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voice.scrippscollege.edu

April 18, 2013

The Scripps Voice Inside... Mary Robinson, the first female president of Ireland,

discusses the importance of climate justice Op-ED Skype sex: elation, masturbation, frustration

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Op-Ed Justine Desmond asking the hard questions about Kiva microloans

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By Nikki Broderick ‘14 Staff Writer

O

n Tuesday, April 9, the former and first female president of Ireland, Mary Robinson, visited Scripps

photo | Caroline Novit ’14

College as a guest of the California European Union Center. Robinson spoke in Balch Auditorium about the

beginning of her career and her passion for climate justice. Du r i n g t h e f i r s t h a l f of her talk, Robinson told stories about her law work and participation in Ireland’s entrance into the European Union. After her undergraduate career at Trinity College Dublin, Robinson studied at Harvard Law School. At Harvard, Robinson learned about European Community law, or as it was to be later known as, European Union law. Although Ireland had not yet joined the European Union, Robinson took an interest and even became the first professor to teach community law in Ireland after she won a professorship upon her return. In her talk, Robinson described her support for Ireland’s entr y into the European Union and “felt

in particular that it would be good for women.” As an attorney, she often represented women in cases brought to the Court of Justice of the European Union, and provided anecdotes of cases that struck her as especially helpful for women’s equality in Ireland. After her election to the senate, Robinson remained influential, particularly in controversial areas such as legal availability of contraception and family planning services. Robinson won the Labour Party’s nomination, and served as president from 19901997. During her tenure as president, Robinson was the first head of state to visit Rwanda and Somalia after their intense conflicts. Two months before the official end of her presidency, Robinson continued on page 10

“Krunk Fu Battle Battle” defies gravity and stereotype Features

Get Ready for Gaypril! pages 6-7

Entertainment Is the “Spring Breakers” movie a masterpiece or just a hot mess?

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By Rosemary McClure ’13 Editor-in-Chief

T

he words “hip-hop musical” hit me like a ton of bricks—or perhaps I should say, like a slug to the chest. The concept makes so much sense, one wonders why such productions are not mainstream. “Krunk Fu Battle Battle (KFBB),” the hip-hop musical written by Qui Nguyen which opened on Apr. 11 at Pomona College, did not disappoint. KFBB tells the story of Norman Lee (Cheuk Piu Lo, PZ ’14), a high school student who just emigrated to Brooklyn from Hong Kong, who foolishly challenges Sunset High’s reigning b-boy Three-Point (Ben Hong) to a dance battle for a date with slam poet Sweet Cindy Chang (Kayla Dalsfoist, SCR ’13). With the help of his new friend Wingnut (Bredan Gillett, PO ’14) and b-boy coach Lloyd, A.K.A. Sir Master Cert (Ken Saw), Norman accesses his inner b-boy, taking down Three Point’s crew and

learning life lessons: “It’s not about getting it right. It’s about making it work when you get it wrong.” KFBB is at its core a feel-good boy-meetsgirl underdog story, which is nothing new. Like all musicals, it is over-the-top—every time a character says “Krunk Fu Battle Battle,” the audience hears thunder and the lights flash ominously. But the hip-hop element is fresh and innovative, preventing heavy-handedness as the narrative explores immigration, language, and burgeoning masculinity and femininity. KFBB is like a younger, hipper “West Side Story.” With breakdancing. Like if “You Got Served” had a soul. Director Joyce Lu, Assistant Professor of Theatre at Pomona College, picked her cast well. Lo was perfect as Norman, conveying the character’s heart of gold without overdoing the naiveté. Saw, as the unexpectedly legit aging b-boy coach Sir Master continued on page 2

Kayla Dalsfoist ‘13 as Sweet Cindy Chang photo | Rosemary McClure ’13

1030 Columbia Avenue | Claremont, CA 91711 | Box 892 email: scrippsvoice@gmail.com | Volume XVI • Issue Eleven


2•News

Krunk Fu continued from p. 1

Cert, was flawless, from the vintage Kangol to the shower sandals (complete with socks!). Dalsfoist as Sweet Cindy Chang left me wanting more: in similar storylines, the female lead is often portrayed as a passive object, her companionship is awarded to the victor like a trophy. But Chang is no damsel in distress. She is a talented poet and a feminist with big dreams and a takelife-by-the-horns attitude. Dalsfoist actually wrote the spoken word piece that introduces us to Chang’s character. Dance performances were collaboratively choreographed by D. Sabela Grimes and King-Edqux Robinson (PO ’15), as well as breakdancers Ben Hong (as Three Points), Ronald Nemo (as Three Points’ crony L.A.), William Goodman, and Rocky Reyes. From flares to floor rocking, hand glides, back spins, backflips (yes, really), and one-handed handstands, these dancers’ incredible talent was a treat. KFBB is breaking ground in terms of both its genre and its thematic concept. Apart from R. Kelly’s magnificent “Trapped in the Closet,” which I consider to be in a genre all its own (one reserved for masterpieces of Shakespearean genius with “Family Guy” randomness), rap musicals have languished at the margins. Pomona’s production was the first run of the show since its world premiere in May 2011. Asian and Asian American actors are exceptionally underrepresented in film and on the stage. The roles they

photos | Rosemary McClure ’13

do receive are often restricted to onedimensional characters that perpetuate offensive stereotypes. Asian men are cast as Kung Fu masters, evil villains, or the token foreigner whose plotline centers on his assimilation into white culture. Asian women are pigeonholed into hypersexual, dangerous roles: secret agents, geishas, and sexy assassins whom the male lead must “conquer.” KFBB pokes fun at these tropes. Meghan Gallagher (SCR ’15) plays Chang’s best friend Moe Moko, whose neon wig and Sailor Moon-esque costume caricature our obsession with anime. To explain his curious bruises and late nights, Norman tells his mother Lloyd is teaching him Kung Fu—“Ancient Chinese wisdom.” But Lloyd does not know the first thing about Kung Fu—he is a KRUNK Fu master! The play also satirized the homogenization of Asian cultures that

too often occurs in pop culture. Norman joked that because he was Chinese, he could easily pick up Tagalog to impress Chang, which is a bit like saying, “I speak Spanish, so Swahili should be no problem.” The Bechdel Test, a heuristic shortcut to expose gender bias in movies, asks three questions: does the film have at least two named female characters? Do they talk to each other? About something other than a man? Anti-racist media critics have adapted this rule of thumb to test for racism: Are there at least two Asian characters? Do they talk to each other? About something other than their ethnicity? Most films, TV shows, and books fail both tests miserably. Thus, KFBB’s majority-minority cast serves as a much-needed counter-narrative to the Othering norms of mainstream American pop culture. “This was the first time I’ve been

cast in a role that’s explicitly Filipino,” said Dalsfoist. “I’ve always been cast as ‘ambiguous’ or whitewashed. I’m Filipino. And Swedish. It’s weird being able to act onstage as yourself.” While KFBB is male-centric, Dalsfoist thinks Cindy Chang has “more depth than the usual leading lady. I also appreciate that they didn’t make Cindy oversexualized.” While KFBB’s lead characters’ ethnicity is in no way ignored—Chang flows about being Filipina, Norman struggles to adjust to Brooklyn, and we discover Lloyd is faking his accent to spend time with Norman’s mother—it is one of many defining characteristics in a narrative that re-centers Asians and Pacific Islanders without tokenizing them. In doing this within the context of the little-utilized hip-hop musical genre, KFBB presents a counternarrative that is well-placed in the college musical theatre context.

CGU announces winners of the Kingsley and Kate Tufts Poetry Awards By Stephanie Steinbrecher ’16 Staff Writer

I

n early March, Claremont Graduate University announced the recipients of its prestigious Kingsley and Kate Tufts Poetry Awards. The pair of awards are given annually to two exemplary poets. The Kingsley Tufts Award bestows the winning mid-career poet with one of the largest monetary awards for a single collection of poetry worldwide; this year, the winner of this honor is Marianne Boruch for her collection “The Book of Hours.” The Kate Tufts Discovery Award is given to a poet who has just published their first book or collection. The Kate Tufts Discovery Award recipient for 2013 is Heidy Steidlmayer for “Fowling Piece.” The awards were created in order to “enable a poet to work on his or her craft for a while without paying bills,” said Kate Tufts, according to CGU’s website. The awards seek to both honor poets and supply them with means to continue working. The Tufts Poetry Awards are based at CGU and are two of the largest given to poets. The Kinglsey Tufts Award offers both praise and a $100,000 prize to an established poet. The Kate Tufts Discovery Award, on the other hand, recognizes a promising poet and offers the winner $10,000. The final judges for 2013 were comprised of many notable individuals from around the country whose backgrounds are entrenched in poetry. Past Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award recipient and Professor at the University of Michigan Linda Gregerson, Poetry Editor of The Atlantic Monthly Dadvid Barber, managing editor of Red Hen Press Kate Gale, prize-winning poet and journalist Ted

photo | courtesy of CGU

Genoways, and past Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award recipient, Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, and Professor at Washington University Carl Phillips made up the judges panel this year. Hundreds of applications are submitted for the awards each year, with a panel of preliminary judges who choose 50 finalists for the Kingsley Tufts Award and 25 for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. The awards both recognize outstanding poets and bodies of poetry as well as encourage poets to continue with their outstanding work. The Awards are affirmations that hopefully encourage poets to continue with their work. Boruch, Professor at Purdue University, has written collections, essays on poetry, and a memoir. Her poetry has appeared in several publications including the New Yorker and Paris Review. Steidlmayer, like Boruch, has had her work published in Poetry and other publications. Kate Tufts decided to base the awards at CGU in 1993, establishing the award in her husband’s name and providing an endowment to help poets continue to excel in and perfect their art. Since then, the Awards have been offered annually and will hopefully continue well into the future, helping fuel the creativity of contemporary poets for years to come.

April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven


Opinions & Editorials•3

The Scripps Voice Editors-in-Chief Rosemary McClure & Lauren Prince Advisor Sam Haynes Design Editors Elaine Chan Aidan Harley Selene Hsu Copy Editors Megan Petersen Star Schneider Alexandra Vallas Photo Editor Caroline Novit Business Manager Grace Xue Social Media Assistant Jane Condon Web Designer Nicole Fergie Staff Writers and Columnists Nikki Broderick Justine Desmond Lily Foss Katherine Goree Rachael Hamilton Stephanie Huang Kehau Jai Anissa Joonas Elizabeth Lee Dagny Xinyue Lu Caroline Miller Caroline Nelson Kara Odum Laurel Schwartz Priya Srivats Stephanie Steinbrecher Abby Volkmann Staff Photographers Tianna Sheih Jacqueline Freedman Comments and letters can be sent to Scripps College The Scripps Voice, 1030 Columbia Ave, Box 892, Claremont, CA, 91711. You can also email The Scripps Voice at scrippsvoice@gmail.com or visit our website at voice.scrippscollege.edu. The Scripps Voice is a student forum and is not responsible for the opinions expressed in it.

Is Kiva really

the right place to

invest?

photo | Courtesy of Kiva Microfunds

By Justine Desmond ‘13 Staff Writer

C

lick on the Kiva homepage, and an image of a potential beneficiary pops up instantly. “Victoria” is 45 years old, lives in Pucallpa, Peru, and a mother of three. She needs $400.00 to buy a greater supply of soft drinks to sell at her store. The window asks for just $25.00 to help empower Victoria and would-be entrepreneurs around the world that need capital to jump start their business. Over 918,000 lenders have been moved by Kiva’s depiction of entrepreneurs in the developing world. As of April 15, 2012, the Scripps College Economics Society joined the growing list of supporters, and invested $747.45 into a micro-lending project. Board members determined that the funds would empower women in developing countries in an economically sound way, and, in fact, 86 percent of the borrowers that received the assistance are female. While I was not a board member when that decision was made, it had my full support: I opened an account with Kiva back in 2006, just a year after it was founded. This past spring, one of our board members, Taryn Ohashi, suggested divesting from Kiva and finding a new microfinance organization. I had just joined the board as communications chair, and was taken aback to learn that Kiva and certain practices associated with microfinance had drawn such criticism. Together, our board, in dialogue with Professor Latika Chaudhary, an Assistant Professor of Economics at Scripps, decided to look into the matter. An investigation yielded some disappointing realities. Questions had been raised about Kiva’s economic soundness. When Kiva first took off, lenders in developed countries believed they could help bolster local economies in countries like India by giving small loans to entrepreneurs. Kiva was presented as a go-between to advance this worthy goal. It seemed efficient, and with rising domestic demand in India, China, and other hubs of the developing world, the need for capital was self-evident. Years later, however, critics concluded that the plan failed to take into account economies of scale and shifting demand in global markets. Governments are leaving behind dated, protectionist policies. India embraced economic reforms in 1991 while China backed dual track reforms in 1978. These markets are changing at a rapid pace. For instance, after facing seemingly insurmountable barriers to entry in India, Walmart finally gained access to domestic markets in Dec. 2012. As Professor Chaudhary points out, “Eventually, Walmart will come. Small-scale traders will not be able to compete.” She explains, developing countries need to embrace economies of scale. Microfinance does not provide the proper economic incentives to help countries along in this process. In addition, some microfinance organizations do not recognize the dynamic nature of these markets as they continue to invest in nonviable sectors like basket weaving. In the short term, stores like 10,000 Villages continue to sell products produced through microfinance initiatives, expecting socially conscious

individuals to make a charitable purchase of beaded earrings, or a wicker basket. But outfits like 10,000 Villages can do little to solve the developing world’s rapidly expanding need to market goods abroad. Second, while we wanted to use microloans as tool for promoting women’s long-term economic independence and empowerment, new research suggests that we may actually do them a disservice by introducing programs that only offer shortterm solutions. As Chaudhary argues, “We are not even giving people real skills. We are perpetuating an enterprise that they are probably not running very well. Teaching something that would be more marketable that would get them more money in the future would be better than helping them with this business.” Why encourage women to become basket weavers when there is a growing demand for informational technology (IT) professionals? Admittedly, some microfinance NGOs have met the need for education. Sadly, Kiva does not appear to be following this path. Further, the model of group borrowing, still practiced by certain groups within Kiva, has faced additional scrutiny. While we are all for accountability, the pressure put on women within these groups can be over the top. A Wall Street Journal article tackled the issue in 2009, pointing to difficulties repaying loans and public shame as two common outcomes of group lending in Ramanagara, a town in India. A last major concern of SCES regarding microfinance institutions like Kiva is that they simultaneously exploit our sympathy for women like Victoria while claiming to be business-minded. Is Victoria an entrepreneur or a charity case? Professor Chaudhary offers her clear judgment: “I don’t like the idea of a business that is not a business, and that is my qualm with microfinance.” At best, this is simply a marketing strategy that grips the attention of socially conscious individuals in the West. At its worst, the advertisements featuring women like Victoria are manipulative and patronizing. The criticism of Kiva serves to remind wellintentioned investors—including small-scale investors, like the Scripps Economics Society, that they should research and evaluate the short and longterm goals of such organizations. The money we take out of Kiva will still stay in microfinance, but in a new organization. Currently, as of April 12, we have $181.28 available Kiva credit, which we plan to invest in the Small Enterprise Foundation. Unlike Kiva, this organization focuses on the long-term benefits of the loans it provides to entrepreneurs in South Africa. SEF gives regular feedback on its clients’ financial health, selfsufficiency, well-being and future plans. While SEF also uses the model of group borrowing, it makes sure to keep track of clients’ repayment rates, savings rates, and attendance at meetings to protect against shaming and harassment by group members. While SCES still has some reservations about microfinance in general, we feel that our money will be put to much better use in SEF.

April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven


4•Opinions & Editorials

E co n oMi x Cyprus: the latest casualty

of the

Eurozone Crisis

photo | Courtesy of Modis

By Kara Odum ’15 Economics Columnist

T

he Eurozone crisis has been dragging on for nearly three years now, with periods of rioting, public unrest, and fierce negotiations between financially unstable countries and the troika, made up of the European Central Bank, the European Commission, and the International Monetary Fund. While most countries have been hit with recessions following the 2008 financial collapse, some have fared better. With multiple countries vying for the Financial Failure Medal, Cyprus is the winner of the month. Cyprus joined the EU in 2004 for the political protection the EU offered, not for economic reasons. Low corporate tax rates and double taxation treaties, which exempt companies from taxes both in Cyprus and in their home companies, have drawn foreign business to Cyprus for several decades. This is partly why so much money from Russian businesses ended up in Cypriot banks. In 2008, Demetris Christofias, a communist, was elected president based on a political platform of reunifying the island and solving political problems with Turkey. Throughout his time in office, the Cypriot government took a fiscally healthy country and overspent on unproductive projects.

This resulted in international investors losing confidence in Cyprus because of its new fiscal policies, and Cyprus ultimately lost access to capital markets in May 2011. Making matters worse, an explosion destroyed a power station that produced half of the island’s power. The country was thrown into recession. At this time, the European Banking Authority reviewed two of the largest Cypriot banks via a stress test. While the banks passed, they needed some extra money to get them through the recession. To avoid asking the troika for a small loan package, the Russian government gave Cyprus a loan of 2.5 billion euros. On Oct. 27, 2011, the real problems started. The EU council decided to wipe out 80 percent of the value of Greek debt held by the private sector, which meant a 5 billion euro writedown for Cypriot banks. In conjunction with a capital shortage in the euro area, the EU also mandated that banks hold more capital to hedge against risk. Cyprus couldn’t come up with the additional capital needed because the government was trying to distance themselves from the banks, otherwise the government could have issued public debt to raise money for the banks.

In June 2012, Cyprus bonds were downgraded to below investment grade; the government debt was not eligible for collateral. The troika had waved this restriction in Greece and Ireland but did not for Cyprus because the banks needed to go through structural adjustments to remain solvent. Cyprus asked the troika for assistance and began implementing programs such as reductions in pension benefits, wages, and salaries of the public sector as well as privatizing government owned corporations, which had been standard practice throughout the EU when a country was asking for financial assistance. On March 1, 2013, the new president Nicos Anastasiades came to office hoping to get the country’s finances straightened out by completing the adjustment program. However, in March, Anastasiades was forced with either haircutting deposits or cutting off liquidity to the banks. The troika had opted for a bail-in, which would have levied a tax on all deposits in Cypriot banks but was later changed to leave out insured deposits of under 100,000 euros. An ge l a Me rke l , the c u rre n t Chancellor of Germany, is up for

re-election in Sept. 2013, which has sparked some speculation that the new strategy of bail-ins was politically motivated. There is some truth to that statement because forcing losses on deposit holders has not been a part of previous bailout packages to countries like Greece, Ireland, or Iceland. Also, people in Germany have been labeling any assistance to Cyprus as an attempt to bail out Russian oligarchs, which is not a popular political move. This strategy will hurt public confidence in the banks and hinder future economic recovery. Furthermore, Cyprus’ trouble and the following EU response have set a new precedent that puts the rest of Europe in danger of losing even more public confidence. Bank deposits are typically very safe and insured to a certain amount, but with the bail-in, people might think twice before trusting a bank with their money. This alone can stunt Europe’s economic growth even more because without money for banks to lend, people can’t get loans for houses or businesses. It will be interesting to see how Europe responds to this new development as Spain, Italy, and Greece remain in financial jeopardy.

April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue eleven


Opinions & Editorials•5

I Am Scrippsie,

Hear Me Roar In

praise

of being a

SWUG By Lily Foss ’13 Feminism Columnist

I

’m not sure how many of you have heard the term “SWUG,” so let me catch you up: it’s an acronym for “senior washed-up girl.” A selfidentified SWUG at Yale coined it in a piece for the Yale Daily News in which she wrote that being a SWUG meant embracing “the slow, wine-filled decline of female sexual empowerment as we live out our college glory days.” Confession time, dear readers: I’m totally a SWUG. Last Saturday night I spent the entire evening watching the first season of “Gilmore Girls.” All 22 episodes. That was my night. And you know what? I LOVED IT. That was exactly how I wanted to spend my evening. And that’s the great part about being a senior, at least in my opinion. When I was a first-year, I felt a lot of pressure to go out and do young-people things every weekend. Sometimes it was fun to do the party circuit. But those parties get repetitive. And I’m really not much of a party person. They’re great once in a while, but every weekend? Not my jam. Now that I’m older, I don’t feel obligated to go out every weekend. I know that my worth doesn’t hinge upon how many social events I attend, so I can admit to myself that, to me, a night spent in my pajamas eating leftover pie and catching up on “The Daily Show” is a great night (tonight was a great night). However, I had some issues with the original article. For one thing, I didn’t care for the implication that not wanting to pursue relationships indicates the “decline of female sexual empowerment.” I’m not single because I am disempowered. I’m single because I am done with playing dumb college dating games. I’m looking at you, guy in my physics class who told me that I should come over to his apartment to “listen to some country music.” If

photo | Caroline Novit ’14

you’re inviting me over for sex, just come out and say it! And I will say no, because that was the last day of class and you hadn’t talked to me at all the whole semester. Should have laid the groundwork, dude. But seriously, enough with all this fake subtlety. I’m too old for this shit. And I’m too old for the guys who randomly want to make out at parties and never see me again, or the guys who ask for my number and never text, or any of that malarkey. Those things have their place, and that’s fine. But it’s not what I want. But my biggest issue with the article? The “washed-up” part. I’m not washed-up. I’m 22 years old. My entire life is ahead of me. So maybe I’m bored with the whole college lifestyle thing. That’s good. I’m graduating in a month (provided this thesis gets done—that “Gilmore Girls” marathon probably wasn’t the best idea), so the sooner I get over college, the better. And my college years weren’t my glory days. I refuse to believe that. These weren’t the four years when I passed the bar. They weren’t the four years when I practiced law and championed for human rights. The four years when I argued a case in front of the Supreme Court. When I was appointed to the Supreme Court. As much as I’ve enjoyed my time at Scripps, if these were my “glory days,” that’d be pretty damn sad. And that’s why I’m totally embracing my SWUG-ness—because I know that there are way more great things to come for me in the future. If the best is yet to come, why waste time trying to fit myself into the “college student” mold when it isn’t what I want? No thanks. Parties and dating are fun sometimes, but right now all I want to do is hang out with my girls: Lorelai and Rory.

Pandora’s Box

Skype sex:

elation, masturbation, By Anonymous

L

ong-distance relationships: the wonders of modern technology make them much easier than ever before. Instead of waiting weeks for a letter from the front lines of Europe, there are any number of video chat services which allow you to see your darling at any hour of the day. They also will always fail you when it comes to one specific, intimate aspect: sex. When all you can do is gaze longingly across 1,980.13 miles, two time zones, and the sorry excuse for an internet connection that is Claremont WPA, any convenience afforded by real-time conversation is overshadowed by the fact that you can’t even hold your sweetheart’s hand. Making matters worse, your super obnoxious, 20-something sex drive never seems to leave you alone. Masturbation is, for most of us, a very personal thing. While we (meaning I) might talk about how we masturbate or what we masturbate to without hesitation, I think most people I know would rather not jack off in front of another person. And up until fairly recently, I would have counted myself among those who would never— EVER—take off my clothes on camera. But 2,000 miles! So I guess you could call me a bit of a convert. Skype sex (meaning mutual masturbation over any video chat service, really) can be a really good thing for long-distance couples. The horniness can be kept at bay, and while masturbating alone is important and healthy, it can be downright lonely when you know there’s someone out there who would gladly jump your bones if you weren’t halfway across the continent. So touching yourself and talking with your honey on camera can be a nice way to keep the fire going until you can see each other again. But it also definitely has its pitfalls. Aside from the more harmless annoyances like getting tangled up in your headphones or your partner turning into a Lego person when the connection goes bad, the internet can be a shady place filled with terrible people who know how to take screen shots and upload them to imgur. That very rational concern of having photos of my o-face all over the Internet made me very wary of Skype sex at first. Soon, though, I became more comfortable with my partner and with

frustration

the idea of masturbating in front of someone, and I’ve found that Skype sex can actually be kind of fun. First, it’s a great break from porn. Generally, I try to be very critical about the media and society around me, so porn can be downright depressing to watch. While watching someone I love get themselves all hot and bothered and mussed up isn’t as enjoyable as doing it to them myself, watching them enjoy my body and their own is better than any porn on the market. Being and feeling as sexy as a porn star without being pressured to look or act like one is pretty great. Second, the mishaps are hilarious t o re c o u n t . L i k e t h e t i m e a “miscommunication” had me giving the camera a close-up of an area that, well, maybe shouldn’t have been given a close-up. Or the look of terror on my partner’s face as they slipped on discarded clothes and tumbled to the ground. Or praying to the Internet gods—Al Gore, Steve Jobs, NASA, who the hell cares?— before beginning that the Internet will last at least until we’ve both orgasmed.

Or when my partner has to gently remind me to adjust my camera angle because they can’t see my boobs. Or when what sounds like a circus parades past my door just as we start getting close. Or when your partner dashes off to pee and comes back to find you no longer horny and instead playing Angry Birds. The list goes on. While Skype sex can be infuriating and even embarrassing, it can also be fun, exciting, and healthy, if done right. And though not being able to snuggle when it’s all said and done is a bummer, I recommend leaving Skype on when you fall asleep. Though it’s a little bittersweet, seeing your partner’s face first thing in the morning might make you forget, if only for a second, that you are even apart in the first place.

April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven


Features•7

LGBTQQIAApril

April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven

photo | Caroline Novit ’14

i ntat

Transsexual: Transsexual, while historically similar in use to ‘transgender,’ is now typically used to describe a person who is transitioned to another gender. MTF: Short for male-to-female, refers to a transgendered individual who identifies as female. Generally synonymous with trans female/ woman. FTM: Short for female-to-male, refers to a transgendered individual who identifies as male. Generally synonymous with trans male/man. PGP: Short for “preferred gender pronouns,” PGPs are the pronouns someone prefers as a reference to themselves in the third person. For instance, someone whose PGPs are Zie/Zir/Zir’s, then someone might say, “Zie is meeting us at the library later.” Genderqueer: Genderqueer is a term used to describe people who feel that they are neither male nor female, but instead may have traits of both. Bigendered: Bigendered is a word used to describe someone who feels they are twogendered, (i.e. both male and female or otherwise). Genderneutral: Genderneutral is used to describe a person who feels they are neither male nor female (either neutral-gendered or nongendered). Genderneutral pronouns include “they” or “them” as well as the lesser-known “Zie” and “Hir.” As previously stated, this list is not at all definitive. This is merely to just provide a taste of the diversity of terms and vocabulary available. There many more terms out there, and we

ie

experiences sexual attraction to people of all gender and sexual identities. Can be synonymous with omnisexual. Romantic identification: This term usually refers to a person’s romantic identity, focusing on romantic relationships as distinct from sexual or platonic relationship. Panromantic: Panromantic refers to someone who experiences romantic attraction to people of all gender identifications and identities. Can be synonymous with omniromantic. Polyamory: Polyamory refers to honest relationships with multiple individuals, but does not necessarily suggest that all individuals are in relationships with each other (i.e. open relationships are polyamorous) Aromantic: Aromantic describes a person who experiences little to no romantic attraction; converse to asexuality, this does not mean an aromantic individual experiences no sexual drive. Gender identification: Different from gender, which is a social or legal status, and biological sex, which refers to physical gender traits. Gender identification is based on how a person feels about themselves regardless of these outside factors. Intersex: Intersex is the condition in which a person is born with sexual anatomy that does not fit female or male definitions. Trans*: Trans* usually describes a person who doesn’t identify with their biological sex at birth. Sometimes it is used as an umbrella-term. Transgender: Transgender describes a person who does not identify with their birth gender but does still identify within the binary gender norm.

o

r

any people are unfamiliar with the terms used to describe different forms of sexual, gender, and romantic identification. Though these explanations are by no means definitive (different people may use these same words and mean very different things), nor is this meant to be a comprehensive list of all terms (anyone who tells you they have a definitive list of all terms is probably lying), this list is meant to serve as a very general guide for reference to explain these terms to the uninitiated. Think of it as a way to place you in the region of what people are talking about; if you’re unsure about the ways in which someone self-identifies, ask them. Binary: Term used to describe a system in which there are only two options, such as the gender binary, which refers to the idea that there are only two genders (male/female, man/woman, masculine/feminine) and that all individuals must or do fit into one category. Sexual identification: Sexuality, or sexual identification or orientation, usually refers to a person’s sexual interest as opposed to their romantic interest. Queer: Queer is an all-encompassing term for gender and sexual minorities, used to describe multisexual identifications as well as to describe those who feel no other labels adequately describe them. Asexual: Asexuality refers to experiencing little to no sexual drive; however, this does not necessarily mean there is no physical aspect to a relationship. Pansexual: Pansexual refers to someone who

mantic o

sion es r genderqueer p masculine androgynous queer cisgender transvestite questioning feminine cross-dresser

G

M

biromantic aromantic attracted to women panromantic attracted to men polyamorous romantic r questioning

er e x

These are just a few common terms. There are many others that fit into these categories, and please keep in mind that their definitions and locations are fluid! The definitions offered here are just a rough guide. Please refer to the article to the left complicating labels as a whole.

nd

lo

io

intersex male

e

G

e

female

b

what state they are from. Had Wong been from one of a handful of other states, she could have changed her birth certificate without surgery, and still applied for FAFSA without Smith knowing of her sex at birth. The fact that Smith would have considered Wong’s application without knowing about her identity as a trans* individual, had she been from another state, indicates that the college indirectly discriminates against applicants based on their geographic backgrounds. Single-sex schools such as Smith have expressed concern that admitting trans* applicants would put them at a risk of losing federal funding under Title IX. However, the law is not applicable to private institutions. Since all single-sex colleges in the U.S. are private, concern about Title IX funding is an invalid excuse for not considering any applicant. If it were to admit someone who is legally of the opposite sex, a private single-sex college would not lose any federal funding. So where does Scripps fit into this debate? Scripps’s admissions policy is to admit any qualified applicant who selfidentifies as female on the Common App. This allows the applicants, not anyone else, to decide whether they identify as women. It is comforting to know that, had Wong applied to Scripps, her application would have received the consideration it deserved. Admitting trans* students is consistent with Scripps’s values. Our school aims to break social barriers and refuse to let gender roles be an obstacle for opportunity. Denying a qualified trans* applicant the opportunity to study at Scripps would be hypocritical of our college.

g

n

alliope Wong, a transgender high school senior who was born male but who has identified as female for several years, attempted to apply to Smith College, a prestigious women’s college in Northampton, Mass., last fall. Smith’s admissions policy is that the school will only consider admitting applicants if all components of their application and supporting documents describe them as female. Smith, which is generally considered to be socially progressive, refused to consider Wong’s application because her Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form designated her as a male. Her home state, Connecticut, mandates that a transgender individual undergo sexreassignment surgery in order to legally change legal status on a birth certificate. Soon after Smith rejected her, Wong started a Tumblr blog, calliowong.tumblr. com, to share her experience and help other trans* high schoolers receive the consideration from Smith that she did not receive. Word of Smith’s refusal to consider Wong’s application has caused backlash from the Smith’s students and alums. They have shown their support for trans* applicants across social media sites. This incident is also an example of financial discrimination against trans* applicants. Had she not needed financial aid, Smith would not have seen her FAFSA, and would thus not have known that Wong was born male. Furthermore, it is often necessary to hire an attorney to change the sex on the birth certificate, making the legal process an expensive and time-consuming one. Trans* applicants should receive fair consideration for admission, regardless of

Vocab

ic al

o

C

definition might be very different from ours. AVENWiki, a Wiki resource for asexuality and the asexual community, defines an aromantic as “a person who experiences little or no romantic attraction to others.” To its credit—and it is a very good Wiki—it does go on to add qualifications, but oftentimes our shared understanding of labels ends there. The qualifications are something we have to add, and we shouldn’t take it at face value that two people identifying with the same term mean to identify with the same qualities that term refers to. Once again, I’m not arguing against labels. They’re useful. I like them, but I can understand why some people don’t. I don’t think people who don’t want to use labels are worng. They can be homogenizing, even if a great diversity of labels mitigates it somewhat. But I personally use them because they DO tell people something. It might not be exactly what I’m trying to say, but it gives me a point of reference to bounce off of and work with. Here’s an idea: Facebook allows you to fill in blank boxes with your religious views, political views, etc. Why can’t we do the same other things like gender? Instead of offering us a list of terms, often limited by a website or organization’s discretion, why can’t we have a blank box to write in? But remember that giving me the option to identify as something can’t be the end of the conversation. Let me define who I am, but don’t assume that’s all there is to me.

cisgender bigender transman trans* transgender questioning one-spirit man intergender two-spirit

o

By Katherine Goree ‘16 Staff Writer

any times in my life, I have felt the need to define myself. But the world doesn’t seem to want to make that easy. Just think about the last time you registered for a website, or filled out a form, or the last time you updated your Facebook info section. Facebook only gives you the option of choosing “Male” and “Female” for gender, and if you don’t identify as either of those: tough. You can choose to hide your gender on your profile, but the symbolism in hiding your gender is strong enough to make that option seem sketchy at best. Google has one more option in its drop-down menu: Other. While some people do identify with that term, the implication is that if you don’t identify as Male or Female, obviously you must identify yourself as Other. But is the solution to just continuously add more terms, more terms for people to pick and choose from, hoping that there’s one that describes them? What’s the point of even including labels if inevitably they will exclude people who don’t identify with them? Who are you? Think about it. Now try to answer that question without relying on signifiers of gender, class, culture, ethnicity, sexuality, etc. We tend to fall back on these terms. “I am Jewish.” “I’m Greek Orthodox.” “I am a woman.” “I’m pansexual.” “I’m aromantic.” “I’m Californian.” “I’m Hawaiian.” Though they might not come up at first (a friend of mine, when asked, first responded “I don’t see the forest for the trees,” which I thought was pretty keen), eventually we do fall back on these terms. And there’s nothing necessarily wrong with identifying with them—not inherently. But when I—using a personal example here— identify as aromantic, what does that say about me? To be honest, it says very little. For one, it doesn’t tell people that, like my friend, I sometimes don’t “see the forest for the trees,” or that, despite my aromantism, one of my favorite books is “Pride and Prejudice”— I’m a sucker for Mr. Darcy. More importantly, it only places you in the ballpark of my romantic identity. My major gripe with labels— specifically labels of gender, gender identity, sexuality, and romantic identity—is that that’s all they really do: place us in a ballpark, but people tend to make them into so much more. Terms like “genderqueer,” “pansexual,” “gray-A” and “male” help us signify to others points about our identity, but we often forget that when a friend tells us they’re queer, their

genderqueer

ntati

and trans* rights

M

Note:

queer

l

omnisexual o ace attracted to female gay asexual queer bisexual object-sexual male lesbian questioning heterosexual straight pansexual lesbian grey-A grey attracted to male homosexual

x

women’s colleges

By Star Schneider ‘16 Copy Editor

Some Helpful By Star Schneider ‘16 Copy Editor

sexua

se

Scripps vs. Smith:

Who am I? And why do I care?

it

pangender y n transwoman woman

ie

photo | Tianna Sheih ’16

Ident

r

What does it mean?

d

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6•Features

strongly encourage researching them yourself! Also, remember that terms don’t necessarily mean the same thing to everyone, so if you’re unsure about what someone means when they use a term, make sure to ask them! Here are some helpful websites that provide more terms and phrases, alongside some useful resources: www.nationalmecha.org/documents/GS_ Terms.pdf fuckyeahsexeducation.tumblr.com/Dictionary www.pomona.edu/administration/qrc


8•Features

Word Find:

Seniors’ thesis words spell check thinks are

fake.

X U F E T I S H I Z A T I O N G T U H P S D J P V N Y B B B E D Y E E C C P D U R Y D T N R W H A F K P K N O I T A Z I D L A N O D C M I H Z L R V N S D W E K Z G W R L R C D C H D E R U Z N L T A H J D R S X K R Q O I O V F M D P U C T K W P O S T C O L O N I A L I T Y J O Q Q Z S J E H T G D E Y C O Y E N V E U D A I M O N I C N S F C O E E R O S C K Z D R E M Y J I W O P I G Z X S A B L T E R U G E N C T V D U D Y S C A E U O Z O T V J Y G P P B M W H U I V J S J T Z L J D A X T T N W P O J U Z J Y O O G I K H Z E G H C T I H E L O A N G C P E A D M T L F M T O A A O P H I W S T L R L Y I U R C K C V L F E M J T E N O P T P I A S R L L N X X G Y A A P M J A F I W X A C P E J R V N N T U V W R S Q E Q O W K B N W B Q O A L E C J L E A H E G G H S N T V Y V C J K J O A G T F I L X O O Z J N P J B R D A N Y Z K P Y G S Z X U O B W A D N O Q F V J E H Q O A Z O T R Q D Y E C B A G I P E S A X C L N W C S I D W C W F T I I I F P J V I E O M H J C R O V R J I Y E C B U J U F U I R T O P K X B B N U A G V K A B Q D F C L X S I R Z R E N E I O R Z B K S L Q B X Q G A R S G Y T C N A L I C E S D S T T A S Q S L F P U O A Q K R A J D Q O E M T S X Q H I A H D T O H U G A H K I O M Z Y W D H F C Q R P J E Q H T W D H L C B G T H W A Y T I L A N O I T I S O P P O Z A O P M Y O S O I A Q F I C R D I I Q D H E R D K S O O H I A P B N Q C X Q L B E C L A H C R A I R T A P N O N O Y L M P W I U I I T E O E Y T M X R J N L A U M A M P D J O L F I I T I M M O G S Z Z B D B N A A H W A O L O X L G Q I X Z N P E F C K M I G O B F R J L M S L F F V M L T A N M N T F I U Q S Q T L C A U R Z R C X P V O O C T E R P F F G A G M Z J G A B F F L A Q V L A I A L W Q X M Y Y N L K D X Y M X Y F R L I I V N K N A R O Z U E P L D R I H I X Y C M B X J O M X C T D U P X N X A G D D Y X S D E T F J Y N H B Y T H R F N O G W S I U Q X L P C L P Z J M J V P L N R Y Y R F I B U P U G F E P W S L T F J D I C E E S I E O A Q R Z S Z Q I T E J G G D U W A N D E R H K P I G D J F O F A J E O V C D I R Y H W Z O M G A R R R F N O M M M H B D J Z M S V B I L I N E A L Q N O L L X T Y B D J I U N H J C H N H B E N V N T M R E E O U A C Q Z U N U S F J N T E Z U J V Z F E Q W S R D H T I T B T T V G F I X A J P E E I I A V O S H F F E E H E X W I R I D J M Y N A P U X N G T P E L O H P M Y N E H D B S R N P V C K S L T L N N A T N P J F S W N C V J I J J H E J X S R H R J N S C O P O P H I L I A M L S O C G Z V M E I I V R R D Z J I X P S P H I E B K N N P V J R E I N S C R I B E E E M T S I Z R A Z M H N J D P D V K T O V W U H H G S K C I C E T H N O H I S T O R Y D D T W E R T E E V U V E A F W R C P R I B D E N A Y R Y V M U R H Q J H I Z P V A B O R T I F I C A N T R K C X N O A D X E E X Z C K S S X W Z I T B S T E U P F B O Y K V J R F A S M W T Z Y K O K I S Q S L D C M O B H V P D E R J S L G Y H K Y H S Z L T A U Y K R E R J P Y R H R A K K U C N X W E V I X W R K U Q Z L B J O K D N G O T V D F S L I D Q X P H Q T X X Y B B V J R C E S Y T I L A N O I T I S O P C T H B L A ABORTIFICANT FETISHIZATION NONPATRIARCHAL PSEUDEPIGRAPHA ATTENTIONAL GLOCALIZATION NYMPHOLEPT RACIALIZED ATTRIBUTIONAL HETERONORMATIVE OPPOSITIONALITY REDEEMABILITY BILINEAL HOMOSOCIAL OVERNUTRITION REINSCRIBE BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL HYPERFERTILE POLYAMORY RENATURIZE DYSPHORIC INTRAFAMILIAL POSITIONALITY SCOPOPHILIA ENOCHIC MATRIFOCAL POSTCOLONIALISM SEDENTARIANISM ETHNOHISTORY MCDONALDIZATION POSTCOLONIALITY SEXUALIZATION EUDAIMONIC MILLENIALS PRECOLONIAL

Dave the Dog Man By Alexandra Vallas ’15 Copy Editor

M

any Scripps students are familiar with the sight of a man and his dogs sitting in Vita Nova courtyard. Fewer have stopped to play with the dogs, and an even smaller number have stopped to have a chat with “Dave the Dog Man.” However, beyond the friendly canines and the red truck, with its sticker imploring any future rescuers to save the whippet first, is a man with a fascinating story and a generous heart. The Scripps Voice recently spoke to Dave over email to get his side of the story. “[A]lthough it looks as though I do nothing but sit at the Motley with the dogs, you’ll note that I’m only ever there in the late afternoon. I actually do other things,” Dave informed us from the beginning. Dave, officially David Null, certainly leads an active life. Those “other things” so humbly noted include serving as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Civil Air Patrol (an offshoot of the Air Force), as an epidemiologist in the Medical Reserve Corps, and as a Field Investigator and Disaster Worker for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. An alumnus of SUNY New Paltz, the University of Manchester, and University College London, among other schools, with a PhD, a JD, an LLM, and a MScPH, Dave also has an ever-expanding list of continuing education certifications, from Harvard Medical School, Johns Hopkins, and Tulane. Dave was a professor at Cal Poly Pomona until 1997, when he took early retirement to care for his dying father. In the wake of Sept. 11, he joined the

Civil Air Patrol, which functions like the National Guard without weapons and flies missions such as search and rescue, surveillance, and disaster aid for the Air Force. But he has adopted the moniker “Dog Man” for a reason—Dave is one of the leaders of the St. Roch Dog Rescue out of Claremont, specializing in whippet and retriever breeds. He adopted his first dog, Robyn, in 1979. “When one has a dog, you immediately start to notice homeless dogs so I soon began taking in a dog or two at a time, rehabilitating them and put them up for adoption,” Dave wrote. His friend, Nancy Bekavac, Scripps College President from 1990-2007, collaborated with him in dog rescue. “Several times we found dogs whose pregnancies were far along, so they had their puppies in luxury at the President’s House,” Dave said. Scripps and the other Claremont Colleges have played an integral role in his fostering work for many years due to the bond between the students and Dave’s dogs. “Students miss dogs and cannot have them. Most of my dogs have been neglected or abused and need attention and affection so they can learn to trust people again if they are to be adoptable,” Dave explained. This “symbiotic relationship,” as he calls it, works in favor of both the students and the dogs, giving both parties the affection they need. The relationship has also influenced Dave to make donations to Scripps beginning in 1990s, totaling about $45,000.

photo | Caroline Novit ‘14 Recently, he established an internship fund, donating $30,000 now and pledging another $50,000 over the next few years. “This year I decided to give away 5 percent of my wealth a year. I expect to live another 20 years, so when I’m dead, I’ll also be dead broke,” Dave joked. Though his original intent was to give Scripps a women-only hot tub with a sliding roof, he changed his plans when Career Planing & Resources convinced him money was more needed for summer internships. This is fitting given Dave’s own experiences. During college summers, he worked as a steelworker, which he called “one of the dirtiest, unpleasant and dangerous industrial jobs there is.” “I’m pleased to be able to help Scripps students experience better summers during college than I did,” Dave said. “Me and the dogs are grateful for all the kindness shown to us by many years of Scripps students and staff.” In his free time, he also enjoys sailing his 25-foot sailboat, the Event Horizon, in Marina del Rey and is always looking for 5C students to join his crew. So next time you are passing through Vita Nova, stop by and pet the dogs, have a chat, and maybe sign up to go sailing with your new friend Dave the Dog Man.

April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven


Arts & Entertainment•9

High-Stitched Voice

Coachella trends By Stephanie Huang ‘16 Fashion Columnist

C

with No-chella beats

oming to California for school, I had formed all the assumptions, interpretations, and idealized versions of what life here would be like. I thought that I would be frequenting festivals and flea markets, and driving down endless, limitless deserts. This may be possible, but I don’t happen to own a car, rendering my fantasies impossible. I planned on tackling the Rose Bowl Flea Market, Santee Alley, and most importantly, Coachella in my first year—in fact, I thought I would have become a regular at the Rose Bowl by now. Yet here I am, having almost finished a whole year of college, and I have not been able to cross a single destination off my bucket list. Due to upcoming finals and Coachella’s hefty price tag, I’ve found myself near tears over the ceaseless stream of Instagram festival photos, blog posts, and the lineup. However, I have found that because of Coachella’s popularity, the same trends tend to repeat themselves, with only a select few bringing something new to the table. Though the Huffing-

ton Post headlines read “Coachella Style 2013 is All About High-Waisted Shorts, Crop Tops, Neon and Tattoos,” there is really nothing new about these trends. In fact, we’d probably see the same trends in the headlines back in 2012. To find the innovative and exciting looks among the throng of monotonous denim, fringe, and flow-

“I have found that because of Coachella’s popularity, the same trends tend to repeat themselves...” er-crowns is a difficult feat, but worth it. To name a few, bloggers from Song of Style, Trop Rouge, and Snakesnest struck a balance between structure and fluidity, scanty and sweaty, all the while incorporat-

Keep it Reel

Happy Together in

“Girls?”

Reflection on the end of the second season

By Caroline Nelson ‘16 Film Columnist

“T

ogether,” the final episode of this season’s “Girls,” does what any good finale is supposed to do. It ties up some loose ends, offers some dramatic conclusions, and leaves those who like the show with questions about the season. The great shows of the past decade have earned the distinction “novelistic.” This is not just because of an improvement in quality but because of a larger coherence that characterizes contemporary cable shows. Many shows work under the principle that people should be able to catch an episode on television and basically understand what was going on whether they are tuning into episode one or episode forty. In these shows, whatever themes the writers might want

ing simplicity and prints. Introducing new materials like silk, these girls brought a refined air to their outfits. While their ensembles are completely new, they somehow still manage to encompass the essence of festivals. Hopefully, by next year, these refreshing looks will finally catch on, and the cycle will continue to repeat. Despite my inability to attend Coachella, seeing No-chella was gratifying. Unlike Coachella, Nochella goers seemed to be much more about personal-style rather than conforming to the homogenizing notion of what festival-wear is supposed to be about, with guys in snapbacks and plaid, and girls in overalls and tropical floral prints. Perhaps it is only without the pressure of what a festival is supposed to be like can we truly see the individuality of fashion at work. Just as the “No” in “Nochella” can be seen as stimulating style-wise, the trailblazing bloggers succeed in their festival looks because they have chosen to deviate from standard festival apparel. photos | Caroline Novit ’14

to deal with are often addressed in one episode and then mostly left there. In a bad show this will be so heavy-handed that it recalls episodes of children’s shows brought to you by some word or another. But shows like “Girls” have themes that run through the entire series. This is what makes contemporary shows feel like the serial fiction of days gone by. Each episode has to function as a single unit, as does each season, as does the series as a whole. Throughout season two many of the characters have been in free-fall. Shoshanna tried to negotiate her first adult relationship, Marnie is floundering, Hannah’s OCD is back with a vengeance (well, in her world; for the viewer it sort of came out of the blue), Jessa took off after her marriage fell apart, and Adam went off the wagon and into a very dark place. By the end of the last episode the characters have all found some sort of answer to their situations. Shoshanna has broken up with Ray, citing her need to find out who she is and her need to escape his constant negativity. Marnie and Charlie reunite, presumably because they really love each other but possibly because Charlie has just gotten rich and enjoys the newly humbled version of his ex. Hannah is hit with a combination of mental illness, a perforated eardrum, and a sound telling-off by her father and the recovering drug addict downstairs who have both had enough of her taking advantage of them. She and Adam are also reunited by virtue of both having hit rock bottom. The cleverness of these resolutions lies in the way everything was wrapped up, so that it is completely possible that everything will change as soon as season three begins.

April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven


10•Arts & Entertainment

“Spring Breakers”: A study in violent surrealism Caroline Miller ’15 Staff Writer

photo | courtesy of Annapurna Pictures

I

t’s definitely safe to say that my spring break pales in comparison to the clear), and he does it by showing rather than telling. In fact, the only time wildly out-of-hand and darkly comic “spraaaaaaang break” depicted in there is much being said is when the scenes contain voice-overs, which the film “Spring Breakers” from director Harmony Korine. repeat throughout the film and serve as its narrative device. They are pretty The story depicts four bored college girls named Candy, Faith, Brit, annoying, but you don’t really end up paying attention to what’s being and Cotty (played by Vanessa Hudgens, Selena Gomez, Ashley Benson, said because there’s so much to look at. The only line you retain is “Spring and Rachel Korine, respectively), whose greatest aspiration apparently is break forever, bitches.” So is it a good film? It’s tough to say. It is certainly a lot of things, and to escape the mundanity of their lives and go on a spring break adventure on the beaches of St. Petersburg, Florida. Since they have no money, they perhaps “good” is one of them. Every frame of every scene is so loaded with come up with the next most ‘logical’ plan during a late night coked-out stimuli that it feels like a long and outrageous music video. Maybe that’s planning session: rob a diner wielding squirt guns and hammers and drive the real point: that it’s all a music video for Alien. Regardless, the film is full of blatant product placement, overemphasizing the a stolen car. What’s crazier is that they then proceed to do exactly what they planned. They get the money, state of excess. There is so much to dissect and mentally “The film is violent, unpack that I eventually stopped trying and just let the torch the car, go on spring break, and are living the sexual, wildy offensive, entire spectacle of the film wash over me. dream as they walk happily into the sunset!... The real reason for my submission, however, is that ...until they get arrested for underage drinking and and devoid of emotion. the film didn’t give me a good enough reason to want narcotics. This is when the film truly begins and the It makes no apologies— girls are bailed out of jail (still wearing bikinis) by to try interpreting it. That is exactly what I believe and I have to say I director Korine wants. James Franco’s rapper/drug dealer character, Alien. He What does all this mean, or amount to? Well, the introduces them to his world of sin, and although there respect Korine for that.” movie is certainly entertaining. I laughed through much are some casualties along the way, the film marches on towards its dreamlike and over-the-top climax. of it instead of letting it offend me (although I know Korine strategically cast former Disney channel stars to play Faith and that people have been walking out of theaters nationwide) exactly because Candy, who are the girls that stand out the most. None of the four women it is so ridiculous. I left the film speechless because I simply didn’t know act that well, but again: is that the point? They only serve, in the end, to what to think of it. That may be the real point. I don’t think even Korine make James Franco’s superb performance that much better. knows his true intention with this film—if he did then maybe the film The film is violent, sexual, wildly offensive, and devoid of emotion. would be more affective and its “message” more effective. It makes no apologies—and I have to say I respect Korine for that. He’s got something to say (regardless of whether its message is actually crystal

Mary Robinson continued from p. 1

took the post of United Nations Human High Commissioner for Human Rights, where she worked for five years. Robinson’s interest in climate justice stems from this experience, and she explained that she believes “acute poverty is a deprivation of human rights.” Describing weather shocks that hit underdeveloped countries much more heavily as a result of climate change, Robinson stated, “The lives we have enjoyed have affected other nations more than it has affected Western nations.” She describes climate change as an injustice because we are “hurting people who are not responsible for the problem.” Robinson also commented that it was an intergenerational injustice, and cited her grandchildren as part of her inspiration to work towards a solution to climate injustice. Robinson started an organization, the Mary Robinson Foundation for Climate Justice, to work with local groups to combat climate injustice. When asked the most effective method for change, Robinson mentioned, “Aid is still necessary, but it is not the solution,” citing a more bottom-up approach that empowers local communities as a more effective method.

photo | Caroline Novit ’14

April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven


Student Life•11

The 5C student-run By Elizabeth Lee ‘16 Staff Writer

T

he recently established Claremont Colleges Ballet Company (CCBC) is preparing for its second performance of the year. During the course of this second semester the dancers, along with Co-Founders/Presidents Emily Kleeman (PZ ’14) and Vivian Delchamps (SC ’14) and Vice-President Nicole Wein (HMC ‘15), have been preparing excerpts from traditional classics such as Tchaikovksy and Petipa’s “Sleeping Beauty” as well as from the more abstract world of contemporary ballet like the Joffrey’s “Ray One.” As a new outlet within the vast Claremont Colleges dance community, the club is looking to not only attract new members but also to develop greater presence and recognition across campus by drawing in a larger audience and regular following. Thus in addition to showcasing the classical and neoclassical ballet talents of its own members, the CCBC is also collaborating with the Tap Club in a friendly performance “battle” during its upcoming show.

Ballet Company takes root

While many dancers have at some point felt forced to choose academics over dance, the need or desire to dance is not something that is easily shed. Many students are often determined to stick with it despite their other obligations. Although many unique dance classes and performance opportunities exist at the Claremont Colleges, the CCBC is the only performing ballet group on campus, and it is completely studentrun, a status which comes with its own unique drawbacks and advantages. As a small, new group, the CCBC is still struggling to gain enough funding to put on performances of high quality production value—a dancer’s pointe shoes alone can cost up to $100 and last for as little as one to two weeks. Additionally, the club’s lack of association with any particular college’s dance department makes it difficult to gain widespread recognition and performance opportunities. Within the club, the dancers face a variety of other internal struggles.

The process of early development for this company has provided a plethora of learning experiences. Students from a variety of different training backgrounds, and therefore different methods of approach, meet at least once a week in Scripps’s Richardson Dance Studio to work through a warm-up class to keep dancers in shape before launching into repertoire classes or rehearsals for upcoming showcases. This system requires its participants to organize themselves with great discipline and commitment. It offers these dancers the opportunity to develop great leadership, cooperation, and communication skills as they work with one another to develop the structures, schedules, and creative goals within their company. While these dancers may come from a variety of dance backgrounds and methods, what they all share is a love of dance that allows them to come together to share and consider each other’s insights and ideas. This pure

love of dance, untainted by contracts, monetary commitment, competition, or judgment gives these dancers a sense of newfound freedom with the art form in which many of them have so strictly trained for years. “The atmosphere is much more relaxed than the regular rigorous discipline of ballet,” said dancer Rebekah Lim (PO ’15). “We’ll do frappés to the ‘Cantina Band’ song from Star Wars or sing Les Misérables at the barre.” There is a sense of contagious joy and pride within the dance studio each Saturday afternoon, when the club convenes. There are few rules and all arms are poised in an unfaltering “à la seconde”, or open wide stance. Such freedom opens this budding company’s future up for either great chaos but more likely even greater success. The Claremont Colleges Ballet Company’s first spring showcase will take place Sunday, April 28 at 1:30 p.m. in the Pendleton Dance Studio.

photo | courtesy of CCBC

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April 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven


12•Student Life

happy

HOLI! much

photos | Stephanie Huang ’16

so

COLOR! april 18, 2013 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XVI • Issue Eleven

April 18, 2013  

Volume XVI Issue 11

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