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Sustainable Strategies in Higher Education CONSERVATION THROUGH CONSTRUCTION AND CURRICULUM


Sustainable Strategies in Higher Education Contents 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 10. 11. 15. 17. 19. 21. 23. 25. 27. 29. 33. 35. 37. 39. 41. 43. 44.

Letter from the Chancellor San Diego Community College District Climate Change Policy and Regulatory Drivers Building A Better World Reduce, Recycle, Reuse Water, Water Everywhere Let the Sun Shine Smart, Current, Measurable Alternative Energy Planting Seeds of Change Seeds@City Urban Farm Raise the (Green) Roof Creative, Sustainable Savings Bikes, Trolleys, and Automobiles Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Environmental Control - San Diego City College Collaborative Curriculum - San Diego Mesa College Heavy Duty Transportation - San Diego Miramar College Training and Resources - San Diego Continuing Education Awards, Accolades, Kudos Going Green Pays Green

San Diego Community College District Board of Trustees Rich Grosch Mary Graham Bernie Rhinerson Maria Nieto Senour, Ph.D. Peter Zschiesche

Presidents (Interim) Lynn Ceresino Neault, Ed.D. San Diego City College

Chancellor Constance M. Carroll, Ph.D.

Patricia Hsieh, Ed.D. San Diego Miramar College

Vice Chancellor, Facilities Management Christopher Manis

Anthony E. Beebe, Ed.D. San Diego Continuing Education

Pamela T. Luster, Ed.D. San Diego Mesa College


N O I T A V R E S N CO consthrtourghuc tion curriculum and Dear Friends and Colleagues,

letter from the chancellor

On behalf of the San Diego Community College District (SDCCD), I am pleased to present the 2014 Sustainable Strategies in Higher Education report. Over the past several years, SDCCD has taken a number of important steps to become a more sustainable organization and to create facilities that serve as models of excellence in sustainability and conservation.

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and major renovations to obtain, at minimum, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification or higher by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). To date, we have obtained or are track to obtain 42 LEED certifications, more than any single organization within San Diego County.

Environmental sustainability is an essential goal of the SDCCD. Diminishing resources and escalating costs of energy and rubbish disposal require that management at all levels focus on the efficient and effective use of energy and resources.

Requirements are in place for all projects to exceed Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations energy efficiency standards by at least 10%. On average, SDCCD projects exceed Title 24 by 20%, and some as high as 49%. Efforts to incorporate strategic energy efficiencies into building designs have resulted in financial incentives provided to the District by San Diego Gas & Electric in excess of $1 million.

Our Green Building Policy calls for our new facilities

Aggressive water conservation measures are

also in place - especially important now, as California moves further into a third consecutive dry year. By using lowflow fixtures, water consumption is reduced by approximately 40% compared to buildings using standard fixtures. The use of high-efficiency irrigation and droughttolerant landscaping has further reduced the consumption of water for irrigation by millions of gallons annually. We are proud to have an extensive photovoltaic system in place across the District – the maximum available to us under current state code. The utilization of thermal energy is also providing significant cost savings while substantially reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A key goal of our Strategic

Plan is to become a sustainability citizen and advocate within the community, and to ensure that we are a responsible and responsive stakeholder in the community. We welcome the community’s collaboration in meeting this objective and helping us achieve greater climate neutrality.

Constance M. Carroll, P h.D. Chancellor


san diego community college district As the second largest community college district in California, and the sixth largest in the country, the SDCCD educates approximately 100,000 students every semester through City, Mesa, and Miramar colleges, and six Continuing Education campuses. It is our duty to not only lead students by example, but integrate sustainability programs into our curriculum that will promote an understanding and appreciation of how future decision-making will influence world climate, energy consumption, and the well-being of the environment for future generations.

1. 2. 3.

A first for Southern California, the SDCCD’s program in Sustainable Urban Agriculture teaches how to best use natural resources, reduce energy consumption, and lower CO2 emissions. Through hands-on experience at an urban farm, the program offers an associate degree and five certificate programs supporting three key goals: Help society improve the health of its environment, food and communities Give students practical experience working alongside professional urban farms and agriculture faculty Teach students how to critically analyze historical and current food systems to offer more sustainable solutions

The Sustainable Urban Agriculture program creates multiple career tracks such as urban farmer, market gardener, farm manager, and farm/garden educator. Graduates can work for businesses, non-profit agencies, international organizations, government agencies, public institutions, and educational institutions. Additionally, students may use the certificates as a foundation to continue with a related professional or academic focus in agriculture, plant science, biology, nutrition, culinary arts, public health, sustainable business models, urban design, landscape architecture, sustainable international development, environmental science, botany, horticultural therapy, conservation, alternative energy, and others. All coursework is transferable to degree programs at applicable California State University (CSU) or University of California (UC) campuses. Program internships are available through the Seeds@City urban farm, profiled on page 23. 4


"climate change affects the entire living world" -u.s. global change research program

Climate change affects the entire living world, through changes in ecosystems and biodiversity. Ecosystems provide a rich array of benefits to humanity, including fisheries, drinking water, fertile soils for growing crops, buffering from climatological impacts, and aesthetic and cultural values. These benefits are not always easy to quantify, but they translate into jobs, economic growth, health, and human well-being.

1. Changes in the global climate can be seen across the United States in a multitude of ways; these changes are primarily attributable to human activities. Since 1895 the average temperature in the U.S. has risen by 1.5ºF, with more than 80% of this increase happening after 1980.

gases already ensure a hotter tomorrow; how hot tomorrow will be solely depends on human involvement.

2. The prevalence of extreme weather events has increased in recent decades; excessively high temperatures, an increase in heavy downpours or severe droughts have become prevailing trends in the past 50 years.

4. Many sectors locally, nationally, and globally have already seen tangible effects of climate change – agriculture, infrastructure, human health, water resources, and others. The interplay between climate change and other environmental and societal factors is delicate and can either moderate or intensify the direction and pace that our climate is shifting.

3. Climate change attributable to human actions is projected to exponentially increase if emissions of heat trapping gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, are not regulated. These

5. Planning efforts will help mitigate the impact humans will have on climate change but implementation is limited. If plans can be turned into actions, public health, economic

development, the protection of natural systems, and overall quality of life will be positively affected. 6. Ecosystems in many regions are suffering from fluctuations in the reliability of their water supply due to climate change. In the western United States melting snowpack is heavily relied upon for water storage; the eastern U.S., despite projections of increased precipitation, is experiencing water shortages. Competition for clean water among municipal, environmental, and agricultural interests further complicates the politics of a waning water supply. Compounding the issue is water quality. Challenges in this arena focus on sediment and contaminant concentrations after heavy downpours.

U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) 2013 DRAFT. “Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States.” Pages 5, 8, and10. http://ncadacglobalchange.gov/ 5


Assembly Bill 1493, widely known as “The Pavley Bill”, authorizes the California Air Resource Board (CARB) to establish regulations to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 18% by 2020 and 23% by 2030 from 2002 levels. This aggressive bill was temporarily blocked by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in March 2008 but later received a waiver of approval for implementation throughout California in June 2009.

The Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) was established in January 2007 by Executive Order S-01-07 and requires California fuel providers to decrease lifecycle carbon intensity of transportation fuels by 10% from 2007 levels by 2020.

Executive Order S-3-05 was signed by the Governor of California in 2005, thereby identifying the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) as the primary state agency responsible for establishing climate change emission reduction targets throughout the state. The Climate Action Team was formed to implement Executive Order S-3-05. Shortly thereafter in 2006, the team introduced GHG emission reduction strategies and practices to reduce global warming. These measures are aimed at meeting the Executive Order’s long-term goal of reducing GHG emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. The Global Warming Solutions Act, or Assembly Bill 32 (AB-32), was adopted in 2006 by the California legislature and establishes two key emissions reduction strategies. The first requires that California GHG emissions be capped at 1990 levels by 2020, and the second establishes an enforcement mechanism for the program, with monitoring and reporting implemented by the CARB. In 2008, the AB-32 Scoping Plan was released by the CARB to describe the measures needed to meet the requirements set by AB-32. In addition to partnering with local governments to encourage the establishment of regional emission reduction goals and community regulations, the scoping plan uses various mechanisms to reduce emissions statewide, including incentives, direct regulation, and compliance mechanisms. On July 1, 2012, Assembly Bill 341 required businesses and public entities, including schools and school districts that generate four cubic yards or more of waste per week and multi-family units of five or more, to recycle. Assembly Bill 341 also establishes a statewide goal of 75% diversion of solid waste to landfills. The purpose of this new law is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting commercial solid waste to recycling efforts and expand opportunities for additional recycling services and recycling manufacturing facilities in California.

Senate Bill 375 was passed in 2008 to reduce GHG emissions caused indirectly by urban sprawl throughout California. The bill offers incentives for local governments to execute planned growth and development patterns around public transportation in addition to revitalizing existing communities. Metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) work with CARB to reduce vehicle miles traveled by creating sustainable urban plans with a focus on housing, transportation, and land use. Urban projects consistent with the MPO’s Sustainable Community Strategy (SCS) can bypass the California Environmental Quality Act’s GHG emission environmental review. This provides developers with an incentive to comply with local planning strategies which support the state’s effort for emission reduction in the land use and transportation sector.

CALIFORNIA STATE CLIMATE REGULATIONS POLICY AND REGULATORY DRIVERS 6


BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS BUILDING A BETTER WORLD On Course for Compliance with the Global Warming Solutions Act At the SDCCD, we are committed to compliance with Assembly Bill (AB) 32 - the Global Warming Solutions Act. The Act requires the District to: • •

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 to 1990 levels Reduce electricity consumption by 20% in existing and new state-owned buildings 20% by 2015

By the time the Propositions S and N construction bond program wraps up it will have been responsible for more than doubling the San Diego Community College District’s total square footage, including parking, to more than 5.6 million square feet. In 2008 SDCCD's largest source of emissions came from commuting, which comprised 46% of total emissions. The second largest source (31%) is purchased electricity,

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followed by the use of natural gas to heat buildings via boilers and to produce electricity (9%).

a per-square-foot basis overall greenhouse gas emissions were lower in 2008 than they were

five years prior despite a 21% increase in physical footprint.

Since 2003 San Diego City College’s square footage has increased by 47%, San Diego Mesa College has expanded by 16%, San Diego Miramar College has more than doubled its square footage and San Diego Continuing Education has increased by 28% Despite increases on three out of four campuses during the 2003 - 2008 period, emissions at City College decreased by 1%; Mesa College’s emissions dropped 3%; greenhouse gas emissions at San Diego Miramar College increased by 12%; and emissions related to San Diego Continuing Education decreased by 5%. These results show that an increase in building size does not necessitate an increase in emissions. On

$1.9m

A solar pool heater for the Ned Baumer Aquatic Center is on track to save more than 31,500 therms of natural gas per year, resulting in an annual cost savings of $1.9 million over 30 years.

Data from the California Center for Sustainable Energy show that the District is one of the top producers renewable energy amon all educational entities within the San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) service


Green Building Policy In 2003, the San Diego Community College District Board of Trustees established a Green Building Policy and Major Renovation Standards to govern all projects meeting the minimum requirements. The intent of the policy is to provide District students, faculty, and staff with working and

learning environments that are thermally, visually and acoustically comfortable; energy-efficient; material-efficient; water-efficient; easy to maintain and operate; safe and secure; and sited in an environmentally responsible manner. To support this policy, a Leadership in Energy

and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification, at minimum, is pursued for all eligible projects. All new buildings and major renovations are required to exceed Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations energy efficiency standards by at least 10%. Of the energy utilized by the project,

the san diego community college district strategies target the biggest greenhouse gas emissions sources - buildings and transportation.

$13m

A one million gallon thermal energy storage tank at the central plant at Miramar College helps balance energy demand between peak and low-use times, saving more than 764,404 kilowatt hours of electricity per year. This system will have paid for itself within nine years; over 30 years it will generate an estimated $13 million in savings.

s of ng

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10% must be renewable with at least 5% of the total project’s energy generated on site. The balance is to be supplied by utility companies as green power. All projects are expected to achieve at least 75% waste diversion of construction and demolition debris. In some cases, diversion rates have been higher than 90%. Performance goals are in place for indoor air quality to ensure compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor Air Quality checklist. Goals are also outlined for the use of sustainable materials or products using recycled content within the project’s design and construction.  

The use of Smart Metering digital devices that measure electricity and energy usage continuously, providing timely and meaningful information about when and where energy consumption is at its highest. This can help District faculty and staff better monitor energy usage and implement energysaving techniques.

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BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS BUILDING A BETTER WORLD

C02 SDCCD EMISSIONS SPLIT: 25,003 TOTAL METRIC TONS CO2

46% 31% COMMUTING

PURCHASED ELECTRICITY

9%

3%

3%

ON-CAMPUS STATIONARY NATURAL GAS

TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION LOSSES FROM ELECTRICITY

PAPER

3%

2%

2%

1%

DIRECTLYFINANCED OUTSOURCED TRAVEL (DISTRICT FUNDED)

DISTRICT TRANSPORTATION (FLEET SERVICES)

SOLID WASTE (LANDFILLED WASTE)

AGRICULTURE (SYNTHETIC AND ORGANIC FERTILIZERS)

San Diego Community College District, 2003-2008. “Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory” Randy Van Vleck, SDCCD Sustainability Specialist

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BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS REDUCE, RECYCLE, REUSE

THE DISTRICT CONTINUES TO DIVERT A SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER PERCENTAGE OF ITS WASTE STREAM THAN THE 50% REQUIRED BY LEGISLATION.

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

CITY COLLEGE

70.6%

72.0%

74.3%

80.9%

85.83%

73.50%

MESA COLLEGE

57.8%

59.0%

66.9%

61.4%

97.06%

83.00%

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

61.2%

69.5%

70.2%

89.5%

58.98%

88.20%

CONTINUING EDUCATION

62.5%

92.4%

87.7%

88.6%

89.27%

92.40%

DISTRICT OFFICE AND SERVICES CENTER

63.3%

78.0%

66.4%

59.6%

96.53%

67.80%

2013/2014 data not available at time of publication.

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BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS WATER, WATER, EVERYWHERE Calsense Makes Sense In order to comply with regional requirements for water conservation and to reduce water costs, the SDCCD prioritized implementation of a standardized irrigation control system. By using grants from the county’s water authority, the SDCCD was able to pilot a year-long test of the Calsense weather-based centralized control system, selecting a variety of surfaces and environments. At the conclusion of the year-long pilot, conducted from October 2008 through October 2009, data showed that the system

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produced a 40% reduction in water use. This meant a savings to the District of over 37 million gallons of water. As a result, the Calsense system is now incorporated as the District standard for all new construction projects. The Calsense system projects an overall average water savings of 30%. Calsense is capable of detecting catastrophic main line breaks down to a single irrigation head. The controllers measure evapotranspiration (ET) and rainfall utilizing a rain gauge and a soil moisture sensor. When

sufficient soil moisture is detected, the system does not irrigate. As moisture measurements indicate water is needed, the system restarts. The computerized system also generates a variety of valuable reports on water usage, savings, and total rainfall. Automatic alerts are sent out to alert staff of possible line breaks. It also allows the SDCCD to monitor the irrigation controllers from a webbased platform. In addition to the use of Calsense irrigation, the District has also moved away from using turf as a major landscape component, either

replacing the typical thirsty fescue grass with a drought-tolerant variety, or removing the turf altogether and replacing with low-water usage landscape. Project design standards also now require xeriscaping, using a combination of native trees, flowers, and other vegetation; Mediterraneantype plants that perform well in San Diego’s various micro-climates; and mulch, gravel or boulders as aesthetic hardscape elements requiring no water. Combined, these strategies accounted for savings of tens of millions of gallons each year.


CALSENSE WATER SAVINGS HIGHLIGHTS JANUARY - DECEMBER 2013

70% 55% 65% 82% City College Fitness Center 62,782 Gallons | 70%

City College Learning Resource Center 1,615,310 Gallons | 55%

Mesa College Landscaping – Parking Structure (Controller #1) 1,022,489 Gallons | 65%

Mesa College Landscaping – Parking Structure (Controller #2) 503,134 Gallons | 82%

71% 60% 78% 74% Mesa College HVAC Storage Facility 954,280 Gallons | 71%

Miramar College Arts & Humanities Building 70,670 Gallons | 60%

Miramar College Automotive Technology Career Instructional Building 145,512 Gallons | 78%

Miramar College Landscaping – Parking Lot A 653,719 Gallons | 74%

74% 74% 66% 71% Miramar College Sports Fields 3,103,317 Gallons | 74%

Continuing Education Educational Cultural Complex Skills Center 3,485,546 Gallons | 74%

Continuing Education Educational Cultural Complex 5,824,777 Gallons | 66%

San Diego Community College District Offices 567,784 Gallons | 71%

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BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS WATER, WATER, EVERYWHERE Stormwater Management An effective stormwater management system goes a long way toward maintaining San Diego’s regional water quality. Stormwater is runoff from heavy rainfall that does not seep into the ground. As it flows across streets, parking lots and other surfaces, runoff picks up sediment and pollutants, and carries them into the storm drain system. These pollutants can include chemicals, pesticides, animal waste, debris, and other materials washed 13

off roadways, sidewalks, buildings, and vehicles. Unlike the sanitary sewer system, the storm drain system does not connect to a wastewater treatment plant but flows directly into local waterways, such as the San Diego River and bays. If left untreated, these pollutants have a serious effect on local water quality. The SDCCD employs numerous strategies to manage and minimize the effects of stormwater runoff on the campuses, in compliance with and sometimes in excess of regulatory guidelines.

As part of a massive site infrastructure project at Miramar College, a 260-foot-long, 60-footwide, and 11-foot-deep underground detention basin vault was constructed to provide stormwater treatment for all future buildings on campus. The basin has a 2.4 acre-feet storage capacity, or the equivalent of 6,650,000 gallons. Detention basins are considered stormwater management best management practices (BMPs) that capture and filter stormwater, removing additional pollutants before

being diverted into the local storm system. At Continuing Education's West City Campus, pervious concrete is used in the parking lot to help manage runoff. Pervious concrete is made with large aggregate that allows water to pass directly through, thereby reducing the runoff from the site. West City also has a small stormwater detention basin at its southern entry. The basin resembles a small pond when filled, providing an aesthetic as well as functional value.


Pervious C oncrete At Continuing Education's North City Campus, a dry well is in place to help collect and filter stormwater runoff. The dry well receives runoff from the rooftop and site. Dry wells can capture and filter a significant amount of stormwater runoff. Bioswales are a stormwater BMP typically found along parking lots and roadsides to collect and treat stormwater runoff. These swales may look like small depressions or channels in the ground using vegetation and rocks or other materials

to filter runoff and trap pollutants. SDCCD is required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to have in place a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). The District’s Facilities Management division includes a SWPPP manager to work with the campuses and construction sites to ensure compliance with EPA regulations and reporting requirements.

Bioswales

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BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS LET THE SUN SHINE

Renewable Energy The San Diego Community College District's Green Building Policy requires at least 5% of a project’s total energy is generated from renewable resources such as solar or thermal energy.

10,043,465.7 kWh, saving over $501,625 in utility costs.

Annual greenhouse gas emissions from 1,886 passenger vehicles

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, this is the equivalent of:

CO2 emissions from 373,355 propane cylinders used for home barbeques

• Data from the California Center for Sustainable Energy show that the District is one of the top producers of renewable energy among all educational entities within San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) territory. Of the photovoltaic systems installed under the California Solar Initiative, SDCCD constitutes 2.367 mega watts (MW) of the total. To date, the District’s conservation efforts have generated

Saving nearly 9,000 metric tons of CO2 emissions CO2 emissions from the energy use of 818 homes for one year Greenhouse gas emissions avoided by recycling 3,212 tons of waste instead of sending it to the landfill Carbon sequestered annually by 7,345 acres of U.S. forests

The SDCCD Solar installations include: The District-owned installation on the Career Technology Center at City College, which generates approximately 67,558 kWh annually. This vertical array is the largest of its kind in the country. A SDG&E-owned system atop the roof of the Skills Center at the Educational Cultural Complex, generates a total of 66.6 kW.

close-up of photovoltaics located at city college career technology center 15

Multiple installations, as part of a 20-year Power Purchase Agreement (PPA), including carport solar arrays at Mesa and Miramar colleges, and the District’s main office rooftop systems at City College and Continuing Education’s Mid-City Campus, have saved roughly $330,00 in utility costs to date. By generating solar energy, the District is able to earn Renewable Energy Credits – one credit for every megawatt-hour (MWh) of renewable energy delivered to the local power grid. A solar pool heater for the Ned Baumer Aquatic Center is on track to save more than 31,500 therms of natural gas per year, resulting in an annual cost savings of $27,700.


As part of the SDCCD’s districtwide photovoltaic program, web-based dashboards provide continuously updated graphs and estimates of savings and carbon emissions avoided. The graphs can show timeof generation, as well as cumulative lifetime production and a snapshot of how much energy has been generated to date. Reported data can be used to validate generated renewable energy credits or sustainability audits. The dashboards include an alert system to inform the District if something is interfering with production, such as debris on a solar cell, so that maintenance staff can be informed and take action.

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BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS SMART, CURRENT, MEASURABLE Numerous meters have been installed throughout the District at a variety of locations, measuring: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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Voltage per phase Voltage line to line Voltage line to neutral Current per phase Poser factor per phase kWh, Consumption kW, Demand

8. Frequency 9. kVA per phase 10. kVar per phase 11. THD, Voltage line to neutral 12. THD, Voltage line to line 13. THD, Current per phase

Chilled Water and Heating Hot Water – BTU Meters 1. Total Energy 2. Total Flow 3. Energy Rate 4. Flow Rate 5. Supply Temperature

Glossary: BTU: British Thermal Unit KvA: Kilovolt-Amps kVar: Kilovolt-Amp Reduction kW: Kilowatt kWh: Kilowatt Hours THD: Total Harmonic Distortion


The District participates in SDG&E’s Critical Peak Pricing program by remotely resetting thermostats. With the installation of a one million gallon chilled water storage tank, the SDCCD has a new way to reduce demand. The District has completed numerous lighting retrofits by leveraging the SDG&E On-Bill Financing program,

as well as monitoring-based retro-commissioning in less efficient buildings through the California Community College Investor Owned Utility Partnership program. The SDCCD plans to implement a Tridium smart metering system districtwide. Electric meters, segregated by voltage load, and BTU meters for monitoring

chilled water, heating hot water, and natural gas consumption are being installed on all buildings. This data will be available via a dashboard to help staff determine if facilities are performing appropriately and where maintenance time and resources should be focused.

at year-over-year changes, and evaluate building groupings to identify ways to modify and incentivize more energy-conscious behavior. The SDCCD will use this data to develop a load-shedding algorithm for peak events.

The SDCCD will be able to compare buildings, look

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BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS ALTERNATIVE ENERGY Energy Miramar C ol lege Ther mal

Storage Tank

Dril l Rig and B ore Sampl e

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The SDCCD is committed to evaluating the viability of various sustainable resources and green technologies as part of efforts to reduce energy consumption throughout the District. This has included exploration of geothermal strategies. In 2009, two 400-foot deep geothermal test wells were drilled at Miramar College to determine whether it would be feasible to use a geothermal heat exchange for the heating and cooling of future projects. Although the technology to heat and cool using underground

energy has been around since the 1940’s, its costeffectiveness is drawing more attention as fuel and energy costs skyrocket. Because the earth absorbs and stores much of the energy it receives from the sun as heat, underground temperatures tend to remain constant. Depending on where you are in the country, this is typically between 42 - 82 degrees Fahrenheit. Geothermal projects, while common on the east coast, Canada, and in other areas with greater variations in temperature, are not yet widely used in California.

The ground temperatures at Miramar turned out to be warmer than expected, meaning a geothermal exchange at the campus would not be technically viable. Other alternative energy resources continue to be explored as part of the District’s ongoing sustainability objectives. Thermal energy storage (TES) comprises a number of technologies that store thermal energy in tanks or storage reservoirs for use as needed to balance energy demands between day and night. A thermal energy storage tank to be constructed at Miramar

College in Spring 2013 will serve numerous buildings on campus. The TES tank helps mitigate high energy demand. This million-gallon tank is the equivalent of the entire campus’ cooling load for six hours. Anticipated energy savings are targeted at 764,404 kWh or a cost savings of $190,000 annually. The project will pay for itself in nine years, and over a 30-year life expectancy, will result in energy cost savings of $13 million.

close-up of geothermal test well drilling at miramar college

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Gazania Rigens

Dietes Grandif lora

Sedum Acre

Yellow Stonecrop Cotula Coronopifolia Gazania Camissonia Cheiranthifolia

Achillea Millefolium

Brass Buttons

Sedum Telephium

White Yarrow Calandrinia Ciliata

Red Maids 21

Statice

Wild Iris

BUILDING PLANTIN

Limonium Perezii

Beach Evening Primrose

Salvia

Landscape plans across the District are designed to respect the character of the existing sites, while at the same time enhancing them with vegetation and other elements that provide a more droughttolerant environment that requires less maintenance. The designs are intended to provide year-round, aesthetically pleasing outdoor environments appropriate for each campus setting. Many designs include hardscape and benches or seating

Autumn Charm Sedum Ferrocactus Cylindraceus

Gilia Tricolor

Birds Eyes

Barrel Cactus

are cla spa pla are Ca shr Th pla Die typ abi wa hig Th spe Die irri


a Apiana

Nemophila Menziesii

White Sage

Baby Blue Eyes

G A BETTER CAMPUS NG SEEDS OF CHANGE

eas to serve as outdoor assrooms or gathering aces. The types of ants used for landscaping e a combination of alifornia-friendly trees, rubs, and groundcovers. hese low water-use ants grow well in San ego's Mediterraneanpe climate, with the ility to tolerate less ater and, in some cases, gh summer temperatures. hey include several ecies native to San ego County. The igation design and

equipment incorporates a number of proven water and soil conservation methods. The SDCCD’s standardized irrigation system uses an automatic controller that measures the amount of moisture in the air and soil, and automatically adjusts water accordingly. Plants are grouped by “hydro zones” so that those with similar requirements for sun and water exposure are clustered together to increase irrigation efficiency. At Miramar

Nemophlia Maculate

College, reclaimed water is used for all landscape irrigation. Natural and reintroduced vegetation also help with storm water management and pollutant removal. Vegetated depressions in the ground – known as “swales” – collect and filter rainfall and runoff. Plants, trees, and other vegetation remove pollutants before they can enter the storm drain system and help control erosion.

Tradescantia Pallida

Lasthenia Californica Magn o l ia Sout h Grandif lo r er n M agnoli a a

Five Spot

Wandering Jew

Dwarf Goldfields 22


BUILDING SEEDS@C Seeds@City is proud to support certificates, degrees and transfer options such as Introduction to Ecological Landscaping, Advanced Ecological Landscaping, Urban Farming, Urban Gardening, and Organic Gardening for the Culinary Arts.

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The first of its kind at an institution of higher education in San Diego County, the Seeds@City Urban Farm was formed in June 2008 through a partnership between San Diego City College and San Diego Roots Sustainable Food Project. Since 2010, the Farm has also served as an outdoor classroom for the certificate program in Sustainable Urban Agriculture and Ecological Landscaping at City College, one of the first in Southern California. The

pr th di bu pa tra op

U sh tw po in w gr co be th


G A BETTER CAMPUS CITY URBAN FARM

rogram provides students he opportunity to work irectly with agriculture usinesses and community artners for hands-on aining and employment pportunities.

United Nations projections how that within 20 years wo thirds of the world's opulation will reside n cities, yet 85% of the world’s food supply is rown in rural areas with onsiderable distance etween them and hese densly populated

municipalities. This system entrenches the current food distribution model, which relies heavily on fossil fuels. The demand for urban farmers is a call to meet the growing need to establish more tangible food security, thereby redirecting our current model of agricultural distribution in a more carbon-neutral direction. Sustainable farming protects biodiversity and fosters the development and maintenance of healthy

ecosystems; minimizing or eliminating the use of pesticides diminishes the potential for groundwater contamination and allows food to be grown in a safer manner, protecting communities as a whole over time. Seeds@City has produced more than 10,000 pounds of produce since its inception. In past years this produce ended up on plates at area eateries like The Rose Wine Bar and Searocket Bistro, but this year the

farm’s focus has shifted to supplying City College’s cafeteria. 53 students have completed internships for academic credit at Seeds@City, or off-campus with agriculturerelated businesses and nonprofit community partners; 42% of which are now employed in the agriculture field or are farming their own land. Students grew over 2000 pounds of produce to support direct marketing ventures since January 2012.

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BUILDING RAISE THE Green roofs are an increasingly popular strategy for mitigating what is known as an urban heat island (UHI), a developed urban area that is significantly warmer than nearby rural areas. As these urban areas are built out, buildings, roads and other infrastructure replace open land and vegetation. These changes cause urban regions to become warmer than their rural surrounds, forming an “island” of

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high Hea on t atm the urba roof tem 50– whi surf rura clos Wit islan roof


G A BETTER CAMPUS E (GREEN) ROOF

her temperatures. at islands can occur the surface and in the mosphere. On a hot day, sun can heat exposed an surfaces such as fs and pavement, to mperatures as much as –90°F hotter than the air, ile shaded or vegetated faces - often in more al surroundings - remain se to air temperatures. th regards to urban heat nds, green roofs - or ftop gardens - work

by shading roof surfaces. These cooler vegetated surfaces reduce the heat transmitted into the buildings or re-emitted into the atmosphere. The growing medium of the plant material also protects the underlying layers from exposure to wind and ultraviolet radiation. The SDCCD has installed or plans to install green roofs at several projects, including the Miramar College Police Station,

the Miramar College Library Learning Resource Center, the North City Campus for San Diego Continuing Education, the Mesa College Cafeteria/ Bookstore, and the “D” Building at City College.

26


BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS CREATIVE, SUSTAINABLE SAVINGS

3

2

4

1

5 1. Trespa paneling is made up of wood-based fibers reinforced with resin and manufactured under high pressure and high temperature. Options for finishes are almost limitless and the products typically last the life of the building. 2. Kalwall panels are structural composite panels formed by permanently bonding speciallyformulated fiberglassreinforced translucent material to a grid core. 27

This unique construction reduces solar gain while maximizing thermal insulation and produces a safer and healthier indoor climate and also allows for daylighting. 3. Cradle to Cradle Materials™ can be deconstructed and recycled back into their original materials again and again so that waste is never created. These products can include carpet and carpet tile backing, often made from recycled plastic

bottles. 4. Linoleum floors contain linseed oil, rosin, wood flour, limestone and natural pigments, and are backed with jute – all of which are natural materials. Harvesting these raw materials and producing linoleum demands relatively little energy and there are no toxic by-products. 5. Terrazo tile is composed of naturally occurring aggregates; recycled glass, plastic or bits of mirror, and processed cement or epoxy.

6 It is extremely durable, requires low maintenance, and typically lasts the life of the building. 6. Bamboo is a 100% sustainable resource since it does not require replanting after harvest. It is extremely durable and is tougher than typical hardwood surfaces. It can take about 3-5 years for bamboo to reach full maturity. Traditional hardwoods can take 20-120 years to mature.


7

8

9

11

10 7. Recycled rubber play surface areas used at our parent-child development centers are made from recycled scrap tires and other rubber materials. In addition to providing excellent durability, recycled rubber surfaces provide a safer play surface than concrete or asphalt. 8. Natural ventilation at Continuing Education Mesa College Campus, combines mechanically operated windows with an

open-air corridor. When a breeze flows into the central hallway through screens in the stairwells and clerestories, it creates a pressure situation that draws air in through the windows in the classrooms. The resulting airflow is strong enough to cool students without disturbing the papers on their desks. 9. Daylighting is the practice of placing windows or other openings and reflective surfaces in a

manner that maximizes the use of natural light and reduces the need for artificial light. This can include the use of high, vertically placed windows known as clerestory windows that allow natural light to filter through buildings or the use of tubular skylight fixtures. 10. Lattice ceiling diffuses daylight and allows for excess heat to rise and escape. 11. Recycled plastic fencing is designed to make

the rails and posts look like they are made from actual wood. Plastic fencing is a unique environmentally friendly product made from milk jugs and other recycled plastics. Unlike pressuretreated wood, there are no hazardous chemicals to leach out. A single tworail section of fencing can recycle as many as 525 one gallon-sized milk jugs.

28


BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS BIKES, TROLLEYS, AND AUTOMOBILES

The SDCCD promotes the use of public and shared transportation. Bus stops are generally within a few minutes’ walk of all campuses, with stops directly located at Mesa and City colleges. City College also has a trolley stop directly across the street from the campus. Carpoolers get special treatment at Mesa College, with premium parking spaces set aside specifically for those who share their commute. A new bus transit center at Miramar College is being built in response to the demand for public transportation centering around the college and its nearby businesses. It will include a center island passenger platform and 12 bus bays and transit furnishings. The center will support a future Direct Access Ramp (DAR) off of the Interstate 15 freeway. The DAR will provide direct access to the eastern edge of the campus and maximize the integration of land uses and transportation facilities, and encourage the use of mass transit, carpooling and vanpooling.

For those who like to bike to campus, safe bicycle parking is widely available. For bicyclists working or attending classes at the Educational Cultural Complex (ECC) Skills Center, locker rooms with showers are available.

29


ECOTALITY’S ELECTRIC VEHICLE (EV) PROJECT BLINK AND CHARGE NATIONWIDE

2013 DISTRICTWIDE BLINK CHARGING STATIONS

5

City College Career Technology Center 5 Charging Stations

4

Continuing Education ECC Skills Center 4 Charging Stations

5

Mesa College Parking Structure 5 Charging Stations

6

6

Miramar College Parking Structure 6 Charging Stations

Electric vehicle charging stations are in parking structures throughout the District supporting renewable energy initiatives. 26 new Blink charging stations for electric vehicles have been installed throughout the District as part of ECOtality’s nationwide Electric Vehicle (EV) Project deploying electric vehicles and charge infrastructure in 18 major cities.

Continuing Education North City Campus 6 Charging Stations

Learn more! www.blinknetwork.com/index.html

30


BUILDING A BETTER CAMPUS BIKES, TROLLEYS, AND AUTOMOBILES City College San Diego City College has a dedicated trolley stop at 12th and "C" streets with arrivals and departures from both blue and orange lines. Metropolitan Transit System (MTS) bus line 7 serves City College attendees. Mesa College MTS transit lines 41 and 44 service the campus;

route 44 is the Rosa Parks Memorial Transit stop, which supports the functioning bus stop and the custom bus shelter that displays historic images of Rosa Parks and her connection to San Diego Mesa College. Miramar College San Diego Miramar College is served to some degree by five bus lines, including the 20, 31, 210,

921, and 964. A dedicated transit center and Direct Access Ramp (DAR) are under construction, and will serve the campus community directly. Continuing Education Each of the Continuing Education campuses is served by the MTS system. The future César E. Chávez Campus is served by MTS bus route 3 and orange line trolley.

The Mid-City Campus is supported by bus routes 965 and 13; MTS bus route 3 and orange line serve Educational Cultural Complex (ECC) campus attendees. The North City Campus has two MTS stops within a few minutes’ walk, one near the corner of Aero Drive and the other on Aero Court. San Diego Continuing Education Mesa College Campus is adjacent to the Rosa Parks Memorial Transit stop. Schedules available at http://sdcommute.com/ TripPlanner/index.asp.

31


2013-2014 SEMESTER BUS PASS SALES DISTRICTWIDE FALL 2013

SPRING 2014

CITY COLLEGE

1,687

1,794

3,481

MESA COLLEGE

525

562

1,087

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

106

109

215

EDUCATIONAL CULTURAL COMPLEX DISTRICTWIDE

TOTAL

22

14

36

2,340

2,479

4,819

2013-2014 MONTHLY BUS PASS SALES CITY COLLEGE

MESA COLLEGE

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

DISTRICTWIDE

MAY 2013

79

50

8

137

SEPTEMBER 2013

48

35

3

86

OCTOBER 2013

76

52

11

139

NOVEMBER 2013

73

50

8

131

DECEMBER 2013

44

32

1

77

FEBRUARY 2014

52

47

7

106

MARCH 2014 TOTAL

*

75

65

10

150

Monthly bus passes are not sold during the months of January, June, July, and August.

447

331

48

826

ECC does not sell monthly bus passes.

32


LEED LEADERSHIP IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) through the U.S. Green Building Council is an internationally recognized green building certification, providing third-party verification that a building was designed and built using strategies aimed at improving energy savings, water efficiency, reductions of

CO2 emissions, improved indoor environmental quality and stewardship of resources, and sensitivity to project impacts on the environment.

certifications include a Platinum certification for the Miramar College Police Station, the highest possible designation and the first for a local higher education institution

Currently, the SDCCD is on track to obtain 42 LEED certifications, more than any single organization in San Diego County. These

AWARDED CERTIFICATIONS TIER

CAMPUS

PROJECT

PLATINUM

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

POLICE SUBSTATION

GOLD

CITY COLLEGE

CAREER TECHNOLOGY CENTER

GOLD

MESA COLLEGE

STUDENT SERVICES CENTER

GOLD

MESA COLLEGE

ALLIED HEALTH EDUCATION AND TRAINING FACILITY

GOLD

MESA COLLEGE

POLICE STATION

GOLD

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY CENTER

GOLD

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY CAREER INSTRUCTIONAL BUILDING EXPANSION

GOLD

CONTINUING EDUCATION

EDUCATIONAL CULTURAL COMPLEX SKILLS CENTER

GOLD

CONTINUING EDUCATION

WEST CITY CAMPUS

SILVER

CITY COLLEGE

LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER

SILVER

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

ARTS AND HUMANITIES BUILDING

SILVER

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

HEAVY DUTY ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER

SILVER

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

MATHEMATICS AND BUSINESS BUILDING

SILVER

CONTINUING EDUCATION

CONTINUING EDUCATION MESA COLLEGE CAMPUS

CERTIFIED

CITY COLLEGE

P BUILDING RENOVATION

CERTIFIED

MIRAMAR COLLEGE

HOURGLASS PARK FIELD HOUSE

VISIT HTTP://PUBLIC.SDCCDPROPS-N.COM/ABOUT/PAGES/SUSTAINABILITY.ASPX FOR MORE INFORMATION

33


PENDING CERTIFICATIONS TRACKING LEED GOLD: City College Arts and Humanities/Business Technology Buildings Mesa College Cafeteria/Bookstore Center for Business and Technology Social and Behavioral Sciences Building Miramar College Student Services Center (Interim Library) Continuing Education North City Campus TRACKING LEED SILVER: City College "A" Building Renovation "C" Building Renovation Child Development Center Engineering Technology Building (T Building) "M" Classroom Building Math and Social Sciences Building Science Building

TRACKING LEED SILVER: Mesa College Fitness Center Fine Arts and Dramatic Arts Renovation Instructional Technology Building Math and Science Building Miramar College Fire Science and EMT Training Facility Cafeteria/Bookstore + Student/Campus Center College Services Center Library/Learning Resource Center New Administration Building Science Building Renovation Continuing Education César E. Chávez Campus ECC Wing Phase II B Expansion. TRACKING GENERAL CERTIFICATION: Miramar College A-100 Remodel

34


LEEDING THE WAY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL San Diego City College’s Environmental Control Technology program provides technical instruction and handson training in both air conditioning and solar energy utilization. With about 40% of current U.S. energy usage being utilized for heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVACR), even the smallest system efficiency increases go a long way toward a more sustainable energy future for the United States. Students in the Environmental Control Technology program learn equipment-level technical skills that ensure efficient equipment operation as well as enterprise-level monitoring and control systems which achieves maximum systemwide synergistic performance. With the current graying

35

of the HVACR industry and a national push towards sophisticated higher efficiency systems, San Diego City College is helping lead the way forward in training the HVACR workers of tomorrow. City College’s Solar Energy Utilization courses focus on the two major solar technologies being utilized today – solar thermal, used in heating and cooling and solar photovoltaic, which is used to generate electricity. With both federal and state financial incentives available, solar utilization is booming throughout California and the United States. City's classes cover both technical and handson training and are taught by industry-experienced nationally certified solar professionals.

PHOTO BY PABLO MASON

Course content includes: • • •

Solar Site Assessment Passive Design Active System-type Selection

• • • •

Solar Energy Safety Net-zero System Design Return on Investment Analysis Solar Hot Water and Solar Photovoltaic


LEEDING THE WAY GREEN CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN Math and Social Sciences Building - Slated for LEED Silver

Career Technology Center - Certified LEED Gold

Career Technology Center

Learning Resource Center

P Building Renovation

San Diego City College has 12 buildings on track for LEED certifications. To date, three buildings have been awarded official certifications. The Career Technology Center is a five-story instructional facility housing the Nursing, Cosmetology, and Photography departments. There is extensive use of recycled materials, such as terrazzo flooring that contains 100% post-consumer glass. The building is designed with significant daylighting of the public, study, and work areas. This is shown to provide a healthier learning environment for students while reducing the building's energy consumption. Photovoltaic panels are installed on the building's roof and parking structure. The energy generated provides more than 7% of the building's total energy needs, contributing to an energy efficiency that is 25% better than what the building code requires. The Learning Resource Center renovation involved the conversion of 15,000 square feet of parking garage space into a new location for classrooms and support spaces. A rooftop photovoltaic array generates more than 140,000 kilowatt hours of renewable energy annually. The P Building involved the dramatic renovation of an existing two-story concrete gymnasium building, essentially gutting the entire interior of the building and leaving only the original exterior “skin� intact. The renovation included a complete redesign of the interior space, creating new workout rooms, locker rooms and classrooms. The original maple gymnasium flooring was removed, restored and refinished, and re-installed in the new gym. The project was awarded a Design Visionary Award by the local American Institute of Architects in 2009 for exemplary design intent. 36


LEEDING THE WAY COLLABORATIVE CURRICULUM The public’s growing awareness of the need to design sustainable projects has changed how design is taught. In recent years, the Interior Design and Building Construction professions have begun to focus their efforts on issues of sustainability and in turn, our curriculum in these areas has taken this shift into account. In light of this, courses now exist that are team-taught by faculty from Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior Design to demonstrate the way these three professions must interact collaboratively as a team throughout the design process to achieve an optimal level of sustainability. Architectural theory, environmental ethics and sustainable design strategies, instill students with a sense of future

37

directions in architectural design, and the assumption that global climate change is a present fact which architects must incorporate into all of their designs. Because buildings are among the greatest consumers of energy, the thoughtful design of building elements such as roof overhangs, window placement and building orientation has a large impact on sustainability and the global carbon footprint. Likewise, in interior design courses, students are introduced to working with energy codes while specifying low energy appliances, water conserving fixtures and equipment, and appropriate light source selections which utilize day lighting as a passive light source. As Architecture and Interior Design programs focus

on energy conservation and efficiency, Landscape Architecture teaches students design methods in which water conservation and ease of maintenance and durability are present

while working with a client’s requirements to develop land and minimize negative impacts from the built environment.


LEEDING THE WAY GREEN CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN Student Services Center - Certified LEED Gold

Allied Health Building - Certified LEED Gold

Allied Health Building

Police Station

Student Services Center

The three-story, 50,000-square-foot Allied Health building provides training facilities for degree and certificate programs for five healthcare fields: Dental Assisting, Health Information Technology, Medical Assisting, Physical Therapy Assistant, and Radiologic Technology. This structure obtains some of its energy from the photovoltaic panels on the nearby parking structure, boosting the building’s energy efficiency cost savings to 58.7% compared to a standard building. Energy efficient design and features help Allied Health exceed California’s Title 24 energy requirements by 7.4%. The Mesa College Police Station is a 7,000 gross-square-foot singlestory building. The building’s facilities include daylight-harvesting fixtures and waterless, and low-flow plumbing fixtures. The Student Services Center is a four story, 85,000 gross-square-foot building with new facilities for student services on campus. Services include Admissions, Financial Aid, Evaluations, and Testing, Counseling, student government, and Disability Support Programs and Services (DSPS). Projected energy savings of 340,000 kWh annually for this building are 35% better than state requirements. Water-efficient plumbing, irrigation, and landscape will result in a water savings of 40% on the building use and 50% on landscape. The project includes materials and finishes that include recycled content, displacement ventilation, attention to indoor air quality, and the use of natural daylight.

38


LEEDING THE WAY HEAVY DUTY TRANSPORTATION The San Diego Community College District is actively working with industry and community partners to minimize greenhouse gas emissions; San Diego Miramar College’s Heavy Duty Advanced Transportation (HDAT) Technology program is a great example of SDCCDs focus on the environment.

software operating systems; to new alternative fuels, such as natural gas; to the creation of new emission control systems. On campus, the HDAT program offers students and incumbent workers technical training that provides: •

The effort to reduce climate emissions requires continual improvements in technology. This is no small matter in the area of transportation vehicle operation and fuel consumption. In California the transportation sector represents over 35% of our greenhouse gas emissions. Heavy duty transportation, or buses, trucks and construction equipment, is continually undergoing changes in technology ranging from the introduction of electronic controls and 39

Miramar College Police Substation - Certified LEED Platinum – the highest possible certification and the first Platinum project for a local community college.

• • • •

Skills in diesel electronics Integrated industry certifications Expertise in the use of diagnostic software Experience in the use of emission testing equipment Technical training in natural gas engine technology

These complement an effective apprenticeship program with San Diego Metropolitan Transit System and over nine community college transportation technology

and 14 transit agencies throughout Southern California to provide incumbent workforce training. Additional courses addressing vehicle emission control

technology and heavyduty hybrid technology are under development. This in turn prepares students for successfully entering the green transportation technology workforce.

Automotive Technology Career Instructional Building Expan


r nsion

LEEDING THE WAY GREEN CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN

Hourglass Park Field House - LEED Certified

Humanities and Arts Building

San Diego Miramar College has 15 buildings on track for LEED certifications. To date, seven buildings have been awarded official certifications. The Automotive Technology Career Instructional Building expansion added a new classroom wing with teaching labs, classrooms and a computer lab, along with a storage facility and two covered outdoor service bays, and an auto detailing bay. The Aviation Maintenance Building Technology Center project repaired and renovated the existing 17,400 square feet building and added 10,400 additional square feet. The Heavy Duty Advanced Transportation Technology Center (Diesel) added approximately 17,500 square feet of new building construction to support program expansion to diesel, natural gas, hybrid bus and transit technologies and new developments in construction equipment technology. Combined as a dual-classroom building project, the Humanities and Arts building was constructed concurrently with the Mathematics and Business building. Both buildings consist of over 44,000 gross square feet of new construction and have sloped roofs with north-facing clerestory windows that allow light to filter into adjacent spaces as well as south-facing photovoltaic panels. The building design includes energy-efficient “thermal massing,” which delays the transfer of heat throughout the course of the day and minimizes the building’s heating or cooling load. The Police Substation includes a green roof and green screen with sustainability benefits that include insulation from high temperatures and the retention of stormwater. The tower element serves as a solar chimney, to create a flow of natural ventilation and save energy. The Hourglass Park Field House has high energy performance of the building envelope and HVAC elements by adding additional insulation at roofs and walls, lighting occupancy sensors, and air handlers for the HVAC units that utilize cool morning and evening outside air. The high-efficiency irrigation system uses reclaimed water to support drought-tolerant landscaping, which, combined with waterless and low-flow plumbing fixtures, that saves hundreds of thousands of gallons of water. The building uses 20% of recycled materials, including high level of post-consumer materials in steel elements and recycled tires in rubber gymnasium flooring. Over 50% of wood on the project is certified by the Forestry Steward Council as responsibly harvested. Non-heat absorbing roofing materials help mitigate “heat islands” and indoor air quality is maximized by the use of materials with low chemical content, and increased outside air ventilation.

Mathematics and Business Building Police Substation

40


LEEDING THE WAY TRAINING AND RESOURCES Continuing Education began a new program that will help train San Diegans in green technology. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act helped fund California’s Clean Energy Workforce Training Program and it is through this effort that Continuing Education is able to offer the new green building training in the STAR (Sustainable Training and Resource) Center at the Educational Cultural Complex (ECC). The STAR Center includes a weatherization simulation used for energy auditing with hightech infrared monitors, insulation demonstrations and applications, solar panel installation and maintenance, and classroom facilities with a “tell-tale� pressure house to demonstrate energy savings and building envelope efficiencies. It also houses 41

a mobile weatherization lab, where training can be taken anywhere in Southern California.

Continuing Education Mesa College Campus - Certified LEED Silver

The vision for the STAR Center is to become the regional Southern California green technology training center, promoting energy conservation and sustainability. Continuing Education is collaborating with local career centers on this new green building training effort. Upon completion of the five-week program, students are prepared for entry-level work in the field or to enroll in more specialized training in the areas of HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) mechanics, technicians, or installers; building performance or retrofitting specialists; building controls systems technicians; energy auditors or home energy raters;

and solar photovoltaic installers. The program aids displaced workers, the longterm unemployed, new workforce entrants, military veterans, and older, out-of-

school youth in gaining the skills necessary to compete for job opportunities in the emerging green economy. More than 100 students completed the training in 2013.


LEEDING THE WAY GREEN CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN Educational Cultural Complex (ECC) Skills Center - Certified LEED Gold

Continuing Education Mesa College Campus ECC Skills Center

West City Campus

The orientation of the Educational Cultural Complex (ECC) was designed to maximize both daylight and views to the outside. Daylight is available to 90% of the space, which increases user comfort and reduces the need for artificial lighting. High-efficiency plumbing fixtures reduce water consumption by over 40% as compared to a standard building. High-efficiency fixtures reduce the amount of electricity used and indoor air quality is optimized through the use of natural ventilation, carbon dioxide monitors, low chemical-emitting materials and finishes, and walk-off mats to control dirt from entering the building. The Continuing Education Mesa College Campus has a cutting-edge passive ventilation system that disengages the mechanical air conditioning system and automatically opens the windows when the weather is comfortable. High efficiency plumbing fixtures and mechanical systems are used throughout, and contribute to energy efficiency that exceeds state requirements by as much as 43%. The West City Campus has Low E-rated windows and solar tubes help maximize natural daylighting, reducing energy demands on cooling and artificial lighting. A high percentage of new construction materials are made from recycled materials including counter tops made from recycled newsprint, fences made from recycled plastics, and play surfaces made from recycled tires. Over 50% of the project materials were obtained locally to reduce the negative impacts of transporting them from distant sources. 42


LEEDING THE WAY AWARDS, ACCOLADES, KUDOS American Public Works Association, San Diego and Imperial Counties Chapter 2013 Honor Project, Structures - $26 - $75 million: San Diego Mesa College Student Services Center 2013 Project of the Year, Structures - Over $75 million: San Diego City College Math & Social Sciences Building 2012 Project of the Year: San Diego Miramar College Police Station 2011 Chapter Project of the Year Award - 2.4 Megawatt (MW) Power Purchase Agreement American Society of Civil Engineers, San Diego Chapter 2013 Award of Excellence: San Diego City College Math & Social Sciences Building 2013 Outstanding Award in Sustainable Technology: San Diego Mesa College Student Services Center 2010 Outstanding Engineering Feasibility Project: San Diego Miramar College Infrastructure Project 2009 Award of Merit in Sustainable Technology: San Diego Continuing Education West City Campus California Higher Education Sustainability Conference 2011 Best Practice for Sustainable Design: San Diego City College Career Technology Center 2010 Best Practice for Water Efficiency and Site Water Quality: Standardization of Calsense Irrigation Control System ENR California 2013 Best Project: Continuing Education Mesa College Campus San Diego Gas and Electric 2013 Higher Education Energy Champion 2012 Honorable Mention: Energy Champion 2011 Honorable Mention: Energy Champion 2010 Honorable Mention: Energy Champion UC/CSU/CCC Sustainability Conference 2009 Best Practice - Student Sustainability Program: San Diego City College Urban Farm 2009 Best Practice - Lighting Design and Retrofit: Harry West Gym 2008 Honorable Mention - HVAC Retrofit: Districtwide Upgrades to HVAC Systems

43


LEEDING THE WAY GOING GREEN PAYS GREEN Through its participation in a variety of utility and energy efficiency incentive programs, the SDCCD has received substantial incentive funding for prioritizing energyefficiency in building designs. These programs include: San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) Sustainable Communities The Sustainable Communities Program advances and promotes the use of clean energy generation technologies within our region. These

30 plus projects contribute a combined total of over 4 megawatts (MW) of locally generated, renewable power to the community.

better than Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards). Over $708,000 in incentive dollars have gone to the District to date.

comprehensive energy management program at the 112 campuses served by California's four large IOUs, including SDG&E.

California Utilities Savings By Design Program

The California Community College/ Investor Owned Utility (CCC/IOU) Partnership

Since the beginning of the CCC/IOU program, SDCCD has completed 20 individual energy efficient projects that save more than 2.8 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity and nearly 34,000 therms of natural gas annually. These savings have resulted in a total of $807,625 in incentive dollars that went directly to the District.

Savings By Design encourages owners to invest in energy efficiency as a major goal in their new buildings; financial incentives are available to owners when the efficiency of their new building exceeds the minimum Savings By Design threshold (generally 10%

The CCC/IOU Partnership is a unique, statewide energy-efficiency program achieving costeffective immediate and persistent peak energy and demand savings. Moreover, it establishes a permanent framework for a sustainable, long-term,

Learn more! http://cccutilitypartnership.com http://www.savingsbydesign.com/owners www.sdge.com/environment/sustainable-communities 44


SAN DIEGO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT The mission of the san diego community college district is to provide accessible, high-quality learning experiences to meet the educational needs of the san diego community. Board of Trustees: Mary Graham . Rich Grosch . Bernie Rhinerson Maria Nieto Senour, Ph.D. . Peter Zschiesche Constance M. Carroll, Ph.D., Chancellor Presidents: (Interim) Lynn Ceresino Neault , Ed.D., San Diego City College Pamela T. Luster, Ed.D., San Diego Mesa College Patricia Hsieh, Ed.D., San Diego Miramar College Anthony E. Beebe, Ed.D., San Diego Continuing Education Christopher Manis, Vice Chancellor, Facilities Management Jack Beresford, Director, Communications and Public Relations The San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) includes San Diego City College, San Diego Mesa College, San Diego Miramar College, and San Diego Continuing Education. The SDCCD is governed by its Board of Trustees. No oral or written representation is binding on the SDCCD without the express approval of the Board of Trustees.

LEARN MORE: District Website sdccd.edu Propositions S and N Website public.sdccdprops-n.com YouTube youtube.com/SDCCDPropsSN Facebook facebook.com/PropsSN Twitter twitter.com/sdccdpropssn

Sustainable Strategies in Higher Education  

As the second largest community college district in California, and the sixth largest in the country, the San Diego Community College Distri...

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