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Volume XV, Issue Two

October 20, 2011

The Scripps Voice Inside...

Thrill the World: Zombies Dance for Humanity By Tori Mirsadjadi ‘12 Senior Copy Editor

Core I Diversity and Homogeneity Sparks Debate page 6

New Scripps Green Bikes Program Picks Up Speed page 3

Every year, people all over the world dress up as zombies and perform Michael Jackson’s iconic “Thriller” dance to raise funds for charity. This year, students all over Claremont have been learning the dance in preparation for joining this worldwide phenomenon. On Oct. 29, at 7:00 p.m., Claremont will join performers around the world in a record-breaking event. With the support of 5C students and the local community, Claremont’s “Thrill the World” event will take place on Jaqua Quad to raise funds for charity. Not only will the community convene on Scripps’s Jaqua Quad to do this charitable performance, but Scripps will thereby become the host putting Claremont on the map for participating in the largest simultaneous dance worldwide. Thrill the World is a world-wide phenomenon which combines flashmobstyle dance performance with charitable fundraising. Every year, 100 countries on 5 continents perform the Thriller dance at exactly the same moment. The organization behind the event was created and founded by Ines Markeljevic. Local Thrill the World events are organized by area Event Managers, who register on the Thrill the World website to help prepare for and participate in “Thrill Day.” On Thrill Day, the dance is performed at exactly the same moment by every registered group around the world. Each local event, according to the Thrill the World website, “is free to choose the charity of their choice and raise funds.” Claremont Event Manager Jenna Tico (‘12) has selected Women for Women International as the organization for which the Claremont Thrill the World

will be fundraising. Tico first became interested in Thrill the World through her involvement in a Santa Barbara dance class which donates its proceeds to charity. “For the first time in my dancing life, and perhaps ever, I was met with the powerful sense of community that arises when a group bands together over the common desire to make a difference,” said Tico. “We were no longer dancing only for ourselves, but for women all over the world.” Tico’s class also provided her with the opportunity to meet Women for Women International founder Zainab Salbi. Fueled by the feelings from her experience in Santa Barbara, Tico decided to bring that inspirational energy to Claremont. Tico decided that Thrill the World would be an ideal way to bring this energy to Claremont, calling the performance “the most bizarre of world records and fundraisers.” The performance on Jaqua Quad will be raising funds for Women for Women International. Tico’s dedication to this organization’s cause was solidified after meeting with Salbi this summer. Women for Women International helps women move toward economic self-sufficiency through a “year-long program of direct aid, rights education, job skills training and small business development,” according to their website.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JENNA TICO

The organization supports female survivors of war and conflict, addressing immediate and long-term needs in an effort “to create a more just and peaceful world.” “This organization,” said Tico, “is deserving of our time, attention and love. As a graduating senior, it is my greatest hope that this event will set into motion a chain of annual gatherings that allow Scripps students to dance our way to a better future for women around the world, and for ourselves.” A Humanities major, Tico’s senior thesis has had her investigating “the unique capability of site-specific performance and flashmob.” She’s interested in challenging established ideas of what constitutes “dance” and “performance.” Tico hopes that Claremont’s Thrill the World event will open up categories of existence—“the everyday, the unexpected, every body, everybody”—to expand the community’s

continued on page 8

Three Arab Women Win Nobel Peace Prize By Hanna Baird-Herron ‘15 Contributing Writer

Scripps weighs in on the Eurotrash/HEO controversy page 5

Who Brought Back Scripps Afternoon Tea? page 12

On Oct. 7, the announcement was made that this year’s Nobel Peace Prize will be awarded to three women who have promoted democracy, gender equality and peace throughout the African and Arab worlds. The recipients were Yemeni democracy activist Tawakel Karman, Liberian activist Leymah Gbowee and Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. According to Norwegian Nobel Committee President Thorbjoern Jagland, the three women won the prize because of their “nonviolent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work.” Tawakel Karman, often known as “Yemen’s Iron Woman,” is the youngest person to ever win the Nobel Peace Prize. Karman is also the first Arab woman awarded the honor. A journalist and prominent member of the Yemeni Congregation for Reform, Karman started and remains the leader of the group “Women Journalists Without Chains.” The group promotes democracy, freedom of expression and other human rights. Karman has also been called the “Mother of the Revolution” for her prominent role in the Yemeni aspect of the Arab Spring, including the hand she had in organizing weekly protests. Karman has accomplished all this while raising three children. She dedicated her award to “all Yemenis who preferred to make their revolution peaceful by facing the snipers with flowers. [The award] is for the Yemeni women, for the peaceful protesters in Tunisia, Egypt and all of the Arab world.” Leymah Gbowee, a mother of six, is a peace activist whose organization of a peace movement helped to end the Second Li-

berian Civil War in 2003. The movement brought together thousands of Christian and Muslim women in Monrovia, the capital city of Liberia, who carried out nonviolent protests. With the movement, she also traveled to Ghana to attempt to conclude the stalled peace talks in Accra. Gbowee’s movement and her cofounding of the Women in Peacebuliding Network contributed to the successful election campaign of fellow Nobel Prize winner Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is the president of Liberia and the first and only elected female African head of state. Sirleaf was born in Liberia but later moved to the United States, where she studied at the University of Colorado and Harvard University. She served as Minister of Finance under Liberian President William Tolbert from 1972 to 1973 and 1979 to 1980. Sirleaf was forced to flee Liberia in 1980 after a violent coup overthrew the government. She returned in 1985 to run for Vice President, but was forced into house arrest and fled to the United States again in 1986. Sirleaf returned to Liberia and successfully ran for president in 2005; she has been in power ever since. In her time as president, Sirleaf has built strong relations with the international community and has brought about an end to the horrible debt conditions in Liberia. Sirleaf is considered one of the best leaders in the world. The Nobel Peace Prize Committee’s decision to recognize these three women who have done so much for the world is an important symbolic occurrence. The committee is encouraging women around the world to stand up for their rights.

1030 Columbia Avenue | Claremont CA 91711 | Box 892 email: scrippsvoice@gmail.com


2 • News The Scripps Voice Editors-in-Chief Vritti Goel & Lauren Prince Adviser Sam Haynes Design Editors Nancy Herrera Charlotte Rosenfield Senior Copy Editor Tori Mirsadjadi Copy Editors Megan Peterson Kate Pluth

Project for Women’s Leadership to Open Universty in Malaysia By Rebecca Dutta ‘15 Opinions & Editorials Section Head The Asian Women’s Leadership University Project (AWLU) has embarked on a journey to open the first women’s liberal arts university in Asia. Slated to open in Malaysia by September 2015, this new university will assist women in becoming effective competitors in leadership and industry. This ambitious project is being backed by numerous supporters across the world, including several liberal arts colleges in the United States. Carol Christ of Smith College and Lynn Pasquerella of Mount Holyoke have both dedicated time to serving on the Advisory Council for AWLU. The Malaysian government is also supporting the endeavor by covering between 10 percent and 15 percent of the costs to fund the university in Malaysia. The John Hopkins collaboration of Perdana University in Malaysia has also agreed to assist AWLU. Though AWLU started this project of empowerment in Asia, the hope is that the Malaysian university’s success will enable the organization to start similar projects in different parts of the world. Many students already travel abroad for higher liberal arts educations; the founders of this project hope to bring the same standard of education closer to these students’ homes, reducing the hassles of having to move abroad. Barbara Hou (Smith ’03), one of AWLU’s founders, said, “We saw the great demand and need for more access to the type of education offered at U.S. liberal arts colleges.” Hou also said that “in principle, students from any part of the world are able to apply to and study at the [Malaysian] university.” The new university will aim to offer more educational opportunities to women in Asia by introducing new learning methods from around the world. The new university plans to enroll students who are

passionate about their desire to use their educations in real life settings to improve their home countries. Applicants must demonstrate high academic potential and must be finished with their final year of secondary studies (equivalent to U.S. high school). Hou said that she hopes to find students who are attracted to the university’s mission to empower women and are seeking a “U.S.-style liberal arts education” in a more local context in which the expenses of studying abroad need not be incurred. In spite of the appeal for local students, Hou also said that the new university will be an international institution; students may apply no matter where they call home. By allowing their students to become more critical and analytical thinkers, Hou said that she hopes that the women who attend the university in Malaysia will be open to a wide range of perspectives. The primary goal is to build leadership abilities through a liberal arts education, so that students will be able to make informed decisions independently. Said Hou, “These cognitive abilities are really leadership abilities. Complementing these skill sets with public speaking skills, computer literacy, financial literacy or entrepreneurship skills give students the technical—not just academic or cognitive— ability to carry out their vision and ideas as leaders.” Right now, AWLU is looking for ways by which more people can be involved in the process. Students can start promoting the project by becoming campus representatives or applying for upcoming summer internships in Malaysia. Supporters can also donate monetary support to AWLU’s “Campus Campaign.” AWLU hopes that with more support, they will be able to realize their goal of opening liberal arts colleges for women across the world. Visit  www.awluproject.org for more information about this project.

Soldier Released from Gaza After Five Years of Captivity

Section Heads Rebecca Dutta Alissa Fang Taylor Healy Michelle Nagler Kaela Nurmi Ishmam Rahman

By Leah Soffer ‘14 Contributing Writer

Web Assistants Alix Franklin Meredith Kertzman

Printer Gardena Valley Press Comments and letters can be sent to Scripps College The Scripps Voice, 1030 Columbia Ave, Box 892, Claremont, CA, 91711. You can also email The Scripps Voice at scrippsvoice@gmail. com or visit our website at voice. scrippscollege.edu. If you want to contribute to The Scripps Voice, send your articles or photos to editor. scrippsvoice@gmail.com. The Scripps Voice is a student forum and is not responsible for the opinions expressed in it.

Hamas took control of the Gaza in 2006. In its charter, Hamas refers to “the Nazism of the Jews.” It also states: “The time will not come until Muslims will fight the Jews (and kill them)” and that “Israel will rise and will remain erect until Islam eliminates it as it had eliminated its predecessors.” Hamas’s charter further states that “Israel, by virtue of its being Jewish and of having a Jewish population, defies Islam and the Muslims.” Hamas as an organization blames Jews for the French Revolution, the Communist Revolution and for creating the League of Nations. Hamas believes “There was no war that broke out anywhere without [Jewish] fingerprints on it,” says the organization. They also claim that Jews reaped benefits from World War II, during which the Nazis orchestrated a genocide which destroyed one-third of the world’s Jewish population. Over five years ago, Hamas extremists from Gaza traveled in tunnels under the border between Gaza and Israel, near the Kerem Shalom Crossing. The extremists wore stolen Israeli Defense Force uniforms and, at 5 a.m., attacked a group of soldiers who had recently begun their mandatory army service. This crossing, ironically, was the same crossing through which Israel sends thousands of tons of aid to Gaza several times a week. The Hamas extremists murdered two 20-year-old soldiers, Hanan Barak and Pavel Stutzker, and captured the 19-year-old Gilad Shalit. Hamas has released public statements that show their support for their members’ actions. The attack was planned by the Popular Resistance Committees, consisting of affiliates of Islamic Jihad, Fatah (the political party in control of the West Bank) and Hamas.

Hamas members had been holding Shalit at an unknown location in the Gaza Strip for over five years. Israel demanded Shalit’s immediate release, but Hamas refused to release the young soldier. After a bevy of rocket attacks from Gaza had targeted Israeli civilian centers, Israel invaded Gaza. Even after this invasion, the Israel government could not find Shalit’s location. While being kept in an undisclosed location, Shalit was denied visits from the International Committee of the Red Cross by his captors. This denial violated international law. While Shalit’s parents were lobbying for their son’s safe return home, Hamas was supporting his captivity. The organization published a number of cartoons on their children’s television station that mock Shalit. One depicts Shalit chained to a wall, crying for his mother as a Hamas child mocks him and assures him that his country does not care about him. Another cartoon depicts a Hamas child chipping away at a giant chain with a stone that has Shalit’s face on it. The child says that “If one stone isn’t enough, we’ll bring more,” insinuating that Hamas plans to continue abducting Israeli soldiers to pressure Israel into releasing more terrorist prisoners. The debate stands: should Israel negotiate with Hamas to release Shalit in exchange for releasing over 1,000 Palestinian prisoners, all of whom have been arrested for attempted or successful terrorist attacks against Israel, and who will most likely return home only to plot more Israeli deaths? Israel, the only democracy in the Middle East, has been continually attacked since its declaration as an independent state. Morale is integral to the existence of the state because the soldiers must

October 20, 2011 • The Scripps Voice •Volume XV • Issue Two

feel hopeful for the country for which they risk their lives. Bringing Shalit home lends credence to the Israeli Defense Force’s ideal of “no soldier left behind.” Though Shalit’s return heralds new hope for Israelis the only way to bring Shalit home was to trade him for Palestinian prisoners. The Palestinian prisoners, unlike the randomly-captured Shalit, were arrested for plotting or committing attacks against Israel. Is one soldier, who has turned into a national symbol of the hatred Hamas has displayed toward Israel, worth the thousands of lives that could be taken by those Israel would have to release? And, is that soldier of greater importance to the country than giving justice to those who have lost family and friends from these prisoners’ attacks? This week, Hamas and Israel agreed to a two-stage exchange to release Gilad Shalit in exchange for hundreds of Palestinean prisoners taken by Israel for violent crimes against the state. Tuesday, Hamas released Shalit, now 25, to return to his parents’ home in Israel. He was transported to Egypt to be retrieved by Israel. Israel agreed to release 477 prisoners at the time of Shalit’s return. Of those prisoners, about 280 had been serving life sentences; 131 will be returned to Gaza, 14 to east Jerusalem and 96 to the West Bank. About half of the prisoners being returned to East Jerusalem and the West Bank will not have complete freedom of mobility. Ahlam Tamini is one of the 477 that are to be released; Tamini is responsible for aiding in a suicide bombing that took 16 lives. If all proceeds as planned, Israel will free 550 more prisoners in two months. If you are interested in discussing Hamas, come to LESS HAMAS MORE HUMMUS, October 20 at 7 p.m. in Vita Nova 100.


News • 3

Green Bike Program Shifting Gears and Gaining Momentum By Liz Lyon ‘12 Staff Writer This semester, Scripps’s Green Bike Program (GBP) opened its garage doors for the first time. Since its inaugural SAS Snack a few weeks ago, the bike shop is seeing an average of three to five students every shift. In line with their goals of empowering Scripps students while providing an eco-friendly and sustainable method of transportation, the bike program offers basic maintenance on bikes and instructs students on how to care for their own bikes.“We teach workshops so you can be an empowered woman,” said Bike Manager Kristen Piepgrass (’12). “The goal is very ‘do it yourself.’” The GBP, located in southwest side of the Scripps parking garage just below the Tiernan Field House, has weekly workshops and open hours. During open hours, which happen four days a week, students can drop by and learn about proper bike maintenance. Past workshops’ topics have been wheel truing and hub overhaul. The workshop staff and volunteers are interested in what students want to learn, and said they will tailor future workshops to fit all students’ needs, interests and skill levels. In addition to promoting Scripps students’ selfsufficiency, the GBP also promotes a bike community and culture on campus. Bike Tech Asia Morris (’12) sponsors a weekly Ladies’ Ride in Claremont Wednesday

PHOTO BY MICHELLE NAGLER Caroline Vurlumis ‘14 and Melissa Anacker ‘12 work to fix a flat tire.

evenings. The rides introduce cyclists to a moderate, 1015 mile ride through Claremont. The GBP also serves as a launch pad for exploring the bike community around the five colleges, and can direct students to other places which promote bike culture, such as community rides in Claremont and bike polo at Pitzer. Future GBP events are also being planned. True to its name, the Green Bike Program promotes sustainability. This sustainability involves more than

the reduction of emissions inherent in bicycles as an alternative to motor vehicles. Instead of buying new bikes, the program rehabilitates old and abandoned bikes. Some students purchase bikes as first-years, and four years later, not knowing what to do with the bikes as they’re packing and leaving Scripps, abandon them. Maintenance has to wait a certain amount of time before they can confiscate these bikes; in the meantime, the bikes can get rusty. Taking these bikes, the GBP repairs them and puts them back into students’ use. The rehabilitation extends the life of the bike from four years to around 10 to 15 years. Currently, the GBP has 40 bikes for semester-use and 30 for day-use, with another 20 being repaired for semesteruse. There are bikes for all purposes, including mountain bikes and bikes with baskets for grocery shopping. “When I was a first-year, I had to go to the other colleges, to Claremont, to find a bike culture,” said Piepgrass. “In the four years I’ve been here, there has been huge improvement in what attention has been given to biking on Scripps. We’re gaining momentum right here on campus.” To keep up that momentum, the program will accept bike donations at the end of the semester. The GBP is open Tuesday and Thursday from 6-9 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11-3 p.m.

THRILL CONTINUED FROM PG 1 mind “to the broad spectrum of what constitutes ‘dance.’” All while raising money for a good cause. It’s not too late to join this year’s Thrill the World event. Rehearsals are open to all and will be continuing up to the day of the event, including a 10-11 a.m. rehearsal at the Tiernan Field House and a 4-6 p.m. rehearsal at El Barrio Park on the 22nd and a 10-11 a.m. rehearsal at the field house on the 29th. All skill levels are welcome. As the Thrill the World website reminds Event Managers, Thriller is unique for the way that, “knowing what bad dancers Zombies are,” people may (re)discover the joy of dance. For those who are interested in participating in the charitable event but may not want to perform, Tico is still collecting donations and sponsorships for individual dancers before the event. Donations can be made in cash or in checks made out directly to Women for Women International. “Even as little as $5 makes a huge difference,” Tico said. The Motley has contributed external funding to the event, and Jamba Juice will be selling smoothies at the event—starting at 5 p.m., two hours before the actual performance begins—for $3.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JENNA TICO

Money Wise Women Mentors By Ina Herlihy ‘14 Contributing Writer

The Money Wise Women Mentors (MWWM) are beginning their personal financial literacy program this year, after spending last semester planning the program topics and selecting mentors. a The mentors read four personal finance books over the summer to expand their knowledge to be a resource to students. The MWWMs are holding living room office hours on the first and third Tuesdays and Wednesdays of every month from 8 – 9 p.m. in rotating dorms. This will be an opportunity for students to have their personal finance questions answered individually. The next office hours will be held in the Toll living room on Oct. 19. Every month, two mentors are giving a workshop on selected personal finance topics. On Sept. 17 Ina Herlihy (’14) and Maddie Ripley (’14), the student founders of MWWM, gave a presentation on personal budgeting. “Personal budgeting is keeping track of what you spend, and formulating a spending plan is essential to gaining control of your financial life — you can only control what you know,” said Ripley. “Knowing where your money goes each day lets you be in charge.” Ripley and Herlihy cited Ramit Sethi’s book I Will Teach You to be Rich several times in their presentation. It was one of the books mentors read over the summer. Sethi highlighted that the term “budget” has a negative connotation, and should be considered a conscious spending plan. “When you first start following a spending plan, changing spending habits can be difficult,” said Ripley. “If you currently spend $80 a month eating out, it may be difficult to cut that figure down to $20. Try making the smallest change you can today, then gradually adding to that change. Making incremental decreases allows you to make positive, sustainable changes to your spending.” Mentors Mary Creedon (’14) and Szeyin Lee (’14) will host the next workshop on Oct. 22 about saving and investing. “We’ll talk about how Roth IRAs work great for people with small incomes because the money is taxed before contributing it to the account,” said Creedon. “It grows tax free so that students can contribute money that isn’t heavily taxed, and withdraw that money and its earnings when they retire without paying any new taxes.” “Investing is not ‘beating’ the stock market, but rather another form of saving in the long run,” said Lee. “There are different investing strategies for people with different needs. We actually don’t need professional investing counselors to tell us what to do, unlike what most people believe. We can start investing ourselves with some research.” For more information, contact the MWWMs at mwwm@scrippscollege.edu.

October 20, 2011 • The Scripps Voice •Volume XV •Issue Two


4 • Opinions & Editorials

Let’s Get NAKED Hello sexy readers! My first batch of questions is in, and I really don’t want to waste space with a lengthy preamble when I could be writing about sex. Please don’t take this as some sort of veiled dismissal of the importance of foreplay. Rushing into writing about sex is very different from rushing into the act of sex itself. LET’S DO THIS.

How do you fake an orgasm? –Lucy O’Fakin Don’t.

Is giggling during sex weird? –Anonymous There’s a time and place for seriousness. Like now, when I must seriously inform you that it’s weirder to be stern and unemotive during sex than it is to let out a few giggles. Laughter is, in my experience, a surefire sign that at least one person is having a good time. Your concern over being “weird” suggests that you’re worried about why you’re giggling and how it’s being perceived by your partner(s). If you think sex-giggling is a weird occurrence, I’m here to assure you that it’s not. If someone falls off the bed, or you bump foreheads, or queef, or fart, or do anything remotely awkward, it’s perfectly normal to laugh it off. Giggling during sex is not, as a reaction to sex’s often fun and/or funny occurrences, weird. If your partner(s) think(s) giggling is weird, I’m here to suggest that you re-evaluate your sex life, because either you and your humorless partner(s) aren’t on the same page, or you are in fact experiencing some bad sex-giggles (to be explained below). At the very least, talk with your partner(s) about why you’re giggling. It’ll help, of course, if you understand why it is that you’re giggling in the first place. I assume you don’t really know why you’re giggling, otherwise you wouldn’t be writing to me. Luckily, I am a sex-giggling expert who can help you de-code all sorts of sex giggles. Feel free to clip this next section and hang it by your hookup location of choice for easy reference when the sex-giggles strike.

Good Giggles

Bad Giggles

Having fun Giddy, mind-blowing happiness frequently results in giddy laughter. Sometimes there’s nothing better than a playful session of naked wrestling. But a good throw-down need not be the only way to elicit happy sex-giggles; it feels great to get kissed in certain erogenous zones—I am referring, of course, to the neck region—and sometimes a giggle is more apropos than a moan. I happen to have a friend who lets out a little giggle after every orgasm. We call this type of sexgiggling Fucking Awesome. Or Awesome Fucking.

Discomfort... With the position, the person, the [role-playing] scenario or the act of sex itself. Never force yourself into uncomfortable positions. Laughing at your partner In sex, prepositions are at least as important as positions. And when it comes to partnered sex, “with” is the preposition of choice. Doing things “to” or “at” someone isn’t very respectful. Laughter at someone else’s abilities, size or personality will probably end up making you feel ucky and morally unclean later. Do you really want to have sex with someone you find laughable? Have I mentioned lately that sex should be fun? And honest? (See O’Fakin’s question if you need a refresher on the importance of that last point.)

Relief e.g. “why was I so nervous about this?” or “finally, an orgasm!” A sexy tickle Increased sensitivity from being in an aroused state can cause ticklishness. You may or may not consider being tickled “good,” depending on how you feel about being tickled; I find that channeling the urge to giggle toward the less-cute sound of squealing like a dying rabbit generally gets the I-hate-being-tickled message across. Whipping out a safety word also works.

Mood-killing laughter Sometimes, I’ve been told, sex is less like “making fun naked times” and more like “making love.” If you and your partner(s) have chosen to engage in this serious expression of mutual love, it can be a mood-killer if you can’t look deeply into another’s eyes without feeling silly. If you’re a giggly person, maybe serious sex isn’t for you.

If you can’t channel the emotional energy behind your giggles to suit the proper mood…try closing your eyes and thinking of England? Or just surrender yourself to the giggles. Part of what makes sex feel so good, part of what makes sex liberating, is that it involves a naked recognition of our most basic emotions and urges. If that experience manifests itself in giggles, then you should enjoy those giggles rather than worry about them or how they’re being perceived. I really can’t recommend that you suppress a genuine expression of happiness. (I once again direct your attention to the first question in case you doubt my rigid adherence to the principle of sexual honesty). If your partner(s) truly find(s) sex-giggles off-putting, you should explain that you’re laughing because you’re enjoying yourself, not because there’s anything inherently silly about your sexual partner(s) or the thought of having sex with him/her/them. If you can’t talk openly about sex with your partner(s), if you’re incapable of bringing yourself to address why you laugh or of acknowledging a partner as someone who deserves to understand where you’re coming (cumming?) from, then maybe you should hold off on sex for a while. If you’re not comfortable with it, you really shouldn’t be doing it. (I’m repeating myself here, but it’s important that you get this message. It applies to more than sex, you know.) I will leave you with a couple of pro-sex-giggling tidbits, in case you are still feeling “weird.” Firstly, laughter is kind of like tons of mini-orgasms, releasing happy hormones and working those muscles. Secondly, those involuntary contractions of your core—speaking of muscles—create happy little squeezes of anything/anyone/ anyone’s thing residing in your core at the time. (I already mentioned the importance of [pre]positions, right?) I LOVE YOU

-SHE

Write SHE: Scripps Box #797

(no stamp required for intercampus mail!)

E-mail SHE:

editor.scrippsvoice@gmail.com

or

scrippsvoice@gmail.com (SHE encourages you to make the subject “SEXXX” or something. SHE also promises to ignore the email address from which your sexy emails are sent and assume everyone’s writing on behalf of sexually-awkward friends)

October 20, 2011 • The Scripps Voice• Volume XV• Issue Two


Opinions & Editorials • 5

Eurotrash “Eurotrashed” Cut-outs Spark Controversy By Stacy Wheeler ‘13 Staff Writer

On Friday, two cardboard cutouts outside Scripps’s Malott Dining Commons sparked controversy on campus. The cutouts, set up by the Health Education Outreach (HEO), depicted two girls covered in vomit and bruises with ripped clothes and used condoms in their pockets. The cutouts were labeled “Eurotrashed 2011” and were accompanied by a sign that read, “You wouldn’t start your night like this. So why end it this way?” In a statement released later that day in response to student concerns, HEO explained that the display was based on the online “Know Your Limits” campaign, which was used during Peer Mentor and RA training this August. Before putting up the display, HEO contacted the Scripps Dean of Students office on Monday and got conceptual approval for the cutouts. On Friday, representatives from HEO erected two displays at Malott–one at the north and one at the east door. At first, they were removed because they had not been approved by SARLO, but after they added a contact email to the display, they were ap-

proved and put back up. Emily Yau (’13) saw the cutout right before eating lunch. “Initially, I did a triple take and was like, ew, what’s that?” Yau expected to find copies of the display at the other colleges, or at least a male version of the cutout. “When I found out that there were only cutouts of girls, that really bothered me.” She was also concerned by the inclusion of condoms on the cutout. “They’re not supposed to be commenting on morality here, and aren’t we supposed to be using condoms?” She thought the posters got people talking, but not about the right issues. Rachel Picher (’12) also took issue with the display. In a public Facebook note, Picher analyzed the cutouts from a feminist perspective. “These images present alcohol consumption as the cause of several female-engendered experiences of shame and use this shame as a deterrent to excess alcohol consumption.…The deployment of female gendered shame may be an effective tool to keep women from drinking, but it will not keep women well.” After receiving complaints from two students who were upset by the display, SAS President Antoinette Meyers (’12), removed one of the cutouts and took it to the Dean of Students office to talk about how to address students’ concerns. Later, a representative from HEO removed the other cutout. Currently, both cutouts are on display in the HEO office. Andrea Kablanian (’12), a peer health educator at HEO, was suprised that students responded so negatively to the display. She wanted to make sure that students knew Scripps was not being singled out. “This was a campaign we were interested in using throughout the year before several parties, and Eurotrash happened to be the first.” Kablanian explained that it might have been a coincidence that both cutouts were female. The cutouts were made by tracing the outlines of two Peer Health Educators, and two female students were on the shift when the displays were being made. “Our time limitations only

allowed for two to be made, so we decided we’d have them at Scripps, seeing as the party was going to be [there].” Elizabeth Wilmott, acting HEO coordinator, confirmed that plans to display the cutouts on other campuses are still moving forward and that HEO intends to make a male display. Dean of Students Rebecca Lee acknowledged that the cutouts had upset some students, but she made it clear that overall she supports alcohol education initiatives. “Frankly, I am concerned there are some students who end up looking like the cutout and have been found displaying aspects of what was depicted.” She pointed out that the cutouts drew more attention than a simple poster might have. “With education, the element of controversy is sometimes a good thing. I hope this controversy is also raising awareness and results in students getting involved with assisting HEO and Scripps in identifying better approaches to this most important issue.” In an email addressing Scripps students about the event, Dean Lee encouraged students to “accept HEO’s offer to engage in dialogue” and directed students’ attention to a forum discussion about the College’s alcohol policy.

Offensive Displays “Damaging” to Scripps Community By Theresa Iker ‘14 Staff Writer

While personal responses to HEO’s “Eurotrashed” displays outside Malott Commons have varied from negative to apathetic to even positive, I feel that they have caused widespread damage to the Scripps community.

Because HEO is a 5C organization, there was absolutely no reason to solely depict women in these displays. Even though Eurotrash was a Scripps party, it was open to all 5C students and their guests. Displaying “Eurotrashed” women only at the Scripps dining hall appears to pass judgment upon Scripps students and their alcohol consumption. Can’t men be “Eurotrashed”?

The Bottom line

The displays were offensive. The displays were sexist. The displays were more about gendered morality than about safety.

If HEO made the displays, HEO is responsible

Several people who have thus far criticized HEO’s Eurotrashed display, including some of my friends, have prefaced their thoughts by sympathizing with HEO or trying to point fingers elsewhere. While I don’t think HEO deserves all the blame in this situation, as many of the more offensive aspects of their display stemmed from larger cultural problems, I do not think we can pardon the organization simply because their intent was allegedly innocent. HEO has already apologized for the way their displays came off to Scripps students, but I feel that a student committee should meet to discuss and approve similar displays in the future to ensure that something like this does not happen again.

The major problems I had with the displays are as follows:

Suggestive imagery of sexual assault

Such graphic images of women with unbuttoned jeans, hickeys and bruises can have emotionally and psychologically harmful effects upon members of the 5Cs who have been victims of sexual assault. Because the displays target alcohol consumption and depict a girl covered in vomit, and therefore “out of control,” they perpetuate damaging tropes about the nature of rape. A girl who drinks too much is not asking to be raped, nor does she deserve it.

Where are all the men?

Could there even be equally incriminating images of male students? Sadly, an image of a vomit-covered, hickey-laden male student with condoms in his pockets and phone numbers written on his arms wouldn’t have the same moralistically negative effect as HEO’s female student images. Arguably, HEO’s text wouldn’t even apply to identical images of male students: While a male student may not opt to start his nights this way, it wouldn’t be embarrassing or shameful to end his nights that way—at worst, he would be a sexually soughtafter male who had too much to drink, but was admirably thoughtful enough to provide his own contraceptives. This is indicative of the displays’ focus upon gendered morality rather than upon safety. If the message does not work both ways, it is necessarily reliant upon specific notions of gender.

While I believe that HEO’s displays were offensive and ideologically harmful, I do commend their intent to create provocative imagery to discourage alcohol abuse. I hope that the controversy that has ensued can be channeled toward the positive idea of achieving HEO’s original goal without relying on a framework of gendered morality.

HEO’s Inspiration Cut-outs were inspired the YouTube video titled “Alcohol Know Your Limits - Binge drinking girl” Watch it by visiting this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jftfU30xJg

October 20, 2011• The Scripps Voice •Volume XV • Issue Two


8 • Features

Clinton Intern Tells Us “Why?” By Vritti Goel ‘12 Editor in Chief

Vritti Goel (‘12): Where are you?

Juliet Carnoy (‘13): I am in New York, N.Y. for the fall 2011 academic semester.

VG: What’s the Clinton Foundation all about?

JC: Established in 2005, the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) is a branch of the William J Clinton Foundation located in Midtown. We foster relationships between our members (global leaders, CEOs and heads of nonprofits) in order to empower disadvantaged communities across the world. Essentially, you could say we serve as a facilitator between our members to help them connect with each other and pledge to develop a philanthropic cause. During his term, President Clinton realized that he had attended hundreds of meetings on global development, yet not once was he asked to actually do anything specific about it. When creating CGI, Clinton decided that every member and corporation that sought to join the foundation would have to make a “commitment to action,” a pledge to attain a philanthropic goal. Since 2005, CGI members have made nearly 2,000 commitments, which have already improved the lives of 300 million people in more than 180 countries.

VG: What has been the best part of your internship so far?

JC: The most exciting part of my internship occurred two weeks ago, when I was able to work at the annual meeting. The annual meeting is a three-day long event held in New York in which all CGI members adjourn to analyze pressing global challenges, discuss the most effective solutions and build lasting partnerships that enable them to create positive social change. There, I ran into celebrities such as Martha Stewart, Barbara Streisand, Mandy Moore, Heather Graham, Petra Nemkova and Olivia Wilde. I was also able to listen to live interviews conducted by Wolf Blitzer and Charlie Rose. There was nothing more exciting than recogniz-

ing political figures in the crowd such as Secretary of State under the Clinton Administration Madeline Albright, Chair of the Elders and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Mexican President Felipe Calderon, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and current U.S. President Barack Obama. There were so many incredible people there, all members of the Clinton Global Initiative! It was truly inspiring to watch the CEOs of mega-corporations such as Cisco and Coca-Cola speak about their charitable goals and global aspirations, and actively seek partnerships in order to make this happen.

VG: What does your specific internship involve?

JC: I am working for another branch of CGI, the Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U). The university holds its own annual meeting, which will be from March 30th to April 1st at George Washington University. The annual CGI U meetings parallel the CGI annual meeting in New York—but instead of hosting heads of state and CEOs, this meeting is for university students! Any student can apply to attend the meeting in March. CGI University, like its parent organization, asks that each student and celebrity who applies to attend the annual meeting make a “commitment to action.” Annual meeting attendees pledge to become actively involved with CGI U on their campus. One of my favorite CGI U commitments is “Female Empowerment through Reusable Sanitary Pads.” Grace Ochieng, a student from St Lawrence University, committed to starting a microfinance sewing project that will create reusable, washable, and environmentally-friendly menstrual sanitary pads in the rural village of Lwala, Kenya. This project will empower women in Lwala through the enhancement of business skills and...improve girls’ attendance in primary and secondary schools. In my internship I get to do a lot of student outreach and work with student activists across the country to

help them achieve their commitments. Although I have only been working at the Clinton Foundation for a month, I have conducted many interviews for campus representatives, and have started sifting through applications for the upcoming spring. It’s incredible to get such insight into the inner workings of such a prominent non-profit foundation.

VG: Did you choose to do this instead of a study abroad program?

JC: Yes, I did. Although many of my friends are off to Europe for the year, I wanted to tailor my own educational experience. I previously lived in Florence, Italy as a small child and moved to Paris in fifth grade where I attended the public elementary school for several months. Additionally, I participated in a three-month archeological excavation with Stanford undergraduates in rural Peru when I was high school. Because I felt that I had already had my ‘foreign’ educational opportunity, I wanted a different form of challenge: working in the big city! So far it has been a fabulous experience. I would very much encourage Scripps students to take into account their past experiences before deciding where to spend a semester abroad. I think it’s important for students not be fearful of straying from their 4-year plan and to realize that an educational adventure can be anything from enrolling in econometrics in England to making the executive decision to move into a craigslist apartment in DC. When it comes down to it, you can learn something anywhere. Studying abroad is really about expanding yourself, and in order to do so you have to realize what your personal limitations are. For me, it was the process of living by myself outside of the university atmosphere. But this is not everyone’s challenge. So, like I said, I encourage Scripps students to realize their own boundaries and tailor their own experiences.

Emphasizing the Value of Being a Woman, Not Just a Body For a Week, at Least

By Melissa Anacker ‘12 Contributing Writer

“Fat Talk Free Week” is about more than addressing “Fat Talk.” It’s also about how women devalue themselves based on their physical bodies. The idea that our bodies are not good enough as they are is problematic, and the issue is about so much more than words. Beauty standards are everywhere in the media. Billboards, T-shirts, magazines, TV shows, blogs, porn and the internet in general. We don’t even notice their messages they send because they are so permeated in our everyday life. Even if we do notice these damaging messages we may not think there is much that we can do about them. All we can do, we might think, is try our hardest to stay thin, fit and pretty. We are told subtly—or not so subtly—that we need to look a certain way to attract boys. The messages even extend to tell us how to look to attract other girls, and how to get our friends to keep liking us. Amid all of this focus on our image, we are told it is a turn-off for us to be so self conscious (see “What Turns Men Off,” Cosmopolitan’s latest article on sex appeal). In short, we are made self conscious of our own self consciousness…all in order to fit into guys’ sexual ideals! The media constantly makes us feel like we’re falling short. And piggybacking on these selfesteem destroying messages is the idea that a woman’s sole purpose in life is to please a man. At Scripps we may pride ourselves on knowing better, or not wanting to fall into the same trap as those girls who spend their extra time shopping for the right shade of lipstick or trying to shed those few extra pounds. We tell ourselves we’ve escaped this trap by studying a topic we really love, by pursuing an academic life that will lead us to a career we really want. But do we know better? I spend plenty of time worrying about my hair, or how messed up my acne is, or worrying whether I am thin enough or too thin, even if I don’t say it out loud. Which is why it’s important to make “Fat Talk Free Week” about more than words. Being “Fat Talk Free” is about reclaiming your body. Last year’s activity of posting a photo on the wall in the field house, listing something you love about yourself or your body, made

me smile every time I walked into the field house. I secretly wished they would keep it up all year long, as a reminder that there are so many things to like about my body. Last year’s pictures reminded me to stop obsessing about the little—or “big”—details that upset me every time I look in the mirror. I was reading articles for my thesis when I stumbled upon a psychology article which studied how women internalize beauty standards. The article, titled “That Swimsuit Becomes Her,” pointed out how women began to judge and view their bodies as objects to be made sexually appealing with the right combination of clothes, makeup, diet and fitness. “That Swimsuit Becomes Her” was underpinned by a feminist philosophy known as Self-Objectification Theory, which is associated in the study with eating disorders, depression and sexual health for women. So what is this really about? It’s about every woman’s right for her body to be her own, not a sexual object. It’s about the right for every person to feel good in her (or his, or their) own skin, whether or not they fit into an external standard. The article raised my consciousness about my own body consciousness and emphasized the most important message we can take from “Fat Talk Free Week:” we need to find new ways to claim our bodies as our own. Your body is unique and individual, your physical manifestation in this world. More important than how we look is how we feel. After all, even if we live up to the media’s beauty standard, does that mean we win? If we see ourselves as an object and only appreciate ourselves for living up to a sexual attractiveness ideal, are we really any more worthwhile? And if we feel we are, whose standard are we living up to, Cosmopolitan’s or our own? So yeah, maybe Cosmo has a point. Be self conscious about yourself consciousness. But don’t do it to avoid turning anyone off. Do it, during Fat Talk Free Week at least, to find out how much “fat talk” is really coming from you. Do it to notice how much “fat talk” is coming from outside sources. Notice your self consciousness and eventually you just might notice you’ll be okay ignoring all those “Do’s and Don’ts,” and just be.

Embracing EveryBody Weekly Events Everyday Activities Operation Beautiful Daily Inspiration Station Facts about Body Image Thursday, October 20 9:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. Love, Dance, Body Saturday, October 22 11:00 a.m. Zumba My Way 1:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Mind and Body Empowerment Fair **all events are held at the Sallie Tiernan Field House**

October 20, 2011• The Scripps Voice •Volume XV • Issue Two


Arts & Entertainment • 9

Scripps College Problem #107

Friday Class By Earnest Eleanor Staff Satirist

The four days leading up to Fall Break were perhaps the longest days of my existence. It had been an unusually hard beginning of the semester—new material being heaped on me like I was expected to concentrate and study after only a week of introductory material and syllabus-reading to help me shift from my summernumbed mental state. I needed the break. After my last class on Thursday, I skipped back to my room feeling possibly the most free I’ve felt since finals ended last May. Even though professors make up for the respite of Fall Break by giving us an inordinate amount of reading, I could still do this reading by the pool, or in my bed, or anywhere I chose. It was Fall Break, sweet sunny Fall Break. The glorious five-day break which lasts longer than the one we get for Thanksgiving. As I traipsed back to my dorm room, deciding whether I should go lay on a lounge chair near the pool (it was a remarkably hot day) or curl back into bed and take a nice nap, I ran into one of my lovely Scrippsies in the hallway. “Soo glad it’s Fall Break!” I chirped, giving her a little fist pump that I’ve learned from our ever-so-intelligent friends over at Jersey Shore. I know it’s cheesy, but it really does pump you up. I stopped mid-pump when I noticed, to my alarm, that my Scrippsie friend was shaking her head in frustration. “Yeah, it’s Fall Break for you!” she whimpered. “You’re so lucky!” I heard the jealously in her voice, but my mind was busy contemplating the hot sunshine and the nap I would soon be taking poolside. (I had solved my earlier dilemma by combining the activities. Clever, I know. ) Forcing myself to focus on the issue at hand, I tried to figure out why my fellow Scrippsie was not going to join me in my poolside relaxation. “What do you mean? Do you still have another class today?” I asked. It was early

By Charlotte Rosenfield ’15

afternoon, I reminded myself. Late class on Thursday was always a bummer, but sometimes it was unavoidable. I watched the frustration on her face grow. Her jaw tightened, and I might have caught a glimmer of angry tears in those eyes. Horrified, I braced myself for the only possible answer. “I have…Friday Class.” I winced at those fatal words, feeling a rush of sympathy for my tormented friend. “So you have a Keck Science class,” I observed with an understanding nod, trying not to think too hard about the horror that is Friday Class. Friday. Class. The two words should just never exist in the same sentence. “No!” she moaned. “It’s at Scripps.” Irritation rang clear through her battered voice. The Keck Science Department is one thing, but Scripps? We don’t have classes on Friday. It’s our day of homework (or, more likely, of some well-deserved relaxation). It’s the night where the 5Cs are pretty much dead: chill in your room or outside, hang out with your friends, maybe take a nice walk to the village… But learn? In a classroom? On a Friday? No, surely not. Not at Scripps. A few of us, apparently, are not so lucky. Some Scripps students must endure the weekly suffering that is a class on Friday. My heart goes out to you, Friday Class Endurers. Hopefully next semester you can return to the normal and have your Fridays free and clear. I know the rest of the world abides by the notion that Friday is a weekday. But let’s be real. It’s not. How can our weekend begin with the always classy TNC if we have to be mentally present the next day for class on Fridays? It’s a tough life at Scripps, it really is.

A Cure for the Common Comedy

Design Editor

“Who wants to see a movie about a guy who has cancer?” This seemed to be the consensus from the informal poll I conducted, attempting to recruit friends to accompany me to see the new Joseph Gordon-Levitt film 50/50. A second friend refused on the grounds of it sounding “too sad.” “I’ll probably cry,” she said. “But it’s a comedy!” I pleaded. To no avail. By the time I returned home for fall break, I’d resigned myself to seeing the movie by myself. In retrospect, this decision was probably for the best. This complex, yet witty, film took me on an emotional roller coaster ride, and I’m glad no one was there to see it. 50/50 is based on writer Will Reiser’s real struggle with cancer. The story’s factual origins make the film feel real and grounded in experience. Gordon-Levitt stars as Adam, a young, healthy Seattleite with what appears to be a pretty ideal existence: a stimulating job; a serious girlfriend, Rachel (Bryce Dallas Howard) and a bachelor best friend, Kyle (Seth Rogen). As the movie progresses, we discover that Adam is extremely insecure and scared of nearly everything. His insecurity limits and controls Adam’s life. Early in the film, we learn that Adam doesn’t even have a driver’s license because driving is “the 5th leading cause of death.” When Adam is (spoiler!) diagnosed with cancer, such insecurities become poignant. The true natures and conditions of his core relationships begin to reveal themselves as those around them struggle to cope with his diagnosis. The ways in which Adam connects to those around him, as well as how he forms new connections, are central to the movie. Director Jonathan Levine’s representation of Adam was driven by a focus on how relationships develop, for both the good and the bad, during hardship and struggle. While the concept of 50/50 is tough for some to handle, it is not a tragedy by any stretch of the imagination. Anna Kendrick, who plays Adam’s therapist Katherine, contributes to the comedic ethos of the film already brought out by the comedic stylings of Seth Rogen. Intelligent humor and profanity are sprinkled throughout the film (though maybe the latter is less “sprinkled” and more “dumped by the bucket load”). Adam forms new, worthwhile relationships while going through treatment that keep him grounded and personable. In some of my favorite scenes, Adam joins two older gentlemen, Alan (Philip Baker Hall) and Mitch (Matt Frewer), for multiple rounds of chemotherapy, relationship advice and some “pot macaroons.” By getting to know these gentlemen on the verge of death, Adam is able to consider his own existence and learn to appreciate his worth as a person. Drawing its emotional resonance from Reiser’s personal battle with cancer, 50/50’s story of Adam’s transformative—and often humorous—journey to health reminds us that friendship and support are the greatest healers.

starring

This could be You! Want to place an ad in our paper? Contact scrippsvoice@gmail.com for more information! October 20, 2011• The Scripps Voice •Volume XV • Issue Two


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84. ____ Cheney 85. chemical symbol for Strontium 86. postgraduate degree which might help in identifying the origins of this crossword’s theme? 87. where, previous years, you might have been frustrated not to find crosswords 91. one __ a time, how Bluebeard killed his wives 92. “__, seriously” 93. ___ Lee, director of “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” 95. the green-eyed monster 97. the 2009 film adaptation of this children’s book featured Arcade Fire’s “Wake Up” in its trailer 104. what Odysseus’s men had to say in response to Circe’s magic 105. a strange time to be awake, on a Saturday 106. no big deal 109. a manticore’s is a scorpion’s 110. supplier of Frary’s organic bananas 111. Christina Rosetti’s sororal poem, “______ Market” 114. red teletubby 115. Aristotle’s conception of the world was ___centric 117. Sylvia Plath poem which begins “You do not do” 119. Hindustani register which draws heavily on Persian and Arabic 122. Spanish “if ” 123. fairies might seek drops of these 125. flaccid 127. ___ takers? 129. vicious, biting little buggers infesting Pomona 132. punny moral of Little Bunny Foo Foo

Down: 1. it came first 3. type of thumb Megan Fox has? 4. boggart-destroying syllable 5. Sumerian city-state (sounds like 63-across) 6. quirky musicians’ instrument of choice, abbr. 7. Tommy ___ Jones, Agent K in the Men In Black films 8. what Medusa’s hair might do? 10. Snakes __ _ Plane 12. Shakespeare generally wrote in this type of pentameter 14. who bombed Nagasaki? 16. beast whose slaying might make you chortle callooh and callay 18. a wizened old woman 20. mythical medical condition represented in the film “Teeth” 23. excusez- ___! (response to Francophiles who caught my musically-derived misspelling in last week’s crossword) 24. electrostatic type of bonding 25. Jack and the ____-stalk 26. Great nickname for Philip Pirrip 27. Sesame Street monster who shares a name with president number 22 and 24 28. how Mary Shelley referred to her monster in “Frankenstein” 29. Robert A. Heinlein novel Stranger __ a Strange Land

33. deoxyribonucleic acid 34. true name of he who introduced himself to Poseidon’s Cyclops son as Nobody 36. __ Who, iconic figure for 67-across 38. Hawaii 41. nonprofit organization more germane to professors than to most students 43. group 44. before 47. “___ on a Grecian Urn,” by poet of 22-across 48. it has its thorns 50. what Hagrid thinks a dragon is 52. how one might describe the gait of a werewolf 53. author of quotation which was last issue’s crossword theme 54. what debtors do 56. Much ___ About Nothing 57. 27-down is one 58. terrifying beast to be conquered by all Scripps seniors 59. open-handed attack 66. person one might wish to avoid 68. YA series by 50-down 69. 19-across came from this part of 28-down’s namesake 70. initials for video game setting and name of secret organization which combats the horrific mental trauma induced by 2-across; also, Dolce and Gabana 72. what 79-across’s naval namesake is most famous for 73. what a 59-down does to a face 74. Ichabod Crane’s legendary hometown 77. first word in Albert Camus novel whose Better Book Title is “Interests: Long Walks on the Beach, People Watching, Shooting Arabs” 78. John _____, author of “The Canonization” 80. female rapper featured in Kanye West’s “Monster” 83. William Blake said this man was unknowingly of the Devil’s party 88. blade with which to slay 16-down 89. rude thing to do to strangers 90. 2007 film based on 1996 book of the same name, ____ the Wild 93. professor’s note on a strangely-worded sentence 94. what shrubbery-obsessed knights might say? 96. nullified 98. Brief Interviews with _______ Men 99. how the eighth and ninth letters of the alphabet greet one another 100. “_____--if you dare!” 101. Lysander’s magically-induced feelings for Helena? 102. Sam I __ 103. what Shrek is 107. past tense of bleed 108. Dragon ___, video game series 112. Descartes knew that he was a cognizant one of these (“cogito ergo sum”) 113. Freud’s word for the amoral self-serving beast lurking within us all 116. dragon’s home 118. pseudo-dog of Fred and Wilma Flinstone 120. fitting acronym for American Players Theatre 121. synonym for strange 122. incredulous response, “You don’t ___!” 124. that which controls and satisfies 113-down 125. Shangri-__ 126. “__ gustan sus dientes,” polite thing to say to a Spanish dragon, as it eats you? 128. __ya, musical duo playing at the Motley tomorrow night 129. @ 130. trademark 131. __ it goes, Tralfamadorian saying

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Student Life •11

Alumnae Spotlight By Sarah Stringer ‘12 Contributing Writer

The students who currently populate the Scripps campus are just the tip of the iceberg. There have been an astounding array of people involved in making the College what it is, what it has been and what it will be in the future. This legacy began with the original Ellen Browning Scripps, and continues with the academic community here today. I was reminded of this enduring legacy when, last year, I started looking up psychology alumnae who might be interested in sharing their experiences with current Scripps students like myself. Sitting at tea mere minutes after sending an email to one such alumna, I got a call back. Not only was she willing to speak with me, this alumna was also incredibly helpful. Eventually our conversation turned to chatting about campus life and her involvement on campus. “Do you still have afternoon tea?” she asked, before revealing that she was part of the group that restarted the tradition in the 1990s. I almost choked on my cookie. I was speaking with someone who—through her engagement when she was a student—had essentially made my experience in that moment possible. Participating in such an established Scripps tradition, I had forgotten that there had actually been students involved in launching, maintaining and reviving such traditions. I was talking with someone who had played a huge role in shaping my daily life on

campus. Scripps has a past, and an amazing one at that. As we live and study here, being shaped by its history and its academia, we are inevitably effecting our own changes on the College and the values it embodies. No matter how much Scripps may seem to have changed from previous years, it is important to historicize our daily activities and remember the students who have come before us. The topics we address and studies we pursue may seem different on the surface, but underlying threads of community connect Scripps students across the ephemeral differences of time, knitting its past to its future. As I started to recognize this awesome history, I wanted to hear more voices and share them with our community. I am starting with Brittani Morris (‘98), the alumna whose engagement with the College, through its Tea, inspired this whole endeaver. Morris inspired my search to find and build community on campus. She is a reminder that there are students behind every significant movement at Scripps. What we do now in our efforts to create community will influence future generations of students. You never know who you will inspire by doing what you love. Keep going, and keep your voices strong.

Brittani Morris Class of 1998

Studied: Psychology major, fine arts minor

PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH STRINGER (‘12)

Why you are connected to her: If you take your requisite study break every Wednesday Tea, if you’ve signed up for an inordinate amount of 5C clubs at a Turf Dinner or if you’ve gone on any A-Team excursions, you’re participating in the legacy Morris and a group of other students helped to create. What’s she doing now: Morris works for a community mental health organization in Los Angeles. She is a licensed social worker and a project-driven manager, now working to train other therapists. She is actively involved in the Black Alumni Association for the Claremont Colleges, and gets to meet and support students through on-campus events and student scholarships. Her advice: Stay connected and use your resources here. Thoughts on her time at Scripps:

“Quite simply the best years of my life.”

Brittani Morris entered Scripps in 1994. Her involvement with the 5C community and devotion to Scripps was virtually immediate, and would endure throughout her four years as a student and beyond. As a first-year, Morris was a peer counselor, a tour guide with the Admissions Office, the dorm activities coordinator for Dorsey and the first year representative on the Board of Trustees. In addition to all of these positions, Morris was an active member of Wanawake Weusi, serving as treasurer, secretary, vice president and president during her four years as an undergraduate at Scripps. Morris knew from the beginning that she wanted to major in psychology, but Introductory Psychology with Professor Amy Marcus-Newhall served as a wake-up call in terms of her study habits. Morris quickly realized that reading her textbook a week before the final was not the best study skill. Motivated academically by her Scripps classes, Morris began to mature as a student. “Amy Marcus Newhall gave me a run for my money,” Morris said. “She is an absolutely phenomenal professor. Intro courses are tough, but this helped to set a precedent for my future work.” By the beginning of her sophomore year, Morris was ready for her next challenge. Working with Dean of Students as a peer mentor coordinator over the summer, Morris recognized the untapped potential the Dean of Students Office had to reach out to students. With a group of about five other Scripps students, Morris collaborated with the office to create A-Team. This original A-Team’s biggest event, which coupled recreation with business, was the “movie on the lawn” which has since morphed into the 5C Turf Dinner. ATeam set up an inflatable screen on Jacqua quad and played a movie for students. Morris reached out to organizations on other campuses that had similar functions as A-Team, and invited clubs from all five campuses to

set up booths where they could recruit interested students. As a tour guide for the Admissions Office, Morris had become familiar with earlier Scripps traditions. One that stuck with her was afternoon tea, which had disappeared from campus life. Morris worked with the Dean of Faculty and Dean of Students to resuscitate this tradition with a more informal, modern feel. Morris saw the potential for Tea to get students, staff and faculty from all the colleges to interact outside of academics. Overall, Morris looked to create a sense of acceptance and community between all the colleges. She recognized that students held their allegiances to individual schools, but wanted to encourage cross-Claremont unity. “Each college was functioning as a silo,” Morris said. “We wanted to show that it was okay to eat meals at another dining hall, or to have friends on other campuses. We were giving students permission to be elsewhere, and wanted to open up to the wider community for other people to feel welcome.” Morris was passionate about what she was doing. “ATeam was my baby,” she said; but her extensive involvement on campus led to a period of burnout during sophomore year. As a junior and senior, Morris continued her activities, and was slowly able to relinquish some of her duties and share responsibilities with other students. Her senior year, she worked on a first-semester thesis and was able to use the second semester to decompress. Now working with a community mental health organization, Morris integrates working with clients and with the administration. Her work allows her to see multiple perspectives and levels interacting to impact community mental health. Applying her experience as a Scripps student, Morris is able to bridge direct personal contact and managerial aspects in her job. “My work is extremely rewarding,” Morris said. “I get to see the clinical side and the administrative side,

and what makes a community health facility tick.” Morris did not know what she wanted to do when she left college, and did not have any job prospects until the summer after her senior year. She worked in Admissions in a private school during her first years after college, but it was mainly through her connections to Scripps faculty—particularly Professors Sheila Walker and Judith LeMaster—that Morris discovered social work and found her current career. Her Scripps connections were a major factor in helping Morris construct her career path. Her advice to students now is to develop those connections and use the bidirectional relationships entailed in the resources at Scripps. Morris suggests that students always retain a connection to academia, and use on-campus resources as much as possible while they can. “You don’t know the value of it until it’s gone,” Morris said. “The whole Career Planning & Resources Center is there for a reason. And I think if people can be brave enough to be savvy and network, they’re going to fare much better when they graduate.” Beyond that, Morris encourages alumnae to get involved. “You’ll always maintain that sense of home, and you’ll always feel grounded someplace,” Morris said, of why to stay involved in the alumnae network. There is no one true way to stay involved, and Morris emphasizes finding a way that feels right. Morris’s own involvement has included working as a recent graduate trustee on the Board of Trustees for a several years. Morris’s current involvement is mainly through the Black Alumni Association. There are, Morris emphasized, countless other ways to engage with the Scripps community. “Find a way with which you’d like to stay connected, and that you feel comfortable staying connected. But stay connected.”

October 20, 2011• The Scripps Voice •Volume XV • Issue Two


12 •Student Life

CLORGS! Spotlight Introducing: 5C Abolitionist Movement New Group Opens Dialogue Around Human Trafficking By Julia Petraglia‘12 Contributing Writer

The 5 College Abolitionist Movement (5CAM) was started last spring by Marissa Enfield (Scripps ’12). Enfield started this club after she returned from studying abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark last fall. While in Copenhagen, Enfield had taken a course which focused on human trafficking. She realized that the human rights issue wasn’t often discussed in the greater Scripps community, and her class in Copenhagen exposed just how little she had been exposed to this sort of information. “I was surprised my professors weren’t talking about this,” said Enfield. “I wanted students to have an extracurricular outlet to learn more about the different forms that slavery takes, and where and why it happens throughout the world.” Last semester, one of 5CAM’s first events as a club was a screening of Lilya 4-Ever. This film about the sex trafficking industry garnered a large student turnout. The screening showed that student interest in the issue of human trafficking was high. However, 5CAM is a club which emphasizes all sorts of human trafficking; the sex industry is not the only industry in which this trafficking occurs, and the victims of human trafficking aren’t limited to women and children. This semester, 5CAM collaborated with SCORE in bringing Kay Buck, the executive director of the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking LA, to Scripps. Buck’s Oct. 4 lecture

discussed ways that college students can get involved in the fight against trafficking. In the coming weeks, 5CAM has more informational events planned to raise awareness about human trafficking and implement the strategies brought up by Buck. Members of the club will be outside 5C dining halls for a reversetrick-or-treating project. Members of 5CAM will be handing out fair-trade chocolate in an attempt to educate the student body about trafficking issues within the cocoa industry. The reversetrick-or-treating will be followed by a screening of the film The Dark Side of Chocolate. Though Enfield has been active in the club’s formation, she emphasizes that there are many perspectives and she still has much to learn. “I can’t claim to be an expert on the topic,” Enfield said. Since there are so many perspectives surrounding the myriad global instances of human trafficking, members of 5CAM are hoping to help their fellow students get a wellrounded view of the issues. The club is planning on bringing more experts to the colleges to help students become better informed. 5CAM is a space for students to learn about the global issue of human trafficking through discussion, documentary and film screenings, local volunteering and activism. The club is always looking for new members. If interested, contact marissa.enfield@scrippscollege.edu for more information.

5CAM’s Mission •

Raising awareness of modern slavery and human trafficking to the Claremont Colleges community.

Advocating for human rights of enslaved and trafficked peoples internationally.

Fundraising for local non-profit organizations dedicated to fighting human trafficking and slavery.

Educating the greater Claremont community about slavery and trafficking.

Networking with local schools and organizations to contribute and learn more about the issues of human trafficking and modern slavery.

Scripps Adventures Abroad Edinburgh, Scotland: It’s not all rainbows and sunshine...but it comes close By Kari Geiger ‘13 Contributing Writer

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KARI GEIGER

If anyone tries to convince you that study abroad is purely rainbows and sunshine, she’s lying. It’s not. Studying abroad is a serious decision full of serious dangers and serious adjustments and serious challenges. That being said, it is possibly one of the greatest experiences you will get to take advantage of in college. If you decide to study abroad, which you should, you’ll have to leave the safe bosom of the Claremont Colleges and be put into what I like to think of as a much more realistic living situation— complete with accents and foreign languages and a lot of swallowed pride and asking for help. Before I get to the great parts about being abroad and the fantastic experience overall, I do have to be a little realistic here. Like I said, rainbows and sunshine are lovely; but if you’ve ever met me you know I don’t do niceties. So here goes: the worst part about studying abroad is being a first-year again. It’s the wandering around, looking for classes, trying to find friends to eat and rage with (who you hope you can trust), living out of one suitcase, repeating your name and hometown and not understanding why the hot water runs out in five minutes. All of these things have been manageable and refreshing and I promise you’ll find amazing people to be close with. The biggest shock to me was the size difference. The city of Edinburgh has the population of a little bit less than 500,000 people, but in this city almost 70,000 of those people are students. So while in Claremont, everyone knows someone who knows someone, here you don’t know, you might never know and that’s just part of the whirlwind. The biggest struggle is the eight hour (or more) time difference that makes it rough to talk to family and friends back home. But you manage. Luckily I decided to come to a country that is essentially college life all the time for all ages. Most of the people here would fit in well at CMC and life generally resembles Pub (except with actual pubs and more clothing because it’s cold). Most nights I can hear a drunken chorus of “Don’t Stop Believing” from the 30 year old Scotsmen spilling out of a pub around 1 a.m. It’s fantastic. The University of Edinburgh is also a prestigious university with qualified staff, excessive resources and a library so large that I haven’t yet mustered up the courage to go back. While I do look forward to traveling to a few other countries, I’m mainly focusing my attention on falling in love with Scotland and experiencing all I can here. Just in the immediate area, I can go on spectacular hikes, run around several castles, museums, pubs, clubs, cafes and bookstores. Through Scripps’s program with IFSA Butler, I got to do a homestay on a farm in the gorgeous English countryside where I got to milk cows and feed sheep and explore more castle ruins. This weekend we’re off to the Highlands to find Nessie in Loch Ness and go to a Whisky Distillery. Claremont is safe and fun and comfortable, but I would definitely recommend getting away for a semester. Come somewhere like Scotland where the University has a Hot Air Balloon Society and soar above Edinburgh, or join the Medieval Reenactment Society and bash people with swords and chainmail. This University is almost 200 years older than America itself, and I get to take classes in a remodeled castle. Or hang out in our student center (also a remodeled castle) in the Library Bar and connect with hundreds of international students who are just as intellectual and passionate as one could hope for. So it’s not all rainbows and sunshine, but that’s mostly just because it rains a lot in Edinburgh.

October 20, 2011• The Scripps Voice• Volume XV• Issue Two


6 • Features

Features • 7

C o r e I C o n t r o v e r s y: Diversity,

Diversity and Homogeneity

Sensitivity Elizabeth Ly on ‘12

Contributing Writer

and Core I

In trying to make Scrip few change ps a more w s have been elcoming p ta lace, a k in and three p g place. On rofessors m S e p t. 2 9 , six students et to discus mutual resp s the infrac ect and free ti o n s of trust, speech that Core I discu have been o ssions. c curring in The meetin g o ccurred bec cidences of ause of thre racist and c e discrete in lassist comm students an ents being d professor made—by s alike—in of these inc Core I discu idents occu ssions. The rred in a Co led by Profe first re I discuss ssor John P ion class be eavoy. In an like her com ing other case, ments had a student fe no validity cial demog lt in class bec raphic. Add ause of her itionally, so by class dis rame students cussions an feel alienate d reading, a contributin d nd do not fe g their opin el comforta ions. ble The studen ALL PHOTOS BY MICHELLE t-faculty co that arise. In N A a G n m LER ‘15 other on a w mittee will addition to check in wit eekly basis, addressing h one a le The curren r is ti s n u g e s o a n s they arise e another to t means of , anticipate a s any issues tudent repr addressing nd prevent esentatives these sensit such incide a iv n e d is fa sues is retro culty will m nts in the fu The comm active, but th eet fortnigh ittee wants tu r e . e tly. classroom, c o to m fi m n d it te a standardiz e hopes to e and to estab e d x pand to way to enco lish a form want divers alized way urage trust ity worksho fo a r n s d tu ps to be ma respect for dents to add Committee everyone’s de part of fi ress issues a members h opinions in r s s ty th ear orientati ave also sug e y a r is the e. Members Wanawake o g n e s a te n d d o r th equire firstf the comm at professor Weusi Presid y it expressed s e s te a go through rs to attend e ent Zaneh W kepticism o sensitivity a events on d illiams (’14), ver the pro n iv d real issues,” e w r d ho is one of sity. iversity train gress being said William the students ing. made durin s. “It’s much in environme th g e student-fa these talks. deeper than nt to all stu “Scripps is n culty comm Core discus dents regar ittee, o should ‘talk t d o in d s g io le a n s nything to s of race, so s. What we about it,’ bu a n c d io e dress the ed to addre t talking is -economic s would be to ss is the lac not actively tatus or sex have a mor k u c o h a f l a a nging the s orientation e diverse stu n inclusive Over the fir . The admin ituation.” O dent body a s n t is e w n tr d s e a o e fa ti lution to th kend in Oc on says we culty, with ber, membe toese problem unified adm rs of SCOR s , in W E is il tration to su gathered to liams said, watch Who pport all stu se Voice? W d e h n o ts. se Vision?, a DVD create d 10 years a g o to address is sues regard ing diversit y . “These are problems w years ago,” e saw ten Williams sa id . “We’re still dealing wit h the same p r o blems now as we did th en, which s h o ws the lack progress an of d interest p e r ta ining to the issues on ca se mpus.” Additionall y, the comm briefly disc ittee ussed Core I r e adings. It h been noted as that the rea d in gs privilege heteronorm a ative identi ty and som ternational e instudents fee l alienated the curricu from lum.

October 20, 2011 The Scripps Voice Volume XV Issue Two

Core I: Western Values and Western Sameness Anonymous

As a first-year up to my neck in Core I readings, I wasn’t a huge fan of the curriculum. But reflecting as a sophomore, I am still dissatisfied with my experience. While my particular Core I section did not

include any moments of outright racism, as was in the case of a few sections this year, I would argue that the very basis of Core I contains some inherent misrepresentations and a general degree of ethnocentrism. Let’s start with the title: “Histories of the Present.” Already, we have a vague and rather redundant terminology on our hands. As a second-semester professor of mine pointed out last year (when our class was discussing our generally negative Core I experiences), history is “of the present.” You may as well just call the curriculum “History” and avoid the repetition. What’s that you say? Core I isn’t merely a history course? Then let me try to figure out what it is. On the Scripps website, it is eloquently argued that “Core I, ‘Histories of the Present: Human Nature and Human Difference,’ takes up this task [of highlighting categories or values we take to be given or obvious] “[This issue is] much deeper than through an examination of how it is that competing views Core discussions, what we need to of human nature and human difference underlie various address is the lack of an inclusive modes of thought and action.” This description, when examined alongside this year’s Core I reading list, is at best environment to all students lofty and at worst extremely misleading; “human” implies regardless of race, socio-economic a cross-cultural, global experience, while the Core I readings are limited to decidedly Western authors who generally fostatus or sexual orientation.” cus on humanity in the United States or Europe (with the exception of Nussbaum, a Western author writing about – Zaneh Williams (’14), President Indian women in her human capabilities approach theory). Here we have a prime example of ethnocentrism, or evaluof Wanawake Weusi ating other’s cultures on the basis of one’s own cultural standards. Isn’t this the very thing Core I is claims to try to eradicate? I have no problem with this year’s reading list. But I do have a problem with slanting it to lay claim to a much broader focus than it actually has. A first step in addressing the ethnocentrism of Core I would be simply renaming it. Plenty of alternatives would, in my opinion, much more accurately describe the scope of this intellectual project. “Core I: Human Nature in Western Civilization” or “Core I: Humanity in the Western Canon” are viable options. And if this idea irks the Core faculty, than perhaps another reassessment of the program’s priorities and change in curriculum is in order. Plenty of other colleges have required freshman seminars in Western Civilization. I believe that Scripps is one of them—we just call it something else.

October 20, 2011 The Scripps Voice Volume XV Issue Two


October 20, 2011