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Volume CIII, No. 4

Huron, SD

JUNE 2018

South Dakota

Union Farmer A PUBLICATION OF SOUTH DAKOTA FARMERS UNION Farmers Harvest Sun’s Energy

Meet 2018 Summer Interns

2018 Golf Tournament

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Camps Emphasize Cooperating South Dakota Farmers Union for a Brighter Tomorrow Celebrates the Cable Ranch Family, Pukwana, South Dakota

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s S.D. Farmers Union (SDFU) enters its 84th camping season, its focus remains the same. Priority is placed on shaping the leaders of tomorrow, fostering engagement in rural communities and introducing youth to the many opportunities in agriculture. “Camp is a place where kids can come to learn and grow as leaders in an engaging positive atmosphere,” says Rachel Haigh-

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Thank A Community Volunteer Nominate them for the Rural Dakota Pride Award Deadline is July 1, 2018

To learn more, contact Karla Hofhenke at 605-350-5976 or Karla@SDFU.org.

South Dakota Farmers Union has served South Dakota farm and ranch families for more than a century. Throughout the year, we share their stories in order to highlight the families who make up our state’s No. 1 industry and help feed the world. This month we feature the Harley and Dawn Cable ranch near Pukwana.

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awn (Gilman) Cable was shorter than the barrels she raced around when she began competing at area playday rodeos. Her daughters, Jimmi and Kari, could say the same for the sport that also captured their hearts. After chores were done on the family’s cow/calf and club calf ranch north of Pukwana, the Cable women practiced together on a barrel patch Dawn’s husband, Harley, disks up each spring for them. On the weekends, the family raced to wrap up chores so they could head off to rodeos together. In their teens, through college and into adulthood, Dawn and her daughters continued to barrel race together. “It’s one thing the three of us did together since they were teeny,

Cable Family Continued on Page 2


Union Farmer By Boaz Dov Elkes

Cable Family Continued from Page 1

Dawn Cable has barrel raced since childhood.

tiny girls,” Dawn says. “It gave us something we all enjoyed and got to spend time outside of the ranch together and we made so many friends,” adds daughter, Kari, 27, who today is the lead MRI technician at Rapid City Regional Hospital. Because of all the good memories the family created barrel racing together, when a tragic car accident took Jimmi’s life four years ago, Harley, Dawn and Kari decided a memorial barrel race would be a fitting way to remember Jimmi; her love of horses and passion for barrel racing, livestock and their Pukwana ranch. And, most of all, her love for her family and friends. As the state director of the South Dakota Barrel Horse Association, Dawn knew how to organize the event. Friends and family

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members also chipped in and July 2015 the family hosted the first Jimmi Rose Memorial Barrel Race. “I was hoping for 50 entries and 200 showed up,” Dawn says of the event that has become an annual tradition, held each year during the last Sunday in July in Huron on the Beadle County 4-H Rodeo Grounds. All funds raised go to support organizations and events Jimmi and her family hold dear: a belt buckle for the winner of round robin at the 4-H round robin at the Brule County Achievement Days; jackets for grand champion Sim-Angus heifer at the

Kari (left) with her sister, Jimmi. Jimmi was killed in a tragic car accident in 2014. She was an organ donor. Her memory is honored each year during the Jimmi Rose Memorial Barrel Race.

Spotlight Livestock Show; prizes for all the peewee barrel racers at the memorial barrel race and many other events. “It’s a good feeling knowing you still support what she loved. Another part of the memorial barrel race is, it’s a way to bring all my family and all of her friends together to remember her,” Kari says. “It’s a bittersweet day. We all enjoy getting to see each other and to honor her memory. The support from each other keeps you going.” Kari says. Her mom agrees. “It’s the comradery. I tell you, when we lost Jimmi, I found out who my real friends are – and my barrel racing friends are definitely in that category. They have stuck beside me through it all,” Dawn explains. The ranch, with its wide open spaces, cattle who need caring for and a few good horses always ready for a ride, also helps. “If I have a bad day, I get on my horse and ride the creek,” says Dawn, of Crow Creek which runs through the property.

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Cable Ranch Harley grew up on the ranch, and says he never wanted to do anything else. “I like cattle and I like breeding superior livestock.” In addition to raising commercial cattle, since his teens, Harley has been raising sought after livestock, selling Sim-Angus bulls and club calves to commercial cattle producers and show youth who exhibit the calves in livestock shows across the nation. Only 15 when his dad died, Harley made ranching his full-time career, building on the 2,500 acres and 25-head of cattle his dad left to him. Their overall breeding program has a strong focus on maternal traits – sound udders, good feet and legs and, “of course, good rate of gain,” Harley explains. “Makes a guy feel pretty proud to see the calves we raise, do well in the show ring. There are a lot of people breeding club calves who buy high-dollar donors, and most of the time we can do it through cows we raise and AI-ing them,” Harley explains. Also raised on a ranch, Dawn has worked beside Harley since they married 32 years ago. “I’ve always preferred to be outdoors working. The first time I brought Harley home to meet my parents, he was having coffee with my dad and I was out feeding cows,” Dawn says. She then asks Harley. “What did you think of when you were having coffee with my dad while I was feeding cows?”

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Harley Cable has been raising club calves for show youth since he was a teen.

With a twinkle in his eye, Harley answers, “She was trying to impress me.” Although the couple has been through unimaginable grief together, there is a lot of jesting and laughter when they discuss working together as a family on the ranch. Before they were school-age, the girls spent their days outdoors with their parents. Harley recalled a time when Jimmi was a baby and he needed help, so Dawn brought her out to the barn in her car seat. Dawn set the car seat on some square bales and got to work helping Harley. “We look over and a baby goat had jumped up and was nursing on Jimmi’s bottle,” Harley explains. By the time they were school-age, the girls were helping with all the ranch chores.

“We wanted to raise capable girls,” Harley says. “They know how to work hard and they can do just about anything.” Harley recalls another time, when the ranch still had sheep, and Kari pulled her first lamb. “We were lambing like crazy and the lambs were all mixed up. Kari came out to help me, and a lamb needed pulled. She wasn’t very old at the time, but she put on the gloves and goes in and pulls it. After that, if you walked in the barn and there was a water bag out, she’d call out, ‘I’m pulling it! And would put on the gloves.’” Dawn adds. “I’m really glad we raised them to be independent. They knew they were always welcome here, but we wanted them to grow up to be their own person. And, I’m really proud we trained all our own barrel horses. We send our roping horses to be finished, but we always trained our own barrel horses and never paid more than $5,000 for a horse.” She shares a story about a barrel horse, Calvert, that she and Kari trained together. Kari competed on Calvert through high school and college rodeo. After college, she sold Calvert to a high school rodeo athlete from Oklahoma who ended up riding him when she won the World Title in barrel racing at the National Little Britches Rodeo. In addition to the ranch and rodeo, both girls were also active in 4-H and FFA.

Jimmi and Kari Cable

“I attribute 4-H and FFA to a lot of good things. Our girls showed cattle, sheep and goats and they learned how to give prepared talks,” Dawn says. These agriculture youth organizations introduced Jimmi to livestock judging. A competition which she excelled at. As a junior in high school her team won state 4-H livestock judging, advancing to compete at the North American International Livestock Show and placing seventh individual giving her All American Status. She attended Northwest College in Powell, Wyoming, on a livestock judging scholarship. To participate in the Jimmi Rose Memorial Barrel Race, contact Dawn at HDCable@ midstatesd.net or call 605-680-4224. To view more photos of the Cable ranch family and hear a radio interview with the family, visit www.sdfu.org. ■ by Lura Roti for SDFU

4TH ANNUAL JIMMI ROSE CE MEMORIAL BARREL RA Sunday, July 29 Beadle County Huron 4-H Rodeo Grounds, First Run 10 a.m. Second Run to follow Exhibitions 8-9:30 , For more information ble Ca contact Dawn at 605-680-4224.

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2018 Insuring a Brighter Tomorrow Scholarship Winners Announced

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he South Dakota Farmers Union Foundation, in cooperation with Farmers Union Insurance Agency, announces the Insuring a Brighter Tomorrow scholarship recipients. Each of the scholarship recipients will receive $1,000 to put toward their postsecondary education at a South Dakota college, university or technical school. Over the past 11 years, the Foundation has awarded more than $275,000 in scholarships to students attending South Dakota post-secondary schools. The recipients were chosen from among a large pool of applicants. They were scored based on a combination of academic record, activities and awards, financial need and an essay relating to how they will “Insure a Brighter Tomorrow” in South Dakota. Farmers Union Insurance agents throughout the state fund this scholarship program administered by the Farmers Union Foundation. “Our insurance agents are committed to building a brighter future in South Dakota,” says Jason Wells, Regional Manager of Farmers Union Insurance Agency. “This is a remarkable group and they make me excited about the future of our great state. We’re choosing to invest in these outstanding individuals to help them pursue their goals and aspirations.” ■

Jenifer Fjelstad Daughter of Clint & Tara Fjelstad Groton Area High School

Matthew Sperry Son of Scott & Kathy Sperry Aberdeen Roncalli High School

Sage Pulse Daughter of Lee & Nicole Pulse Kimball High School

Anne Knoff Daughter of David & Jozette Knoff Yankton High School

Trew DeJong Son of Travis & Pamela DeJong Philip High School

Riley Calhoon Son of John & Jodi Calhoon Winner High School

Brianna Mount Daughter of Randy & Stacy Mount Webster Area High School

Erica Koster Daughter of Dean & Bonnie Koster Armour High School

Saraya Bronson Daughter of Colin & Renae Bronson Wilmot High School

Chastin Mohr Daughter of Scott & Jenia Mohr Parker High School

Sadie Vander Wal Daughter of Jeff & Beth Vander Wal Northwestern High School

Kylee Guindon Daughter of Rayne & Jen Guindon Plankinton High School

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Ellie Holmes Daughter of Mike & Val Holmes Brandon Valley High School

Taylor Gall Daughter of Fred & Tricia Gall Scotland High School

Savannah Krogman Daughter of Neil & Kathy Krogman Jones County High School

Kaylee Hart Daughter of Troy & Andrea Hart Mitchell High School

Katie McManus Daughter of Don & Melinda McManus Lyman High School

Eric Olson Son of Jim & Julie Olson Watertown High School

Zachary Severson Son of Brad & LuAnn Severson Canton High School

Dalton Howe Son of Lance & Shirley Howe Redfield High School

Carter Larson Son of Eric Larson & Laurie Larson Vermillion High School

Nathan Rook Son of Kevin & Brenda Rook Aberdeen Central High School

Emily Oswald Daughter of Jason & Sherri Oswald Yankton High School

Kaylee Becker Daughter of David & Denette Becker TF Riggs High School

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Union Farmer Farmers Harvest the Sun’s Energy & Save

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“If energy is harvested from the sun, and it saves a farmer money, that is more money a farm family is able to spend locally.” – Hans Breitenmoser, Merrill, Wisconsin, farmer

enewable energy has intrigued Hans Breitenmoser since childhood. “I can remember climbing up our 80-foot silo when I was a kid and thinking we should put up a wind turbine,” says the Merrill, Wisconsin, dairy farmer. His renewable energy daydreams became a reality in 2012 when he installed solar panels on the main freestall barn of his 430-cow dairy. The panels produced about 10 percent of his dairy’s energy needs. Which, he explains are substantial. “Even though today’s dairy uses much less energy than we did in the past thanks to energy efficient technology, dairies use a lot of energy,” he says, explaining energy is used to do everything from cool milk and run a parlor’s milking equipment to powering ventilation fans, lagoon pumps and alley scrapers. So, in 2016, when Breitenmoser was drawing up plans for a new barn, he decided to increase his farm’s solar energy footprint. This time, instead of financing the project on his own, the Wisconsin Farmers Union member worked with Farmers Union Enterprises to help him fund the installation that, coupled with the 2012 panels, now covers 25 percent of his farm’s energy needs. “In the state of Wisconsin, we don’t have any coal, we don’t have any natural gas, so I think it’s silly that in 2018 more than 60 percent of the electricity our citizens consume is produced by burning coal that has to be transported to our state from more than a 1,000 miles away,” Breitenmoser says. Investing in renewable energy not only aligns with Breitenmoser’s moral compass, but it saves him, on average, more than $330 each month on his electric bill. “The Wisconsin dairy industry is really hurting right now – corn and beans aren’t worth much either – so, if solar energy can help farmers save money, and maybe provide an opportunity to sell extra energy back to the grid, all the while decreasing our use of fossil fuels, which we don’t own, I think it’s a good deal,” Breitenmoser explains. Darin Von Ruden agrees. “Every year we continue to see farmers leaving the land

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because they don’t have a steady income,” says the President of Wisconsin Farmers Union. As state Farmers Union president, Von Ruden sits on the board of directors for Farmers Union Enterprises (FUE), the multi-business cooperative which helped Breitenmoser finance the solar panel installation. The other Farmers Union state organizations which make up FUE include:

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South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota and Montana. All funds raised through FUE businesses go to support the National Farmers Union and the five state’s Farmers Union organizations. “We are always looking for ways to keep our farmers farming,” says Von Ruden, who also has solar panels on his barn roof – saving him, on average, $625 in electricity each month.

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Meet the 2018 SD Farmers Union Intern Team

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his summer, the 2018 S.D. Farmers Union intern team will crisscross the state working with member volunteers to engage and educate rural youth about agriculture, farm safety and cooperatives during numerous county and local day camps. “Those involved in hosting these summer camps are making a positive difference in the lives of South Dakota youth and families,” says Doug Sombke, President of SDFU. “Education of rural citizens, youth as well as adults, is a large focus of S.D. Farmers Union.” Selected through an application and interview process, these college students and recent graduates are excited to get on the road and share their passion for agriculture with youth in a community near you. Read on to learn more about the 2018 SDFU intern team. NAME: Danielle Schmitz SCHOOL: 2018 Graduate of South Dakota State University: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education Specialization QUESTION: You’ve gained a lot of experience through this internship as this will be your third year to serve as an SDFU summer intern. What skills have you gained that you can see helping you in your future career? ANSWER: This internship has already made a huge impact in my career. I have learned so much from year-to-year that I used to help me become a better teacher. I have grown a lot in organization, management, public speaking and instructional skills that truly helped me secure my first teaching position Holy Cross School in Sioux City, Iowa, this coming August. I am looking forward to continuing to learn this summer to help prepare me for my first year of teaching. I also look forward to returning to work with the youth who attend camps. I have made a variety of connections with the kids throughout the past two years and I want to continue making those connections. I also have enjoyed watching them grow. NAME: Paige Hildebrandt SCHOOL: University of Minnesota: Agricultural Communications and Marketing QUESTION: Since this is your first year serving as a SDFU intern, tell us a bit about you and why you wanted to work for this

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Meet the 2018 SDFU Intern Team: Danielle Schmitz, Paige Hildebrandt, Breanna Vogel and Hunter Klontz.

grassroots agricultural organization? ANSWER: I grew up on a hog and crop farm near Waseca, Minnesota. As a farm kid, I think the coolest thing about this internship is the opportunity it gives me to help youth understand where their food comes from and share my first hand farm experiences with them. This is an important message to convey because, even in rural communities, many kids are at least three generations removed from the farm or ranch. They don’t have the opportunity to experience farm animals or see where their food comes from. I want to help make that connection to agriculture. NAME: Hunter Klontz SCHOOL: 2018 Graduate of South Dakota State University: Agricultural Education QUESTION: You’ve gained a lot of experience through this internship as this will be your second year to serve as an SDFU summer intern. What skills have you gained that you can see helping you in your future career? ANSWER: This internship taught me how to work with youth of all ages – 4 years to 18. I gained skills that helped me last fall when I student taught and I know the skills will also come in handy when I begin my first teaching position this fall as an agriculture education instructor at Red Rock Central High School in Lamberton, Minnesota. The Farmers Union internship was overall such a great experience last year, I know it will be a good experience this year too. And, I’m eager to work with youth again. I student taught in Canton High

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School last fall, then returned to college after Christmas to finish my coursework. It was during this last semester, when I was back on campus and not working with students, that I realized how much I miss them and their energy. NAME: Breanna Vogel SCHOOL: South Dakota State University: Agricultural Education QUESTION: Since this is your first year serving as a SDFU intern, tell us a bit about you and why you wanted to work for this grassroots agricultural organization? ANSWER: I was looking for an internship that would be rewarding and provide me with experience that will help me in my future career as an agriculture education instructor. I think this internship will be refreshing because I get to work with youth and for an organization that is focused on supporting family farmers and ranchers. Also, because I didn’t grow up on a farm or ranch, I understand how important agriculture education is. I developed an interest in agriculture through my participation in the agriculture leadership organization, FFA. FFA was my first connection to agriculture. I know that this summer, Farmers Union camps may be some youth’s first connection to agriculture – an industry I believe is humble and under-recognized, that many consumers have misconceptions about. Through this internship, I’m looking forward to helping clear up misconceptions that youth may have. ■

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2018 Golf Tournament Raises More than $10,000 farmers, ily m fa f o d w ro c e rg la A turned out s d n ie fr ir e th d n a rs e h ranc ying golf, la p f o y a d d lle -fi n fu a for draising. N U F d n a s e m a g n fu

17 teams donated more

than $10,000 to support SDFU Education Programming.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS Glacial Lakes Energy LLC Farmers Mutual of Nebraska KWAT/KDLO, Travelers Motor Club East River Electric No Limit Soil Service Full Circle Ag Larson King Sumption Farms CarlsonSV Insight Marketing Chubb Agribusiness Leader Printing Farmers Mutual Hail Insurance Company of Iowa Kirk Schaunaman Wayne Soren Larry Birgen Farmers Union Insurance American Bank and Trust Morford Financial Services Lodge in Deadwood Beef Bucks Terry Sestak Robert Sharp and Associates Cherrybean Coffee Wild Water West Reptile Gardens Turtle Creek-Miller Tomahawk Lake Country Club Grand Falls Casino & Golf Resort Bath and Body Works-Aberdeen Great Plains Brookings/Sanford Health Southern Hills Golf Course Arrowhead Country Club Great Plains Zoo Sky Zone

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Tour Inspires New Ways to Help S.D. Farmers

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hen the same old, same old isn’t working, sometimes it’s a good idea to step out of what is known to get fresh ideas. Inspiration and new ideas is the reason the Farmers Union Enterprises (FUE) board of directors recently embarked on a 3-day tour of the Netherlands, explains Conde family farmer, Doug Sombke, who serves as the current President of the FUE board and is our SDFU President. “FUE board is always looking for new ways we can add value to family farmers and ranchers. Not so much the same old stuff – today’s farmers and ranchers are good at raising the commodities we currently raise. But looking for new ways to increase on-farm and ranch profits,” Sombke says. If you’re not familiar with FUE, it is the multi-business cooperative operated by a board of directors which includes Farmers Union presidents from North and South Dakota,

Minnesota, Montana and Wisconsin. All funds raised through FUE businesses go to support the National Farmers Union and the five state’s Farmers Union organizations. The board decided to travel to the Netherlands after meeting Frayne Olson, Crop Economist/Marketing Specialist with NDSU Extension, while researching another project. Olson offered to guide the tour which included: canal systems, modern and historic working windmills, flower market and massive scale greenhouse flower and vegetable farms. “Most innovative ideas in agriculture have come from farmers looking at what they are doing and searching for a better way,” Sombke says. Because a picture is worth 1,000 words … To learn more about the FUE innovation tour, Sombke shares a few images. ■ by Lura Roti for SDFU

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1 “We toured working windmills – modern and historic. One windmill was used to cut wood into planks for building materials, the other was turning seeds into oil for pain and another was grinding seed for food,” Sombke explains.

During the agriculture tour of The Netherlands, the FUE group visited a flower auction market, which Sombke says reminded him of a South Dakota cattle market, only all bidding was done electronically. “Just like a livestock sale barn, the bidders were just as intense.”

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2 The FUE group toured several greenhouses that covered acres and acres of land, maximizing inputs, conserving water resources (water is collected from the roofs and recycled to water crops grown inside the greenhouses), and eliminating weather-related risks. These Netherlands farmers use greenhouses to raise high-value crops such as vegetables and flowers. “In the Netherlands, they can’t afford to waste anything because they are short on resources – in fact, over the generations, they have reclaimed land from the sea. Farmers we visited with shared that the largest challenge they face is the cost of land. One farmer said 1 acre of land sells for $22,000 in U.S. dollars.”

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Let’s continue the good work. FUEL UP WITH PREMIUM E-30! NAME CITY ADDRESS PHONE # Airport Travel Center.......................................... Aberdeen.............4707 E Hwy 12............................................ 605-725-9100 Bonn Express..................................................... Aberdeen.............801 N Hwy 281............................................ 605-229-4131 Cenex C-Express................................................ Aberdeen.............2303 6th Ave SE......................................... 605-229-5482 North Central Farmers Elevator - Cardtrol........ Aberdeen.............811 3rd Ave SW.......................................... 605-426-6021 Total Stop............................................................ Alcester...............210 E 1st St................................................. 605-934-1818 Friendly’s Fuel Stop............................................ Baltic...................47155 250th St............................................ 605-696-5000 Midway Service Station..................................... Baltic...................25402 475th Ave......................................... 605-351-7161 CBH Cooperative-Travel Center........................ Belle Fourche......18765 US-85............................................... 605-720-2946 Jet Truck Plaza................................................... Beresford ...........Hwy 29 and State Hwy 46 Interchange..... 605-763-5005 Coffee Cup Fuel Stop......................................... Brandon...............1009 N Splitrock Blvd................................. 605-582-7229 Martin’s Oil.......................................................... Brookings............106 1st St S................................................. 605-692-2424 The Depot........................................................... Brookings............921 S 20th St S........................................... 605-692-4424 Cenex.................................................................. Bryant..................102 West 6th Ave........................................ 605-628-2342 Total Stop............................................................ Canistota.............100 E Main St.............................................. 605-296-3434 Kones Corner...................................................... Castlewood.........18299 US Hwy 81....................................... 605-793-2263 Big C Travel Plaza............................................... Clark....................801 1st St.................................................... 605-532-3703 Clark Community Oil.......................................... Clark....................401st East................................................... 605-532-4011 Cowboy Country Store....................................... Clear Lake...........420 3rd St S................................................ 605-874-2431 Estelline Community Oil..................................... Estelline...............201 4th St N................................................ 605-873-2375 Bermack 2........................................................... Faulkton..............817 Main St................................................. 605-598-4175 Farmers Union Co-op......................................... Ferney.................101 1st St.................................................... 605-395-6461 North Central Farmers Elevator......................... Frederick.............38604 Brown County 10A.......................... 605-426-6021 Ma & Pa’s C-Store LLC...................................... Gayville................31095 451st Ave......................................... 605-267-2386 Coffee Cup Fuel Stop......................................... Hartford...............1001 S. Western Ave.................................. 605-528-4622 Farmers Co-op................................................... Hayti....................101 Redbird Ave......................................... 605-783-3621 Farmers Union Oil Co-op................................... Hazel...................44175 SD Hwy 22....................................... 605-628-2342 Friendly’s Fuel Stop............................................ Humboldt............210 N Stofferan Dr...................................... 605-363-3000 Tip Top, Inc......................................................... Kranzburg............46399 US Hwy 212..................................... 605-886-9294 Lake Nordon Country Store............................... Lake Norden........721 Burlington Street................................. 605-785-3401 Tip Top, Inc......................................................... Lake Norden........471 Burmington St...................................... 605-785-3401 Prairie Ag Partners............................................. Lake Preston.......101 Main Ave N........................................... 605-847-4844 Dave’s Service & Repair..................................... Lennox.................210 North Main........................................... 605-647-5252 F&M Co-op......................................................... Madison..............45316 SD Hwy 34....................................... 605-256-4516 Mellette Travel Center........................................ Mellette...............38620 SD Hwy 20....................................... 605-887-3364 Berens................................................................. Milbank................1506 Morningside Dr. ................................ 605-432-6234

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NAME CITY ADDRESS PHONE # Food and Fuel..................................................... Milbank................103 W 4th Ave............................................. 605-432-6678 UPI Petroleum Inc.............................................. Milbank................313 W 4th Ave............................................. 605-432-5561 The M Station .................................................... Mina.....................800 Nesbitt Dr............................................. 605-725-6462 Cubby’s West...................................................... Mitchell................1700 W Havens Ave.................................... 605-996-1951 Highland Travel Plaza, LLC................................ Mitchell................2166 Highland Way..................................... 605-996-5221 Holiday I-90 Travel Center.................................. Mitchell................1821 S Burr St East.................................... 605-996-3371 Lucky’s Gas N More........................................... Mobridge.............705 W Grand Crossing............................... 605-845-3382 Goode To Go....................................................... N. Sioux City.......1301 River Dr.............................................. 605-232-4329 Farmers Union Oil Co-op................................... Orient...................108 Co Hwy 16............................................ 605-392-2424 Cowboy #5 ......................................................... Pierre...................1619 N Harrison.......................................... 605-882-0464 Holiday Station................................................... Pierre...................520 N Garfield............................................. 605-224-8958 The Corner Station............................................. Pierre...................103 E Pleasant Dr....................................... 605-224-3121 Coffee Cup Fuel Stop......................................... Plankinton...........25471 US Hwy 281..................................... 605-942-7138 Canyon Lake Gas & Auto Care.......................... Rapid City...........3928 Canyon Lake Dr................................. 605-343-3688 Apprel’s Quick Stop............................................ Redfield...............23 W 7th Ave............................................... 605-472-2626 One Stop Convenience Store............................ Redfield...............105 W 7th Ave............................................. 605-472-1005 Sioux Valley Co-op............................................. Roslyn.................110th Hwy 25.............................................. 605-486-4658 Central Farmers Co-op...................................... Salem..................131 S Nebraska St...................................... 605-425-2691 Main Stop............................................................ Scotland..............411 Main St................................................. 605-583-4336 Friendly’s Fuel Stop............................................ Sioux Falls ..........3700 Pottsdam Ave.................................... 605-977-6114 K & K Convenience............................................. Sisseton..............309 E Hickory St......................................... 605-742-7474 Tabor Lumber Co-op.......................................... Tabor...................42697 SD Hwy 50....................................... 605-463-2565 Deuel County Farmers Union Co-op................. Toronto ...............375 Main St................................................. 605-794-4861 North Central Farmers Elevator......................... Warner.................110 Central Ave N....................................... 605-426-6021 Cowboy Country Store....................................... Watertown...........504 9th Ave SE........................................... 605-882-9000 Cowboy Country Store....................................... Watertown...........1400 4th St NE............................................ 605-886-4444 LakeStop 20........................................................ Watertown...........2301 N Hwy 20............................................ 605-753-5646 Prairie Stop......................................................... Watertown...........1107 9th Ave SW........................................ 605-886-3133 Sioux Valley Co-op - Cardtrol............................ Watertown...........1016 5th St SE............................................ 605-886-5829 Stone’s Truck Stop............................................. Watertown...........3801 9th Ave SE......................................... 605-886-5007 Sioux Valley Co-op............................................. Watertown ..........1601 9th Ave SE......................................... 605-886-5829 Sioux Valley Co-op............................................. Webster...............11 W Hwy 12............................................... 605-345-3549 Jurgen’s Oil Company........................................ Wilmot.................406 Main St................................................. 605-938-4641 Cork and Bottle.................................................. Yankton ..............1500 Broadway Ave.................................... 605-665-3881 The Fox Stop...................................................... Yankton ..............1316 West 30th St...................................... 605-689-0227

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Union Farmer s e t a D p m a C U F D S 8 1 20 May

21 Clark Co. Camp – Clark 22 Sanborn Co. Camp – Forestburg 22 Charles Mix Co. Camp – Geddes 23 Haakon/Jackson Co. Camp – Philip 24 Hand Co. Camp – Miller 24 Hughes/Sully/Stanley Co. Camp – Onida 29 Faulk Co. Camp – Faulkton 30 Lincoln Co. Camp – Tea 30 – June 1 District I & II Camp – Swan Lake

June

 1 Yankton Co. Camp – Yankton  3-8 State Leadership Camp – Storm Mountain 10-12 District IV, V, VI Camp – Storm Mountain 12 Campbell/Walworth/Potter Co. Camp – Herreid 13 Corson Co. Camp – McIntosh 14 Kingsbury Co. Camp – DeSmet 14 Perkins Co. Camp – Lemmon 18 Tripp Co. Camp – Colome 19 Lyman Co. Camp – Reliance 19 Gregory Co. Camp – Fairfax 20 Hutchinson Co. Camp – Menno 27 Brule Co. Camp – Kimball 27 Harding Co. Camp – Buffalo 28 Meade/Pennington Co. Camp – Union Center

July

 5 Codington/Hamlin Co. Camp – Watertown  9 Marshall Co. Camp – Britton 10 Brown Co. Camp – Aberdeen 11 Day Co. Camp – Webster 11 Aurora Co. Camp – Stickney 12 Minnehaha Co. Camp – Hartford 12 Jerauld/Buffalo Co. Camp – Wessington Springs 16 Roberts Co. Camp – Wilmot 16 Spink Co. Camp – Frankfort 17 McCook Co. Camp – Salem 18 Beadle Co. Camp – Huron 18 Bon Homme Co. Camp – Tyndall 19 Davison Co. Camp – Mitchell 19 Gregory Co. Camp – Gregory 25 Lake/Moody Co. Camp – Flandreau 27-29 District III & VII Camp – Lake Byron TBA Brookings Co. Camp TBA Deuel/Grant Co. Camp For updates and more camps, visit www.sdfu.org/calendar/list

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Camp Season Continued from Page 1

Blume, S.D. Farmers Union Education Director. “The lessons they learn today will stick with them for years to come as they take on leadership roles in their communities and future careers.” SDFU hosts nearly 50 camps across the state each year for children ages 5 to 18. These camps work to fulfill a vital purpose for the future of rural communities by educating children on agriculture careers that often help them return home to their rural communities. “Promoting the concept of careers in agriculture that have the potential to bring youth back home is important for the future of rural communities and maintaining our way of life,” says Haigh-Blume. “We talk a lot about those who have moved for their careers but we also need to promote the success stories of hometown returners and what they are doing to give back to their rural communities.” This year’s camp theme is “Cooperating for a Brighter Tomorrow.” Activities highlight cooperative education, careers, leadership and where food comes from. Teaching campers the importance of leadership and how they can brighten their tomorrow has always been a part of the camp experience. “Fun, food, friends and happy days is what camp is all about,” says HaighBlume. “It’s what keeps our camping

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family returning year after year.” Understanding farm safety is, as always, a priority at camp. Along with the usual discussion and focus of farm safety at camp, SDFU’s new farm safety trailer is scheduled to appear at several county camps, where campers will be given innovative demonstrations on topics such as grain safety, power take-off (PTO) safety, electrical safety, ATV use and more. “Farm safety is a very important aspect of agriculture,” says Haigh-Blume. “We want our campers to leave camp having a better grasp on how to keep themselves and others safe. I’m excited to see how the farm safety trailer engages campers.” SDFU camps are unique in that senior campers have a hand in creating the camp structure and shaping the experience for fellow campers. Taylin Montague, a senior at New Underwood High School, is one of two campers on the Senior Advisory Council working to create the most memorable camp experience possible. “Building a great camp is important because it gives campers the opportunity to learn and grow into leaders all while having fun,” says Montague. “For many kids, Farmers Union becomes a second family and it is important that camp is and can stay that way for these kids.” Junior Advisory Council member Haley Keizer, a senior at Corsica-Stickney

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High School, is excited to have a hand in planning a new and impactful aspect of state camp. “A focus at State Leadership Camp this year will be teaching campers the importance of mental health and positive coping skills, as well as, being able to spot emotional struggle in your peers,” says Keizer. “This subject isn’t talked about often enough. Teaching young campers these skills makes going through tough situations much easier for them and helps them spot emotional struggle in someone else. They could potentially save someone’s life.” The idea of a brighter tomorrow has a positive impact. “Brighter tomorrows are a theme we can all relate to,” says Haigh-Blume. “With a random act of kindness, a game, a smile and a new friend tomorrow is bright for all of us. Sometimes we just need a day to go unplugged and get back to the basics. Camp is a safe place to be yourself and be cherished for who you are. When we are in a safe place we all feel brighter about tomorrow.” To learn more about South Dakota Farmers Union camps in your area, go to www.sdfu.org/education/youth-camps. ■ by Christina Dexter, SDFU Legislative Specialist

JUNE 2018

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Union Farmer Roger Johnson National Farmers Union President

T

he big news from Washington is the 2018 Farm Bill. The House is expected to vote on its version in mid-May, while the Senate Agriculture Committee is writing its own version. Throughout the process, Farmers Union has been actively advocating legislation that works for farmers and ranchers, rural communities, hungry Americans, and the environment. Last month, the NFU board of directors passed a resolution stating its opposition to the House bill and recommending a number of improvements before its passage. Additionally, a group of farmers and farm advocates from the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic came to D.C. to share their Farm Bill priorities with their legislators. But the Farm Bill is not the only important piece of agriculture news. Renewable fuels, international trade volatility, the weakened farm economy and farm stress all continue to be issues of concern, and until they are resolved, Farmers Union will pursue policies and solutions in the best interest of family farmers and ranchers.

farmers. The NFU board advocated the restoration of mandatory funding for programs that improve access to local, regional and specialty markets and energy programs that promote development of the bioeconomy in rural areas. The bill contains some bad news for hungry Americans, too. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program may see budget cuts and more stringent work requirements for participants, even though there are already such requirements in place. The NFU board advised that the House maintain funding levels for consumer benefits under nutrition programs. In May, 13 farmers and farm advocates from the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic made the trip to Washington, D.C., to discuss the Farm Bill with their legislators. The group campaigned for many of the board’s requests, including the reauthorization and funding of working lands conservation programs and programs that support the development and growth of diverse markets.

NFU Board, Farmers Urge Congress to Strengthen Farm Bill In late April, the National Farmers Union Board of Directors passed a resolution stating its opposition to the House draft of the 2018 Farm Bill, H.R. 2. The House Agriculture Committee passed the bill last month and it is expected to be considered by the full chamber sometime in mid-May. The NFU board urged members of the House to make significant improvements to the Farm Bill before passing the legislation. As written, the bill is wholly inadequate for providing family farmers with the resources they need to endure weak commodity prices, large surpluses, an increasingly consolidated marketplace and depressed farm income. The Title I commodity programs would be largely the same as they were in 2014 Farm Bill. Price Loss Coverage (PLC) would maintain its reference prices, the threshold below which payments are triggered, for all commodities. As a result, struggling farmers will likely not receive an adequate amount of assistance to deal with such low commodity prices. The NFU board resolution recommended that Congress increase PLC reference prices to improve the farm safety net and offset potential trade retaliation. Additionally, they emphasized the need to provide dairy farmers, who have been particularly vulnerable to low prices, with enhanced price supports and a mechanism that manages our nation’s milk inventories to meet market demand. Additionally, the House draft fails to provide farmers with the tools they need to be the best possible stewards of our natural resources. The bill would eliminate the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), a working lands program that offers incentives for improving and maintaining conservation practices. The board decried the move and called for the reauthorization of CSP. The bill would also eliminate mandatory funding for Value-Added Producer Grants, Farmers Market and Local Food Promotion Programs, the National Organic Certification Cost Share Program, all of which facilitate the development of fair and diverse markets for family

Farmer’s Share Hits 15-Year Low Since 1993, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service (ERS) has reported on the farmer’s share of the American food dollar. This is the portion of every dollar that American consumer spends on food that is allotted to food producers. The rest of the dollar goes to marketing, processing, wholesaling, distribution and retailing. In April, ERS reported that the 2016 farmer’s share hit a record low, bottoming out at 14.8 cents. That number marks a 5 percent decline over the previous year, and the lowest mark for the farmer’s share since USDA ERS began reporting on the numbers 15 years ago. The rapid drop shadows the larger agricultural economic picture, which has been grim for some time. The difference is particularly stark for specific products. For instance, in 2014, beef cattle farmers were earning 44 cents for every dollar Americans spent on steak. This year, they are only earning 22 cents. Similarly, dairy producers, who have been hit especially hard by economic difficulties, have seen a drastically decreased return on investment. Four years ago, milk farmers were claiming more than half of the milk dollar, whereas today, that value stands at just 30 cents..

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JUNE 2018

Ethanol Agreement a Mixed Bag As an attempt to end an ongoing dispute about the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), President Donald Trump met with legislators and stakeholders from the oil and biofuel industries. The meeting concluded with an agreement to allow year-round use of E15 gasoline, a limit on RFS “hardship waivers” being handed out to refiners, and the possibility that Renewable Identification Numbers (RIN) credits could be applied to exports of renewable fuel. No cap on RIN prices, nor any offset for the hardship waivers that were handed out to large refiners were included in the agreement. The deal is not yet finalized – it must first go through the federal rulemaking process and implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). National Farmers Union viewed the agreement

Union Farmer

as a mixed bag for family farmers and ranchers. The organization was pleased with the decision to make E15 available during all seasons, but emphasized that moving toward higher blends like E30 is critical for maximizing environmental benefits as well as for opening market opportunities to farmers. NFU also felt ambivalent about the proposed changes to RFS’s RIN requirements and pricing. On the one hand, it is positive that caps will not be put on RIN prices, as this would disincentivize the blending of homegrown, renewable fuels in our transportation fuel sector. On the other hand, assigning RIN credits to biofuel exports would both devastate domestic demand for biofuels and likely provoke our trading partners into retaliation. That proposal, paired with at least 40 hardship waivers the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency already handed out to major refining operations, would eliminate demand for several billion gallons of biofuel. Farmers Union Urges Measures to Address Farm Stress Many farmers and ranchers cope with alarming levels of stress – financial risk, volatile markets, unpredictable weather, social isolation and heavy workloads can all place significant strain on farmers’ and ranchers’ mental and emotional well-being. Recently, the burden has been especially substantial due to the prolonged downturn in the farm economy. Throughout these tough times, Farmers Union has vocalized the need for additional support for struggling food producers. NFU President Roger Johnson reiterated this sentiment in a recent letter to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, emphasizing the role of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in providing assistance to those in crisis. The letter lays out the grim statistics of farm stress – farmers and ranchers commit suicide at a rate five times that of the general population, and 60 percent of rural residents live in areas with mental health professional shortages. Unfortunately, the weight of economic stress farmers experience is not expected to ease for some time. Net farm income has fallen by more than half in the last five years and may not recover for several years. To alleviate the pressures farmers are facing, Johnson recommended that the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) leverage its ubiquity and prominence in farming communities to provide stress assistance to farmers and ranchers. Specifically, he requested that the USDA develop and distribute training materials to help FSA employees identify and respond to mental stress; provide guidance and best practices to Cooperative Extension Services for conducting trainings, workshops and webinars on recognizing and responding to the signs of mental stress; and convene agricultural and rural stakeholders at the national, state and local levels to assess the causes of mental stress in farmers and ranchers, identify best practices in responding to that stress and leverage partnerships with nonprofit organizations and state and local agencies. ■ Current as of May 15, 2018

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Union Farmer From the President....

Democracy Works

A

s South Dakota family farmers and ranchers we As a general farm organization, we are constantly aware of many issues affecting family farmers. At the moment, one really has our attention, a new farm bill being considered in the U.S House, with 104 amendments submitted, which, at first blush, 16 seem to align with National Farmers Union policy. But, less than a handful get a yes vote from NFU. NFU is urging leadership to pass a farm bill that works for farmers and taxpayers. We urge them to implement legislation that supports farmers receiving fair compensation through the marketplace and depending less on bureaucracy. The current administration wants to make crop insurance a major portion of the new farm bill. Even though most active family crop farmers are satisfied with crop insurance in its current form, the president wants to make it great. He has not indicated what he will change to make it great, but that hasn’t stopped him from winging it until something comes together. So, I’d like to make a suggestion. The Inventory Management Soil Enhancement Tool (IMSET) proposal, which was developed by SDFU member Craig Blindert and focuses on farmer-led solution to poor markets. IMSET incentivizes soil health building while at the same time giving each individual farmer a tool assisting them to manage their crop inventory. It is our hope that IMSET could work as a product for RMA to release to farmers to use alongside crop insurance. As a member of SDFU, you all had an opportunity

South Dakota

Doug Sombke SDFU President

during our state convention to vote on this and then again, during the NFU convention. This was voted into national policy. IMSET is a great example of democracy in action. Even though it has yet to develop political attention on a national scale, with this administration, it has merit. As this president has proven, never say it can’t be done. As I write this, efforts are underway to get IMSET in front of the president for his consideration. The reason I became active in SDFU was because of times like today that I faced as a young farmer during the farm crisis of the 1980s. We are an organization that believes in the power of grassroots advocacy, the ones who support the underdog and anyone with a thought or dream of a better life for themselves and their family. I’d like to close this column on a positive note. I do see slow, yet positive change on the horizon as far as markets are concerned. The surplus is slowly being depleted, which is a sign markets will be responding very soon. It would appear we may have weathered the worst of the storm and are headed to better tomorrow. God Bless all you do! . Doug Sombke President SDFU

Union Farmer

A PUBLICATION OF SOUTH DAKOTA FARMERS UNION

South Dakota Union Farmer, ISSN 0745-8797, publishes 9 times per calendar year, with issues printed in February, March/April, May, June, July/August, September, October, November and December/January. Periodical postage paid at Madison, S.D. Karla Hofhenke, Publisher Lura Roti, Editor ~ Wendy Sweeter, Copy Editor Diane Martinson, Layout & Design

All information for publication must be submitted by the 15th of the month. You may submit items to address below or email items to: sdfu@sdfu.org POSTMASTER: Address changes to: SDFU, PO Box 1388, Huron, S.D. 57350-1388

Contact SDFU • 605.352.6761 1410 Dakota Avenue South, PO Box 1388, Huron, SD 57350 www.sdfu.org sdfu@sdfu.org

SDFU State Office Staff Karla Hofhenke.......ext. 114 Executive Director Huron Rocky Forman...............ext 117 Member Services Coordinator Huron

Rachel Haigh-Blume.... ext. 125 Education Director Tulare

Kecia Beranek.............. ext. 113 Communications Specialist Miller

Pam Evenson................ ext. 116 Membership Specialist Doland

Christina Dexter............ext 122 Legislative Specialist Huron

Kayla Stevens............... ext. 118 Controller Miller

Luanne Thompson.......ext. 111 Administrative Assistant Virgil

Karon Rembold.............ext 111 Receptionist Miller

SDFU Board of Directors Doug Sombke.........President Groton Wayne Soren.. Vice President Lake Preston Terry Sestak.............. District I Tabor Lisa Snedeker........... District II Woonsocket Gail Temple............. District III Clark

Contact NFU

Joel Keierleber........District IV Colome Dallis Basel...............District V Union Center Lynn Frey.................District VI Lemmon Chad Johnson........District VII Groton

National Farmers Union 20 F Street NW Suite 300 Washington, DC 20001

Roger Johnson, President ~ Patty Edelburg, Vice President Darin Von Ruden, Secretary ~ Doug Sombke, Treasurer 202.554.1600 www.nfu.org

WWW.SDFU.ORG

Union Farmer

JUNE 2018

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Union Farmer Cooperative Highlight: Rosebud Farmers Union Cooperative S pring is always a busy time for employees of Rosebud Farmers Union Cooperative. But spring 2018 is testing everyone’s stamina with simultaneous demand for spraying and application. “We are going from sunup to sundown,” explains Clayton Whitney, General Manager for Rosebud Cooperative, Gregory and Fairfax. Whitney says it would not be possible to meet patrons’ needs without the dedicated, loyal and hard-working employee team he serves with. “It’s tough to find people this good,”

he says of the cooperative’s 30 employees. Whitney says he and the board work to show their employees their value through pay and a strong benefit package. “My philosophy has always been, if you have good employees, give them good incentives and pay them what they are worth,” he explains. Whitney has served the members of Rosebud Cooperative for 23 years, when he began working in the shop driving a service truck. He moved into the role of general manager in 2016. “The employees I work with are like

family to me. We all try to get along because we are out working for the same main goal – to do the best we can for our cooperative and the members we serve,” Whitney explains. More information Rosebud Farmers Union Cooperative provides the following products and services to its members: bulk fuel, propane, fertilizer, custom chemical application, bulk feed, seed, farm store, auto and farm machinery service department, tire service trucks, full line of fencing supplies. ■

Sun Energy Continued from Page 5

Breitenmoser, who serves on the Lincoln County Board of Supervisors. Looking to the future, Breitenmoser who is a father of five, says for him, using solar energy is the right thing to do. “On our farm there are plenty of places to stick money. I chose to invest in solar energy because aside from the fact that I think it’s a

decent investment, I did it because I have five children and I want to set a good example,” Breitenmoser says. To learn how FUE can help you finance installation of solar energy, contact Dave Velde, dave@veldemoore.com. ■ by

FUE collaborated with North Wind Renewable Energy Cooperative to encourage Wisconsin farmers to consider solar energy. “Farmers understand the long-term investment on equipment, like these solar panels,” says Josh Stolzenburg, President of North Wind Renewable Energy Cooperative, an Amherst, Wisconsin, farmer and a Wisconsin Farmers Union member. How it works Because solar panels only weigh about 50 pounds each, the roof of farm buildings can easily handle the weight. Once installed, the solar panels work seamlessly with other electric sources to provide power. “When I turn on a machine or light switch, I can’t tell if the energy is from the panels or electric grid,” says Breitenmoser. And, when the sun isn’t shining, electricity pulls from the power grid. However, research shows that northern states, like Wisconsin and South Dakota actually produce the same amount of solar energy as Florida. “Why not harvest this power?” asks Doug Sombke, President of FUE and SDFU. Sombke explains that now that the pilot the solar energy program in Wisconsin has gone well, FUE looks forward to working with Farmers Union members from North and South Dakota, Minnesota and Montana. Also involved in county government, Breitenmoser says he sees farmers’ use of solar energy as an opportunity to help the entire rural community. “Every time you pay an electric bill, and the energy is produced by coal harvested 1,000 miles away, some of what you pay leaves your community and state – however, if energy is harvested from the sun, and it saves a farmer money, that is more money a farm family is able to spend locally,” explains

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JUNE 2018

Union Farmer

Lura Roti for SDFU

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Union Farmer

Congratulations!

Arlene Elliot, recently received a lifetime achievement recognition at the Credit Union Association of the Dakotas annual banquet and was inducted into their Hall of Fame. Arlene Elliot has been a volunteer at Aberdeen Federal Credit Union since 1997, for 21 years. She currently serves as their First Vice Chair. She was the SDFU State Director of Education from 1959-1967.

FARMERS UNION SIGNS AVAILABLE Show your Farmers Union spirit with a special Farmers Union sign. Available for a limited time, the sign makes a fun addition to the farm driveway, the side of a barn or even a statement piece in the house. The cost per sign is $10 or free with a 5-year or greater membership to Farmers Union. To get yours today, contact Membership Specialist Pam Evenson at 605-352-6761 ext 116 or at PEvenson@ sdfu.org.

Order Your Own Copy of the Farmers Union Centennial Cookbook Cookbooks are $10 plus tax and shipping. Contact Pam Evenson, 605-352-6761, ext 116, to place your order today!

5 Ways to Connect With Us! SOUTH DAKOTA FARMERS UNION mail to: sdfu@sdfu.org Like us for updates, photos, news, and so much more. https://www.facebook.com/ South-Dakota-Farmers-Union277721538812/ Follow us for the latest legislative updates and news. https://twitter.com/sdfarmersunion View videos at the South Dakota Farmers Union Channel. https://www.youtube.com/ user/sdfarmersunion

Departings Jeffrey Foster, 56, of Watertown, passed away, April 11, 2018, after a fouryear battle with ALS. His parents are Jeanette Foster and the late Ron Foster of Estelline. He is survived by his wife, Tammy; son, Jordan; daughter, Kelsi (Brandon) Houge; grandchildren and a sister, Carla (Tom) Clarke; and brother, Todd (Jolynn).

Anna Frederickson, 45, of Inver Grove Heights, passed away May 10, 2018. She is survived by her parents, David and Kay Kennedy Frederickson, and a sister, Emelyn (Devon). Anna’s Dad, David, is the former National Farmers Union President and current Secretary of Ag in Minnesota. Cards may be sent to Dave & Kay Frederickson, 2952 Fairview Ave N, Roseville MN 55113.

COOK’S CORNER

Mexican Dip 1 can refried beans, seasoned 1 c. sour cream 1 c. shredded cheddar cheese 1 tomato, cubed

Carol Sabers, Sturgis, S.D., Lifetime Member

1 c. olives, sliced Chopped onion and green peppers

Put beans in a glass pie pan or round cake dish. Top with other ingredients. Serve with taco chips. WWW.SDFU.ORG

Union Farmer

SDFU CLIP AND SAVE CALENDAR JUNE   6 12 12 13-16 16

Women in Ag, Faulkton KELO AM Radio, 10 a.m. Sioux Falls Ag Women’s Day, Brookings SD High School Rodeo, Belle Fourche District II Meeting, Mitchell

JULY   4 10 12 13-14 24 25

State Office Closed KELO AM Radio, 10 a.m. Sioux Falls Hutchinson Co. Annual Mtg., Tripp Young Producers, Sioux Falls State Board Meeting, Huron State Policy Meeting, Huron

AUGUST   6 Clay County Meeting, Irene   7 District VII Meeting, Aberdeen 14 KELO AM Radio, 10 a.m. Sioux Falls 30-Sept. 3 SD State Fair, Huron SEPTEMBER   1 SDFU Day, SD State Fair, Huron   3 State Office Closed 11 KELO AM Radio, 10 a.m. Sioux Falls 12-14 Fly-In, Washington D.C.

JUNE 2018

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Aberdeen Aberdeen Bison Bison Britton Brookings Brookings Brookings Buffalo Clark Doland Doland Faulkton Huron Irene Irene Kadoka Lemmon

Darrel Kessler J.R. Johnson Alan Voller Karen Voller Tom Farber Gary Ray Beth Reams Heidi Fields Jim Erk Lon Reidburn Bonnie Wagner Mark Rozell Dawn Melius Blaine Anderson Brendon Hansen Brian Hansen Donna Enders Carrie Derschan

229-3945 725-3003 244-7431 244-7431 448-5150 692-6735 690-3018 881-2830 375-3311 532-3299 635-6511 635-6511 598-6570 352-2130 263-2121 263-3342 837-2144 374-3462

Marion Menno Mitchell Piedmont Pierre Rapid City Rapid City Rapid City Sioux Falls Sisseton Spearfish Sturgis Watertown Webster Webster Winner Yankton

Kevin Albrecht Brendon Hansen Ryan Leischner Ce Faulkner Mefferd Agency Black Hills Agency Kasey Keller Lewis Agency Jeff Nord Erica Steiner Sabers Agency Scott Sabers Todd Nichols Debbie Baumgarn Larry Baumgarn Jeremy Clay James Murphy

941-0650 387-5555 996-9651 737-0463 224-4123 342-5555 343-4213 342-3585 338-5302 698-7316 642-8870 347-4507 886-9683 345-2640 345-2640 842-1556 664-2121

June 2018  
June 2018  
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