Scripps Sustainability Report

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SUSTAINABILITY ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION SUSTAINABILITY AT SCRIPPS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EDUCATION

1 2 3

ENERGY BUILDINGS TRANSPORTATION WATER GROUNDS WASTE DINING

5 6 7 8 9 11 12 15 17 19 21

THANK YOU

23

ACADEMICS RESEARCH ENGAGEMENT ORGANIZATIONS


Introduction Welcome to the 2017-2018 Sustainability Annual Report. We are proud to present the first report of this kind focusing on the integrative aspects of sustainability throughout Scripps College. This report provides Scripps’ administration and the community with an overview of what sustainable measures, programs, and data are currently undertaken. It also highlights opportunities for improvement in areas of tracking methodology, strategic planning, and funding allocated for sustainability. Since this initial report is without institutional framework for sustainable approach, the document serves as a baseline for future reports to be modelled. Throughout the report, there is reference to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). This is an external reporting agency, which reports to the Princeton Review and Sierra on the sustainable progress of academic institutions. STARS is a self-tracking assessment tool, which allows Scripps College to obtain a holistic understanding of sustainable integration at the college. This is different from emissions reporting, as it takes into account a range of quantitative and qualitative data.

THE SUMMER TEAM

Tiffany Ortamond Sustainability Coordinator

Alexi Butts Summer Intern: SCR ‘20

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sUSTAINABILITY AT SCRIPPS In 2008, former Scripps President Lori Bettison-Varga began the Presidential Advisory Council on Sustainability (PACS) in order to initiate the integration of sustainability throughout Scripps College campus life and operations. Directors and staff from critical areas throughout campus were asked to serve on the committee so that departments could collaboratively identify opportunities to increase sustainability within their purview. PACS has continued to convene since 2008, however, lacking institutional commitment to sustainability in the form of a sustainability plan or climate action plan, the efforts of the committe have remained superficial. PACS recognizes significant opportunity for sustainable integration thus decreasing the carbon footprint of Scripps College and increasing the fiscal stability of the college.

ON-CAMPUS STUDENT EMPLOYMENT

Note: Most of these student positions were pilot programs or have since discontinued. This list is only representative of spring 2018. PAID POSITIONS SCRIPPS SCRAPPS TEAM SUSTAINABILITY DATA ASSISTANT Amalia Barrett Julia McCartan Maya Cohrssen-Hernandez SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAMS & OUTREACH ASSISTANT Rowen Light-Wills Roxy Rozo-Marsh Yunjing Lin ANNUAL REPORT INTERN Julia McCartan Alexi Butts Madison Seto GARDEN COORDINATORS Anne Shalamoff Erika Johnsons Caroline Wofford Rowen light-wills VOLUNTEER POSITIONS MALOTT COMPOST PEER EDUCATORS Amalia Barrett Alexi Butts Sagrika Jawadi Eirka Johnson Elena Lev Rowen Light-Wills Claire Payne Lauren Romero Rhiannon Schaub Kati Tuemmler Caroline Wofford

SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE Leta Ames Maya Cohrssen-Hernandez Shelby DeVolder SAS ENVIRONMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES Leta Ames Maya Cohrssen-Hernandez Shelby DeVolder POWERDOWN REPRESENTATIVES Julia McCartan Moira Mulhern

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report highlights a range of decentralized approaches toward sustainable integration throughout departments at Scripps College. It is the result of conversations, data gathering and analysis by the sustainability coordinator and student employees throughout the 2017-2018 year. After many conversations within the Presidential Advisory Committee on Sustainability and campus constituents, it is concluded by the committee that although these decentralized efforts are an initial step, they remain less effective and primarily superficial due to the lack of institutional endorsement in the form of a strategic report on sustainability or a climate action plan. The Sustainability Committee recognizes significant opportunity for sustainable integration, which would decrease the carbon footprint of Scripps College and increase revenue savings. With many changes taking place in environmental legislature and the increasing precedent that incoming students place on sustainable action, Scripps College cannot afford to ignore this committment. It is with this in mind that the Presidential Advisory Committee on Sustainability makes the following recommendation for the 2018-2019 academic year.

RECOMMENDATIONS • • • • •

Development of a Strategic Plan on Sustainable Integration or Climate Action Plan Improved tracking methodologies and access to tracking/reporting tools Operating budget for sustainability in order to cover costs related to co-curricular programming, student employment, tracking tools, memberships, and renewals. Creation of an Office for Sustainable Integration Sustainable integration in the pre-planning phases of buildings and landscape projects

HIGHLIGHTS

12.7%

458 tonnes

of students participated in

sustainability-related study abroad programs.

of CO2 emissions were produced due to the estimated 1,505,918 miles of air travel linked to study abroad.

4.5%

$238,439.53

reduction in energy usage from 2016-2017.

in total savings from energy reduction.

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EXECTUIVE SUMMARY 1 in 4

290 tonnes

academic departments offered a sustainability-related course.

of CO2 emissions produced by the estimated 781,024 miles travelled by the campus fleet.

1 in 4

9,407 lbs

recipients of CP&R’s summer internship grant obtained jobs at organizations with sustainable missions.

of CO2 was conserved as a result of the two month ofo pilot program totalling 45,625 rides with 3,230 riders.

1,215,500

34.3%

gallons of water saved since 2016.

of total waste diverted from the landfill.

14.6 tonnes

13 tonnes

of pre and post consumer food composted over the course of only 3.5 months.

of greenhouse gas emissions avoided by composting.

1120.7 lbs

of leftover dining hall food donated through the Scripps Food Recovery Network.

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EDUCATION: ACADEMICS In alignment with the mission of Scripps College, educating and training students in how to become future leaders on issues relating to sustainability is paramount. Scripps College offers one Environmental Analysis track through Keck Science. However, students interested in majoring in other Environmental Analysis tracks can do so through one of the other colleges in the consortium. Research is an important aspect of institutional success and involvement, in turn, many of Scripps faculty and students engage in research related to sustainability. These academic contributions add to the wider community in bettering understanding and creating solutions to sustainability-related challenges. Co-curricular programming is also a vital part of student educational engagement. This year, sustainability staff collaborated with SCORE and the Laspa Center in developing the first Environmental Justic and Leadership series at the college. Additionally, the Annual Sustainability Fair, PowerDown competition, and a number of other programs facilitated involvement beyond the classroom. AASHE reporting assesses sustainability course and research inventories, sustainability literary assessments, sustainability-focused immersive study opportunities, and programs that offer incentives to faculty to develop sustainability-related courses. Co-curricular reporting includes student groups focused on sustainability, gardens or farms where students learn about organic and local food systems, student-run enterprises, art events and installations focused on sustainability, wilderness/outdoor programs, sustainability-focused student employment, student orientation activities focusing on sustainability, and professional trainings and development available to faculty and staff.

1 in 4

12.7%

academic departments offered a sustainabilityrelated course

of students participated in study abroad programs related to sustainability.

4.5%

of the class of 2018 majored in Environmental Analysis.

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EDUCATION: RESEARCH PROFESSOR KATIE PURVIS-ROBERTS

CHEMISTRY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Chemical Mechanism for Particulate Matter Formation from Amines & Reduced Sulfur Compunds Emitted from Agricultural Sources

“In graduate school, I was doing very theoretical chemistry studies, and I realized that I wanted to do research that was more applicable to the real world and got into air quality. We’re hoping that the results from this study can be used for air quality modeling and just for understanding agricultural emissions in general, because not much is known about them now.”

Students working with Professsor Purvis-Roberts during a summer field study on dairy farms and piggeries in Kentucky: Ryan Drover, PZ ‘19; Tanner Cress, CMC ‘21; Cara Michael, SCR ‘20

1 in 4

recipients of CP&R’s summer 2018 internship grant obtained jobs at organizations with sustainable missions at the intersection of environmental, social, and economic welfare.

TALI CASPI

‘18 ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS Effects of Invasice Annuals on Soil C and N StorageAlong a Coast to Inland Gradient in Southern California

“I’m interested in conservation biology, especially at the urban-wildland interface. Being in LA county/the inland empire offers a really interested place to study how our native ecosystem (California sage scrub) is impacted by rapid urbanization, habitat fragmentation, nitrogen deposition, increased fire frequency and many other anthropogenic impacts.”

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Tali Caspi SCR ‘18


EDUCATION: ENGAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE SPEAKER SERIES This year, SCORE collaborated with the Laspa Center and sustainability staff on an environmental justice series throughout the Spring semester. With tremendous outreach, over 80 students, in addition to staff and faculty, were in attendance throughout the lecture series. Guest speakers included Bhavna Shamasunder, Guillermo DouglassJaimes, and Paula Daniels. The series focused on environmental justice as it relates to sustainability, public health, food, and water. In addition to the speakers, the series also hosted Scripps Tea and invited various organization representatives as well as student organizations that focus on public health through an environmental health lens. The organizations and student groups represented during the Scripps SustainabiliTEA included: the Scripps Student Garden, Huerta Del Ville, UnCommon Good, SEED, AIDS Van, Food Recovery Network, Pomona College Organic Farm, Laspa Center, SCORE, and Challah for Hunger.

8TH ANNUAL SCRIPPS SUSTAINABILITY FAIR Celebrating the end of 5C Earth week events, this year’s newly expanded Sustainability Fair drew over 600 people for a full day of educational and interactive setups, bringing together student clubs and programs as well as local organizations. Offering activities and information on sustainability issues such as food production, social equality, energy conservation, and recycling, the event culminated with an evening of music, art and games for the community. The event was presented by the Sustainability Committee, DOS, SAS, Food Recovery Network, SEED, and Eclectic Roots.

Students tabling about the Green Living Learning Community

Students reconnect with their body and mind with a free mssage

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EDUCATION: ORGANIZATIONS 7

clubs and organization dedicated to sustainability and the environment.

(Scripps Environmental Education and Development)

SEED

Scripps Food Recovery Network

Garden Club

Challah for Hunger

OWL

Ocean Initiative Club

(Oudoor Wilderness Leaders)

SAS Sustainability/ Environmental Committee

Erica Little SCR ‘18 : Garden Coordinator

THE SCRIPPS STUDENT GARDEN In 2010, the Scripps Student Garden began as a student-led initiative and since then, the garden has Persimmons from the Scripps Garden remained primarily student-run, with the support of Grounds Department staff. This year, two student Garden Coordinators were hired and supported by the Sustainability Coordinator in order to meet the demand for a productive organic growing space. The Student Garden is home to numerous fruit trees, vegetable plants, and herbs. Located just behind Browning Hall, weekly gardening events are hosted by the Garden Club. In addition to the 23 varieties of edible plants on Scripps’ campus, the student garden is accessible 24 hours a day for students to enjoy any and all foods grown.

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ENERGY Energy consumption is one of the leading contributors of greenhouse gas emissions affecting our global community. Scripps College is taking a proactive stance on decreasing energy consumption throughout many departments at the college. AASHE reporting focuses on on-site renewable electric energy sources; on-site renewable non-electric energy sources, co-generation (combined heat and electric), off-site institution-catalized renewable electricity generating devices and purchased offsets (e.g. RECS, GOs). Scripps College conducts on-going retrofits to decrease energy usage in all buildings. LED retrofits have been completed throughout the entirety of New Hall, as well as Browning and Dorsey Halls. Additionally, New Hall and the Performing Arts Center feature on-site solar panels, which generate an average of 1% of Scripps’ annual energy usage.

15000000

700000

2017-'18

12000000

1.35%

6000000

600000 500000 400000

ELECTRICITY

0

SOLAR

2017-'18

300000

$17,084 in savings

100000 NATURAL GAS

2016-'17

$86,300 in savings

200000

3000000 0

$83,960 in savings

800000

2016-'17

7.07%

9000000

ANNUAL COST SAVINGS

Cost in Dollars

Total Energy Usage (kWh)

ANNUAL ENERGY USAGE

NATURAL GAS

ELECTRICITY

SOLAR

MELROK ENERGY This year, Scripps is implementing MelRok metering and energy analytics, which will enable the college to track building usage and improve overall system performance. On a broad scale, all other 5C’s are also implementing MelRok, which will create opportunities for collaborative energy management strategies. All buildings will be metered for energy usage, and real time data will be available to assess how Scripps buildings operate, and where there are opportunities for improvements and cost savings.

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ENERGY WHERE DOES SCRIPPS GET ITS ENERGY? Solar 0.60% Natural Gas

63.30% Electricity

36.10%

POWER DOWN CHALLENGE During the two week competition across the colleges to reduce electricity consumption in residence halls, Scripps College had a 9.7% decrease in energy usage. Many events were held during the challenge to promote PowerDown, including a 5C community meal where students learned how to brew their own kombucha.

2nd Place

in 5C PowerDown Competition

TAYLOR HAAS

‘18 ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS Environmental Analysis Sustainable End-of-Life Management for Photovoltaic Waste in California

“I got interested in my thesis topic through an internship I did last summer at a solar company called Cypress Creek Renewables. During my internship, I worked on a project where I looked at all the federal and state environmental laws that apply to a utility-scale solar facility during it’s life cycle and found that there was pretty much no regulations in place for the end of life for solar. When I asked one guy what we did when panels break he only somewhat facetiously pointed to a panel hanging on the wall and said we turn them into wall art. I realized there was a huge hole in the industry and in regulation, which led me to write my thesis about how to sustainably manage PV wastes.”

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BUILDINGS The buildings of Scripps College are beacons of sustainability in many ways. Built for the desert environment, these historical buildings were constructed to last. Many buildings are self-cooling, with 13� walls, passive cooling design, terracotta roofing meant to absorb moisture and strategically placed courtyards that work with the passive cooling design of the buildings. Future building projects and retrofits offer significant opportunity for sustainable integration on-going and improvement. Scripps aims to carry-on this legacy of sustainable integration and retrofits improvement. Constructed in 2016, New Hall is the first LEED Gold building on campus, setting a new standard of sustainable building practice. Since buildings use significant resources, it is critical to manage and track building performance in order to identify cost savings and decrease Scripps’ carbon footprint. In order to become more effective at managing the energy consumption of buildings, Scripps College is implementing MelRok energy management technology on all campus buildings. AASHE identifies sustainable operational policies, sustainable rating systems for existing buildings, and indoor air quality management as key areas of focus in the report. For new building projects, the report emphasizes the creation of sustainable building policies/guidelines and a green building rating system. of lamps in residence

35 %

halls have been converted to LED lighting, consuming only 10 watts while producing 60 watts. All lighting in New Hall, Browning, and Dorsey have been converted to LED fixtures.

GREEN CLEANING PROGRAM Green cleaning is a holistic approach to cleaning that considers human health and environmental impacts. Scripps College procures green cleaning products directly from WAXIE Sanitary Supply and EcoLab for use in all buildings. Green cleaning products are also accessible for student use in residence halls. Some green products include WAXIE glass cleaner, vacuum cleaners with HEPA filters, and paper products with the following seals: EPA compliant recyclablefiber, 100% recyclable fiber, ECOLOGO, Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and Green Seal. Additionally, bathroom cleaner, multisurface cleaner, disinfectant, and neutral floor cleaner are purchased through EcoLab.

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TRANSPORTATION Transportation is a critical area of improvement for Scripps College as we aim to find a balance of accessibility for our students and reduce our negative impact on human health and climate change. With many harmful pollutants linked to heart and lung disease throughout our communities, Scripps College has instated the RideShare Program, Green Bike Program, and electric charging stations to provide incentives and opportunities for the campus to decrease the environmental costs of transit. Although there are significant opportunities for improvement, Scripps College measures progress based on the scoring system in the AASHE STARS report. The transportation portion of the report includes topics ranging from methodologies on data gathering, bike-share programs, storage facilities, mass transit, rideshare programs, incentives, telecommuting, and condensed workweek.

781,024

25 carts

miles travelled by campus fleet with 14 vehicles.

in campus fleet. All are electric.

15 GRADS

90 SENIORS

41 FIRST-YEARS

336

Registered Student Vehicles

96 JUNIORS

12

94 SOPHOMORES


TRANSPORTATION CLASS PASS

RIDESHARE

Estimated

574 shared drives per week.

As a member of the Claremont College Consortium, Scripps students, faculty, and staff are able to acquire a Class Pass, offering free, unlimited rides on Foothill Transit buss. Accepted on all Foothill Transit Local and Silver Streak buses, the Class Pass connects members of the Scripps community to 22 cities throughout the San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys, as well as to downtown Los Angeles.

OFO BIKES OFO Bikes 5C Highlights Avg. minutes/ride: 11.27 Avg. daily trip/person: 2.04 Total miles biked: 22,099 Calories burned: 1,279,540 Avg. miles/ride: 0.48 Lbs of CO2 saved/Trees planted per year: 9,407lbs/196 trees

GREEN BIKES The Green Bike Program provides 10 to 20 bikes that can be loaned to Scripps students, faculty, or staff for 24 hours at a time. With 8 student employees, the program teaches concrete skills such as bike maintenance. Each semester, approximately 60 bikes are raffled off to the Scripps student body for use throughout the semester.

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TRANSPORTATION WHERE DID SCRIPPS STUDENTS STUDY ABROAD?

32

134

countries

Scripps students studied abroad during the 2017-2018 academic year.

458.3

Furthest Destinations Travelled: • Cape Town, South Africa • Jaipur, India • Melbourne, Australia

tonnes of CO2 emissions were produced due to the estimated 1,505,918 miles of air travel linked to study abroad. Based on the annual CO2 production of an average American household,

Closest Destinations Travelled: • Guanajuato, Mexico • Merida, Mexico • Havana, Cuba

61 homes

could be fueled using the total emissions from study abroad air travel.

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WATER As an institution of higher education in Southern California, Scripps College is conscious of, and concerned about, the finite water resources of our region. That is why water conservation best practices and conserving projects are implemented in conjunction with landscaping and building projects. Such improvements are critical in maintaining and protecting finite groundwater supplies in Southern California. Since 2015, the Grounds Department has removed over 200,000 square feet of water intensive turf, replacing it with drought tolerant ground cover. Tiernan Field House is one such example, as well as being the first green roof on campus. Likewise, pumping, delivering, and treating water is a major driver of energy consumption, so Scripps College can help reduce energy use and the greenhouse gas emissions associated with energy generation by conserving water. Measures such as low flush toilets, as well as low flow faucets and showerheads, have been implemented throughout dormitories to decrease usage, and opportunities for future retrofits are being explored. AASHE reporting focuses on water conservation specific to water recovery and reuse, water reducing building retrofits, and green infrastructure practices. Currently, there have been no firm institutional goals established for the reduction in water usage, but the integration of these conservation principles are considered in landscaping and building projects and designs.

ANNUAL WATER USAGE 26,142,600 23,882,144

30000000 20,125,688

Total Gallons

25000000

2016-17

19,075,496

2017-18

20000000 15000000 10000000 5000000

0

11,220

Irrigation

Domestic

15

5,984

Fire


WATER COMPARATIVE ANNUAL COSTS $210,985.66

Cost in Dollars

250,000 200,000

$200,188.93

$188,170.58

2016-17 2017-18

$145,604.64

150,000 100,000 50,000 $4,693.77

0

Irrigation

Domestic

$4,995.14

Fire

2/3rds

of fountains were deactivated during drought periods. Trayless dining hall practices promote water and electricity savings, while also Tiernan Field House Athletic Field with Drought Tolerant Bermuda Grass decreasing food WATER SAVING INITIATIVES waste. There are numerous water filtration stations to refill water bottles throughout residence halls and campus buildings, including 4 stations in Tiernan Field House. These stations are combatting the need for single-use cups as well as reducing plastic bottle waste.

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Grounds The Grounds Department has historically been very sensitive to sustainability best practices and attempts to mitigate the use of excessive fertilizers and weed killing herbicides, water usage, and implementing drought tolerant landscaping. In 2015, Scripps College decided to conserve water by replacing water intensive lawns with a Bermuda grass variety which uses 30% less water, goes dormant in the winter, and also recovers faster from activities on the The Grounds campus such as tent set ups for large venues. Grounds Department works Department strives to implement ground cover, such as decomposed granite, that increases percolation with the edible landscape, and replenishes local aquafers. AASHE reporting focuses on sustainability throughout grounds in integrated pest management, plant stewardship, soil stewardship, hydrology and water use, materials management and waste minimization, energy efficient landscape design, methodologies and plans to identify and protect vulnerable species.

71 tonnes

of CO2 emissions sequestered through our greenwaste initiative.

olive oil production, and assist faculty and students on sustainable and green educational programs and initiatives.

The CO2 emissions offset through greenwaste is the equilvalent of the carbon sequestered by 83.6 acres of U.S forests in one year.

SCRIPPS COLLEGE OLIVE OIL Originating in 2012, the Scripps Olive Oil Project continues to be a beautiful, bountiful, and sustainable initiative on the campus. Engaging students, faculty, and staff, the Olive Oil Project embraces Scripps’s edible landscape as a classroom for hands-on learning and a community building opportunity.

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Grounds INTEGRATIVE PEST MANAGEMENT

INTEGRATIVE PEST MANAGEMENT

All blowers are battery operated to reduce equipment gas emissions. Utility carts are also battery operated.

ENERGY CONSERVATION & EMISSIONS

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WASTE Waste reduction is a critical aspect of decreasing greenhouse gas emissions, bettering air quality, decreasing reliance on virgin resources, and promoting a better quality of life throughout local low-income communities. The production of waste at Scripps College has diverse impacts on our local and global communities. In order to reduce these impacts, sustainability staff created two programs with the support of multiple departments, student employees, and volunteers, which divert waste produced by Scripps College from the landfill. The Malott Commons program and Scripps Scrapps were created for this purpose, as well as increasing accessibility for Scripps College students. Additionally, Maintenance oversees the recycling of cardboard bales from Malott, and Grounds diverts green waste through the City of Claremont. AASHE reporting assesses waste audits, procurement policies designed to prevent waste, paper and ink consumption limits, efforts to increase online or digital information circulation, electronic waste recycling, and programs to reduce residence hall move in/out waste. Waste reduction is an excellent way to engage the entire campus community in working towards a unified goal, bringing people together to increase awareness, improve our local community, and create an experience that students are able to carry beyond the undergraduate experience.

WASTE BREAKDOWN (IN TONNES) Green Waste

7.80%

Landfill

65.70%

Recycling

23.30%

EMISSIONS PRODUCED VS SEQUESTERED

Compost

3.20%

3.6%

$8188

savings incured from recycling and composting programs

3.6% carbon sequestration is equivalent to removing 1183 cars from the road.

96.4% CO2 emmitted due to landfill waste (12,200 tons)

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of CO2 emissions sequestered through recycling, compost, and green waste programs (456 tons)


WASTE CARDBOARD BALES 19.8 tons of cardboard bales were recycled this year, obtaining Scripps a revenue of $1150 and saving 3.6 tons of CO2 per ton.

SCRIPPS SCRAPPS Fueled by student demand, this year sustainability staff partnered with the Dean of Students Office to implement a dorm diversion pilot program: Scripps Scrapps. During spring semester move-out, the program collected mounds of reusable dorm and school supplies from students, which will be resold to first-year students in a fall sale. Working to reduce landfill waste, Scripps Scrapps is also intended to help students save money on dorm items.

Scripps Scrapps team in front of partially-filled container

FOOD WASTE INITIATIVES

14.6 tonnes

of pre and post The 12.86 tonnes of greenhouse consumer food waste composted gas emissions avoided by composting could fuel 33 cars.

20

1120.7 lbs

of leftover dining hall food recovered by the Food Recovery Network


DINING Industrial food practices have detrimental environmental and social impacts. Scripps College has the opportunity to enhance local economies, endorse safe and human farming practices, and help eliminate unsafe working conditions and alleviate people can be poverty of farm workers. Through improved food purchasing served using greenpractices and policies, the experience of dining at Scripps can reflect the mission of the college. Dining intersects a ware. In the effort of range of life cycle challenges, which are not being tracked waste reduction, greenby the college. Malott contracts with Sodexo, which limits the ability of the college to set purchasing priorities. ware is available for

150

Beyond these contractual limitations, Malott staff have been supportive of ensuring the successful implementation of the comprehensive composting program and the use of green-ware for student and staff council events. This significantly reduces waste associated with food preparation and small events. AASHE reporting assesses sustainable food and beverage purchasing programs, sustainable food and beverage initiatives, initiatives to reduce food waste, tracking methods of purchases, and vegetarian/ vegan dining programs. The Motley Coffeehouse has led the way, exemplifying their commitment to good food purchasing, as well as supporting localized economy through purchasing and selling local goods. The Food Recovery Network is another student run organization that diverts unused food from Malott Commons to two local organizations dedicated to aiding women and children.

Vegetarian, vegan, and gluten free food options are prepared daily and labeled at each meal.

checkout by students and staff for use during on-campus events and activities. All dishes used for catering services are compostable

Each first-year student recieves one reusable clamshell container and one to-go cup upon arrival for use throughout the year. Malott Commons offers cleaning services for the containers so long as students drop off dirty greenboxes in exchange for a clean one. If lost, reusable to-go containers are also available or purchase.

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DINING SUSTAINABILITY AT THE MOTLEY COFFEEHOUSE

Mission: “To connect the Claremont Colleges with local The Motley is committed to sustainability and methods and global communities by of reducing waste. Working with local vendors, such as perpetuating sustainable Miss Donuts and Last Drop Cafe, ensures sustainable purchasing practices. The Motley also works with Scripps to supply chains.” compost coffee grounds, which are used around the campus. The reusable mug policy also promotes sustainability-customers recieve $1 discount off of any drink if they bring their own mug or use a Motley mug. Conscious of reducing waste last semester, the Motley decided to switch from traditional plastic straws to compostable ones.

SCRIPPS FOOD RECOVERY NETWORK In partnership with Malott Commons, the student-led Food Recovery Network works to divert food waste by delivering leftover dining hall food to House of Ruth and Crossroads. With current deliveries only twice a week, over 1120 lbs of food waste were recovered during the spring semester alone. This volunteer-based program helps to both reduce Scripps’s overall food waste, while also engaging students in the broader community.

CHALLAH FOR HUNGER

Founded in 2004 by Scripps student Eli Winkelman, Challah for Hunger now has chapters on university campuses across the US, Canada, UK, and Australia. With a uniting social mission of making positive change in the community, this year’s Scripps ChF team included 15 student leaders and over 60 volunteers. With the majority of profits donated to Crossroads, ChF also had an occasional partnership with SEED (Scripps Environmental Education and Development club) presenting a $1 off discount when people brought their own containers.

1800

loaves of challah sold this spring

Natalie Quek SCR ‘19; Alexi Butts SCR ’20 Leaders of the Food Recovery Network

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THANK YOU A special thank you to everyone involved in the creation of this first Sustainability Annual Report. This landmark report could not have been accomplished without you and will help move Scripps College toward a more sustainable future. PRESIDENTIAL ADVISORY COUNCIL ON SUSTAINABILITY CHAIR Lola Trafecanty

SCORE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR Danielle Cana-Banae

CO-CHAIR Dean Calvo

PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE Nancy Neiman

SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR Tiffany Ortamond

PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY Sarah Gilman

DINING MANAGER Tom Adkins

ALUMNA ‘18 Leta Ames

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Paul Kalush

SAS ENVIRONMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE Shelby DeVolder

FACILITIES DIRECTOR Josh Reeder

SCR ’21 Maya Cohrssen-Hernandez

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