus. At the Zoo, look for them in the garden between Africa Rocks and Australian Outback. 44

T

Living Seed Bank

he rare Tecate cypress found in San Diego and Orange counties, as well as Baja California, is also on our list as a species of concern. We lent a helping hand with local land managers to establish a field gene bank of nearly 500 Tecate cypresses.

Center for Plant Conservation: Saving the Rarest of the Rare

O

ur seed scientists work with California Plant Rescue (CaPR), coordinated by our partner, the Center for Plant Conservation (CPC), to

W

e can’t exaggerate the importance of seed collections: they are a safety net against catastrophic loss. That’s why we’re working on the front line against extinction with the rare plant community in San Diego County—there are plant species in our own backyard at risk of disappearing in the wild.

conserve globally rare species found on federal lands. This year, we contributed 37 collections of 30 species. It is a great resource for future recovery projects.

45


S

an Diego Zoo Global strives to share the wonders of the living world with those of all ages. We are the most visited informal science center in California!

E d u ca ti o n 46

Our team also takes programs to school assemblies and engages patients at hospitals and nursing homes to enrich their lives with unique animal encounters.

San Diego Zoo Kids: Bringing Healing and Happiness

Leslie Miller Healing Animal Arts Program

A

n incredibly generous endowment gift from lifelong San Diegan Leslie Miller will support the Zoo’s Healing Animal Arts program, serving 5,000 children and their families each year. Ms. Miller was inspired to make the gift after attending Zoo summer camps and visiting the Children’s Zoo as a child with her parents. “The Zoo has given me countless hours of enjoyment, and I want to bring joy to the children and parents who can benefit from this wonderful program.” It expands our partnership with Kaiser Zion Hospital’s Pediatrics Unit to provide therapeutic, hands-on wildlife art lessons and animal encounters to young patients and their families, either at the hospital or the Zoo. We thank Leslie Miller again and again for this enriching program that gives families such a special healing and bonding experience.

H

Connecting Kids with Wildlife

2.4

Million

100+ 250,000

16,000

2.4 million guests from infants to seniors enjoyed our programs & services!

100+ innovative education program choices!

250,000 students visited/ attended our special youth programs! 16,000 “wowed” by the Zoo’s Second Grade program!

900 35,000

60,800

900 teachers attended our workshops—impacting 1 million students! 35,000 students participated in the Price Family Watershed Heroes program!

Connected 60,800 students to wildlife conservation with Zoo assembly & classroom programs!

Our Education Mission Statement: To ignite the spark in people to make a difference for wildlife and wild places through fun, exciting, and life-changing experiences.

eartwarming and educational” describes San Diego Zoo Kids, our 24-hour-a-day, broadcast TV channel designed for children’s hospitals and Ronald McDonald Houses. It gives young patients something to smile about as they recover from illness or injury. Fascinating live animal cams and videos, keeper chats, and field projects entertain children—and parents—during a hospital stay. Children see their favorite animals facing and overcoming medical challenges, just as they are. While not all children can visit their local zoo because of medical conditions, San Diego Zoo Kids brings these animal connections to them. San Diego Zoo Kids hospital network, funded by philanthropist Denny Sanford, experienced amazing growth in 2016 and is now seen in 85 facilities in 26 states and 4 countries! San Diego Zoo Global received the 2016 Wish Impact Award from the Make-A-Wish® Foundation, recognizing that the experiences we provide at the Zoo and Safari Park have a positive effect on our Make-A-Wish 47 kids and their families!


C

Twiga Walinizi: Proud of Our Giraffe Guards!

ommunity

M

BASED

n o i t a

v r e s Con

Our Working

Partnerships

O

48

ur Teacher Workshops spark change on a national and global level. Our partner organizations include: Save the Elephants, Free the Bears, Giraffe Conservation Fund, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, CEDO, Saiga Conservation Alliance, and Pronatura Noroeste.

Twiga Walinizi monitoring wildlife in northern Kenya.

ay was the official start of on-theground giraffe conservation at two sites in northern Kenya as 6 community members became giraffe guards, or Twiga Walinizi. They patrol every day, monitoring giraffes and leopards in the area, removing snares, engaging neighbors in giraffe conservation, and encouraging them to coexist with wildlife and consider alternative jobs in conservation and tourism—the positive impacts have been huge. We now have 100 camera traps to help us learn where giraffes roam, with plans next year to use satellite tracking on 18 giraffes. And we were thrilled to release 3 orphaned giraffes rescued last year so they could join a wild herd. This all gives us hope that giraffes can be saved.

Safeguarding Lemurs

L

emurs are Madagascar’s wild treasures, but all 106 species are threatened by habitat loss and poaching. Our 5-year plan includes practical ways to improve people’s livelihoods with small enterprises; engage schoolchildren with a conservation education curriculum; strengthen forest ranger patrols; and continue to monitor lemurs and help regenerate forest areas. Alleviating local poverty will help save lemurs!

More Partnerships, More Successes Peru: Our Forest Guardians and the Spectacled Bear Conservation Society engage teachers and students to protect Andean bears and a local nature reserve. We also supported women artisans in creating alternative livelihood programs.

China, Vietnam, and Madagascar: Little Green Guards continues to foster a love for wildlife in schoolchildren living near nature reserves.

Baja California, Mexico: Ridge to Reef program engages

teachers and students to protect wildlife, like the critically endangered vaquita porpoise and California condor. Community education and creating sustainable income sources are keys to success.

O

ur teams in San Diego and Southeast Asia continue to work with partners in Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam to stop the devastating cycle of poaching and sale of wildlife products. 49


Wildlife Heroes!

4,424 members of the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife

Conservancy are protecting and saving endangered species around the globe. These Wildlife Heroes contribute monthly donations that directly support our conservation efforts worldwide as we lead the fight against extinction.

E

C

O

U

T

TS OF PR

Our Valuable Volunteers

2,635 community members contributed 185,500+ hours of service in 2016—the equivalent of 90 full-time staff—a record high!

$5.1 million was the

Web Visitors and Social Media Profile

1.5 million visitors each month to our websites

7.9 million views on live

animal cams

value of volunteer service in 2016.

1.14 million Facebook fans

1.1 million cumulative

33.3 million YouTube video views

hours of volunteer service were recorded since 2009— a value estimated at more than $30 million!

488,178

Instagram followers

Employee Dedication

1.6 million Tumblr followers

1,620 full-time employees

23% have worked for the

Zoo for 20+ years

10% have worked for the Zoo for 30+ years

50

N

ID

SAN

With almost 500,000 members, San Diego Zoo Global has the largest membership base of any zoo in the world! Our family of loyal members includes 372,942 adults and 109,758 children who call the Zoo and Safari Park their home away from home.

BAL

Our Loyal Members

IN

O ZOO G

LO

D

#

PO

N U M B E R S

IEG

217,589

Twitter followers

9.9 million

Zoo and Safari Park Annual Attendance – 5.44 million

Flickr photo views

51


S

f u t u r e

E

o u r

ID

IN

BAL

Billion

SAN

D

$

PO

$1.2

O N

O ZOO G LO

B A N K I N G

IEG

TS OF PR

an Diego Zoo Global's economic impact and activity in the San Diego region: $1.2 billion.

Animal and Plant Care, Conservation Projects, Education Programs, Exhibit and Facilities Maintenance, Zoo and Safari Park Operating Costs

89%

Gifts, Grants, and Sponsorships

Membership

6% Tax Revenue and Other

15% 9%

2016 REVENUE

$300 Million*

$275 Million*

11%

41%

29% Admissions

52

2016 EXPENSES

Administration

Food, Merchandise, Catering, Tours, and Education

25

Million

I

n excess revenues over expenses were put to work immediately to lead the fight against extinction!

*Please note: These are unaudited numbers for 2016. Audited financials and IRS Form 990 will be posted on sandiegozoo.org under the Support Us tab when they are completed.

53


San Diego Zoo Global 2017

Foundation Board

San Diego Zoo Global 2017

Board of Trustees

OFFICERS Richard M. Hills Chair

OFFICERS Robert B. Horsman Chairman Steven G. Tappan Vice Chairman Judith A. Wheatley Secretary Richard B. Gulley Treasurer

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Rolf Benirschke Sandra A. Brue Javade Chaudhri Clifford W. Hague Linda Lowenstine, D.V.M., Ph.D. Patricia L. Roscoe Steven S. Simpson

Judith C. Harris Vice Chair

TRUSTEES EMERITI Frank C. Alexander Kurt Benirschke, M.D. Berit N. Durler Thompson Fetter Bill L. Fox Frederick A. Frye, M.D. George L. Gildred Yvonne W. Larsen John M. Thornton A. Eugene Trepte Betty Jo F. Williams James E. Lauth General Counsel Douglas G. Myers President/CEO

Susan B. Major Secretary Susan N. McClellan Treasurer Mark A. Stuart President Amy B. Parrott Vice President

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Christine L. Andrews Joye D. Blount Rick Bregman Douglas Dawson Berit N. Durler, Ex officio Chris L. Eddy Arthur E. Engel Valerie A. Ewell, D.V.M. Susan Guinn

Robert B. Horsman Ex officio

Michael N. Hammes

Douglas G. Myers Ex officio

Joshua A. Pack

Murray H. Hutchison Nikita Kahn Philip C. Seeger Elizabeth W. Shoemaker Ryan Sullivan Ed Wilson

Charles L. Bieler Executive Director Emeritus 54

55


Current Gifts

H E L P US

p e e K ng Roari

FORWARD

S

an Diego Zoo Global invites you to help us Roar Forward into our second century. Meeting our goal to raise $400 million by the close of 2017 will transform our efforts to lead the fight against extinction. Following are ways you can support our vision. 56

Cash:

You may donate your home to the Zoo now but retain the right to live there for the rest of your life.

A gift of cash provides immediate support for the Zoo and provides you with a charitable income tax deduction in the year of the gift.

Charitable Remainder Trusts:

Securities and Real Estate:

For gifts of appreciated property, you can receive a charitable income tax deduction for the full fair market value of the property and avoid paying capital gains tax on the appreciation.

Future Gifts Bequests:

With a charitable remainder trust, you can choose to receive a fixed annuity payment or receive variable payments based on the trust principal. When the trust matures, the remaining amount passes to the Zoo.

Charitable Gift Annuity (CGA):

A bequest is made through your will or living trust and can be for a specific amount, a specific asset, or a percentage of your estate.

For More Information:

Retained Life Estate:

A charitable gift annuity enables you to receive fixed payments, based on your age, for the rest of your life (or lives). When the annuity matures, the remainder passes to the Zoo.

Pooled Income Fund:

A pooled income fund is similar to a mutual fund in which you receive variable payments for the rest of your life (or lives). When the gift matures, the remaining principal passes to the Zoo.

Individual Retirement Account (IRA):

Naming the Zoo as a beneficiary of your Individual Retirement Account is a taxeffective way to make a charitable gift, because it avoids multiple estate and income taxes.

Life Insurance:

Naming the Zoo as a beneficiary of your life insurance is a simple way of supporting us without giving up current assets.

Foundation Grants

Partner with us to advance a broad range of projects and programs that create new habitats, help the underserved, inspire the next generation, or use scientific techniques to save endangered species.

Sustaining Gifts

Monthly gifts to the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy directly support our conservation efforts in more than 140 field projects on 6 continents. These Wildlife Heroes ensure that critically endangered species—from rhinos to jaguars, elephants to gorillas, and koalas to pandas—make a comeback. To learn more, and become a Wildlife Hero, visit endextinction.org.

Visit us at : z oolegacy.o r g , cal l us at : 619- 557- 39 47 or email us at donatio ns @ s and i e g o z o o .o r g .

Editors:

Mary Sekulovich Karen Worley Justin Weber

Design: Scott Ramsey Production Coordinator:

Amy Williams

Photographer: Ken Bohn Photo Archive Librarians:

Lisa Bissi Jennifer MacEwen

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© 2017 SDZG. All rights reserved.

A Century of Celebrating Wildlife  
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