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SAN DIEGO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

Lean Enterprise Processes In Facilities Presented to PCAPPA 2011

October 18, 2011 1


Lean Processes

Agenda •The Challenge • Lean Custodial Practices

–Identify services –Custodial Beat Leveling –Cleaning Standards –Management By Walking Around (MBWA)

• Lean Work Order Processes –Centralized Work Order Center –Service Level Agreement (SLA) –Work Flow Process Mapping –Material/Supply Store –Planner/Schedulers –CMMS

• Electronic Work Order Delivery 2


San Diego Community College District (SDCCD)

About the District •Second Largest Community College District in California •Sixth Largest in Nation •Centralized M & O

•Four Regions –Three main campuses (City, Mesa and Miramar Colleges) –Six Continuing Education campuses 3


San Diego Community College District (SDCCD)

About the District Current Square Footage Buildings = 2,078,008 Gross Square Feet (GSF) Parking = 377,712 Gross Square Feet (GSF)

Current Acres of Landscape = 130.2 Current Utilities Consumption Electric = $3,971,950 Gas = $480,821 Water = $774,070 Total = $5,226,841

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San Diego Community College District (SDCCD)

About the District Projected Square Footage Additional Building GSF = 1,601,443 Total Building GSF = 3,679,451 Additional Parking GSF = 987,289 Total Parking GSF = 1,365,001

Grand Total GSF = 5,044,452

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San Diego Community College District (SDCCD)

About the District Projected Acres of Landscape Additional Acres of Landscape = 19 Total Acres of Landscape = 149.2

Projected Utilities Consumption Additional Utility Costs = $4,542,390 Total Annual Costs = $8,790,209

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Lean Processes

Our Challenge • Current economic conditions continue to impact SDCCD • SDCCD Facilities Services must reduce FY09-16 forecasted expenditures • While current state revenue is down, SDCCD must plan for future doubling service base without doubling the budget

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Lean Processes

Benchmarking and Goals Custodial •Beginning cleanable sf - 13,900 per custodian •Increase to 25,000 sf

Maintenance •Beginning cost per sf - $3.93 •Reduce to $2.25 sf

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Lean Processes

Potential Cumulative Savings FY

FY 09/10

Custodial

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

Custodial Forecast H/C

104

113

132

149

162

173

189

191

6,098,855 $

6,650,098 $

7,769,004 $

8,731,333 $

9,504,832 $

100

122

130

140

147

Cust Forecast Salary

$

Custodial Adj HC

77

82

88

10,169,255 $

11,098,158 $

Ave Salary $

58,643

11,227,172 45

Custodial Adj Budget

$

4,497,197 $

4,782,522 $

5,187,077 $

5,878,320 $

7,150,669 $

7,622,296 $

8,208,826 $

8,597,611

Delta

$

1,601,658 $

1,867,576 $

2,581,927 $

2,853,013 $

2,354,162 $

2,546,959 $

2,889,331 $

2,629,561 $

19,324,187

$

13,273,027

$

76,457

Hold HC Flat until projection exceeds current HC

Maintenance Maint Forecast H/C Maint Forecast Salary

45 $

Maintenance Adj H/C

3,440,546 $ 29

50

57

3,793,010 $ 32

4,344,262 $ 37

64

69

4,857,286 $ 41

5,245,685 $ 45

73 5,579,036 $ 47

79 6,044,656 $ 51

80 6,108,880 52

28

Maint Adj Salary

$

2,236,355 $

2,465,457 $

2,823,770 $

3,157,236 $

3,409,695 $

3,626,373 $

3,929,027 $

3,970,772

Delta

$

1,204,191 $

1,327,554 $

1,520,492 $

1,700,050 $

1,835,990 $

1,952,663 $

2,115,630 $

2,138,108 $

13,794,676

$

12,590,485

Hold HC Flat until projection exceeds current HC

$25,863,512 Opportunity

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Lean Processes

The Business Principles of the Toyota Way Principle 1 – Base Your Management Decisions on a Long-Term Philosophy, Even at the Expense of Short-Term Goals Principle 2 – Create Continuous Process Flow to Bring Problems to the Surface Principle 3 – Use “Pull” Systems to Avoid Overproduction Principle 4 – Level Out the Workload (Heijunka)

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Lean Processes

The Business Principles of the Toyota Way Principle 5 – Build a Culture of Stopping to Fix Problems, to Get Quality Right the First Time Principle 6 – Standardized Tasks are the Foundation For Continuous Improvement and Employee Empowerment Principle 7 – Use Visual Control So No Problems are Hidden

Principle 8 – Use Only Reliable, Thoroughly Tested Technology That Serve Your People and Processes Principle 9 – Grow Leaders Who Thoroughly Understand the Work, Live the Philosophy, and Teach It to Others 11


Lean Processes

The Business Principles of the Toyota Way Principle 10 – Develop Exceptional People and Teams Who Follow Your Company’s Philosophy Principle 11 – Respect Your Extended Network of Partners and Suppliers by Challenging Them and Helping Them Improve Principle 12 – Go and See for Yourself to Thoroughly Understand the Situation (Genchi Genbutsu)

Principle 13 – Make Decisions Slowly by Consensus, Thoroughly Considering All Options; Implement Decisions Rapidly Principle 14 – Become a Learning Organization Through Relentless Reflection (Hansei) and Continuous Improvement (Kaizen) 12


Lean Processes

Custodial Practices •Identify our core mission •Identify how we were spending time •Load Leveling •Increase cleaning square footage •Beat books •Cleaning Standards •MBWA •Pride Program 13


Lean Processes

Assessment of Services • Findings –Opening doors –Stock room duties –Personal assistants –Event set ups –Temperature checks –Movers –Concierge Service –Cleaning 14


Lean Processes

Opportunities for Improvement •Get back to core mission •Board of Trustees and Chancellor buy in –Developed a door opening policy –Developed an out of scope work list –Directing work requests through the call center –Plan and schedule work

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Lean Custodial Practices

Custodial Load Level – Finding the Balance

•Identify the type of space use and the finishes used within the space to identify the base cleaning factor for that space type 16


Lean Custodial Practices

Assign Cleaning Time Based on Space

Calculate the time to clean based on the assignable square footage and the base cleaning factor 17


Lean Custodial Practices

Summarize Head Count Requirements

With all buildings added, the total required HC for Level 2 Cleaning at San Diego Mesa College is 26

The space is then summed from room up to building and then up to campus. –This leads to a qualitative method to determine the proper HC requirements –Enables the supervisor to develop project teams to tackle larger projects that require more man power and are outside the daily cleaning requirements 18


Lean Processes

Beat Book-Example Beat #4

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Lean Custodial Processes

Route with Times per Area

20


Lean Custodial Processes

Map of the Campus

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Lean Custodial Processes

Floor Plan of Area

22


Lean Custodial Processes

Cleaning Guidelines—Daily/Weekly/Monthly

23


Lean Custodial Processes

MBWA Form

24


Lean Custodial Practices

SDCCD Cleaning Standards (per APPA)

• SDCCD defined the acceptable level of cleaning for district as a Level 2. At the start of the project they were consistently at a level 3 – 4. • This underlined the need to improve the level of service 25


Lean Custodial Practices

SDCCD Cleaning Standards – APPA Level 1 & 2

26


Lean Custodial Practices

Implementation of Pride Program Began by implementing Management by Walking Around (MBWA) to track building scores. The indicator of success for this phase was simply number or percentage of MBWA inspections completed over time.

27


Lean Custodial Practices

Tracking and Trending Discrepancies

Buildings are inspected and discrepancies are tracked by work week 28


Lean Custodial Practices

Tracking and Trending Discrepancies

First goal of the MBWA’s was to inspect all buildings consistently. 29


Lean Custodial Practices

Management By Walking Around (MBWA)

30


Lean Custodial Practices

Transitioning from MBWA to Pride Program • Once the team has been trained on doing inspections, and they are occurring regularly, it was time to move to the Pride Program –Designed to build a sense of Pride with those who have ownership for the space or function

•Began entering the data of discrepancies into a database to begin tracking the actual data vs. simply whether the inspection has occurred. •Track and trend the types of discrepancies and the total overall score.

31


Lean Custodial Practices

Converting the Data to Building Scores

•Score is created by taking the number of discrepancies and subtracting from 100. •The score is then normalized based on building sized with 20,000 ASF assumed as normal 32


Lean Custodial Practices

Trend by Discrepancy: Campus Example

Each week, the top discrepancies are identified 33


Lean Custodial Practices

Use of Data to Improve Performance The data collected from this tool/process is used to: –Drive for Continuous Improvement –Chart performance goals for a campus, department or individual •Campus Trend •Trend by Discrepancy (i.e., burned out lights) •Trend by Area Owner

–Implement a recognition program •“Pride Award” based on best scoring building •Most Improved

–Performance Management •Improve area by 10% •Lowest performing area owner 34


Lean Custodial Practices

Lessons Learned •Don’t use the top down approach –No buy in from users –Better communication with entire group –No formal consistent plan for implementation –Visual presentation as to the direction we are heading

•Take small steps –Test a process before jumping into it

•Remember “what’s in it for me?” 35


Lean Work Order Processes

Maintenance Assessment

•Identify how we were spending time •Examine priorities •Scrutinize processes •Should we redesign or improve this process? •What tools do we need to do this?

36


Lean Work Order Processes

Maintenance Process Findings •We were a reactive organization •No formal method of prioritization •Inefficient, unpredictable processes •Too much windshield time for technicians •We needed a more robust computerized maintenance management system

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Lean Work Order Processes

Maintenance Process Improvement Steps Develop a prioritization matrix Design new work flow processes Create a centralized work distribution center Standardize triage and follow up procedures to support processes and reduce windshield time • Purchase a more robust computerized maintenance management system • Evaluating Grainger rolling stock for fleet • • • •

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Lean Work Order Processes

Work Prioritization •SDCCD - in its quest to be “service oriented” - had no formal work prioritization processes –This led to 85%+ of work being reactive –On a recurring basis there were an excess of 1600 open work orders

•A prioritization matrix was developed to establish a service level agreement within the District •As an organization we made a decision to transition from a reactive mode to a planned maintenance base operation. 39


Lean Work Order Processes

Priority Matrix: Service Level Agreement

40


Lean Work Order Processes

Service Level Agreement: Priority Level 1 Example

41


Lean Work Order Processes

Call Center / Work Distribution Center

•Centralized •Standardized •Customer Service

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Lean Work Order Processes

Productive Maintenance Time

Reactive organizations have an average wrench time of only 20% while proactive organizations approach 60% or higher.

43


Lean Work Order Processes

Productive Maintenance Time The Case for Planner / Schedulers

Productive Hours

60% 50%

Preventative 40%

30%

Reactive

• Three techs without planning • 3 x 30% = 90% • One planner with two technicians • 1 x 0% + 2 x 50% = 100% • 50% / 30% = 1.67 ( 67% Improvement ) • 45 techs x 1.67 = 75 technicians

% Wrench Time

In today's economy, how are you going to get 67% more resources for maintenance? 11/3/2010

Copyright © 2009, Step Function – FMC, L.L.C.

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Lean Work Order Processes

Megamation (CMMS) •Web-based •Work request entry by customers and Facilities

•Useful dashboard/work order console •Auto generated due date for priorities 1-4 •Key performance indicator reports •Time keeping •Unlimited training 45


Lean Work Order Processes

Megamation (CMMS)

46


Lean Work Order Processes

Work Order Metrics

47


Lean Work Order Processes

Work Order Metrics

48


Lean Work Order Processes

Work Order Metrics

49


Lean Work Order Processes

Reduce Windshield Time •5 technicians x 1 hour windshield time daily x 45 weeks=1125 hours •3 months per region •Reduced access to supply house •Painters success

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Lean Work Order Processes

Electronic Work Order Delivery

Objective To enable maintenance employees to receive work orders, and log time on task, by use of internet capable device.

51


Lean Work Order Processes

Electronic Work Order Delivery •CMMS provider designed their browser to integrate with our maintenance software. Work Orders “pushed” to hand held device and upload to CMMS Server upon completion

•Testing and Implementation Our initial browser using a blackberry device met with limited success. Continuous improvement led us to fix what was not working. Currently implementing a more robust EVO device to work with Megamation. 52


Lean Work Order Processes

Electronic Work Order Delivery

•What was working? What wasn’t? Blackberry screen size limited browser view Upload/download bit rate was ‘dial up’ Workers were frustrated with product that was adapted to work with CMMS Workers used personal internet capable devices that worked

53


Lean Work Order Processes

Electronic Work Order Delivery

54


Lean Work Order Processes

Electronic Work Order Delivery

BENEFITS •Less paper and printing •“Real time” logging of time on task •Can be assigned to multiple employees •Less driving time •Less data entry from paper to computer for staff, allowing more time for other tasks •Fewer lost or misplaced work orders

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San Diego Community College District

Facilities Services Lean Enterprise Efforts Industry Findings: Cost of O&M Inefficiencies

Over half the costs are from searching for and validating data

* Source: NIST Study – August 2004 56


Lean Processes

Facilities Services Lean Enterprise Efforts Building the Solution: BIM to FM Inexpensive access to BIM model Any time, anywhere access to facilities docs Consistent, scalable, unified database Collaboration and communication productivity platform Integration with and extension of existing Program Portal

57


Lean Processes

Facilities Services Lean Enterprise Efforts Approach: Improve Collaboration and Transparency

SharePoint 2010

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SAN DIEGO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

Questions? Dane Lindsay Regional Facilities Officer San Diego Community College District Miramar College dlindsay@sdccd.edu (619) 388-7461

Tony Goudie Director Facilities Services San Diego Community College District tgoudie@sdccd.edu (619) 388-6422

David Umstot, PE Vice Chancellor, Facilities Management San Diego Community College District dumstot@sdccd.edu (619) 388-6456

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Lean Enterprise Processes in Facilities