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Volume XCVI, NO. 4

Huron, SD

April 2013

South Dakota

Union Farmer A PUBLICATION OF SOUTH DAKOTA FARMERS UNION Tonsager to step down from USDA Under Secretary post May 3

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Sen. Johnson to Retire after term is up

Legislative Scorecard for 2013 Session

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Making Waves in Agriculture South Dakotans attend NFU Convention at Springfield, Mass.

Over two dozens South Dakotans traveled to the Northeast last month to attend the National Farmers Union’s 111th anniversary convention held at the Mass Mutual Center in Springfield, Mass. The large group of South Dakotans was there for four days of speakers, breakout ses- Pictured, from left, front row: SDFU President Doug Sombke of Groton, board member Terry Sestak of Tabor, delegate Tammy Basel of Union Center, delegate Paul Dennert of sions, tours, and policy discus- Columbia, Myles Bialas of Dimock, Bailey Zwahr of Sioux falls, Tawny Barry of Winner, sion. In all, nearly 600 Farmers Taylor Melius of Faulkton, SDFU Education Director Bonnie Geyer of Huron, Mitchell Mohror of Dell Rapids, and Tucker Greene of Plankinton. Back row: SDFU Legislation Union members from across the country attended the event. Director Mike Traxinger, delegate Steve Harwood of Union Center, SDFU Vice President Wayne Soren of Lake Preston, Larry Birgen of Sioux Falls, Corey Snedeker of Woon“The convention is an op- socket, Maria Nightingale of White Lake, delegate Lisa Snedeker of Woonsocket, Nathan portunity for our members to Nugteren of Canistota, and Jared Kloucek of Scotland. gather and exchange ideas, share struggles and network,” said NFU president Safety Modernization Act, continuation of reliable postal service, Foot and Mouth Disease in ArgenRoger Johnson. “This year’s convention theme tina, and appropriate regulation of small financial [was] ‘Making Waves in Agriculture,’ and Farminstitutions. ers Union members and all U.S. farmers and “We had just an incredible convention, and ranchers need to do just I’m so proud of the South Dakota delegates and that. We need to take an all they did this year,” said SDFU President Doug active role in encouragSombke. ing Congress to do its Serving as delegates this year were Sombke, job and pass a five-year SDFU Vice President Wayne Soren of Lake Presfarm bill.” ton, state board member Terry Sestak of Tabor, During the convenSteve Harwood and Tammy Basel, both of Union tion, Farmers Union Center, Lisa Snedeker of Woonsocket and Paul delegates, including Dennert, a Brown County farmer. seven from South Da“South Dakota’s delegation led the way on a kota, passed special orders of business, which number of new policies that were adopted by all of the delegates,” Sombke said. “From adding included emphasizing the passage of a five-year language favoring fair, nonpartisan legislative redistricting in all states, to calling for mandatory farm bill this year. Other funding of the Plum Island research center for special orders dealt with livestock diseases, the South Dakota delegation ongoing challenges to dairy farmers, the impleSee NFU CONVENTION Page 8 mentation of the Food

Bones to Step Down, Lentsch named new Secretary of Ag South Dakota Secretary of Agriculture Walt Bones has announced that he will retire April 29, and Gov. Dennis Daugaard has already picked his successor. Lucas Lentsch was announced April 2 as the next South Dakota secretary of agriculture. Lentsch is a native of the Britton area where his family runs a farm. Lentsch serves on the board of directors of South Dakota Agriculture and Rural Leadership Inc., is a former staffer of the South Dakota Department of Walt Bones Agriculture as its director of agriculture development. He also previously served as the executive director of the South Dakota Republican Party. Bones, who owns a farm near Parker, was appointed by Gov. Daugaard to his post in 2011. “In his two years as the secretary of agriculture, Walt Bones has been a pleasure to work with and I’m saddened to see him go,” Sombke said. “He was a farmer first, and came at the job with a farmer’s mentality. He knows first-hand what it’s Lucas Lentsch like to take on the risk of farming and make a living off the land. That was one of his greatest attributes, he looked at See NEW AG SECRETARY Page 4


Union Farmer From the President...

Abraham Lincoln once said, “All men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a mans character, give him power.” South Dakota is a conservative state which can be a good thing but too much of one thing is never good. As in life, the political process needs a balance. Even though this last year’s legislative session demonstrated better cooperation between the political wills to work together than in the past. There still is the issue of Doug Sombke unbalance in representaSDFU President tion in Pierre. As we all know, more and more people are leaving rural South Dakota and moving to the urban communities of Sioux Falls and Rapid City. Now, there is nothing wrong with this until you compare things like population and taxes, who is represented and how they are taxed. Do we have a fair collection and distribution of funds supporting public services and infrastructure? Are all South Dakotans being treated equally? The answer to those questions was in the news not long ago, pointing out where our legislative leadership resides today compared to 30 years ago. There are fewer farmers in the Legislature and more lawyers than we had in the last three decades. Now, I know as our lives move on a pendulum, moving from one side to the other. But our government, which is designed to serve all South Dakotan’s fairly, should do everything in its power to ensure that is the case. Yet, when faced with the task of ensuring voting districts are drawn fairly, many legislators don’t trust the citizens of South Dakota to handle it. During discussion on a proposal to create a bipartisan, citizen-only legislative redistricting commission (House Joint Resolution 1001), Rep. David Novstrup, R-Aberdeen, had something to say that I think is very telling.

“The citizens being the ones that decide the districts somewhat makes me nervous,” Novstrup said. “Not that I don’t trust them, but it just somewhat makes me nervous.” In other words, legislators want to pick their own voters, and don’t trust the voters to pick the legislators. David, it’s apparent that you are afraid of not getting re-elected if you can’t decide who votes for you and who doesn’t. Such statements should be a siren to all South Dakotas, alerting us all that we need to take control of our government, not the other way around. But what can South Dakotan’s do about it? We can support proposals like creating singlemember House districts and a nonpartisan, or at least bipartisan, redistricting committee of equal representation politically. Wouldn’t it be easier for the legislators to do this? After all isn’t that why we send them to Pierre every year anyway? YES! But, when they have their own self-interests in mind, we must take charge or suffer the consequences. Another example of the use of power was covered recently by the press. The headline in the Aberdeen American News read: “State water board chairman loses seat.” It was an article from respected writer Bob Mercer about Brad Johnson of Watertown losing his seat on the Regional Watershed Task Force to Kim Vanneman of Ideal, a former state legislator. Bob did a very good job writing a nonbiased article. But everyone who follows politics in South Dakota closely at all could read between the lines. This is just another position filled to satisfy the will of those with power. At a time when agriculture is losing more representation in Pierre and Washington, D.C., because of an out-migration from rural areas to urban, we need to come together, not be divided by political views. As President Lincoln said, those in power here in South Dakota are showing their true character. The question is: Do we as South Dakotan’s approve? Have a safe and joyous spring and God bless all you do!

Union Farmer A PUBLICATION OF SOUTH DAKOTA FARMERS UNION South Dakota Union Farmer, ISSN 0745-8797, publishes ten times per calendar year, with issues printed in January, February, March, April, May/June, July, August, Sept/Oct, November, and December. Copies are available for $3.00 per year (included with membership dues), and non-members annual subscription is $7.50. Advertising rate is $6.00/column inch. Periodical postage paid at Mitchell, S.D. POSTMASTER: Address changes to: SDFU, PO Box 1388, Huron, S.D. 57350-1388

Contact SDFU 888.734.8136

605.352.6761

1410 Dakota Avenue South, PO Box 1388, Huron, SD 57350 www.sdfu.org

sdfu@sdfu.org

SDFU State Office Staff

Karla Hofhenke.......ext. 114 Secretary Treasurer Huron

Bonnie Geyer...........ext. 125 Education Director Huron

Chris Studer.............ext. 122 Communications/Marketing Huron

Garret Bischoff.......ext. 118 Membership Director Huron

Mitch Fargen...........ext. 116 Rural Development Director Sioux Falls

Angela Tarasoff......ext. 111 Membership Specialist Huron

Mike Traxinger........ext. 112 Legislative Director Claremont

Leslie Rupiper........ext. 115 Foundation Exec. Director Sioux Falls

SDFU Board of Directors Doug Sombke.........President Groton

Wayne Soren..........Vice Pres. Lake Preston Terry Sestak...........District I Tabor Jim Wahle..............District II Salem Franklin Olson.....District III Pierpont

Contact NFU

Joel Keierleber.......District IV Colome Dallis Basel..............District V Union Center Lynn Frey...............District VI Lemmon Chad Johnson.......District VII Groton

National Farmers Union 20 F Street NW Suite 300 Washington, DC 20001

Roger Johnson, President ~ Claudia Svarstad, Vice President Doug Peterson, Secretary ~ Don Teske, Treasurer 202.554.1600 www.nfu.org

It’s April, and that means it’s time for

QUIZ BOWL!

The Farmers Union’s ‘Team up to Safety’ quiz bowl competition is coming to Brookings Monday, April 15 during the state FFA convention.

Come and cheer on your hometown team on the campus of South Dakota State University beginning at 9am in the SDSU Student Union on campus!

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South Dakota

Farmers Union Members get

20% OFF

*

their entire purchase at

Double D

Western Wear & Tack 800 21st St., Huron, SD

www.doubledwestern.net Please present this coupon with your purchase * Excludes all boots, men’s jeans and tack

April 2013

Union Farmer

www.sdfu.org


Education News

Union Farmer

By Bonnie Geyer Education Director

Your Education Department is busy preparing for all the activities of the camping program, farm safety programs and the Senior Achievement Education Award trips! We are very excited for another successful summer! I am pleased to announce the hiring of the 2013 summer interns. Joining us for their second summer will be Hannah Lily of Aberdeen and Emma Smith of Huron. Hannah attends Houghton College in New York. She’s been active in the Farmers Union youth program as a camper, Junior Advisory Council member, Torchbearer, scholarship recipient and a member of the National Youth Advisory Council. Emma Smith attends USD majoring in advertising and public relations. While serving as 2012 summer interns, Hannah and Emma did an outstanding job for the Youth Camping Program and I am so pleased that they will be returning! Joining Hannah and Emma will be Kortny Sterrett of Huron and Nicole Seible of Merrill, Iowa. Kortny attends USD and Nicole attends SDSU. We welcome all of our interns to the team! We are working hard to get ready for the camping season and I challenge you to help us continue to make our youth program grow. Encourage your family and friends to send their children to camps or offer to bring them to camp yourself. Also, when you receive a camp flyer in the mail please share the information with at least one other individual or family in your area. It is up to each of us to invite others to be part of the Farmers Union family and we must offer all children this great opportunity. We are also busy getting ready for State Camp at Storm Mountain in the Black Hills. I’ve been so impressed with the kindness and closeness that the youth display when they come together for this week long camp and how they gain confidence and skills that will bring this organization and our communities into the future. This camp is offered to youth who have finished the 7th grade through the summer following their senior year in high school. Registration forms are out and if you have any questions please give us a call at (605) 352-6761, Ext. 125. You can also obtain a form by checking the website, www.sdfu.org. Congratulations to the districts and the counties which have their camp dates set. Please give us a call to schedule your camp date as soon as possible so we can begin promoting your camp. Remember the opportunity for 25 South Dakota high school seniors to share $25,000 in scholarships from Farmers Union Insurance Agency in cooperation with the South Daktota Farmers Union Foundation. Find more details on the application requirements and find application forms online at www.sdfufoundation.org. The application deadline is April 15, 2013.

www.sdfu.org

2012 Torchbearers received a trip to the National Farmers Union convention in Springfield, Mass., March 2-7. Attending the trip were, front row, Maria Nightingale of White Lake, Bailey Zwahr of Sioux Falls, Education Director Bonnie Geyer of Huron, Taylor Melius of Faulkton and Tawny Barry of Winner. Back row, Mitchell Mohror of Dell Rapids, Jared Kloucek of Scotland, Corey Snedeker of Woonsocket, Myles Bialas of Dimock, Nathan Nugteren of Canistota and Tucker Greene of Plankinton.

Torchbearers Travel to Northeast A large group of 2012 Torchbearers hopped on a plane in Sioux Falls and traveled to Springfield, Mass., to attend the National Farmers Union’s 111th anniversary convention March 2-5, 2013. Attending the convention for their Torchbearer Award Trip were Maria Nightingale of White Lake, Bailey Zwahr of Sioux Falls, Education Director Bonnie Geyer of Huron, Taylor Melius of Faulkton and Tawny Barry of Winner. Back row, Mitchell Mohror of Dell Rapids, Jared Kloucek of Scotland, Corey Snedeker of Woonsocket, Myles Bialas of Dimock, Nathan Nugteren of Canistota and Tucker Greene of Plankinton. The young people, who have put in a lot of time and effort to reach the level of Torchbearer,

Union Farmer

were treated to a trip to New Englad for their efforts. They were able to travel to some of Springfield’s local attractions and take in the speakers and all of the convention events. “We had a wonderful trip and the young people were able to learn a lot about how national policy comes together,” said SDFU Education Director Bonnie Geyer. “It’s a chance for them to hear from nationally-known speakers and presenters, get to know other young people and Farmers Union members from across the country, and reall get an up close look at how the policy is put together.”

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Union Farmer

‘Keep COOL’ Effort Underway National Farmers Union (NFU) has joined a coalition of 229 farm, rural, faith, consumer and environmental organizations from 45 states in delivering a letter urging the U.S. Department of Agriculture to protect the integrity of Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) for meat products. The 2008 Farm Bill included mandatory COOL provisions for beef, pork, poultry, fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables and some nuts, but Canada and Mexico successfully challenged the implemented rules for meat products at the World Trade Organization as a barrier to international trade. The USDA has issued proposed new rules that simplify and clarify COOL to comply with the WTO decision. “Consumers want more information about the source of their food, not less,” said Chris Waldrop, director of the Food Policy Institute at Consumer Federation of America. “Strengthening the Country of Origin Label provides consumers with more accurate and precise information about the source of beef and pork products they purchase.” The proposed rules that the USDA issued in early March strengthen the COOL labels by ensuring that all meat from animals born, raised and processed in the United States will bear a “born, raised and slaughtered in the USA” label and

eliminating some of the confusing, vague labeling provisions that were highlighted in the WTO ruling. “U.S. farmers and ranchers take pride in what they produce, and consumers ought to be able to know the origins of their food,” said National Farmers Union President Roger Johnson. “NFU has long supported COOL and urges the USDA to move forward with the new, more accurate, strengthened proposed rule.” Ben Burkett, president of the National Family Farm Coalition and a farmer from Mississippi, added: “COOL is very important for the farmer members of the Mississippi Association of Cooperatives as we market our products in our state and region. We strongly support the USDA’s revisions on this critical issue.” The letter demonstrates the broad-based support for sensible country of origin labeling rules. The letter was submitted to the USDA as part of the regulatory comment period and sent to USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack. The federal comment period closes on April 11, 2013, and the WTO ruling directed USDA to offer new COOL rules by May 23, 2013. For details on submitting comments, visit www.nfu.org and click on the “Keep COOL” link at the top of the page.

NEW AG SECRETARY: Lentsch to Take Over SDDA Continued from Page 1 policy from the farmer’s perspective. I thank him for his service to our state and I wish him well.” Since leaving the Department of Agriculture last year, Lentsch, 39, has worked for Reinke Gray Wealth Management of Pierre as a financial advisor. He’s a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. It is a tremendous honor to be asked to serve as Secretary of Agriculture,” Lentsch said. “I look forward to partnering with Governor Daugaard, industry leadership, and our state’s farmers and ranchers to support South Dakota’s leading industry.” Along with his work as a financial advisor recently, Lentsch was a registered lobbyist during the 2013 legislative session for a newly formed group called the South Dakota Dairy Products Alliance. His employer listed on the South Dakota Secretary of State’s website was an address for Valley Queen Cheese Factory in Milbank.

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“I’m looking forward to working with Mr. Lentsch in his new position,” Sombke said. “Having worked for the department in the past, we expect he’ll be able to hit the ground running and work with farmers and ranchers to enhance the agriculture industry in South Dakota. “I’m hopeful that Mr. Lentsch will continue to make the ethanol industry in South Dakota a priority of the department and that he can work to put policies into place that benefit the ethanol industry, our economy and the agriculture industry. Water management issues should also be a top priority. Whether it’s drainage or drought management, our farmers and ranchers who have dealt with these issues need the Department of Agriculture to take the lead in cleaning up water management and drainage laws and work on drought management to help solve some major problems.”

Union Farmer

Membership News By Garret Bischoff Membership Director

Will spring ever get here? What a drastic change in weather from last spring. I just had to order another fill of my propane tank; I’m hoping I won’t have to use much until October! Hopefully the cool weather this spring means we won’t have such a long and hot summer this year. The good thing about a cold spring is that we don’t have much mud around our farm yet. Keeping the new baby calves warm has been a struggle, but at least we aren’t in 10 inches of muck. We should be getting pretty busy in a few weeks as calving starts to slow down, but the fields finally start getting to where we can start planting. This year is shaping up to be a good one, with our state and national convention behind us we are fired up and ready to go out and grow our membership this year. We’ve already had a few membership drives and activities in a few counties, but we need to get more going. With your help we can grow our organization into a larger and more active one. I’m looking for counties interested in membership drives and other activities in your county. The more we can do to promote Farmers Union from the county level the better our year will be. There are some really great incentives for members who want to go out and help grow membership. The Silver Star award and Blue Star award from National Farmers Union makes your hard work worthwhile. Last year Silver Star award winners received $500 gift card along with some other great prizes, and the Blue star received $350 gift card with some great prizes. But it’s not just about getting rewards. True rewards come from hard work, and making sure people know what Farmers Union does and the impact we can make together on the future of South Dakota. It’s an important job, and working with you we can accomplish our goals of growing stronger into the future. If you are interesting in helping to recruit members so you can be eligible for an award or if you want some ideas of things that can be done in your county or district to get some activity going, please contact me at 605-3526761 extension 118 or email me at gbischoff@ sdfu.org.

www.sdfu.org


Rural Development News

Union Farmer

By Mitch Fargen Rural Development Director

All good things must come to an end. I’m always open to change because I believe it makes us all better, and can make organizations even stronger. Without change, you can only know a small portion of yourself. The more you change, the more you grow. A major change is coming to my life, and it will be bittersweet. I am leaving South Dakota Farmers Union this month and moving to California toward the end of April. I am really excited to make the move because I look forward to new challenges and new adventures. I have been with SDFU for 5 ½ years, working on almost everything in the office: membership director, legislative director, rural development director, interim executive director of the SDFU Foundation and just about anything else they wanted me to do. I have had fun starting my career here and I am so grateful to have this chance to work for a great organization and meet so many great people. I want to thank Doug Sombke and Karla Hofhenke for always being there for me and helping me in my career. I know sometimes I was difficult to work with, but I know they always saw the best in me and helped me at work and in my personal life. I also want to say thank you to the staff and board members at SDFU for putting up with me for the past few years. I have learned a lot from all of you that I will take forward in my career. I’m grateful for the programs and initiatives I was able to work on over my time here and the impact they had on our state and our members. Whether it was the Rural Economic And Leadership (REAL) Development Program, the Cabela’s incentives, MarketPlace, Jr. REAL, Quiz Bowl, SDFU house parties, the Farmers Union Young Adults Group, the SDSU collegiate chapter, brown bags events, blender pump education forums, Carbon Credits, wind and ethanol forums, tech school outreach, A Night on the Prairie, the president’s pheasant hunts, fundraising or special legislative issues, they were all special. I am also proud with all the legislative successes we have seen in my time at SDFU and being a state legislator. We changed the way ethanol is distributed throughout South Dakota and set the standard for Congress by using blender pumps and by pushing for the use of higher blends of ethanol. We also changed the way South Dakota deals with the wind industry and the landowner protections that we put into place and clarified regulations and restrictions for the wind industry. Again I want to say thank you to all of the SDFU members, it has been a great 5 ½ years at South Dakota Farmers Union and I will never forget it.

www.sdfu.org

By NFU President Roger Johnson

Greetings from Washington! The first three months of 2013 have proven to be quite busy for NFU and culminated with our version of March Madness — NFU’s annual convention. As a grassroots organization, the face-to-face time we get with our members during our national convention is critical. This year’s convention in Springfield, Mass., was action packed, and concluded with the adoption of the policies that will serve as the guiding principles for the year to come in Washington, D.C. This year marked the first time the NFU convention traveled to the Northeast, and the New England Farmers Union couldn’t have been better hosts. Thank you again to everyone who attended and to our many speakers, sponsors, exhibitors and volunteers who made this convention a success. We look forward to seeing many of you next year, when NFU’s 112th anniversary convention travels to Santa Fe, N.M. Farm Bill NFU continues to prod Congress to pass a five-year farm bill. On Jan. 1, 2013, Congress hastily passed a one-year extension that expires in September 2013. The first quarter of 2013 came and went with no additional action on a new farm bill. Now farmers, ranchers, and the lenders that provide them credit are at Congress’s mercy, struggling to make business decisions in this uncertain policy environment. During NFU’s recent convention, NFU members renewed the organization’s priorities for a five-year farm bill. Delegates in attendance passed a special order of business that outlined these important issues, and members wrote letters to their members of Congress expressing the importance of the expedient passage of a five-year bill. “We urge Congress to immediately pass, and the president sign, a comprehensive five-year farm bill in its entirety. We are opposed to any further piecemeal extension of the current expired farm bill,” the special order states. Priorities include a strong safety net, a robust conservation title, mandatory funding for renewable energy programs, adequate funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and restored funding for the 2008 farm bill programs that were extended in January 2013 without funding or programs that weren’t extend-

Union Farmer

ed at all. The policy uncertainty caused by short-term farm bill extensions and delays are affecting family farmers’ and ranchers’ ability to obtain commercial credit, improve their business, or pass their farm on to their children. It is time that the internal politics go by the wayside and for Congress to come together to do right by their constituents and pass a five-year farm bill. Family Farmer Advocacy Network Also at the convention, NFU unveiled its new Family Farmer Advocacy Network (FFAN) a group of grassroots advocates who will lead Farmers Union members in grassroots activities across the country. FFAN members penned more than 350 letters, in only two days, to their members of Congress urging prompt action on the farm bill and other legislative issues. We need to sharpen our approach to prod a dysfunctional Congress into action. If you are willing to help, we’d love to have you become a FFAN. To join our network and become a FFAN, please fill out the form at www.SurveyMonkey.com/s/96XG2RM to update your contact information. NFU staff will contact you occasionally with requests to contact lawmakers about specific legislative proposals to educate them about how the legislation will affect family farmers and ranchers. Comments for COOL Rule Being Accepted The Federal Register formally published a new Country-of-Origin Labeling (COOL) rule on March 11 to bring the United States into compliance with World Trade Organization rulings. NFU stands in strong support of this rule. Under the proposed rule, origin designations for animals slaughtered in the United States would be required to specify each production step – where the animal was born, raised and slaughtered. In addition, this proposed rule would eliminate the allowance for any commingling of muscle cut covered commodities of different origins. These changes will provide consumers with more specific information about muscle cut covered commodities. NFU continues to call for farmers, ranchers and consumers to weigh in with their views on Country-of-Origin labeling. On Monday, the new COOL rule was published in the Federal Register, and NFU supports the language as proposed. Visit www.nfu.org for more information.

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Union Farmer Legislative News By Mike Traxinger Legislative Director

Many of you are right in the middle of calving season, prepping for planting, and looking forward to a little warmer weather. The 2013 legislative session has officially come to an end. This year’s session we saw a variety of successes on bills focused on improving animal damage control policy and monies, surface-owner protections for oil and gas development, a clean up of the state’s water drainage statute and many more. Make sure to take a look at our Legislative Scorecard starting on page 11 Most recently on “Veto Day,” March 25, the Legislature met to appoint members to ongoing task forces and to determine any summer studies that should be conducted. The summer studies have yet to be announced, however, the two ongoing task forces that directly affect agriculture are the Agricultural Land Assessment Task Force and the Regional Watershed Task Force. Most recently the members of the Regional Watershed Task Force have been announced and its first meeting has been scheduled for Monday, April 22, in Mitchell at the Ramada Inn and Suites Conference Center at 9 a.m. Watershed management and drought mitigation are extremely important issues in our industry. As our state lawmakers continue to work on improving our state laws governing watersheds, it is imperative that our agricultural producers have a strong voice and representation during this ongoing discussion. Please attend the task force meeting April 22 if you can. Call me if you have any questions. I expect to travel around the state over the next few months in an effort to meet with you to discuss the direction we should take in updating our watershed laws. If you’d like to host a meeting in your area on watershed issues, please contact the state office and please contact me with any thoughts, concerns or comments that you might have. Make sure to be on the lookout for the Legislature’s announcement of the appointees to the Agricultural Land Assessment Task Force and any upcoming summer study committees. Our next edition of the Union Farmer will feature those appointees and a compilation of all of the bills that have been signed into law by the governor that affect agriculture in our state.

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Tonsager to Retire from USDA

Former South Dakota Farmers Union President to Step Down May 3 USDA Undersecretary of Rural Development Obama Administration was the latest part of a Dallas Tonsager has announced that he will leave distinguished career of service to agriculture and his post as head of the department May 3. rural America. I’m proud of the work we have “After spending 12 gratifying years in leaderachieved together and I wish Dallas the best in his ship positions at the United States Department of future endeavors.” Agriculture, I have decided to move on to the next Tonsager was appointed by President Barack chapter in my life,” Tonsager said. “I am enorObama as the Undersecretary for Rural Developmously proud of USDA’s record ment in 2009. Before taking accomplishments — especially over USDA Rural Developthose of my colleagues at Rument, Tonsager was on the ral Development.” board of directors for the Farm A native South Dakotan and Credit Administration from former president of South Da2004-2009. He served as the kota Farmers Union, Tonsager executive director of the South says he does not plan to retire Dakota Value-Added Agriculbut will seek other opportuniture Development Center from ties in the public or private 2002-2004, and was South Dasectors. He said he plans to rekota’s state director of USDA main in the Washington, D.C., Rural Development during area, but often travels back to President Bill Clinton’s adminSouth Dakota where he is still istration from 1993-2001. involved in his family’s farmHe served two terms as ing operation near Oldham. president of South Dakota “In recent years, Rural De- Dallas Tonsager speaks at the 2012 South Farmers Union from 1988velopment has carried out more Dakota Farmers Union state convention held 1993. at Aberdeen. Tonsager has announced he will work to help rural communi“Dallas Tonsager has dedileave his post as USDA Under Secretary of ties than at any other time in cated his life to public service Rural Development. the agency’s history,” Tonsager and improving rural America,” said. “We have provided affordable, quality hous- said SDFU President Doug Sombke after hearing ing in rural America, helped tens of thousands of of Tonsager’s planned departure. “When Dallas rural businesses, and played a key role in helping took over as the head of USDA Rural Developrural Americans create homegrown energy. We’ve ment, we were extremely proud first of all beachieved these results with a shrinking staff and cause he’s a South Dakotan, and the fact that he’s an uncertain budget, but I never questioned the served as president of our organization makes us commitment of our team at Rural Development. extremely proud of all he’s accomplished. Leading this group of 5,000 talented men and “It’s been such a pleasure to work with him women has been an honor.” over the past four years as he has led USDA Rural In an official statement released by USDA, Development. Although we’re saddened to hear Tonsager also thanked President Barack Obama that he won’t continue in his current position, we and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack for the thank Dallas for his service and wish him and his opportunity to serve. “I look forward to colwife Sharon all the best in their future endeavlaborating with them and all of my friends as we ors,” Sombke said. continue to serve rural America.” Tonsager grew up on a dairy farm near OldIn a USDA release, Agriculture Secretary Tom ham and has been involved in the diversified farm Vilsack said, “Dallas Tonsager’s efforts as Under operations since 1976. He graduated from South Secretary for Rural Development have helped Dakota State University with a degree in agriculincrease opportunity for thousands of rural famiture in 1976. Dallas and his wife, Sharon, have lies, businesses and communities. Dallas’s service two sons. to the U.S. Department of Agriculture under the

INSURING A BRIGHTER TOMORROW Scholarship Application Deadline is

APRIL 15, 2013

Visit www.sdfufoundation.org for application information

Union Farmer

www.sdfu.org


Union Farmer Foundation News A Career of Public Service

Sen. Tim Johnson announces his retirement from the U.S. Senate “I will be 68 years old at the end of this term, and it is time for me to say goodbye,” said Sen. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., during a press conference held March 26 on the campus of the University of South Dakota, his alma mater. When his current six-year term in the U.S. Senate expires, Tim Johnson says he’s going to step down. It will be the end of a long and storied career serving South Dakota. South Dakota Farmers Union President Doug Sombke said Sen. Johnson has always been a strong voice for those in rural South Dakota and agricultural producers. “Sen. Johnson has been a champion for those who make their living off the land and we’re extremely grateful for his service and his tireless work on behalf of family farmers and ranchers in South Dakota,” Sombke said. He touted Johnson’s tireless work on a major piece of legislation important to producers. “We would not have Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) laws in this country without Sen. Tim Johnson,” Sombke said. “He’s always been a strong supporter of farm bill legislation. He has been at the forefront of countless pieces of legislation that help family farmers and ranchers survive and succeed. South Dakota owes a lot to Sen. Johnson for all of the work he has done. His leadership is second to none and I appreciate all of his work to make life better for agricultural producers in South Dakota and across the country.” The senator, who has served in public office since his political career began in 1979, has never lost an election. After serving in the South Dakota House of Representatives from 1979-1982, he ran for the state Senate. He won. From 1983-1986 he

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Sen. Tim Johnson served in the state Senate chambers before running for the U.S. House in 1986. Again, he won. He ran against Sen. Larry Pressler in 1996, and he won. After a bitterly close battle with then Rep. John Thune, Johnson kept his seat in the Senate with a narrow victory. In 2006, Johnson was struck with a stroke-like brain injury. He survived and is still recovering from the injury that took much his mobility and hurt his speech. But he ran for re-election in 2008, and Sen. Johnson won. Now, over three decades from the time he first stepped into public life, the undefeated senator is stepping down. “He’s always been a tireless advocate during times of trouble and times of success in agriculture and has stood strong for so many years for our state. He’ll be sorely missed. I can’t thank him enough for his service. I wish Sen. Johnson and his wife Barbara all the best in the future.”

Union Farmer

By Leslie Rupiper Morrow SDFU Foundation Executive Director

Greetings from the Farmers Union Foundation! If you’re like me, you’ve been wondering if spring will ever get here. Just when I think our cold weather is over, Mother Nature sends another blast. This never-ending winter has me thinking a lot about patience. Humorous author Barbara Johnson once wrote, “Patience is the ability to idle your motor, when you feel like stripping your gears.” Isn’t that the truth? I admit I’m not the most patient person — but I’m working on it. Being a non-profit fundraiser is gradually teaching me that sometimes good things really do come to those who wait. It’s so easy to look down the road and see all of the accomplishments you’d like to achieve, the young people you’d like to impact, and the programs you’d like to pursue. It would be great if this could all be done with the wave of a wand. But that’s just not reality. We tend to reach such aspirations slowly — through hard work, determination, and the support of others. It takes patience. When I look back on some of the accomplishments I’m most proud of, I realize they wouldn’t be nearly as special to me if I would have achieved them in an instant. Instead, it was knowing that I’d persevered despite trials and tribulations that made the ultimate result even better. I try to remember those experiences now, when I’m feeling impatient about one thing or another. We can be proud of the Farmers Union Foundation, and the way its supporters have helped it grow. We continue to move steadily forward, solid in our mission and confident in our methods of building South Dakota’s next generation of leaders. Increased attendance at our camps and in leadership programs like REAL and Jr. REAL are proof that our patience is paying off. Farmers Union families are spreading the word about the benefits of these programs, and the Foundation is reaching out to more people. It was Aristotle who said, “Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.” We are already reaping some of the sweet rewards from these important programs, and we’ll continue to see the benefits in the years to come. Being patient is worth it, whether you’re waiting for change, or simply waiting for spring.

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Union Farmer

NATIONAL CONVENTION: Farmers Union members give over $58,000 to Feeding America Continued from Page 1 represented our state extremely well and had a major impact on the national policy for the next year.” NFU President Roger Johnson kicked off the convention March 2 with an address to attendees of the opening banquet. In his address, Johnson outlined priorities for the organization and encouraged NFU’s members to be engaged and “make waves.” “As an organization, our voice has to be louder,” said Johnson. “We are going to keep fighting for Country-of-Origin Labeling (COOL). We believe that consumers want to and ought to know where their food comes from. “Getting a five-year farm bill passed this year is going to be a big, big challenge ... but it is critical to provide certainty to our farmers and ranchers.” Members heard from a variety of speakers, including U.S. Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Kathleen Merrigan. Merrigan, a native of the Northeast, spoke National Farmers Union President to the national Roger Johnson addresses the crowd at the national convention. convention attendees about a wide range of topics from the USDA’s perspective. Her main point centered around Congress’ inaction on the most important piece of legislation to farmers, ranchers and rural America. “By failing to pass a five-year farm bill, Congress is tapping the breaks on the momentum that has been building in rural America,” said Merrigan. “We need a farm bill, and we need it now.” Merrigan also noted in her address that as U.S. farmers and ranchers become more active with consumers, they will “gain more appreciation for the hard work and sacrifice that goes into producing our food.” “It was encouraging to hear from the Deputy Secretary that the USDA continues to promote the importance of Congress passing a five-year farm bill as soon as possible,” said Johnson. “Today we gained perspective from leaders in the industry and our own future leaders.” Convention attendees had the opportunity to attend breakout sessions on topics such as the shared challenges among a diversified agricultural

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landscape; tying conservation compliance to crop by the Howard G. Buffett Foundation. Last year, insurance; Farmers Union’s place in international Buffett challenged Farmers Union members to agriculture; scaling up to meet demand; farm raise funds for Feeding America, and pledged to safety; and the changing and emerging roles for match every dollar up to $50,000 donated through women in agriFarmers Union. culture. The funds raised “The farm bill by Farmers Union is very complex members will benand impacts efit the food banks many parts of in the counties in the agriculture which they were industry,” said generated. Johnson. “Speak“Millions of ers and breakout Americans strugsessions helped gle with hunger to educate memevery day,” said bers on many Johnson. “As the components of producers of feed, the farm bill food, fuel and 2013 delegates, from left, Doug Sombke of Groton, Terry Sestak of Tabor, so that they are fiber, we have an Tammy Basel of Union Center, Lisa Snedeker of Woonsocket, Paul Dennert of able to make obligation to our Columbia, Wayne Soren of Lake Preston and Steve Harwood of Union Center. informed debates fellow man.” when discussing The convention organizational policy.” also featured agricultural tours and the “EveNFU also recognized outstanding members ning for Education” gala, an event to support the during a convention awards luncheon. Each year educational efforts of the NFU Foundation. More top recruiters are recognized by at the convention than 350 people attended the gala, which featured with recognition awards. Tom Farber of South a live auction, entertainment, and presentations Dakota received the NFU Blue Star Award for his by some of the outstanding organizations leadmember recruitment efforts. ers who have participated in NFU’s education Seventeen programs. Nucounty Farmers merous prizes Union organiwere awarded. zations were South Dakota recognized with Farmers Union Leadership youth particiAchievement pated in the gala Awards, includby showing off ing Bon Homme the live auction County Farmers items and walking Union, Brown them through the County Farmers crowd. Union, and Deuel/ “Farmers Grant County Union educational Farmers Union. activities and USDA Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Kathleen Merrigan discusses a number The Leadership summer camps of issues related to the agriculture industry from her perspective within USDA. Achievment touch thousands Award is given to of rural youth county organizations which meet certain requireeach year, teaching them important lessons from ments of increased organizational activity and food nutrition to grassroots activism,” said Johnmembership growth for the previous year. North son. “The generosity of those participating in this Dakota Farmers Union received the Outstanding event allows us to provide leadership training and Leadership Award. education for rural Americans of all ages.” During the convention, NFU also presented The 2014 National Farmers Union convention Feeding America with a check for more than will be held in Santa Fe, N.M. $58,000 as part of a matching challenge made

Union Farmer

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2013 South Dakota delegate Tammy Basel of Union Center speaks on an issue in front of the other delegates from across the country at the NFU convention.

2013 South Dakota delegate and SDFU board member Terry Sestak of Tabor came up to the microphone during the National Farmers Union convention to discuss policy.

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Delegates from South Dakota listen to policy discussions and study the policy book’s proposed changes during the NFU convention.

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Jared Kloucek shows off a print at the evening education gala.

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April 2013

9


Union Farmer

Duane Anderson Settles in to Farmers Union Industries Leadership as Chief Executive Officer By Troy Krause Editor, Redwood Falls Gazette

and CEO was an easy one, because of the people who continue to work for the company. “I am blessed with a great management team,” Growing up on a farm near Gaylord, Duane he said. “There are a lot of good people here with Anderson recalls spending time hanging around a lot of experience who have been doing their in Redwood Falls. Little did he know then how jobs for a long time.” much the community would be part of his life in The vision for the future is to conthe future. tinue to see the kind of growth that has Anderson, who became president made Farmers Union Industries finanand chief executive officer for Farmers cially sound and to continue to develop Union Industries in Redwood Falls as of a strong base of employees. The chalJan. 1, may have ended up just 45 miles lenge, he said, is going to be in finding from home, but he certainly took the the right people to replace those who scenic route to get there. are going to be retiring in the next few After graduating from Gaylord High years. That, he said, is not necessarily School in 1982, Anderson began farmdifferent than what other companies are ing with his dad. He also did some facing, but it does still present a chaltrucking as a way to earn money. Soon lenge for the future. Making sure those after, he started his own business – cusemployees have good jobs is important tom combining. for the company to succeed, he added. “I would start in Texas and head to Anderson said he recognizes as a North Dakota,” said Anderson, adding commodities business much of what there were a couple of times that work they do is driven by the market, but continued into Canada. “It was very Farmers Union Industries CEO Duane Anderson speaks at the S.D. Farmers Union state as he sees the company continuing to good work at the time.” convention in February. Anderson took over as CEO Jan. 1. diversify he believes it can better withHaving gotten married in 1988, stand market volatility. Anderson continued that role spend“Our goal here in the end is to provide a return ing several months on the road, but as the family the CFO position. for our owners and stakeholders,” he said. “This grew he knew something had to change. “Every time I have taken on a new job I have is a good company.” “I sold the business in 1994,” he said. “I did tried to find something that meant more responAnderson, who has demonstrated community it for 10 years and just got tired of being on the sibility and more leadership opportunities for leadership as well is going to continue through road.” me,” said Anderson. the end of this year as chair of the Redwood Knowing he had to find a way to make a livThe CFO job would allow him the chance to County EDA and Redwood Area Development ing, Anderson opted 12 years after graduating take that next step professionally, because it did Corporation. He is also president of the local from high school to start college, and in a little require added responsibility but it also meant he more than three years he earned an accounting de- would be more involved in the business decisions ATV club and is active at St. Michael’s Church and with the Knights of Columbus. He and his gree from Minnesota State University in Mankato. for what has become Farmers Union Industries. wife Kris live on a farm in rural Morgan and have “I was very motivated to get done with Anderson added the potential to climb the ladder seven children. school,” he said, admitting at the time it was hard at the company was an additional enticement for Anderson has seen his goal accomplished, but to be going to school while his wife was working. him. Being closer to extended family was another. now he has new ones and a new vision to take “I took a lot of 20-21 credit quarters and did full Anderson started as CFO May 15, 2003, and summer sessions just to get done.” over the past nine-plus years he has seen the com- what is an already very successful company to the next level. Having started his college career with the vipany grow under the leadership of Davis. sion of becoming an engineer, Anderson discovWhen Anderson graduated from college he set This story originally ran in the March 7 edition of the Redered that was not in the cards, but taking a couple a goal in the long term to either own another busi- wood Falls Gazette and is printed with their permission. of business classes and seeing success led him to ness or to run one for someone else one day. That earn his accounting degree. came to fruition at the beginning of this year. Anderson became a CPA in 1998. He found As president and CEO, Anderson said his role has his first job at a company in New Ulm but soon taken on a more strategic approach as he looks moved on to a new role in Lake Crystal. Prior to to grow the company’s existing assets and to find the move to Redwood Falls, Anderson had been other prospective acquisitions to add to the comworking as a controller for AGCO in Jackson. pany’s profile. “It was my intent to stay at AGCO for a long “We are always looking for that next acquisiSend Us Your Email Address time,” he said. tion,” he said, adding he is hoping within the next Then one day while he was sitting in his office five years to add another quality company to the he got a call. Farmers Union Industries family. That call led him to what was known at the Anderson said taking on the role of president time as the Farmers Union Marketing and Processing Association (FUMPA) for an interview with Don Davis, the current president, and CEO and Dave Morman, the company’s chief financial officer. Anderson said Morman was planning to retire, and so Anderson was offered

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2013 Legislative Scorecard Each year, South Dakota Farmers Union crafts its Legislative Scorecard in an attempt to educate its members about some of the legislation the organization was working on throughout the legislative session and to give you an idea where lawmakers stood on the bills important to you. We hope this will make you a more informed citizen and voter. Please read through the bills which were selected for this year’s scorecard, and find the corresponding votes of your lamakers on the pages that follow. The scores were determined based on the votes each lawmaker cast. If they were absent for a vote, that will not be reflected on their overall score. Some of the legislation was voted on and defeated in committee, so not all lawmakers voted on every piece of legislation chosen for the scorecard. For more information on other pieces of legislation visit www.sdfu.org.

House Bill 1004 This bill would allow for treble damages (triple the amount) to be awarded to a surface owner if any mineral developer (oil, natural gas, etc.) fails to conduct good faith negotiations with a surface owner. SDFU supported this legislation because it provides sufficient protection to landowners dealing with mineral developers who may cause damage to the surface of their land. It passed both chambers and was signed by the governor.

House Bill 1123

This measure increases the surcharge on certain hunting licenses. The money would be used for animal damage control and to allow hunting access for wildlife depredation and damage management programs. SDFU supported this legislation because it provides funds for animal damage control and depredation to protect livestock and crops. The legislation passed both chambers and was signed by the governor.

House Bill 1228

Called the ‘Producer First’ bill, this piece of legislation would’ve put producers first in line to be repaid by a grain buyer’s bond if the company went insolvent. This was in response to the insolvency of Anderson Seed Company in Redfield. SDFU supported this bill because it would give producers the opportunity to be paid back first because they have a greater personal risk than a larger entity. The bill passed the House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee, but failed on the House floor.

House Joint Resolution 1001

This resolution proposed a change to the South Dakota Constitution to set up a bipartisan legislative redistricting commission and single-member House districts. SDFU supported this resolution because it would have set up a more fair system of legislative redistricting and allowed more rural candidates a chance to represent their area. With the current system, House candidates often come from urban centers within a district. This proposal would have called for keeping cities whole when possible, giving rural residents a better chance of getting elected. It failed in the House State Affairs Committee.

Senate Bill 6

This bill determines whether factors like climate, soil classification and terrain should be applied in agricultural land assessment for tax purposes if the actual use of the land doesn’t correspond to the soil classification standards. SDFU supported this legislation because it allows a landowner to request an assessment of their land to determine if the actual use corresponds to soil classification to make sure they are being taxed at the correct level.

Senate Bill 153

This bill was an attempt to clarify and revise some provisions concerning watershed districts. SDFU supported this piece of legislation because many of the current laws concerning water management and watershed districts is tangled and needs to be clarified and updated. It passed both chambers and was signed by the governor.

Senate Concurrent Resolution 1

This resolution doesn’t have the power of law, but it was a clear statement from the Legislature that lawmakers believe the federal farm bill is an important piece of legislation to South Dakota and its farmers and ranchers. SDFU fully supported its passage. It passed both chambers by a total vote of 92-4.

House Bill 1178/Senate Bill 176

After budget cuts imposed over the past few years, South Dakota’s agriculture research has suffered. These bills (the House and Senate versions were identical) would’ve appropriated funds to the South Dakota Board of Regents Agriculture Experiment Station for a research investment program. It would’ve allocated nearly $6 million in additional funding for agriculture research and modernized the research facilities. SDFU supported this legislation would have improved agriculture research vital to the industry and allowed local scientists to compete for national funding opportunities. HB 1178 failed in the House Appropriations Committee. SB 176 passed the Senate after it was amended to include just $1. It was again defeated in the House Appropriations Committee.

Senate Joint Resolution 2

This joint resolution sought to change the South Dakota Constitution to require a two-thirds majority vote of the people to implement any initiated measure that would raise taxes. SDFU opposed the measure. The resolution passed the Senate but narrowly failed in the House of Representatives.

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Union Farmer

April 2013

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Union Farmer Y = Legislator Supported Legislation

N = Legislator Did Not Support

E = Excused

A ‘Y’ vote does not necessarily mean they voted ‘Yes’ during the committee or floor vote. An ‘N’ vote does not necessarily mean a lawmaker voted ‘No.’ Some Yes votes were meant to defeat measures. Some No votes were meant to keep from defeating a measure.

STATE SENATE

Senator

ADELSTEIN BEGALKA BRADFORD BROWN BUHL EWING FRERICHS HEINEMAN, P. HOLIEN HUNHOFF, J. JENSEN JOHNSTON JONES KIRKEBY KREBS LEDERMAN LUCAS MAHER MONROE NOVSTRUP, A. OLSON, R. OMDAHL OTTEN, E. PETERS RAMPELBERG RAVE RHODEN SOHOLT SUTTON TIDEMANN TIESZEN VAN GERPEN VEHLE WELKE WHITE

District

SDFU Stance - Y Senate Floor Vote HB 1004

SDFU Stance - Y Senate Conf. Comm. Vote HB 1123

SDFU Stance - Y Senate Floor Vote SB 6

SDFU Stance - Y Senate Floor Vote SB 153

32 4 27 23 15 31 1 13 5 18 33 12 17 35 10 16 26 28 24 3 8 11 6 9 30 29 19 14 21 7 34 19 20 2 22

Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y E Y Y Y N Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N Y Y N Y Y Y N N Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y

N Y Y N Y Y Y N N Y N N Y N Y N Y Y N N N N Y N N N Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y

29-4

34-1

24-11

19-16

TOTALS

SDFU Stance - Y Senate Floor Vote SCR 1

SDFU Stance - Y Senate Floor Vote SB 176

SDFU Stance - N Senate Floor Vote SJR 2

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y

N Y N Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y N Y Y N Y

71 86 100 57 100 86 100 57 57 86 57 57 100 71 80 71 100 86 57 57 57 0 71 57 86 71 86 71 100 86 71 66 86 100 86

33-2

31-2

25-10

75

Based on total votes cast

% wtih SDFU

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STATE HOUSE

SDFU Stance - Y SDFU Stance - Y SDFU Stance - Y SDFU Stance - Y SDFU Stance - Y SDFU Stance - Y SDFU Stance - Y SDFU Stance - Y SDFU Stance - N Representative

BARTLING BOLIN CAMMACK CAMPBELL CARSON CONZET CRAIG CRONIN DRYDEN DUVALL ECKLUND ERICKSON FEICKERT FEINSTEIN GIBSON GOSCH GREENFIELD HAGGAR, D. HAGGAR, J. HAJEK HANSEN HAWKS HAWLEY HEINEMANN, L. HEINERT HICKEY HOFFMAN HUNHOFF, B. JOHNS KAISER KILLER KIRSCHMAN KOPP LATTERELL LUST MAGSTADT MAY MICKELSON MILLER MUNSTERMAN NELSON, S. NOVSTRUP, D. OLSON, B. OTTEN, H. PARSLEY PETERSON QUALM RASMUSSEN RING ROMKEMA ROUNDS ROZUM RUSSELL SCHAEFER SCHOENFISH SCHREMPP SLY SOLI SOLUM STALZER STEELE STEVENS TULSON TYLER VERCHIO WERNER WESTRA WICK WINK WISMER

District

21 16 29 35 20 32 33 23 34 24 25 11 1 14 22 32 6 10 10 14 25 9 7 8 26A 9 23 18 31 3 27 15 35 6 34 5 27 13 16 7 19 3 28B 6 8 4 21 17 17 31 24 20 30 26B 19 28A 33 15 5 11 12 18 2 4 30 22 13 12 29 1

TOTALS

www.sdfu.org

House Floor Vote

Conf. Comm. Vote

House Floor Vote

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y E Y Y E Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y N N N N Y N N N N N N Y Y Y N N N N N N N Y N Y N N Y N N Y Y N N N N Y N N N Y N Y N N N N N Y N N N N N N Y Y Y N N N N N N N N N N N Y

66-4

64-2

18-52

HB 1004

HB 1123

HB 1228

Committee Vote

HJR 1001

N N

Y N

N

Y Y

E

N N Y

N

N 4-8

House Floor Vote

House Floor Vote

House Floor Vote

Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y N N Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y

Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y E Y Y E Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E

59-8

67-1

59-2

SB 6

Union Farmer

SB 153

SCR 1

House Floor Vote

Based on total votes cast

SJR 2

% wtih SDFU

N

N N Y N E Y N Y Y Y N Y N N N Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Y N Y Y N Y Y N N N Y N Y Y N N Y Y Y Y N N N N N N Y Y N Y N N N Y N Y Y Y N N N Y N N Y Y N

100 83 71 86 33 75 86 63 66 71 86 57 100 100 100 50 57 57 57 71 63 86 100 71 100 57 71 100 71 43 100 100 83 43 57 66 86 71 83 63 57 50 71 86 88 86 86 86 100 50 71 86 71 86 86 100 83 100 71 71 57 86 86 86 63 88 86 57 63 86

3-5

34-35

76

Committee Vote

HB 1178

E N

Y

N

Y

N

N

Y

April 2013

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Union Farmer

Report focuses on Adapting to Climate Change

Many farmers, foresters, and ranchers throughout the United States are adjusting their operations to reduce the risks associated with increasingly variable and unpredictable weather. In addition, producers are facing unprecedented economic, social, and environmental pressures which require that they balance for multiple outcomes. These challenges include feeding, clothing, housing, and fueling a rapidly growing world, making decisions in volatile local and global markets, and managing to continually renew and protect soil, water, and air resources. But farmers, foresters, and ranchers are not solely at the mercy of these trends. Rather, there are

many options available to mitigate risks while strengthening production, cutting input costs, and improving the quality of the land — even in the context of weather-related disasters like those experienced in 2011 and 2012. A recent report produced by the 25x’25 Alliance’s Adaptation Work Group, entitled “Agriculture and Forestry in a Changing Climate: Adaptation Recommendations,” offers various pathways in the areas of research, production systems, risk management, decision tools, and outreach for building a more resilient agriculture and forestry system. The recommendations of the Adaptation Work Group, which is a collaboration of leaders

from the agriculture, forestry, business, academic, conservation, and government sectors, were shaped by the four overlapping goals of profitability, productivity, stewardship, and selfdetermination. The report, however, is not intended to serve as a definitive set of adaptation recommendations. Instead, it is offered as the beginning of a national dialogue on the steps needed to prepare agriculture and forestry for the road ahead. To access the report and to provide feedback on it, visit www.25x25.org and click on the “Agriculture and Forestry in a Changing Climate: Adaptation Recommendations” link.

SDFU State Office Construction Update The new South Dakota Farmers Union state office building under construction in Huron is moving along quickly. Thanks to relatively good weather throughout the winter months, crews have moved quickly to put up the new home of the state office. Construction started in October, and since then the basement has been dug, the walls are up, the roof is on and shingled, the siding is on and the windows are installed. Much of the work being done now is on the inside. Most of the sheetrocking is complete on the inside, and a lot of work is being done on the interior. It won’t be long before the state office staff moves into the new building. If everything continues as planned, the entire project could be done by the middle of May.

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Union Farmer

Passings

Farmers Union Footnotes

LeRoy Edward Hardy, 91, of Sturgis, died Feb. 2, 2013, at the Sturgis Regional Health Care Center. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013, at the First Presbyterian Church in Sturgis with Pastor Denzel Nonhof officiating. Burial was at the Bear Butte Cemetery in Sturgis. A memorial has been established to the First Presbyterian Church and the Western Dakota Antique Club. LeRoy was born March 5, 1921, at Sturgis to Roy Ellsworth and Ruth Elaine (Casteel) Hardy. He grew up on the family farm and attended North Middle Alkali School. After graduating from Sturgis High School, he returned to the family farm to help his father. LeRoy married Virginia Wilkinson at Sturgis on December 18, 1945. LeRoy worked for the John Deere Implement where he assembled farm equipment. During the spring and summer he worked for the Agriculture Stabilization Conservation Service. He also worked for Farmers Union Insurance as an agent from 1955 until 1967. He also worked as a fieldman and lob-

byist for South Dakota Farmers Union. He managed the State Fair booth for 18 years. After retiring from Farmers Union in 1984, he enjoyed photography, growing roses, gardening, hunting deer for 40 years, fishing, and was often seen walking around town. LeRoy was a member of the First Presbyterian Church where he served as a deacon and on the board of elders. He is survived by his daughters, Cheryl (Rod) Renner of Wall, Phyllis (Fred) Venners of Plano, Tex., Marcia Hardy and her partner Roy Mogharabi of Beaumont, Calif., and Linda Paulson of Buffalo; step-brother Richard Todd; step-sister, Coral Etta Todd Stevens; special friend Freda Wilson; seven grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife of 60 years, Virginia; sisters, Edna Kettelson and Delores Beehler; a brother, Glen Hardy; step-mother, Vivian Hardy; a step-brother, Robert Todd; and a grandson, Forrest Paulson.

Clip & Save Calendar April 2013 1 5 15 15

State Camp Planning Mtg, Huron Lyman County Meeting, Presho Quiz Bowl Semifinals (Brookings) Scholarship App. Deadline

May 2013 2 6-10 18 20 22 27 28-31

3rd Grade Farm Tour, Huron Summer Intern Training District IV Meeting, Winner Charles Mix Co. Camp, Geddes Sanborn Co. Camp, Forestburg State Office Closed (Mem. Day) District I&II Camp (Swan Lake)

2-7 19 23-28

State Camp (Storm Mountain) Foundation Golf Tourn. (Huron) All State’s Camp, Bailey, Colo.

June 2013 July 2013 7-10 23 26 29-31 29-31

Dist. III & VII Camp (Lake Rich.) McCook Co. Camp, Salem Miner Co. Camp, Howard 3-Year Award Trip, Mpls Dist. IV, V & VI Camp (Custer)

August 2013

4-7 Assoc. of Co-ops Educators Conf. 29-Sept. 2 S.D. State Fair, Huron 31 Farmers Union Day, State Fair Visit the Events section at www.sdfu.org for more details on upcoming events.

In our next issue... - The 2012-2013 REAL class full of leaders - Summer Youth Camp Preview - Farmers Union youth becoming a rodeo star www.sdfu.org

Union Farmer

The South Dakota Union Farmer is published 10 times per calendar year with issues in January, February, March, April, May/June, July, Aug./ Sept., October, November, and December. All information for publication must be submitted by the 15th of the month. You may submit items by mail to the State Office, P.O. Box 1388, Huron, SD 57350 or email items to: cstuder@sdfu. org April 2013

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South Dakota Union Farmer - April 2013  

The South Dakota Union Farmer prints 10 times per year to update South Dakota Farmers Union members on news in agriculture and the organizat...

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