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MCI (P) 100/09/2019

TRANSFORMATION: FROM NON-TECH TO TECH 02 How Numbers Stack Up for Digitalised Accounting 04 Scoring at the Manufacturing Game with Digitialisation 08 Justice Aedit Chats about Digitalisation Opportunities and Challenges for the Legal Practice 10 Diana Chen Speaks about Digitalisation for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

Issue

04 2019


Contents Vision To be the leading infocomm and digital media professional society in Singapore

Mission Lead the Way To lead and contribute to the vibrancy and growth of Singapore’s infocomm and digital media industry

Add Value To add value to the infocomm and digital media professional’s career and personal development

EDITOR’S MESSAGE

#LATEST@SCS

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Signing of Memorandum of Intent with Institute of Banking and Finance

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Launch of SCS Blockchain Special Interest Group

None Can Sit Out of Digitalisation

THE BIG IDEA 02

How Numbers Stack Up for Digitalised Accounting

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Inaugural Enterprise Architecture Conference

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Scoring at the Manufacturing Game with Digitialisation

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Design Thinking Workshops for Non-tech Professionals

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Why Legaltech is an Unstoppable Force

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Pilot Run of Emerging Tech & Industry Workshop Series

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Addition of New Institute of Technical Education Student Chapter

SPOTLIGHT

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SCS Splash Awards 2019

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Justice Aedit Chats about Digitalisation Opportunities and Challenges for the Legal Practice

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SCS Medals for Outstanding Youths

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Diana Chen Speaks about Digitalisation for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

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Why Join SCS

Be the Voice To engage and be the voice of the infocomm and digital media community

GEEK SPEAK 25

Hello Boss

POWER BOOST 13

Why Every Business is a Digital Media Company

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The Magazine of the Singapore Computer Society

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FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

9:41 AM

Digitalisation – Everyone is In Because There is No Option to Sit Out

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dmit it or not – we have all enjoyed the convenience digitalisation brings to our everyday life. Before digitalisation, doing your banking after hours was unheard of. Similarly, the idea of working remotely was also unimaginable. But today, thanks to digitalisation – we can conduct business as usual (almost) even with the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. And truly, digitalisation not only presents opportunities for the tech industry, it has just as much to offer for non-tech industries – both for age-old professions like accounting and law, and modern industrialisation such as manufacturing. Surprisingly – despite these attractive rewards – the reception and attitude towards digitalisation are relatively polarised. On one end, digitalisation enthusiasts tend to get caught up in chasing after new technology without examining their value and relevance. On the other, digitalisation naysayers either cite high costs or incompatibility and irrelevance as reasons for not adopting technology.

EDITOR Tan Teng Cheong CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Hans Gunawan Vladyslav Koshelyev Josh Lee Kok Thong Joseph Lum Samuel Tan EDITORIAL SUPPORT Claudia Lim

ADVERTISING SALES & ADMIN Claudia Lim For ad sales enquiries, Tel: 6226 2567 ext 12 Email: claudia.lim@scs.org.sg Mailing Address 53 Neil Road Singapore 088891 EMAIL scs.secretariat@scs.org.sg EDITORIAL & DESIGN Lancer Design Pte Ltd

The good news is, non-tech associations such as Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), Institute of Banking and Finance (IBF), Singapore Academy of Law (SAL) and Singapore Manufacturing Federation (SMF) are taking the lead to encourage tech adoption and facilitate digitalisation. Of course, the role of leaders like Justice Aedit Abdullah also cannot be undermined. Their beliefs and advocacy for technology are core to driving change in systems, processes and people. Truth is, as Diana Chen from Singtel has pointed out – digitalisation is not always costly or complicated. Furthermore, given all the indications that digitalisation is here to stay, we will all do well to accept and embrace it – before it is too late! Let’s choose to be the boss rather than be bossed. Happy reading! TAN TENG CHEONG Editor Fellow, SCS tan.teng.cheong@scs.org.sg

FEEDBACK We value your feedback for this magazine. Simply email scs.secretariat@scs.org.sg with your comments to help us produce an even more interesting and relevant magazine for you in subsequent issues. You are welcome to submit articles for inclusion consideration. For advertising enquiries, please call 6226 2567 or email scs.secretariat@scs.org.sg. The IT Society is the official publication of the Singapore Computer Society. Any part of this publication may be reproduced as long as credit is given to the publisher, Singapore Computer Society. All views expressed by contributors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society.

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THE BIG IDEA

THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

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Digitalisation in Accounting – Do the Numbers Stack Up? HANS GUNAWAN Member, SCS-ACCA Accounting/ Finance Tech Interest Group Head of Business Development, AirTrunk

Digitalisation has the ability to not only change our current ways of working, but also reshape industries and impact our society. Question is, for a profession like accounting which dates back thousands of years, what benefits can digitalisation bring?

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aking the forms of Artificial Intelligence (AI), machine learning, blockchain, etc., there is an expectation for digitalisation to positively impact document recognition, data processing and process controls in accounting.


The Magazine of the Singapore Computer Society

STRONG POSITIVES FOR DIGITALISATION IN ACCOUNTING In the area of document recognition, AI can help to recognise documents such as invoices, purchase orders, delivery orders, etc. Besides increasing efficiency in recording details, it helps finance professionals to become more effective in detecting anomalies, identifying process deficiencies and improving integrated reporting with data consistency across reports and ledgers. Further, with digitalisation, companies’ capacity for processing data expands exponentially – whether it is to perform automated payment transfers to suppliers by taking advantage of discounts, generate financial forecasts for the business, or improve strategy analysis by moving operations from the reactive to predictive mode. For example, an automated inventory system offers insights about the stock level and consumption rate, allowing companies to better anticipate demand and reduce wastage. In addition, the tracking of deliveries via an electronic proof of delivery (ePOD) not only enables visual authentication to be generated for suppliers and customers, but also facilitates immediate invoice processing. Compared to the traditional paper trail methodology, digitalisation also empowers companies to tighten its process controls with the deployment of automatic access rights assignment and cybersecurity. With these improved process controls in place, there is hope that time-consuming and labour-intensive financial auditing processes can be simplified. This was also affirmed by the survey1 conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) in 2018, which suggested that 70% of decision makers expect up to 40% of financial audit to be automated by 2022.

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WEAK NEGATIVES AGAINST DIGITALISATION IN ACCOUNTING However, not everything is rosy with digitalisation. General job requirements in the accounting profession are slowly changing to entail more analytical thinking skills as low cognitive, routine jobs involving large amounts of data processing like bookkeeping, periodend account closing, regulatory filings, etc. are expected to be eliminated. But the same PwC survey indicated otherwise – as the percentage of decision makers who think that there will be considerable technology-related staff reduction went down from 27% in 2016 to 19% in 2018. A few factors underpin this belief. For automation to work, companies need to standardise their accounting data, processes and systems; and many are still a long way from achieving this. Furthermore, the application of digitalisation is often limited by the digital maturity of their external stakeholders. The level of complication goes even higher when the company in concern operates in different countries and is subject to varying regulatory requirements on data privacy and security and accounting standards. Beyond which, the need for higherskilled employees who can structure data sets and train the algorithm to recognise new document formats and content, and a better grasp of how immature technologies such as blockchain can be harnessed to ensure high quality data process integrity are also central to the adoption rate of digitalisation in accounting.

THE BIG IDEA

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MEASURES TO OFFSET NEGATIVES FOR BIGGER RETURNS Nonetheless, regardless of challenges in embracing digitalisation, the opportunities it promises are significant. Hence, it is pivotal that the board and senior leadership teams actively pursue digitalisation of the accounting process – especially around finance, treasury, and internal audit – by providing an environment where employees are encouraged to try new solutions, fail fast and learn fast. Equally important is a strong sense of ownership to maintain high quality digital data. Because digitalisation can only be successful if there is a high degree of trust in the data and the underlying systems and controls. To facilitate this, companies can encourage the use of digitally signed documents, limit write access to relevant stakeholders, and minimise the number of software applications across multiple functions on an ongoing basis. Similarly, continuous conversations between companies and their auditors should be maintained to enable learning, and system and regulatory gap mitigation. It is a fact that digitalisation in accounting is inevitable. And as part of this transformation, our role as finance professionals has changed from one that focuses on data reporting to higher value activities such as planning and analysis. Hence it is important for us to embrace digital transformation and redirect our efforts and time towards learning new skills and capabilities.

Then, its implementation – particularly during the stages of information gathering and processing – sometimes also challenges ethics. However, as long as we recognise that unethical behaviour does not come from the adoption of technology but rather our personal ethical conscience, we know it is up to us to do what is right.

PricewaterhouseCoopers Aktiengesellschaft Wirtschaftsprüfungsgesellschaft, “Digitalisation in finance and accounting and what it means for financial statement audits”, July 2018 (https://www.pwc.de/de/im-fokus/digitale-abschlusspruefung/pwc-digitalisation-in-finance-2018.pdf)

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THE BIG IDEA

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THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

Digitalisation –

The Key to Scoring at the Manufacturing Game Industry 4.0 is no longer an emerging force – it is here. Through automation, machine learning, advanced business-intelligence solutions and greater connectivity, Industry 4.0 has empowered manufacturers around the world to achieve significant productivity gains, better returns on investments through longer equipment lifetime, and reduced downtime.

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2018 McKinsey & Company report1 forecasted that the impact of Industry 4.0 on member economies of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) will be between $216 billion to $637 billion a year by 2025. Many global multinational corporations and manufacturing conglomerates have also identified digitalisation as a top strategic priority. Notably, early adopters of digital innovation are already seeing significant gains in bottom line.

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/ operations/our-insights/industry-4-0reinvigorating-asean-manufacturing-for-thefuture

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THE NUMBERS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES One such manufacturer is SATS BRF (now known as Country Foods). Within a few months of adopting Internet of Things (IoT) across their three processing plants and over 70 meat-processing machines, the company saw a 30% increase in equipment output and a 25% reduction in labour-hours. Through optimising Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) performance real-time, they were able to

SAMUEL TAN Member, SCS-SMF Manufacturing Tech Interest Group Chief Executive Officer & Co-founder, Auk Industries

JOSEPH LUM Member, SCS-SMF Manufacturing Tech Interest Group Chief Technology Officer & Co-founder, Auk Industries

level-load their machines and schedule manpower more efficiently. In addition, IoT replaced the previously labour-intensive and imprecise manual tracking to empower 24/7 real-time data collection and decisionmaking based on a “single-source-oftruth”. In the case of another regional beverage company, the implementation of an industrial IoT system saw its bottling plant’s throughput productivity increase 80%.


The Magazine of the Singapore Computer Society

This was possible because for the first time, they were able to pinpoint the sources of productivity losses and tighten processes to minimise wastage. By leveraging data to improve equipment and manpower utilisation, they were able to put off capacity expansion which would otherwise incur large capital expenditure. THE POSITIVE IMPACT IS AN ONGOING REALITY, NOT A ONE-OFF There is a common thread in both examples provided. The manufacturers not only kept their business objectives in sight when introducing new technology, they were also focused on only seeking out technology that can help them reach their business goals. However, the biggest contributor to their successful outcomes is – their agile approach. Rather than searching for the perfect solution to take that first step, they went with quick implementation and feedback cycles. This facilitated the development of an IoT system that truly meets their business needs. The benefits IoT systems bring are sustained. The real-time data these systems provide offers manufacturers opportunities to analyse, investigate and improve operational processes through rapid ideation and hypothesis-testing. The management and production staff can also reinforce best practices while eliminating inefficient ones – achieving performance growth. THE ROAD TO DIGITALISATION CAN BE FAST, BUT BEWARE OF SPEED BUMPS But despite the enthusiasm to digitalise and ride on opportunities Industry 4.0 promises, the road to digitalisation is not without its challenges. Manufacturers are often overwhelmed by the complexity of the project, uncertain about business outcomes they want to achieve with digitalisation or put off by the initial capital outlay. Legacy systems and a mix of old and new machines in the manufacturing plant also further compound the problem of finding the right solutions. The good news is: many startups are undaunted and continue to forge ahead to offer Industry 4.0 manufacturing technologies – industrial IoT systems – to help manufacturers achieve their goals.

THE BIG IDEA

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One such provider is Auk Industries, which offers a flexible and modular IoT system. Through allowing manufacturers to deploy and stream data from different machines quickly, actionable insights are efficiently analysed and displayed; continuous improvements on the factory floor are also enabled. Their fast deployment – within minutes – to

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a large range of machines also means that manufacturers can enjoy the advantages of digitalisation sooner than later. Furthermore, these technologies are scalable, future-proof and compatible with other solutions, such as Manufacturing Execution System (MES) and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, within the ecosystem.

TIPS FOR DIGITALISING YOUR MANUFACTURING BUSINESS

Be businessfocused rather than technology-focused

Use data to drive continuous improvement

Reshape organisational mindset and culture

Instead of chasing after the latest and most popular technology solutions, invest in technologies which can generate maximum bottom line gains for the organisation.

Manufacturers should quantify expected outcomes and compare real-time performance data against them.

Empower employees with access to data and encourage data-driven performance feedback, root cause finding and continuous process improvements.

Figure: Frozen meat processing plant

About Auk Industries Currently headquartered in Singapore, Auk Industries has regional offices across Southeast Asia as well as plans to set up offices in Europe and North America. Auk Industries is one of the founding network partners of the Smart Industry Readiness Index by Economic Development Board Singapore (EDB), working collaboratively with organisations such as McKinsey & Company and TÜV SÜD. If you are looking to digitalise your factory or find out how Industrial IoT can improve your operations, get in touch with Auk Industries. https://auk.industries


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THE BIG IDEA

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THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

Legaltech – An Unstoppable Rising Force The legal practice, like many other industries, is undergoing digitalisation. Particularly in the past five years, there has been a significant number of legaltech activities in Singapore. With the promise of advocating better understanding and easier application of law, legaltech has become a growing force that is hard for legal practitioners to ignore and critical for Singapore’s legal system to embrace.

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hile it is difficult to pinpoint a precise moment when the present legaltech revolution was mooted in Singapore, one of the first technologies adopted and continues to be in use is the Electronic Filing System (or known today as “eLitigation”), a fullyelectronic court registry. THE JUDICIARY SYSTEM PUTS LEGALTECH ON THE CENTRE STAGE In more recent times, the Ministry of Law and the Judiciary have signalled efforts to assess technology’s impact on future legal services. This led to the

formation of a Courts of the Future Taskforce, which will study and provide recommendations on the approach for adopting technology in Singapore’s court work. Since 2017, the emphasis also took on the form of active support for technology adoption – as seen from events such as the unveiling of the Singapore Academy of Law’s Legal Technology Vision, as well as initiatives like Future Law Innovation Programme (FLIP), Tech Start for Law and Techcelerate for Law.

LAW FIRMS GET ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT LEGALTECH Law firms have also begun adopting legaltech in a big way. For instance, at least two large local law firms adopted Luminance, an Artificial Intelligence (AI) powered Merger and Acquisition (M&A) document review tool, in 2017. In addition, Rajah & Tann LLP, a large local legal firm, set up Rajah & Tann Technologies to offer tech-enabled legal solutions like electronic discovery and cybersecurity services. International law firms such as Clifford Chance’s Create+65 and Allen & Overy’s Fuse, have also set up innovation labs and incubators here.


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THE BIG IDEA

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OUR LEGALTECH ECOSYSTEM SHAPES UP AND GROWS Seeing the potential of a digitalised legal sector, not only have homegrown legaltech firms – INTELLLEX, Asia Law Network, Tessaract.io, Pactly, Lex Quanta and Legalese – sprung up, overseas legaltech firms – Zegal and 1Law – have also established footprints here.

JOSH LEE KOK THONG Member, SCS-SAL Legal Tech Interest Group Chairperson, Asia-Pacific Legal Innovation and Technology Association

On the ecosystem level, student clubs such as SMU’s Legal Innovation and Technology Club and NUS’ alt+law have emerged. Organisations like LawTech.Asia are also making strides in documenting and driving local thought leadership in law and technology for the regional audience while others like the Asia-Pacific Legal Innovation and Technology Association (ALITA) promote regional legaltech development, use, thought

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leadership and education. Notably, ALITA is also proactively facilitating regional cross-border legal innovation and technology collaborations, and knowledge sharing. LEGALTECH IN SINGAPORE – AN EXCITING STORY WITH MORE CHAPTERS TO BE WRITTEN Consequently, the rise in legaltech on these various fronts has resulted in a watershed transformation in our legal practice – leading us into the age of digitalised law. However, rather than seeing the digitalisation of law as a disruptive force, we should see it as an enabling one: where legal professionals are enabled to do more with less, transform business models, and most importantly, ensure access to justice for all. Let’s build a better legal system for the next generation together.

FORCES CONTRIBUTING TO THE AGE OF DIGITALISED LAW

Force: Changes in Singapore’s substantive laws, such as the Electronic Transactions Act in 2010 which recognises the use of electronic records, electronic and digital signatures and electronic contracts, and amendments to the Supreme Court of Judicature Act which enable court hearings to be held by electronic means.

Force: Liberalisation of our legal industry has brought in international law firms more versed in using technology in practice.

Force: Increasingly sophisticated clients who not only have knowledge of legaltech and online legal information services, but also appreciate the benefits of working with tech-savvy law firms.

Force: Technology has advanced to a tipping point where its adoption is not cost or scale prohibitive while enabling improved effectiveness.

Result: These changes to our legal framework provide clarity and certainty for innovation in our legal industry to take root and keep pace with technological developments.

Result: Local firms become more proactive in adopting technology to compete and cooperate with these firms on level terms.

Result: Law firms are encouraged by the perceived benefits from investing in technology transformation.

Result: An industry that is ripe for “Uberisation” is created, enabling new and alternative legal service providers with new ways of working to enter the market seamlessly.


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SPOTLIGHT

THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

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WHEN LEGAL BECOMES LEGALTECH:

Challenges and Opportunities for the Practice JUSTICE AEDIT ABDULLAH High Court Judge, Supreme Court, Singapore Age: 49 Earliest Tech Experience: Eight years old with Apple II Plus Currently Playing: Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order on PS4 Pet Topics: Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Law Favourite Way to Relax: Catch up on sleep

Technology is both exciting and unsettling. Particularly, for the legal profession which highly values test cases, it has opened up opportunities to bring about greater fairness. Conversely, its fast pace of change and supposed power to disrupt the practice has also given rise to uncertainties for legal professionals. The IT Society caught up with Justice Aedit Abdullah from the Supreme Court to gain an insider’s perspective on the matter. Q: Question, JAA: Justice Aedit Abdullah Q: Are there more similarities between law and technology than most people know? JAA: People tend to perceive law as traditional. However, the truth is we have benefited in tangible ways from incorporating technology into our everyday work. One example is the law library. While it remains essential to our practice, we are able to function on a leaner library now because much of the information is available online. Furthermore, the wide availability of legal information from other jurisdictions has made it easier for local lawyers and judges to keep abreast of cases and statutes overseas and assess their relevance for the Singapore context. Significantly, it allows people to make the best argument they can, marshal the evidence they need, gather the information they require and reproduce the critical documents necessary.

Hence people in the legal industry are increasingly seeing a need to change and adopt technology into their everyday work. Particularly, developments in the areas of AI and data mining present exciting opportunities for us to do our jobs faster and better. Q: We hear about benefits of technology for the practice. What about for the man on the street? JAA: For the man on the street, thanks to technology, access to justice has become easier. In the past, the court system is paper-based – so for any one case there are many papers moving around and it takes time for the papers to cycle through each process. Today, many things are digitalised. Not only does this speed up the process, there is also a lower possibility of documents and information getting lost. That means safer, easier and faster legal processes for everyone.

In addition, it is now more convenient for the public to locate the latest statutes and regulations through our online resources. They can be assured that information is always up to date and, if they like, even find out when they became effective and were last updated. The abundance of cases available in our portal also empowers the public’s better understanding of regulations and their enforcement. Q: Given the many benefits of technology, why are law firms less than enthusiastic in embracing technology? JAA: Contrary to that perception, there is actually a lot of energy in Singapore regarding legaltech, and there are plenty of novel ideas which will hopefully find traction in the market. I know for a fact that quite a few of our law firms have actually embarked on technology in a big way – coming out with their own solutions and bringing them to market.


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That said, due to the nature of the legal industry in Singapore, there are many small legal firms juggling various aspects of day-to-day operations – from dealing with clients’ demands to ensuring the sufficiency of their manpower resources, bottom line, etc. It is understandable why technology adoption takes a back seat for them. Nonetheless, the Ministry of Law (MinLaw) and Singapore Academy of Law (SAL) recognise that there is much that they can stand to gain from technology, and have therefore been very active in encouraging them to explore technology through initiatives such as the Future Law Innovation Programme (FLIP) and helping them address costs and training concerns. Q: With technology in the background, what lies ahead for the legal profession and our legal system? JAA: For all the good that technology brings, we acknowledge that not all technology is appropriate for our purpose and when used inappropriately, it could do more harm than good. One instance is the video broadcast of trials in courts. Although we see some benefits for the

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public, we are also careful that people might grandstand, play the gallery and make things up which may not be conducive to the victim of a crime or the legal proceedings. Then there is also the paradox that while technology helps speed up court processes, it has also engendered more work for legal professionals. The size of bundles that lawyers pass to courts have grown. The submission lengths have become longer. Consequently, judgments have also grown because more ground has to be covered. It has become part and parcel of our work to deal with more materials, more complex cases and lengthier arguments. But I believe that the solution does not lie in prohibiting people from making use of what is available to bring about greater justice. Instead, technology like AI should be leveraged to help us filter, zoom in on key points, bring up relevant case law and help with legal research. Areas such as real-time proceedings transcription and automated translation without human intervention are also expected to bring

SPOTLIGHT

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about greater efficiency and make it easier for everyone to follow court proceedings. Concurrently, efforts are in place to enhance our online systems. Through making our existing eLitigation system mobile responsive, we hope to improve accessibility and encourage use. Meanwhile, we are also exploring possibilities of allowing people to have their disputes heard online – thereby reducing costs when seeking justice. Ultimately, as long as we stay committed to ensuring that there is justice for the man on the street, rather than serving our interests as judges and lawyers, I believe legal professionals will be able to make use of our training in ways that matter – whether it is collaborating with technologists, becoming technologists ourselves or evolving our role to become counsellors.

“As we look to maximise the benefits technology offers, it is important to be mindful to not just go after shiny new things. We want to deploy technology appropriately so that it is the solution most effective for the problem. The last thing we should do is to overengineer – no matter how attractive it may seem.”

Who inspires you professionally? What is a quote you live by?

The law industry should embrace legaltech because... Will we ever see an AI judge on the bench?

What excites you most about legaltech?


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SPOTLIGHT

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THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

DIGITALISE AND THRIVE:

DIANA CHEN Vice President, Business Segment, Group Enterprise, Singtel Earliest Tech Experience: My basic Computer 101 class in university where I first experienced the wonders of an Apple Macintosh computer Currently Reading: This is Marketing by Seth Godin and Non-violent Communication by Marshall B Rosenberg Pet Topics of the Moment: Marketing and social psychology Favourite Ways to Relax: Going for a ride or stroll or chillax with some chocolates and a good book or magazine

The Small and Mediumsized Edition

For small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) striving to increase revenue, cut costs and raise productivity, the complex and expensive process of digitalisation might just be the furthest thing from business owners’ minds. But as Diana Chen, Vice President, Business Segment, Group Enterprise, Singtel, shares with The IT Society, digitalisation does not always have to be complicated and costly – and may even be the key to future success. Q: Question, DC: Diana Chen Q: Why is it important for SMEs to embrace digitalisation? DC: SMEs’ top priorities are growing revenue, reducing costs and boosting productivity. Digitalisation addresses these priorities and brings about many benefits to SMEs. Our customers have successfully adopted digital solutions to improve staff productivity. For example, the use of payroll software automates the repetitive, manual process of tabulating employees’ salary information for tax forms. By digitalising this process, staff are freed up to focus on more strategic tasks. SMEs can capture new opportunities and stay ahead of the competition by embracing digital tools and technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT), cloud, software-as-a-service and cybersecurity. For example, Adtiq, our online advertising platform service, jointly developed with Amobee, allows SMEs to plan, create, manage and optimise online advertising

on a single platform that supports Google Search, Instagram and Facebook. Adtiq also provides SMEs with the ability to create targeted digital advertising campaigns cost effectively. Similarly, other ready-to-use e-commerce platforms such as Shoptiq and 99%SME also help SMEs deploy omni-channel marketing strategies without the need for large budgets, reach new segments of the market and gain new customers. Q: What are some key concerns SMEs usually have when it comes to digitalisation? DC: For most SMEs, their main priority is the day-to-day operations. Typically, SMEs don’t have an IT team for their technology requirements, and often lack the skill sets and know-how to digitalise the business. They might also be hindered by cost and cybersecurity considerations. Despite these challenges, there are many ways for SMEs to kick-start their digitalisation journey.

With the Start Digital Pack, a solutions package offered by Singtel and supported by Enterprise Singapore and Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA), SMEs can adopt solutions from five categories: accounting, HR management system and payroll, digital marketing, digital transactions and cybersecurity. They will enjoy a free six-month subscription when they sign up for two digital solutions. These solutions are easy to use, and do not require users to have technical expertise. For SMEs who are ready to market products via online platforms, Singtel enables them to get online and develop e-commerce capabilities through our platforms such as Adtiq, Shoptiq and 99%SME, enabling them to reach out to a wider customer base. Singtel also helps SMEs implement ICT solutions, after which we hold regular workshops and engagement sessions, providing additional support and guidance to ensure that they benefit from the solutions.


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SMEs can also tap the Cybersecurity Productivity Solutions Grant, a fund provided by the government, to adopt Singtel’s cybersecurity solutions such as endpoint and unified threat management to keep their business safe from cyberattacks. For example, in any typical month, our Broadband Protect service blocks more than 13 million ransomwarerelated malware and 189 million malicious sites. Q: One year on from the introduction of the Start Digital Pack, what are some of the success stories? DC: One year on from the launch, we’ve seen an increase in interest and number of sign-ups, in particular for software-asa-service and cybersecurity solutions from the Start Digital Pack. Cayman Management Consultants, a regional immigration and business consultancy, faced difficulties in managing its financial data as its previous online accounting software could not meet all its requirements. The company had to use a simple spreadsheet in tandem with the software, which led to its financial data being stored in separate platforms, and could not be reconciled automatically. To solve this issue, we helped them to implement Financio, a Start Digital solution that automatically synchronises data, allowing information to be fed into the right systems. They also deployed Adtiq, our cloud-based, self-service advertising platform, which enables them to activate and execute marketing campaigns that are tailored to their budgets and business objectives. Dainial Lim, the company’s Managing Director, told us that these solutions have helped them streamline their accounting procedures and HR processes, optimise their advertising spend, reach new market segments and increase revenue by 25%. Another success story is TheTriadCo, a marketing and innovation consultancy which also adopted Financio to reconcile its accounts at the end of the month. This allowed them to track their finances

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easily, without having to review multiple spreadsheets and emails. The company also deployed Essentials HR, a HR management app, and according to the company, these solutions enabled them to achieve time savings of up to 20%. In the cybersecurity space, a fast-growing cryptocurrency start-up needed to defend itself against the growing number of cyberattacks against its app. It enlisted the support of Trustwave, our cybersecurity arm. Trustwave stepped in to manage the security breaches, helped restore business operations, and suggested installing a web application firewall to block malicious activity before it reaches the server. According to the start-up, over a period of four months, it received more than 16 million counts of malicious traffic, out of which most were DDoS attacks, and Trustwave blocked every single attack. Q: Do you think SMEs are more receptive towards digitalisation today, and why? DC: During our SME engagement activities, we have seen a growing interest in digital solutions in the areas of softwareas-a-service, cloud, IoT and cybersecurity – as most SMEs recognise the need to improve productivity, manage costs, digitalise and transform their business operations to keep up with the times. The response to the 99%SME movement, which we launched in 2015 with the aim of helping SMEs grow their businesses by adopting digital solutions, is testament to that. We’re heartened that the movement has gained traction over the years. Today, there are more than 10,000 SMEs on the 99%SME platform who are determined to build an omni-channel presence and reach new customers. We will continue to work with them to expand their online presence and help them reap the benefits of going digital. Q: What would you say to encourage SMEs who have yet to embark on their digitalisation journey? DC: I would tell them to take a bold step and get the buy-in from their teams to

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embrace digitalisation. They will start to see incremental gains and positive business outcomes with the adoption of digital solutions like e-commerce, mobile payment, analytics, IoT and cybersecurity. As SMEs continuously seek new technologies to grow their business, Singtel will be there to guide them through training and regular engagement. They can also take up Singtel’s suite of cybersecurity solutions under the Cybersecurity Productivity Solutions Grant to secure their business as they go digital. Q: Over your two-decade stint in Singtel – on different portfolios, what is the most fun aspect about your current portfolio? DC: Working with SMEs of all sizes and from a variety of industries, from a oneman show to a fifty-strong office, has been the most enjoyable part of my job, as no two days are the same. I find it hugely rewarding whenever we successfully provide solutions that eliminate their pain points and make a real and measurable difference to their business. Q: How do you think your previous portfolios have prepared you for your current portfolio? DC: Working across different business units at Singtel has taught me the values of staying humble and hungry. I’m always striving to be better and to keep raising the level of service we offer our customers. Customers have different needs but at the end of the day, what will win them over is our sincerity, level of service and dedication. Q: What are your hopes for your current portfolio? DC: I’m excited to lead Singtel’s SME business, to empower SMEs with technologies to go digital, in addition to providing them with essential connectivity services including broadband, mobile and voice. SMEs are a vital and significant contributor to Singapore’s economy, and our mission is to help them succeed in the digital age. My hope for our current portfolio is that as a team, we continue to enable SMEs to adopt ICT technologies.

“Working with SMEs of all sizes and from a variety of industries has been the most enjoyable part of my job – as no two days are the same. I find it hugely rewarding whenever we successfully provide solutions that eliminate their pain points and make a real and measurable difference to their business.”


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Your Organisation, My Organisation, Our Organisations – They are All Digital Media Companies

POWER BOOST

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VLADYSLAV KOSHELYEV Member, SCS Academy Lead, Facebook Founder, Yellow Red

Today every organisation we know is essentially a tech company – whether it builds gadgets, develops apps, offers legal services or cooks food. Similarly, with powerful digital tools and platforms available to virtually everyone, every business is a media company – it has never been easier and more important for corporations as well as start-ups to communicate with customers and the public. Yet, few are doing so. What is stopping these organisations from becoming great storytellers?

EVERYONE HAS AN INTERESTING STORY Many firms, especially the ones working in traditional and business-to-business trades, aren’t confident that people will find what they do exciting. However, I have yet to find an industry that cannot offer something compelling to learn. For instance, in the last 30 minutes, I’ve been browsing an Instagram profile of a large shipping company. A shipping company, you ask? Indeed, I’m not someone who spends time researching this kind of content – as long as my online shopping packages arrive safely. But the beautiful pictures of gigantic liners passing along breathtaking skylines and exotic landscapes drew me in. Before I realised, I was watching videos about complex global supply chains, reading interviews with data scientists who optimise routes, learning about innovative carbonneutral freighters and discovering how

blockchain is used to manage containers. The logistics industry is so exciting that I would love to work in it! EVERYONE CAN MAKE AN IMPRESSION And that is not all. I’ve been able to lead a healthier life – thanks to information from life sciences labs, discover how new compounds and materials shape the city around me and get solid entrepreneurship advice from law consultancies. It is possible that the curiosity-invoking contents from these companies have taught me just as much as my school and university did – and, at the same time, planted their brands in the mind of a potential client – me. EVERYONE WILL DO WELL TO GET STARTED It is true that digital media can be confusing with new information constantly calling for our attention, and websites, apps and platforms appearing

out of nowhere every day. Yet, the fundamentals of marketing haven’t changed as much as many may think and are still based on a few simple principles. • Produce content about the industry you know a lot about – in the form of videos, images and the written word. • Deliver it across spaces where people spend a lot of time – mobile phones are a good place to start. • Adapt the content to the context. • Share knowledge and good advice ahead of selling – when customers trust you, they will come. These rules stay at the core of marketing communications even as technology changes through the years – they were true before the invention of radio and will continue to be true when we spend vacations in virtual reality.


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SCS Reaches Out to Non-Tech Professionals in Banking and Finance

THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

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n 19 November, SCS signed a Memorandum of Intent (MOI) with the Institute of Banking and Finance (IBF) to reach out to non-tech professionals working in the banking and finance sectors. IBF is the fourth partner to collaborate with SCS on digital skills enhancement of non-tech professionals – following the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), Singapore Academy of Law (SAL) and Singapore Manufacturing Federation (SMF). Supported by Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA), the initiative is an extension of IMDA’s TechSkills Accelerator (TeSA) programme, where SCS extends its reach, resources and tech programmes to professionals across sectors to deepen the digital skills of our workforce.

8 May 2019

8 May 2019

31 May 2019

19 Nov 2019

Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) MOI officiated

Singapore Academy of Law (SAL) MOI formalised

Singapore Manufacturing Federation (SMF) MOI signed

Institute of Banking and Finance (IBF) MOI inked

MOI Signing with IBF on 19 November 2019. From left: Khoong Hock Yun (Chairman of SCS Banking and Finance Tech Working Group), Dr Chong Yoke Sin (SCS President), Lawrence Goh (Chairman of IBF Technology & Operations Industry Workgroup), Ng Nam Sin (IBF CEO), Howie Lau (Chief Industry Development Officer of IMDA)


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BLOCKCHAIN:

More Than a Hype, It is Reality The entry of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoins, Ripples and Ethereum into the public domain around 2016 caused blockchain and Bitcoin to become fascinations for both the public and conspiracy theorists. And in the latest – it is said that within five to 10 years, blockchain will be the norm and reality1 for enterprises. THE RISE AND FALL OF BLOCKCHAIN 2016 to 2018 were good years for blockchain as it reached the Hype Cycle2 peak. However, in early 2018, cryptocurrencies’ downfall and the many speculative incidents surrounding them saw the cycle going through the “trough of disillusionment”. This is despite the push for

Welcome address by Suji Thampi, Chairman of the SCS Blockchain SIG launched on 13 November 2019

bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies from the semiconductor industry to counter slow PC and mini PC sales. The rise of coin farming centres across the globe including remote places like Mongolia, China, limited blockchain’s growth3, and the authorities’ clampdown on cryptocurrencies – in an effort to protect the regular currency regime and prevent the creation of a parallel economy – limited blockchain from realising its full potential.

the establishment of immutable records that cannot be altered by a single entity. Cloud providers also saw opportunities to provide and commercialise computing power and last mile connectivity for blockchain usage. With blockchain, enterprises could build up a connected multiparty network quickly for the first time, evolutionising the enterprise system process or “IRP” – “Interconnected Resource Planning”.

BLOCKCHAIN RETURNS Amidst continued controversy surrounding cryptocurrencies, enterprises understood and enabled applications on blockchain across multiparty, multi-entity processes. In addition, financial institutions and other authorities found blockchain useful for

BLOCKCHAIN BECOMES A REALITY Different from the first Hype Cycle, in 2019, the interest saw many industries – if not all – venturing into blockchain for their own use cases. Building on this momentum, 2020 is likely to see the standardisation of blockchain across supply chain processes. With the adoption of blockchain across supply chain processes, it is expected that there will not only be greater visibility and convenience in tracking, but also better confidence between suppliers, customers and their financial institutions.

Interested to Stay On Top of Blockchain Development and Application? Join SCS Blockchain Special Interest Group (SIG) to learn about the latest industry use cases in Singapore and around the world. Besides quarterly meetups and joint events with different domain players like Open Source Hyperledger from Linux foundation and industry leaders from nontechnical backgrounds, SCS Blockchain SIG will engage with specialist groups on emerging tech relevant to blockchain solutions (e.g. machine learning/RPA/IoT + blockchain) and local industry associations.

Recently, there have been announcements of the issuance of banking licenses to blockchain or cryptocurrency banks in Singapore and China. Year 2020 looks set to be a promising year for widespread adoption of blockchain across enterprises and banking sectors.

https://www.gartner.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2019-09-12-gartner-2019-hype-cycle-for-blockchain-business-shows Gartner (https://www.ledgerinsights.com/gartner-blockchain-hype-cycle/) 3 https://qz.com/1054805/what-its-like-working-at-a-sprawling-bitcoin-mine-in-inner-mongolia/ 1 2


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THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

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Enterprise Architecture:

The Key to Successful Business Transformation By 2021,

40%

of organisations will use enterprise architects to ideate new business innovations made possible by emerging technologies.

By 2022,

80%

of digital businesses will take a collaborative approach to Enterprise Architecture, involving participants across business and IT, and even beyond.

Source: https://www.gartner.com/smarterwithgartner/the-evolution-ofenterprise-architecture

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s businesses increasingly undergo digital transformation, enterprise architecture (EA) is needed more than ever to bridge the digital gap between strategies and execution. That is because EA provides businesses with the flexibility, agility and strategic framework to transit more seamlessly from legacy systems to new technologies. For business leaders, it is important to look into EA first before attempting to adopt technologies such as Artificial Intelligence, Big Data Analytics, Internet of Things and Cloud. As SCS EA Chapter President Aaron Tan shared at the Enterprise Architecture Conference 2019, enterprises that implemented EA as an afterthought experienced a high failure rate of 60% to 80% when embarking on digital transformation.

In view of this, EA professionals should also shift their focus. First, create actionable and measurable deliverables that address specific business outcomes. Then work with other business and tech disciplines such as business process management (BPM), programme and portfolio

management (PPM), business information (BI), finance and human resources. Through their keen understanding of the relationship between the strategic value of business and technology, EA professionals are poised to bring value with their skill sets and talent.

Enterprise Architecture Conference 2019 On 7 November 2019, SCS held its first Enterprise Architecture Conference to help technology leaders gain new insights and actionable strategies on leveraging EA. Besides sharing how to drive digital transformation and innovations, industry experts gave advice on gaining competitive advantage with EA. The Conference was attended by close to 200 participants from government agencies and enterprises.

From left: Aaron Tan (SCS EA Chapter President), Allan Norton (Informatics Education’s Chief Operating Officer), Gilbert Tan (e2i’s Chief Executive Officer), Dr Chong Yoke Sin (SCS President), Howie Lau (IMDA’s Chief Industry Development Officer), Jennifer Ong (SCS Executive Director)


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Charting the Future with Design Thinking

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hrough assessing the impact of digital transformation, identifying key job roles and required digital competencies for professionals in the respective sectors, SCS, Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA) and the respective Trade Associations & Chambers (TACs) are working hand in hand to better equip our workforce with digital skills necessary for the future economy. Following the recent signing of the Memorandums of Intent (MOI) between SCS and TACs, SCS had started running curated programmes and events for TAC members in their respective tech interest groups. One example is the Design Thinking Workshops held since the last quarter of 2019 for members from the Accounting, Legal and Manufacturing sectors. Besides guiding participants in coming up with a broad sector approach for coping with digital disruption in the next three to five years, the workshops also touched on top impacted job roles, key skills needs and required levels of proficiencies. A good mixture of representatives from key hirers and organisations of various sizes attended the workshops conducted by Mr Joel Ng, a specialist in design thinking and innovation.

WHAT? Design Thinking Workshops

WHO? For non-tech professionals from the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), Singapore Academy of Law (SAL) and Singapore Manufacturing Federation (SMF)

WHEN? • 5 September 2019 (ACCA) • 23 and 27 September 2019 (SAL) • 15 October 2019 and 14 January 2020 (SMF)

WHY? To provide industry feedback and input for use in establishing the sector’s digital skills development roadmap and report

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THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

Workshop Seeds Growth of Industry Relevant Tech Curriculums

Group and panel discussions focusing on common issues faced by IHL lecturers also made the session interactive and engaging. In addition, as part of the workshop, a site visit to SAS was arranged. There, the lecturers witnessed first-hand their students interning at SAS apply what they learnt in class in an industry setting. Beyond being a gratifying experience, the site visit reinforced the importance of tech curriculums’ relevance to industry.

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Most attendees had good feedback about the workshop and saw possibilities of incorporating the use cases to their teaching materials on AI and analytics, enriching the learning for industry applications. Notably, the workshop also presented an invaluable opportunity for lecturers to network and exchange knowledge with counterparts from other polytechnics.

he demand for tech talents is growing at an increasing pace. Recognising that Singapore’s competitiveness and continued progress depends on the quality and relevance of tech education curriculums, SCS spearheaded the Emerging Tech & Industry (ETI) workshop series to encourage the infusion of experiential and industry components into teaching curriculums of Institutes of Higher Learning (IHLs), by equipping lecturers with latest updates in emerging technologies and applications. The pilot run themed “Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Analytics” was held at PSB Academy on 24 and 27 September 2019, and attended by 30 lecturers from five polytechnics – Nanyang Polytechnic, Ngee Ann Polytechnic, Republic Polytechnic, Singapore Polytechnic and Temasek Polytechnic.

The session saw speakers from SAS Institute (SAS) and Tableau sharing insights on analytics and its application for businesses in manufacturing, financial and social services sectors; and industry practitioners from Y Ventures and DXC Technology speaking about data security and the role analytics can play in enabling business growth.


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New Student Chapter Launched: Institute of Technical Education

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n 20 November 2019, SCS signed an agreement with the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) to establish a new Student Chapter. The signing ceremony between Low Khah Gek, Chief Executive Officer of ITE, and Dr Chong Yoke Sin, President of SCS, was witnessed by over 200 guests and students. With the new Student Chapter, Electronics & Info-Comm Technology and Design & Media students from ITE East, Central and West colleges will be eligible for SCS Student Chapter membership. To help students gain a deeper understanding of their membership benefits, Lum Seow Khun, Co-Chairperson of SCS Student Chapter, also provided an overview of SCS events, workshops, resources and network at the event.

Low Khah Gek (ITE CEO) and Dr Chong Yoke Sin (SCS President) exchanging handshakes at the launch of SCS Student Chapter at ITE

The event rounded up with a panel discussion on how to jump-start a tech career, featuring speakers from winners of the Best Tech Companies to Work for Award 2019.

Adrian Chye, Chairman of SCS Student Chapter, moderated the discussion, where panellists shared useful tips and information on building a successful career in tech.


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THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

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SCS SPLASH AWARDS 2019:

Youths Make a Difference with Artificial Intelligence (AI) Solutions

Now into its 16th year, SCS Splash Awards 2019 saw 13 teams vying for the top prize with original AI solutions that benefit everyone.

THEME: AI IN OUR DAILY LIVES

77 teams

6

months of intense competition

214

21

37

student participants

training workshops and one-on-one consultations on AI programming, machine learning and cybersecurity

where students deepened their knowledge and learnt how to apply their know-how to solution ideation

13

1

2

finalists

with solutions covering diverse sectors such as community building, education, finance, healthcare, and security & enforcement

finale

on 13 September 2019, graced by Mr Chan Yeng Kit, Chairman of Infocomm Media Development Authority

hours of training

categories Pre-tertiary and Tertiary


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CHAMPION – PRE-TERTIARY

CHAMPION – TERTIARY

Team: DEMUSHI (NUS High School of Math and Science) Winning Solution: Using AI to check for Parkinson’s Disease by analysing images of a person’s drawings

Team: JBawesome (Nanyang Polytechnic) Winning Solution: App to reduce miscommunication for the hearing-impaired through speech recognition technology and self-directed lessons

“SCS places strong emphasis on the continued growth of the tech industry, and SCS Splash Awards is one avenue where we seed interest from a young age. The specially selected themes not only expose students to current tech issues, but also challenge them to come up with innovative solutions. We are hopeful that this will inspire the next generation of future-ready tech professionals.” – Dr Chong Yoke Sin, SCS President

MORE ABOUT SCS SPLASH AWARDS One of Singapore’s longestrunning student tech innovation competitions, SCS Splash Awards stays true to the “for the students, by the students” concept by having students weigh in on the theme and organise the competition. To date, a total of 2,100 teams and over 4,700 students have taken part in the competition.

PRE-TERTIARY CATEGORY

TEAM

Champion

DEMUSHI

SCHOOL NUS High School of Math and Science

1st Runner-up

AIGirls

Dunman High School

2nd Runner-up

AI-Bus

Dunman High School

TERTIARY CATEGORY

TEAM

SCHOOL

Champion

JBawesome

Nanyang Polytechnic

1st Runner-up

Hearts

Republic Polytechnic

2nd Runner-up

SPORTA

Nanyang Polytechnic

SPECIAL AWARD CATEGORY

WINNING TEAM

SCHOOL

Community-building (by Singapore Pools)

Cute Bin

Nanyang Polytechnic

Education (by Accenture)

Cute Bin

Nanyang Polytechnic

Finance (by DBS Bank)

Clothesvolutional

National University of Singapore

Finance (by GIC)

Hearts

Republic Polytechnic

Healthcare (by Huawei)

JBawesome

Nanyang Polytechnic

Healthcare (by IHIS)

JBawesome

Nanyang Polytechnic

Security & Enforcement (by Singtel)

Seeker Catcher

Nanyang Polytechnic


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THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

Outstanding Youths in Tech Spotlighted

Young talent is crucial to our Smart Nation vision, and our youths are embracing the challenge with enthusiasm and fresh perspectives. Recognising their efforts and achievements in academics and industry, SCS commended some 20 youths at the SCS Medals and Awards 2019.

SCS GOLD MEDAL WINNERS

SCS SILVER MEDAL WINNERS

Leong Peng Kuen National University of Singapore Master of Computing Programme in Infocomm Security

Du Sansan Ngee Ann Polytechnic Diploma in Animation & 3D Arts

Wang Junhui National University of Singapore Master of Computing Programme in Information Systems

Muhammad Shazrin Bin Shoffie Ngee Ann Polytechnic Diploma in Information Technology

Wendy Welliana The University of Newcastle Singapore Bachelor of Infocomm Technology (Year 1) “Learning tech has been a fascinating experience – because it’s constantly changing, and a prominent driver of world change. Everyone I’ve met is very supportive and inspiring, and I hope that I too can make a positive contribution – like them.” – Wendy Welliana

Xu Zhiwei The University of Newcastle Singapore Bachelor of Infocomm Technology (Year 2)

Keith Png Jun Xin Singapore Polytechnic Diploma in Information Technology

Soh Zu Wei Singapore Polytechnic Diploma in Business Information Technology

Vernon Tay Jun Feng Singapore Polytechnic Diploma in Infocomm Security Management

SCS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING IT YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT RECIPIENTS Pok Jing Kai Swinnerton Nanyang Polytechnic Diploma in Business Informatics

Tan Soon Ann Nanyang Polytechnic Diploma in Financial Informatics

“Our Smart Nation today is defined by yesterday’s groundbreaking technologies. And for Singapore to remain relevant, we should all embrace the spirit of innovation. My course showed me the beauty of innovative technology, and I’m excited to start creating the technology that powers tomorrow.” – Pok Jing Kai Swinnerton


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SCS PRIZE WINNERS

SCS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PROJECT WORK RECIPIENTS

Charmaine Ang Ngee Ann Polytechnic Diploma in Animation & 3D Arts

Tan Soon Ann Nanyang Polytechnic Diploma in Financial Informatics

Wong Yi Xian Ngee Ann Polytechnic Diploma in Information Technology

Teh Hock Tuck Nanyang Polytechnic Diploma in Information Technology

SCS FINAL YEAR BEST CAPSTONE PROJECT WINNERS Chua Kah Sheng Singapore Institute of Technology Bachelor of Engineering with Honours in Information and Communications Technology (Software Engineering) Mohamed Ajimal s/o Nambiarkandy Abdulla Kunhi Singapore Institute of Technology Bachelor of Engineering with Honours in Information and Communications Technology (Software Engineering)

“Technology is at the forefront of every major industry. It transforms the way we interact, and improves people’s lives. I’m glad that my education has equipped me with essential skills to come up with innovative solutions and contribute.” – Chua Kah Sheng

SCS AWARD FOR BEST FINAL YEAR STUDENT RECIPIENT

SCS SPECIAL INDUSTRY PRIZE WINNER

Clare Yip Kit Yan Singapore Management University Bachelor of Science (Information Systems)

Chan Kei On Temasek Polytechnic Diploma in Information Technology

“I didn’t have much opportunity to be exposed to technology as a child, but I am glad to be studying in the technology sector now. It has given me a completely different perspective of the world. Particularly, it is both eye-opening and exhilarating to see how the work I do can impact the community positively.” – Clare Yip

SCS SKILLS MASTERY AWARD WINNERS Chan Kei On Temasek Polytechnic Diploma in Information Technology

Lim Yi Kai, Edwin Temasek Polytechnic Diploma in Cyber & Digital Security

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THE IT SOCIETY / Issue 04/2019

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Get Ahead with SCS

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oday, upskilling and keeping up-to-date on latest tech developments is serious business. But who says you have to go at it alone? Take advantage of your SCS membership to stay ahead of the curve and discover a like-minded community to share your experiences with. To give you a better idea, here are four things you can do with us.

Grow.

Learn.

Thrive.

Build.

Be part of our 41,000strong professional body to learn, unlearn and relearn together for the future of work.

Join our learning communities and stay abreast of evolving tech trends, tools and skills for Industry 4.0.

Discover your true north and ace your career through our certifications, TechSkills Accelerator and more.

Cultivate your brand, foster ties and weave a closer and stronger professional network.

1-year Membership $15 CapitaVouchers

3-year Membership $42.80 off your membership fee + $50 CapitaVouchers

5-year Membership Free membership for the 5th year worth $139.10

Promotion is valid for a limited period, so RENEW your membership now to enjoy more rewards and savings. Invite your friends and colleagues to JOIN SCS too! They can enjoy an entrance fee waiver of $85.60. Membership renewal/application is easy via the SCS website at www.scs.org.sg. For enquiries, email membership.dept@scs.org.sg.


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GEEK SPEAK

25

Hello Boss…

Y

es Boss – we are calling you!

Surely it is the dream of every hardworking, earnest employee to become their own boss one day. I know it is mine. And it sure does look like I am on the way to realising my ambition soon. And no, it doesn’t involve me owning a business of my own. Neither would I need to oversee a team of unpredictable, and sometimes irrational, colleagues. THE NEW ERA OF BOSS If these traditional definitions of “boss” don’t fit, then what do I mean when I say I’ll be “boss” soon? It is a fact. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and smart machines are not only becoming increasingly essential at workplaces, they have also become our best colleagues and most abled assistants – in many cases. At an offsite meeting, and forgot to bring

some information worked on the day before? No problem. My cloud servant (oops, I mean “server”) is at my service. Took down important minutes from the earlier meeting only to not be able to read my own handwriting? Fear not – my transcription assistant has me covered. She has taken down all meeting proceedings in real-time. WHO’S THE BOSS? That’s not all. I cannot count the number of times I almost double-booked my schedule if not for my Google assistant. Indeed, when we talk about how technology is threatening to disrupt everything we know – and us, are we also keeping score of the number of times our smart gadgets have bailed us out of trouble, helped us organise our work and personal life, and saved us time and effort by making processes faster and simpler? I bet many people, like me, have much to thank technology for.

Funnily enough, we forget the merits of technology and deem machines as competitors when it comes to the context of work. Even though the reality is, we are the ones who control the machines and use them as we see fit. In every instance, it’s clear who’s the boss – us. ONCE A BOSS, ALWAYS THE BOSS And no matter how technology advances, we will always be the one in power – and the boss. No machines can be automated without us programming them to be so; and no AI can truly reach its full potential without us feeding it with relevant and quality data and improving its algorithm. Truly, with technology becoming a driving growth factor in every industry, everyone has an opportunity to play boss to various smart machines and gadgets. And I dare say, we can count on them to be more reliable and willing than human employees. Better yet? They’ll never complain about you being a bad boss!


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SCS Magazine 2019 Issue 4  

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