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Look Who’s Selling

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22 W. New Road Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5528 PUBLISHER Chuck Wells EDITOR Noelle M. Steele ADVERTISING DIRECTOR John Senger CONTRIBUTORS Samm Quinn Amanda Matlock Jim Mayfield Daniel Morgan Anne Smith Caitlin VanOverberghe PHOTOGRAPHER Tom Russo DESIGNER Kyle Lewis

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All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or duplicated without the written permission of the publisher.

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taBle oF contents made in Hancock county .............8-33 community eventS.............................. 34-41 local SeRviceS ...........................................42-43 FaRmeRS maRketS .................................. 44-45 FitneSS .................................................................46-47 paRkS....................................................................48-50 aRtS ........................................................................ 52-58 Hancock county map.................... 60-61 By tHe numBeRS ........................................62-63 youtH SeRviceS ......................................... 64-67 viSitoRS BuReau ....................................... 68-77 education.......................................................78-92 4-H cluBS ......................................................... 94-96 citieS & townS ........................................ 98-102 cHuRcHeS & Religion ................... 104-115 HealtH caRe & animalS ..............116-117 cluBS & oRganiZationS ............118-121

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Stephanie Smith


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Discover Hancock County

Welcome here's always something new to discover in Hancock County, both for families who have called it home for generations and visitors stopping by for the first time. Those who know the area best say it has something for everyone – parks, festivals, trails and a growing arts presence, just to name a few attractions. Hancock County comprises vibrant communities that attract new development while maintaining their unique identities. They embrace growth while preserving the small-town atmosphere residents love, where neighbors still know one another by name. The Daily Reporter's Discover guide is a snapshot of life here. We hope you'll find it useful for finding the people, places and communities that make Hancock County unique.

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How it's made The Daily Reporter goes behind the scenes to explore how products from Hancock County are created, start to finish. Whether the item is crafted in the comfort of a person’s home or put together in a local shop, we’ll show you how it’s made. Pages 8-33

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Debbie Horn checks one of the honeycombs containing a wax cocoon in which the bees store their honey.

Beekeeper harvests hancock county honey he buzzing doesn’t bother Debbie Horn anymore. It’s just white noise now, the drone of tens of thousands of bees beating their wings in unison, fanning the hive she maintains. Theirs is a music that fades into the background, all part of the soundtrack of the small forest surrounding Horn’s rural Greenfield home just north of the Shelby County line.

Photos By tom russo

The white wooden By Noelle estimates she might have 50,000 of the boxes, shining in M. Steele insects in the five the sunlight on the hives she keeps. south side of the Editor And with those bees property, don’t look comes lots of honey, which like much from the road. she harvests and sells to But Horn knows better. local vendors. To a biology professor, Once a hive is started, who makes her living it is self-sustaining, with exploring nature and each bee playing a part in its nuances, those boxes the hive’s survival. Each encase a fascinating little member of the bee commucommunity. Horn has been nity has an important role, raising honeybees for and Horn knows them all. the past three years and

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it’s a cushy life for the queen, whose only job is to lay eggs. Drones are there for mating, then forced from the hive once they’ve served their purpose. Worker bees do just that — work in every capacity, feeding and bathing the queen, collecting nectar, storing the honey and more. Harvesting that honey and prepping it for sale is a multi-step process and a bit of an investment, not so much in money but time, Horn explained. Horn visits her hives often to check the bees’ progress, waiting until just

the right moment when the honeycomb is ready to collect. the bees are hard at work from spring to fall, flying to and from the hive to collect and drop off nectar from nearby flowers and other blooming plants. During each trip, the nectar is stored in the bee’s honey stomach, where the body produces an enzyme that begins to break down the plant sugar, the first step of turning the nectar to honey. When the bees return to the hive, worker bees receive the loot.

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Parker Horn burns wood in a small container, the smoke from which is used to calm bees during harvesting of honey.

“Somebody meets them at the door, so to speak,” Horn said. The worker bees take the nectar and place it in a small cell inside the waxy honeycomb. The bees then fan their wings rapidly to dry the substance into a honey-like consistency. When the honey is properly thickened, the bees seal the cell with a small wax cap. It’s that cap Horn keeps an eye out for — the bees’ signal their work is done. Harvesting the honey is a process that begins with calming the hive, whose residents become agitated upon approach. It’s important to walk toward the hive from the side, Horn said, as someone blocking the sunlight at the front could be perceived as a predator. Even with protective gear — canvas gloves, a hard plastic hat and a mesh veil that covers the beekeeper’s face — the risk of being stung is always there. A second set of hands makes for quicker work, so Horn corralled her son, Parker, to join her at the hives on a recent afternoon. Getting stung Parker manned the smoker while Horn pulled

out wooden frames crawling with bees. Each man-made frame contains a foundation upon which the bees build the honeycomb. If the cells are capped off, the frame is removed. If not, the frame is placed back in the hive — gently so as not to squash any bees — so the bees can finish what they started. The bees swarm about the boxes as their home is disturbed. Hearing the buzz was unnerving at first, Horn said, but she’s learned to recognize when there’s real trouble — the pitch goes up a hair and gets much, much louder. Otherwise, she just busies herself checking the hive, paying little attention to the hum in the background. “You don’t even notice that they’re making a sound anymore,” she said. You get over the occasional stings, too, her son added. For someone who isn’t allergic, fear of landing on the wrong end of a bee’s stinger is far worse than the damage it does, he said. “It’s the anticipation,” he said. (Of course, there’s an epinephrine pen in the house for visitors, just in case someone discovers an allergy the hard way.)

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Debbie and son Parker work together as they check one of their beehives. The harvested honey is then bottled and sold to local vendors.

Some people tend their hives without any protective gear at all. “Me?” Horn said. “I’m a wuss.” Once the frames are removed, the pair hop in the car. Horn drives north on State Road 9 to U.S. 40 and hangs a right. She heads to the home of Tom Ferguson, who has served as her beekeeping mentor since she started with the hobby three years ago.

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Acting like Pooh Ferguson gets questions every so often from someone wanting to start a hive. He ignores the first request on purpose. “Because I don’t think they understand there’s work involved,” he explained. In Horn’s case, persistence paid off, and Ferguson helped her get started. Today, she uses some of his honey-harvesting equip-

ment after removing the frames from her hives. Ferguson’s electric knife takes just a few moments to heat, and then Horn uses it to gently slice off the wax caps holding in the honey. It’s hard to resist popping a dripping piece or two into your mouth as you go along, she admits. With the cells open and glistening with honey, Horn places the frames into

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a manual centrifuge and closes the lid. The crank on the top of the device spins the cylinder, slinging the honey against the side. Gravity does the rest, and within moments, honey drips from a spout at the bottom and passes through a filter. It looks just like what you buy at the store when it comes out of the spout, but it tastes even better, Ferguson said.


“My grandson’ll sit on his haunches like Pooh Bear,” dipping his fingers into the honey, Ferguson said. the honey passes through the filter and drips into a bucket. old plastic ice cream tubs work just fine, Horn has found. the honey is then left out for a few days, during which time any leftover wax rises to the top to be skimmed off. Flavor varies Getting those honey buckets home is perhaps the most harrowing part of the process, Horn joked. Her biggest fear has always been getting into an accident with buckets full of honey in the back seat.

“you might not even have a dent in your car — it’d be totaled,” she said. “can you imagine?” once the honey is bottled, it’s ready to be sold. no two bottles are exactly the same, Horn explained. the flavor depends on what

the bees have been eating. nectar from an apple orchard, for example, will produce apple-blossom honey. Different flowers also affect the color of the honey. one thing never changes, though, Horn said. raw

honey always tastes sweeter than anything off the shelf. she’ll put it on her rice krispies in the morning, and it sweetens up any kind of tea, she added. “you put a little on your tongue; the aroma just fills your whole sinuses and everything,” she said. even three years in, Horn remains fascinated by the process. it’s strange to think the creatures hard at work in the white wooden box create something that ends up on a shelf in the pantry – and over her breakfast cereal. “Bee culture, if that’s what you want to call it, is really interesting,” she said. and of course, “i just love honey.”

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creating a latHer soap-making a Bit oF quirky cHemistry

pHotos By tom russo Carolyn Starks (pictured on facing page) has been making soap for a couple of years and often uses herbs from her garden to give each bar a special scent. She grows patchouli, lemongrass, peppermint and lavender among others.

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he first rule of soapmaking is don’t touch the lye. The second rule is the same as the first: Don’t touch the lye. For soap-makers in Hancock County and around the world, lye — a main ingredient in soap — is the reason protective goggles and gloves are required By amanDa when making the sudsy, matlock foaming, lathering bars of staFF soap destined for showers Writer and sinks. The caustic soda can cause serious burns and is dangerous if not handled properly; but with a few safety measures, anyone can make bars of handmade soap from the comfort of their home, said Carolyn Starks of Fortville.

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Discover Hancock county starks has been making soap to sell at local farmers markets for the past few years. on a recent afternoon in the kitchen of her historic farmhouse, she joked that she would have been happy living at the turn of the century, when making your clothes, food, soap — all manner of things — was a way of life, instead of a hobby. “i feel like i was born 100 years too late,” she said. starks became interested in making soap a few years ago after attending a class offered in Hancock county about cold process soap-making, a process she still uses. to start, she lines up on her counters everything she needs to create one of the 11 types of soap she makes. “i make all the soap right here in the kitchen like a mad scientist,” starks said. a good rule of thumb is to do your research ahead of time. a quick internet search will pull up a variety of methods and recipes. then make sure your measurements are precise,

oatmeal soap Ingredients: • 32 ounces cold water • 12 ounces lye • 24 ounces coconut oil • 38 ounces palm oil • 24 ounces olive oil • 8 ounces oatmeal

Instructions While wearing gloves and goggles, mix cold water and lye together in an oven-safe bowl. Note: Mixture will heat quickly and create toxic fumes. Set aside to cool to 90-115 degrees. While mixture is cooling, heat oils on the stove to 90-115 degrees; then combine with lye and water mixture until blended well. Using a handheld mixer, continue to mix as soap mixture begins to thicken. Mix in oatmeal. Pour soap mixture into lined mold and let cure for at least 24 hours. Cut into bars.

and have an accurate scale and thermometer on hand, she said. “and always, always, always follow the directions,” she said. cold process soap-making requires just three ingredients to start — lye, water and oil. optional additives, such as mint,

lavender, chamomile, calendula, hemp and oatmeal, make the soap smell good and carry medicinal properties, she said. ‘i’m still learning’ starks doesn’t travel far to find items to create her favorite fragrances. a large herb and flower

garden sits outside her kitchen window. “i like to create things, and i don’t like to go to the store much,” starks said. “i like to do my own thing if i can. i’m still learning (about soap) and always experimenting with new items from the garden.” she starts her soapmaking by combining 32 ounces of cold water and 12 ounces of lye in a large pitcher. While she stirs the lye into the water, wisps of toxic fumes waft up. cautious as ever, she avoids the dangerous misty tendrils while carefully continuing to stir the two ingredients together. the mixture will get very hot very quickly, she said, “easily ... 200 degrees.” the clear mixture is then placed to the side. While it cools to the needed 98 degrees, she starts to heat the oil on the stove. she uses three oils in her soap: olive, sustainable palm and coconut. the recipe for this soap calls for 24 ounces of coconut oil, 38 ounces of palm oil and 24 ounces of olive oil.

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Using a large, blue-speckled pot on the stove, all three oils are added together and heated until melted. While making sure both the water and lye mixture and three-oil mixture are between 90 and 115 degrees, she carefully combines the two. Like the pioneers A handheld mixer will save time and energy, she said. Having the small piece of machinery is the one modern tweak she’s made. “This is exactly how the pioneers would have made soap,” she said. Then — glancing down at her mixer — “except I don’t mix it by hand. It would take forever.” Starks mixes the ingredients until they “trace,” a state of consistency she said is hard to explain unless you’ve seen soap made. “Trace is when, well, you just know when it is,” she said. Simply put, trace is when the soap is firm enough to support a drizzled design on the top of the mixture. Additives, if you want them, come last. Starks occasionally uses oatmeal, which soothes irritated skin, or essential oils, which give the soap a pleasant smell. Another tip from Starks — always use dried herbs. They smell the best, she said. Once trace is achieved, the thick soap mixture is poured into a mold, covered and left to cure for at least 24 hours before being hand-cut into bars.

Carolyn has been making soap for only a couple of years and is a 15-year member of the Herb Society.

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a chemical reaction called saponification neutralizes the lye over the course of 24 hours. Just don’t ask starks to explain exactly how that all works. “the lye is still in there doing its thing while it cures,” starks said. “i don’t

know where it goes, but — chemistry!” the longer the soap cures, the more it hardens and the longer it will last. ‘Better than anything’ starks likes that her soap is chemical-free and made from herbs she grew, cut

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and dried on her own farm. the 15-year Hancock county Herb society member even raises bees for honey, which she sometimes adds to her soap. Paul starks, her husband of 47 years, also enjoys the natural ingredients of the handmade soap. He uses the soap daily and loves that his wife makes it in their kitchen. the soap is also gentle, which Paul starks, a skin cancer patient, appreciates. “i like it better than anything i’ve ever got at the store,” he said. “i think it smells better, and it doesn’t hurt my skin at all.” sara Whitaker of Fortville recently bought a bar of starks’ soap at a local

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farmers market and said she’s switching to homemade soap permanently. “Before i started using it, i thought soap was just soap, but this is different,” she said. “it’s mild and doesn’t irritate my skin. Most have too much perfume. i think it’s better than the soap in the grocery store.” starks admits she’s unsure of the exact science behind the process — she flunked chemistry in college — but maybe that’s part of the magic. “i don’t plan on stopping, even if i don’t understand saponification exactly,” starks said. “it’s just so fascinating that you can mix these things together, and it makes soap.”

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Local company combines science, creativity to make unique beers By Caitlin VanOverberghe Staff Writer

he sweet, savory smell

lingers after a batch of beer is made at Wooden Bear Brewing Co. in Greenfield. The floral, nutty, maple-like aroma gives an impression of warmth and sparks curiosity. For those who dabble in craft beer-making, scents like these are the mark of a successful experiment. That’s what brewing is, they said: an artful and scientific trial; structured imagination that takes practice, an educated palate and creativity.

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Fun Times brew Corbin Elliott, left, and Jay Boyd work together maintaining one of the large kettles used in brewing beer at the Wooden Bear Brewing Co. in Greenfield.

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Photos By tom russo

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Jason swift is one of a growing number of americans who have taken on craft beer brewing. For him, it started as a hobby and became a livelihood. He looks at home standing next the super-sized stainless steel vats where his company’s brews are boiled and talks modestly about the effort it took him and Wooden Bear’s co-owners — Dan noah, kurt sundling and Brent sandquist — to grow their brewery from separate makeshift setups in their homes to the establishment now housed in downtown Greenfield.

each batch of beer, at its most basic, contains grains, yeast and water, swift said, holding a small glass of the amber liquid in his hand. Hops, grain-like flowers formed into pellets for the brewing process, and other ingredients are added for flavor. the finished product, much like the brewery where it’s made, depends based on the time and talent put into the process of developing it. “this isn’t a bar, as far as i’m concerned,” swift said. “i think there is a difference between a brewery and bar;

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and I don’t do bars. From day one, we wanted this to be a place where people could come and bring their kids. That’s what craft beer is about. You don’t really get the hard-drinking crowd.” Soak, season, stir Brewing takes four primary ingredients and four main steps, but mixed in are countless recipes and techniques, brewers said. Several types of grain are commonly used in beer, according to Sandquist, who works closely with the brewing team. These include barley, oats, wheat and rye. Various mixtures of grains produce different flavors, colors and consistencies. The first step in brewing is a bit like making tea. The grains are soaked in hot water for roughly an hour during a process called mashing. Here, sugars are extracted from within the grains to form the beer’s base liquid, Sandquist said. Mashing typically is done in a pot called a mash tun, which has a false bottom where the grains settle. Toward the end of the soaking, more warm water is sprinkled over the settled grains to ensure all the

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sugary liquid — called wort — is separated. The grains are removed, and the liquid is put in a kettle, where it boils, Sandquist said. Wooden Bear has four 100-gallon kettles, Swift said, which allows the brewery to produce beer more quickly. The company orders its grains and hops from all over the United States. Brewers also purify the water in house, which allows them to stay true to the different styles of beer, Swift said. As the wort boils, hops are added to the liquid in different stages and quantities to give the beer its taste, Sandquist said. Hops have a harsh flavor on their own but balance the sweetness of the wort. “If hops are added early, (the beer’s taste) will be bitter,” Sandquist said. “If it’s added later, it gives the beer a more distinct smell.” Once the wort has boiled for about an hour, it is quickly chilled to 70 degrees, by putting the pot into a bin of cold water, for example. Yeast is added, and the mixture sets for the fermentation process, Sandquist said.

Jay Boyd takes a moment to take in the aroma of a recent batch of dark ale. (Pictured on facing page) Hops, grain-like flowers, flavor the beer during the brewing process.

Here, the remaining sugar is converted into alcohol by the yeast, he said. The length of fermentation can vary based on several brewing factors, including the type of yeast, how much is added and the

temperature of the beer. When fermentation is complete, the finishing touch is to add carbonation, Sandquist said. The brews are bottled or put into kegs and are ready to be served.

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Discover Hancock county Becoming master brewers Brewing beer as a hobby is growing in popularity in the united states. the american Homebrewers association estimates that 1.2 million people have taken to brewing beer in their homes. Home-brewing follows the same basic steps as professional brewing but on a much smaller scale. rather than 100-gallon kettles and other specialized equipment at professional breweries, large pots on the kitchen stove are used for home-brewing. swift said he and the other Wooden Bear owners each started off as home brewers. they sampled 1,300 beers in roughly three years when they were starting. they made lists of flavors and styles they enjoyed and eventually realized the craft beers they were brewing at home could hold their own against those made by professionals. now, 16 of Wooden Bear’s 24 taps are house brews, swift said, created from the

owners’ original recipes. But there are other ways to learn the art of brewing. eilise Lane, ceo of scarlet Lane Brewing co. in Mccordsville, attended the american Brewers Guild while living in oregon. the classroom-based program required her to complete 18 months of lessons, practical examinations and apprenticeships. What she learned solidi-

fied her dreams of opening a brewery. she and her business partners set out to bring a northwest-inspired establishment to indiana. their business opened just more than a year ago. growing in popularity as an industry, craft brewing increased production by 18 percent in 2014, according to the Brewers association, a nonprofit

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group for professional brewers that works to set industry standards and best practices. More than 3,400 small craft breweries now exist in the united states, and more open regularly. Hancock county’s two breweries are growing, as well, and their owners often share ideas. new equipment has allowed Wooden Bear to double its brewing capacity in the past few months. it has begun to distribute beers to be served at other breweries in central indiana. scarlet Lane, too, has many of its original brews on taps in other establishments. the company receives inquiries regularly about when its beers will be available in bottles and cans for sale at retail stores. the owners have those ambitions, swift said. But, for now, they are content to stick to the basics: creating unique brews that will bring Greenfield’s beerlovers together. “We just want to make really good beer and have fun,” swift said.

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For the love of llamas

McCarty demonstrates the technique she uses to spin fleece from her llamas and alpacas into yarn.

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Local artisan turns fleece into hand-made treasures here was just something about the llamas. As a keeper and educator at the Indianapolis Zoo, Fortville resident Eran McCarty was always attracted to the funny-looking creatures with long ears and big teeth. So it wasn’t surprising when she started a farm and began raising By SAMM llamas and alpacas after she QUINN and her family moved from Staff Irvington to rural Fortville Writer more than a decade ago. When she began using the llamas’ fleece to make yarn, her husband, Scott, offered to buy her a sweater — but she had discovered a hobby she loved. Now, nearly 15 years later, her home is filled with spinning wheels, looms and piles of yarn. She spends hours at her spinning wheel, carefully feeding fleece fibers into the machine to create strands of yarn, later used to craft mittens, shawls and hats for loved ones.


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Eran McCarty poses with one of her llamas at her barn in Fortville.

But the artistry is portable. With a spindle — a handheld tool used to twist fleece into yarn — she’s even spun as she traveled across Europe. The process starts in a quaint wooden barn just

Photos By tom russo

behind McCarty’s home. It’s full of llamas — most of which she’s raised — a few alpacas and several other farm animals. Each spring, her llamas get a bath. Just like a car wash, she breaks

out a hose and shampoo and gives them a good cleaning. After nearly a year spent living in the barn, they’re typically quite dirty, and hay tends to get caught in their fleece.

About a week later — after the fleece has had time to normalize — she breaks out the shears. Then she puts the llamas in a metal contraption that helps to keep the animal still.

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Discover Hancock County The shears don’t hurt the llamas; in fact, a little trim is much appreciated. It helps keep them cool during hot and humid Indiana summers, McCarty said. “They enjoy their spa day,” she said. Each llama’s belly is shaved from its hips to its front legs — the spot where the prime fleece grows. Shearing her llamas, a chore that needs to be done before summer, is what led to her learning to handcraft yarn. “I had all this fuzz,” she said, adding that one llama can yield from 1.5 to 8 pounds of fleece. “I had to learn to do something with it.” The fleece is soft, short and lightweight and is a bit crimped. She sends the fleece to a fiber mill, where it’s cleaned and turned into roving — a long, narrow bundle of fleece. She could do it herself by hand, she said, but it’s time-consuming. “I’d be here forever doing it,” she said. “It’s worth the money to have someone else do it.” Once the fleece is sent back to her, it’s ready to be spun into yarn. Spinners can use a spinning wheel or a spindle to create bobbins of yarn; the first is typically faster. All she’s doing is twisting the fibers — which stick together naturally — McCarty said. The spindle or spinning wheel does all the work; her hands just pinch, glide and pull the roving and feed it into the spindle or wheel. Plying the yarn once it’s spun makes it stronger and more balanced, she said.

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McCarty poses with a favorite shawl she created by hand.

To ply the yarn, the spinner takes two or more strands and twists them together in the direction opposite to the way it was spun. Once the yarn is spun, it can be woven or knitted to make items such as blankets, hats and mittens. Susan Markle, a close friend, helped McCarty perfect her craft. The two share a love of llamas and met during a llama show more than 10 years ago. Markle opened The Trading Post for Fiber Arts in Pendleton several years ago and has taught others the art of spinning and weaving. For her, the craft is relax-

ing and at times therapeutic. Markle said she learned to knit at a young age, so spinning and weaving came naturally. She wanted to own llamas and learn to spin so she could make items and tell the recipients how they were made. “It’s very relaxing, and it gives you something to do so you’re not completely wasting your time, watching TV,” she said with a laugh. Now she’s surrounded herself with a community of spinners, including McCarty, who all enjoy the same art. McCarty said she doesn’t weave or knit much to sell the products, but they do make nice gifts.

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What she really loves, however, is the yarn. She said it’s a finished product, meaning it doesn’t have to be made into anything. In her home, some yarn just sits in baskets, waiting for someone to reach out and touch the soft fibers. Her llamas tend to have really fine fleece, she said, making the craft of spinning it into yarn easier. But it’s not a skill most folks master overnight. It takes practice. “All of a sudden you get that ‘aha!’ moment,” she said. “Your fingers feel it — that’s how much pressure, that’s when to let go — and once you get that, it’s not hard at all.”


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Out of the wooDs Native product inspires artisan’s craft

Local craftsman Aaron Dickinson has been making handcrafted kitchenware/furniture since 2004. The GreenfieldCentral graduate started working with wood back in high school.

Photos By tom russo

n his workshop, tucked away on the edge of his five-acre property, Aaron Dickinson works intently in a cloud of sawdust accompanied by the whine of power tools and machinery. Just steps from his home, he runs Dickinson Woodworking, a family-operated company that produces handmade furniture, kitchenware and accessories. By Daniel What began as a hobby when Dickinson was Morgan in high school has expanded into a full-time job. Staff He purchased the property from his parents Writer when they wanted to downsize, and he built the workshop in 2003 with the help of his father, an engineer. He opened his business shortly after. Dickinson specializes in kitchenware, particularly cutting boards and serving spoons, but produces custom cabinetry and furniture upon request. He sells much of his work at local markets and craft shows but also retails items through an online store and distributes to shops nationwide.

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Discover Hancock county though Dickinson said the work can grow tedious — he regularly logs 12-hour workdays — he can’t imagine any other career for himself. “i couldn’t ever see myself sitting at a desk full time,” said Dickinson, whose wife, kiyomi, manages the finances and distribution of goods. “i love putting the gloves on, working with my hands and making quality products that can be used for generations.” Dickinson sources his wood from indiana mills and prefers using varieties that are native to the state, particularly ash, cherry and walnut. He selects the logs he uses through a lumber supplier then he sends the logs to be milled and air and kiln dried. once the wood is delivered to his property, located off county road 200W, he cuts it into manageable pieces and stores the logs in a barn. the process of producing a cutting board begins by collecting similarly sized strips of wood — often scraps from other projects

Sarah Stultz works at sanding kitchen cutting boards, some shaped like the state of Indiana.

— and gluing them to create a board. the strips typically are glued together horizontally, but he also produces herringbone and checkerboard patterns, which take a little more care to craft. once assembled into a sheet, he cuts the sides flush, carves in grooves or silhouettes, then rounds the edges with a sander. next, he dunks the boards into tubs of water to raise

the grain. this causes the fibers to swell and helps seal the wood, which helps prevent mold, he said. Dickinson then gives the piece another sanding, which he said prevents the wood from becoming fuzzy or rough when washed. “it’s an extra step we take to get a higher-end finished product,” he said. to complete the boards, Dickinson coats them in curing oil and leaves them

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to dry. He initials and writes the varieties of wood used on the back, so anyone looking for details about the piece doesn’t have to go far. each cutting board includes at least five kinds of wood. selling goods at art fairs and craft shows allows him to make a connection with customers, Dickinson said. “People like to know the story of where something came from,” he said. “it makes it easier to appreciate it, and it’s nice to match a face to the product.” Wooden mugs, one of his most popular items, are made in a similar manner. scraps of wood are glued into blocks then mounted on a lathe — a machine used to cut, sand or drill wood. as the block spins, Dickinson sends wood chips flying across the shop, using turning gouges to carve the shape of the mug. He then sands and oils the mug before inserting a stainless steel cup, which is then sealed to the wood so it can be used for drinking — not just as a decorative piece.


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and every new product gets a test drive. “We use all of our products ourselves in our own kitchen before selling them,” his wife said. “We’ll give them out to family members and friends and tell them to use it and let us know what needs to be changed.” Dickinson hires parttime help as needed. Jason knoop, an indianapolis teacher and lifelong friend, works in the shop during summer break. “i spent a lot of time at this place with aaron as a kid, so it’s great to come back and be able to help out,” he said. “it’s relaxing in a sense. i don’t spend a lot of time sitting in the

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classroom. i’m all over the place there. so it’s nice to escape the intensity of the classroom and not have to keep track of a bunch of students.” the work sometimes helps him relax, knoop said, but there’s one thing he can’t ever escape: the sawdust. “it’s a lost cause,” he said with a laugh. “you can try to blow it off with some of the tools, but it doesn’t matter. it gets everywhere.” though he didn’t intend to open a fully operational business on his property, Dickinson said he’s happy with the way it’s unfolded. “i’m connected to this place,” he said. “i’ve lived here my entire life, plus

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The Dickinson Woodworking website is dickinsonwoodworking.com.

i like being 15 feet from my house, being able to see my kids and eat lunch at my dining room table. the trees that were planted in my backyard when i was a kid were only 12 inches, and now they’re 50 feet tall.” the Dickinsons’ 4-year-old son and 6-year-old daughter occasionally join their father in the workshop. “they’ll say, ‘We want to help Daddy,’ and i’ll let

them dunk cutting boards into the water or hammer nails into blocks of wood,” he said. “it’s great having them so close.” though he enjoys the comforts of home, Dickinson said, he knows if the company continues to expand, he’ll need to move operations to a larger, commercial property. “But moving is probably a far way off,” he added. though both parents said they don’t want to pressure either child into taking over the business, it’s certainly a possibility. “My son always says when he grows up he’s gonna work in the shop,” kiyomi Dickinson said. “Just like Daddy.”

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Flurry of Activities Coalition seeks to build on popularity of downtown-area festivals fter a year-long planning process, Greenfield adopted a comprehensive revitalization plan in 2013 charting the city’s course for the future with a reinvented downtown envisioning urban living, literary trails and walkable, By Jim Mayfield connected hubs linking the city’s assets. Contributor But the rub was getting the plan off the drawing board and reaping tangible results before the inspiration became just so many lines on a big blueprint. To jumpstart the vision, the Greenfield Coalition, a broadbased group of community stakeholders, was formed last November to move the plan forward and provide input along the way. With all the moving parts in Hancock County’s redevelopment machine, the coalition is designed to be the central hub in the wheel and make sure everyone is on the same page. “It’s a communication tool for all the groups that are working out there,” said city planning director Joanie Fitzwater.

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The group held its inaugural meeting in January and in short order secured $44,000 from the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs, the city and the Hancock County Visitors Bureau to begin work on a “Living Alley” between North and Main streets. Though still in the conceptual stage, preliminary ideas are driving the empty spaces east of the Lincoln Square Pancake House between the city’s two major thoroughfares toward a landscaped, lighted promenade that will serve as a draw for families to the downtown area. The attraction, organizers say, will serve as a focal point for downtown festivals and activities that have been ramping up in the historic district over the last year. “It goes to establishing quality of place,” said Greenfield Main Street program manager Shelley Swift,


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The annual Riley Festival takes over downtown Greenfield during the first weekend of October.

“where people enjoy downtown and want to spend time there. This creates some synergy among all the things that are going on downtown.” And lately there’s been a lot happening there. Last spring, Greenfield Main Street rolled out its second Bikes in Bloom, calling on local nonprofits to paint donated vintage bicycles in a variety of themes to decorate the district and raise awareness of the revitalization and bring enthusiasm to the effort. Building on the initial success of 2014, this year’s roll-out included 16 brightly

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painted two-wheelers festooned with flowers and even horse saddles to herald the spring’s arrival in Greenfield. During the last year, the city has seen a number of festivals and events occurring downtown, all of which are efforts to connect visitors with the city’s identity and keep traffic and dollars within Hancock County. “Elanco has 1,500 hotel visits annually,” Fitzwater said. “We need to figure out how to connect to those visitors and that business.” Greenfield Main Street has been partnering with the city parks department,

Hancock County Arts and Cultural Council, Hancock Regional Hospital and other civic stakeholders to offer events and festivals designed to bring traffic and interest downtown. May brought the North Street Fitness Festival with cooking and fitness presentations, live music, the Colts Play 60 Zone and a three-onthree basketball tournament to the corner of North and Main streets, an area planners see as downtown’s festival venue of the future. Other events included the city’s annual Chalk Fest. A Beatles theme marked the 50th anniversary of the Fab

Four’s first U.S. performance with amateur artists of all ages sketching their work on city sidewalks. The National Road Garage Sale was held once again, and the Pennsy Trail Art Fair and Music Festival, which ran for its 13th year in June, featured live music, a 5K run, art exhibits and local fare. For those involved in putting a new face on the historic downtown district, it’s all about keeping the momentum. “It’s been going well,” Swift said. “I think all the festivals have been wellattended in terms of vendors and visitors.”

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area events entertainment on the PlaZa gbcbank.com Music fills the air at the Hancock County Courthouse Plaza on Friday nights during June and July. Free concerts sponsored by Greenfield Banking Co. take place at 7 p.m. in downtown for the 29th year. The concerts feature musicians performing everything from oldies to patriotic marches to Southern Gospel. Learn more about the series by logging on to

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gbcbank.com. Click on “All About Us” then “Sponsored Events.” ball day mvoptimist.com Mt. Vernon Optimist Ball Day gives families and residents a chance to get outside in the parks and watch local kids play baseball and softball. The event includes a parade and vendor booths. Ball Day is scheduled for June, through a partnership with the FortvilleMcCordsville Area Chamber. For more information, go to mvoptimist.com.

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riley Festival rileyfestival.com James Whitcomb Riley is the focus of the annual Riley Festival, but even folks who aren’t familiar with his poetry can find something to their liking. The event celebrates the Oct. 7 birthday of the “Hoosier Poet.” The festival features entertainment, arts and crafts vendors, a Riley Festival Queen, carnival-style food, and contests in poetry writing, photography, running, fiddling, baking and more. Highlights include the Parade of Flowers, in which children place flowers at the base of the Riley statue in front of the Hancock County Courthouse. There’s also a large parade at 11 a.m. on the Saturday of the festival. This year’s festival is set for Oct. 1-4. The theme is “The Raggedy Man.” To learn more about the festival, go to rileyfestival.com.

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DISCOvER HANCOCK COUNTy strawberry Festival fpcofgreenfield.org It’s a week-long, group effort to prepare for the annual Strawberry Festival at First Presbyterian Church in downtown Greenfield, which will celebrate its 33rd year. Proceeds from the event, which usually takes place the first Friday of June, go to various community organizations. The church combines funds from a few food fundraisers every year to donate $3,000 to $5,000 to local organizations like Edelweiss Equine Assisted Therapy Center and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Hancock County. The fundraiser started three decades ago by the church’s men’s group. Back then, local strawberries were hand-picked. These days, the church buys frozen berries and mixes them with fresh to pour on top of the shortcake along with ice cream. For more information, visit fpcofgreenfield.org.

4-h Fair ces.purdue.edu/Hancock/4-H.htm The annual event celebrates the achievements of children who have spent months preparing to show animals and complete a wide variety of projects, including foods, tractor maintenance, sewing and model rocketry. Fairgoers can also check out the fun at the baby contest, pet parade, tractor pull and talent show. The family fun also includes live music and carnival rides. And from tangy barbecue to gooey grilled cheese and refreshing lemon shake-ups, there’s something to satisfy any hankering. The 2016 Hancock County 4-H Fair is scheduled for June 24-July 1. For more information about the fair, log on to ces.purdue.edu/ Hancock/4-H.htm.

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lord’s acre Festival mccordsvilleumc.org The Lord’s Acre Festival, put on each September by the McCordsville United Methodist Church, is a time for visitors to come together and celebrate, as well as to shop vendor booths, eat sandwiches and watch the parade. Proceeds help support the church. For more details, visit mccordsvilleumc.org.

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Focus on the arts weekend pennsytrailartfair.com or hancockcountyarts.com Artists, musicians, runners, walkers, craft beer and local food combine for the Pennsy Trail Art and Music Festival and the Will Vawter Art Competition and Exhibit held in June. Visitors can peruse a range of offerings from pottery and basketry to chic jewelry and fine art. The festival features interactive art therapy for kids and adults. A few blocks east, plein air painters compete in the Will Vawter Art Competition and Exhibit to capture scenic Hancock County on canvas and return to the Creative Arts and Event Center downtown to show off their works. The event is a benefit for Mental Health Partners of Hancock County. Find out more at pennsytrailartfair. com or hancockcountyarts.com.

chalkFest/taste oF hancock county tasteofhancockcounty.com or hancockcountyarts.com/ events/sidewalk-chalkfest The Taste of Hancock County and ChalkFest partnered to attract hundreds of people to downtown Greenfield with colorful – albeit temporary – art, samplings of food from local eateries and musical entertainment. Chalk artists spend hours creating colorful drawings for visitors to enjoy. For more information visit tasteofhancockcounty.com and hancockcountyarts. com/events/sidewalk-chalkfest.

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shirley Founders day Marching bands, crafts, show cars, gospel music and plenty of food can be found at the Shirley Founders Day celebration in downtown Shirley. The annual event, typically held in midAugust, also includes a parade, talent show and the presentation of the David L. Estell Civic Award.

indiana bastille day indianabastilleday.com Celebrated for the past six years, this annual Fortville event commemorates the beginning of the French Revolution — July 14, 1789 — when angry Parisians stormed the Bastille, a prison on the bank of the Seine River. The event, which started as a private gathering in a Fortville, has since blossomed into a large community event. Indiana Bastille Day now brings families from across the state to Fortville’s Landmark Park, where they enjoy French food, wine, craft vendors, music and actors in period costumes.

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Fortville winter Festival fortvilleaction.com The annual Fortville Winter Festival brings a full day of planned events for all ages to the community. Events and activities include a large parade, live music, face painting, crafts, a snowflake princess contest and a visit from Santa Claus. For more information about the event, which is normally held before Christmas, visit www. fortvilleaction.com.

cumberland arts Goes to market Facebook.com/ Cumberland ArtsGoesToMarket Bringing together more than 100 art, craft and farmers market vendors together, this event also includes entertainment, children’s activities, food vendors and a silent auction. It takes place near Cumberland Town Hall. Visit Facebook.com/ CumberlandArts GoesToMarket for details.

christmas at the riley home jwrileyhome.org Experience Christmas in Greenfield 145 years ago. The James Whitcomb Riley Home is decorated according to the period. Hostesses and volunteers complete the scene in Victorian costumes as they portray the neighbors of Riley and his family. Enjoy music and songs of the holiday during the Civil War. Union soldiers drop by to pay their respects. The event typically takes place in early December.

new Palestine Fall Festival nplions.com The festival is a homecoming to New Palestine residents. It takes place on the Thursday, Friday and Saturday after Labor Day. The festival is hosted by the New Palestine Lions Club at its community building on U.S. 52. It features rides, music, a parade, karaoke, entertainers and a merchants’ tent.

GreenField christmas Festival & Parade oF liGhts rileyfestival.com Downtown Greenfield lights up for Christmas in early December. The event typically includes craft vendors and a dinner. The lighting of the plaza tree takes place during opening ceremonies followed by a live nativity scene. Musical entertainment continues into the evening. Following the kick-off of the Parade of Lights, Santa Claus arrives by fire truck to listen to children’s wishes in the plaza Santa House. More information at rileyfestival.com.

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Tuesday: 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Wednesday

through Friday:

Tuesday: 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.

Wednesday through Friday: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Saturday: 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

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Monday: Closed

8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday:

8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

liBraries

hancock county

Fortville-vernon townshiP library www.fortville.lib.in.us 625 E. Broadway, Fortville, IN 46040 (317) 485-6402 Monday through Thursday: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday: Closed

Main library GReenField

• D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015

Public library

hcplibrary.org

900 W. McKenzie, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5141 Children’s desk: (317) 462-5141, ext. 238 Reference desk: (317) 462-5141, ext. 240 or reference@hcplibrary.org


c o m m u n i t y

Monday through Thursday: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday: 1-4 p.m.

post offices usps.com

Fortville 101 S. Main St., Fortville, IN

46040 (317) 485-6624

Monday through Friday:

5087 W. U.S. 52, New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-6618

Saturday: 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Monday through Thursday: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

maXwell 9 S. Main St., Maxwell, IN 46154 (317) 326-3154 Monday through Friday:

SUGAR CReeK branCH

hcpl@hcplibrary.org

s e r v i c e s

9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. lobby hours: Open 24 hours

207 N. State St., Greenfield,

IN 46140 (317) 462-5569

Monday through Friday:

Saturday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

8 a.m.-6 p.m.

Sunday: 1-4 p.m.

Saturday: 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m.-noon

8 a.m.-4 p.m. (closed noon-1 p.m. for lunch)

shirley

Saturday: 10 a.m.-noon

330 Main St., Shirley, IN 47384 (765) 737-6335

mccordsville

Monday through Friday:

7397 N. County Road 600W, McCordsville, IN 46055 (317) 336-6446 Monday through Friday: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

GreenField

Monday through Friday:

Saturday: 8:30 a.m.-noon new Palestine 17 Westside Drive, New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-6532

7:30-10:30 a.m.; 12:30 -3:30 p.m. Saturday: 9-11 a.m. wilkinson 145 S. Main St., Wilkinson, IN 46186 (765) 785-2206 Monday through Friday: 8 a.m.-noon Saturday: 8:30-10:30 a.m.

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DISCOvER HANCOCK COUNTy s P e c i a l

area markets carthaGe mill carthagemill.wix.com Across from the CKS Carthage train depot, 201 E. 2nd St., Carthage (Rush County) Thursday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Contact: (765) 914-0944

Farmers market at the FairGrounds Hancock County 4-H Fairgrounds, 620 N. Apple St., Greenfield regular Market Saturdays, May to October, 8 a.m.-noon.

crooked creek Farmers market 7929 N. Michigan Road, Indianapolis (Marion County) Mid-May to October, Sundays 4-6:30 p.m. (317) 217-5388

Summer Season Wednesdays, July through second Wednesday in October, 8 a.m.-noon. Winter Market First and third Saturdays, November-April, 10 a.m.1 p.m. note: winter market is held inside heated show arena. Contact: Barb Smith (765) 763-0246 or Jeniece Miller (765) 561-8265

cumberland Farmers market Cumberland Town Hall, 11501 E. Washington St. May-October, Saturdays 8 a.m.-noon.

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s e c t i o n


f a r m e r s

fOrtVILLe farmers market

701 S. Maple St., Fortville Church of the Nazarene parking lot Mid-May to September, Thursdays 4-7 p.m. Contact: Nancy Stickland (317) 485-0410 or (317) 490-6169; chamber@ fortvillemccordsville.com GeIst farmers market

8115 Oaklandon Road (Intersection of Fox Road and Oaklandon Road) Thursdays 2:30-6:30 p.m. Contact: Tom Brendle (317) 517-0484

Heart Of rUsHVILLe farmers & artIsaNs market localharvest.org/farmersmarkets/M28374 100 E. Third St., Rushville (Rush County) Third Street is blocked at Main Street east to the alley. May to October; Saturdays 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Contact: Mark Sloan (765) 561-7116 or email sloaner692003@yahoo.com HeNrY COUNtY farmers market facebook.com/henryco farmersmarket 100 S. Main St., New Castle (Henry County)

m a r k e t s

June through October,

market

Contact: hcfarmersmarket@

irvingtongardenclub.com

gmail.com

Ellenberger Park,5301 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis

HOOsIer HarVest

Second Sunday of JuneOctober, noon-3 p.m.

COUNCIL Locally produced foods are

available year round from council members at area

sHeLBY COUNtY

farmers markets.

farmers market

Downtown Square, Shelbyville (Shelby County)

HOOsIer HarVest market hoosierharvestmarket.com Online “food hub” to connect

with local producers.

• Garden Decor • Trees & Shrubs • Annuals & Perennials • Bulk Soils & Mulch

Selling Wholesale and Retail

Contact: (317) 540-2425 or irvingtonfarmersmarket@ hotmail.com

hoosierharvestcouncil.com

Garden Center

trailer sales lawn & landscape inc. tree service inc.

IrVINGtON farmers

8 a.m.-noon.

Tree Service • Tree Removal • Stump Grinding • Emerald Ash Borer Treatments • Bucket Truck Service • Trimming • Specializing in Large/Dangerous Trees • Lot Clearing

Mid-May to October Saturdays 8 a.m.-noon and Wednesdays 3-7 p.m. July to October.

Trailer Sales • Dump • Utility

Lawn & Landscape • Mowing • Mulching

• Maintenance Services • Bed Defining • Design & Installation • Snow Removal • Salting Services

7053 W. US Hwy 40, Cumberland, Indiana 317.894.8446 | www.fradysgarden.com | D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

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fitness

pennsy trail One block south of Main Street, Greenfield and Cumberland The Pennsy Trail is a paved path following the roadbed of the former Pennsylvania Railroad. The trail is intended for walking, jogging, biking and in-line skating. Historical markers show points of interest along the way. In Greenfield and just east and west of the city, the trail is a six-mile path. It runs between County Road 150W and County Road 400E. Another segment, the Cumberland Pennsy Trail, which runs from near County Road 600W in Hancock County to German Church Road in Marion County, opened in 2010. A segment just west of County Road 600W that was incomplete was finished in the summer of 2014. The trail now extends to County Road 600W.

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h a n c o c k

anytime Fitness - Geist anytimefitness.com 9653 Olio Road, McCordsville (317) 336-5500 anytime Fitness GreenField anytimefitness.com/ gyms/2689/greenfield-in 1921 Melody Lane, Greenfield IN 46140 (317) 462-1700

c o u n t y

circle city martial arts and Fitness circlecitymartialartsfitness.com 6107 W. Airport Blvd., Building 106, suite 100, Greenfield (317) 690-5135 curves curves.com 48 W. Main St., New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-5636

blue seas Fitness and wellness relaxatblueseas.com 413 W. Broadway St., Fortville (317) 485-4555

Family Fun & Fitness familyfunfit.com 5151 W. U.S. 40, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 894-8888

chanGe Fitness changeyourfitness.com Devon Brown (317) 674-3327

Fitness First 1820 Copeland Farms Dr., Greenfield (317) 462-2767

F i t n e s s

Geist martial arts geistmartialarts.com 11629 Fox Road, Indianapolis (317) 826-0707 GreenField Fitness 20 E. Main St., Greenfield (317) 468-6866 GreenField Parks and recreation dePartment greenfieldin.org/parks 280 N. Apple St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 477-4340 The department organizes exercise classes and lessons in a variety of sports for all ages. hancock wellness www.hancockwellness.org 888 W. New Road, Greenfield, IN 46140

(317) 468-6100 and 8505 N. Clearview Dr., McCordsville (317) 335-6939 indiana Gym-nest

www.indianagymnest.com 58 N. Harrison St., Greenfield (317) 462-9341 Jaycie PhelPs athletic center

www.jpacsports.com 3802 N. County Road 600W, Building 100, suite A, Greenfield (317) 866-1996 Primrose day sPa 9893 Soaring Eagle Lane, McCordsville (317) 336-7250

FUN FOR EVERYONE!

• • • • •

AFTER SCHOOL CARE BASEBALL & SOFTBALL BIRTHDAY PARTIES CHEER TUMBLING GYMNASTICS

CALL TODAY!!!! (317) 866-1996 WWW.JPACSPORTS.COM

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area parks cumBerlanD

baseball field), may be rented. All shelters have electrical outlets. The small shelter lions Park is located near the parking 301 buck Creek road lot and the large shelter is located at the west end near This park offers 6.5 acres of the large playground. One land. The baseball field is used baseball diamond, playground by the Cumberland Cardinals equipment, one tennis court, Youth baseball league for one basketball court, one home games and practices. mnastics • Nature The Programs • Youth & Adult various facilities, or Art theClasses sand volleyball court and • Greenfi eldpark Golden Girls for the entire (except rentable shelters.

Zumba Fitness • ASA Slow Pitch Softball-Adults Open Basketball/Volleyball • Team Building Challenges

fortville memorial Park 9088 W. County road 1025S This 25 acre community park is situated at the junction of Stottlemeyer Ditch and Jackson Ditch that create rolling hillsides

and running water. The park also has many facilities for active recreation as well as playground equipment. Activities and facilities include: picnicking, four shelters, three playgrounds, two tennis courts, two softball/baseball diamonds, a basketball court, foot trails and sledding.

Greenfield Parks & Recre ation Go to www.greenfieldin.org to check out these programs and more!

-Gymnastics - toddler to 12 years of age -Art Classes - adult & youth -Pre School - ages 3-5 -Pee Wee Athletics Instructional Class - ages 3-5 (track, golf, football, tee ball, soccer, basketball, karate) -Nature Programs - families -Slow Pitch Softball Leagues - adults -Zumba Fitness - adults - all fitness levels welcome

Catering | On-Site BBQ | Delivery | Online Store

Patricia Elmore Center 280 North Apple St. • (317) 477-4340

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When it comes to BBQ, we’re not fool’n around! 317-448-5873 BBQNFOOLS.COM


200 E. Church St.

This 3.2 acre park is in a more urban setting, as it is centrally located one-half block from the main street of town. It has an area adjacent to the Methodist Church for passive recreation with paved walks through a landscaped setting and a gazebo. It also has a soccer/football field. hamPton Field 400 block W. Church St.

This six acre park includes two tennis courts, a picnic shelter, paved parking, concession stand (in season), three baseball diamonds, seven bleachers, playground equipment and six picnic tables.

GreenfielD GreenField Parks and recreation dePartment

greenfieldin.org/ recreation

Patricia Elmore Center; 280 North Apple St., Greenfield (317) 477-4340 riley Park apple Street and U.S. 40

Riley Park, the feature park of Greenfield, is 40 acres offering a 7200-square foot skate park, two basketball courts, six tennis courts, five baseball fields, playground equipment, sledding hill, plenty of open areas for play and fishing along Brandywine Creek. In addition, located within the park is the Riley Park Shelter House, Riley Park Pavilion, Riley Pool and the Patricia Elmore Center.

beckenholdt Park 2770 n. Franklin St. Beckenholdt Park includes a one and a half acre pond, fishing pier, wetland, observation deck, two acre dog park, walking paths, interpretive signs, a picnic shelter and more. brandywine Park 900 E. Davis road Brandywine Park is a 60 acre sports complex offering 20 soccer fields, three softball fields (two adult/one youth), playground equipment and a wooded trail along Brandywine Creek. commons Park 856 W. 5th St. Commons Park is a small residential park, less than one acre, offering playground equipment in a quiet setting.

We a re y o u r lo c a l d e a le r fo r. ..

Zero Turn Mowers

henry b. wilson Park East of Greenfield Village subdivision This 14 acre park offers mulched walking trails in a wooded setting along Brandywine Creek. Future development will include fishing piers. mary moore Park 951 n. Franklin St. Mary Moore Park is an eight acre nature park offering mulched trails running throughout a wooded setting. Information markers are located along the trails with plant and bird life points of interest. thornwood Preserve County road 200S and Morristown Pike In the Fall of 2006, the City of Greenfield Park Board received a 20-acre donation of premier woodland from Herb and Judy Brown.

Sales • Parts • Service

Chain Saws • Snow Blowers • Leaf Blowers ZTR Mowers • Gas Powered Trimmers Lawn & Garden Tractors PICK-UP & DELIVERY Hours: Mon-Fri 8-5 • Sat 9-1 • Closed Sunday Extended Summer Hours

1791 E. Main St. Greenfield, IN 46140

317-462-1323 1-866-MOWERS2 www.superiormowers.com

I-70 Airport

SR 9

landmark Park

E. Main St. (US 40) License Branch

N

" TH E ONE-STOP MOWER SH OP "

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s P e c i a l

s e c t i o n

DISCOvER HANCOCK COUNTy

sHirley

This parcel of woodland will be protected and kept it its natural state for future generations. Look for an announcement when the park opens to the public.

shirley Park 200 2nd St. Shirley’s main park offers an outside shelter, a community building available for rent, playground equipment, two baseball diamonds, an outdoor stage, one volleyball court and two basketball courts.

mccorDsville mccordsville town hall Park 6280 W. County road 800n This brand new, two acre park is filled with green space and offers shelters for rent. old school Park County Roads 600W and 750n The three acre park features four picnic tables, play ground equipment, green space, single baseball field, one tennis court and a basketball court.

new palestine southeastway reGional Park 5624 S. Carroll rd. (not in town limits) This 188-acre forested

317.468.0448

malcolm Grass memorial Park 201 Main St. This small park features seating area, a war memorial and a memorial to slain former Hancock County Sheriff Malcolm Grass. park features hiking trails, a prairie preserve, wildlife and education programs.

park includes 88 acres with development on 35 of those acres.

suGar creek townshiP Park 4136 S. County road 700W The park includes two shelters, playground equipment, a nine-hole frisbee golf course, soccer fields and fitness trail. Overall the

Jacob schramm nature Preserve 1586 S. County road 600W Thirty acres of the Schramm Woods were donated as a nature preserve. Jacob Schramm came to Indiana in the mid-1830’s from Germany.

NUTTY MUTT EMPORIUM 16 W. NORTH ST. GREENFIELD

THENUTTYMUTT.COM FOOD TREATS WASHERY BOUTIQUE DEDICATED TO ENHANCING THAT SPECIAL BOND BETWEEN YOU AND YOUR PET (Tuesday - Friday 10am-6pm and Saturday 10am-4pm)

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wilkinson weir cook community Park 147 n. Main St. About a half acre, the only park in Wilkinson offers playground equipment, two shelters, open green space, veterans memorial, a Weir Cook memorial and a basketball court.


E MANNING’S ADVANTAG in November

BLOCK PARTY

Painful loss to Patriots SPORTS B1 might yet benefit Broncos

exhibit will fill Brick by brick, LEGO JUST4FUN A4 exhibit hall this weekend

FOUNDED 1908 • 75

GREENFIELD, INDIANA

GREENFIELDREPORTER.COM BREAKING NEWS & MORE

A ION AT RESIGNATION BOARD ACCEPTS DEPUTY’S

RY 16, 2014 THURSDAY, JANUARY

BRIEFLY City building inspector resigns GREENFIELD — City building inspector Jason Faucett is stepping down on after nine years checking home and building permits and construction. Faucett is taking a similar position in another communiof ty. The Greenfield Board Works unanimously accepted his resignation Tuesday and agreed to let the posinew tion be advertised for a employee.

which But a new county policy, to open the county up fect Jan. 1, states ffe ff effect went into eff unused vacation time receive an even lengthier and that an employee should fforr 2014. in and sick time fo costly legal battle. f ts only if he resigns fi benefi benefits fforr a That makes fo “If he resigns, he can’t with a two– good standing and total of more than appeal it or anything week notice. $12,000 Roeger will on the it’s done, it’s over,” said Shepherd, who was paid since the new Ronnie Mohr, merit that states have been committee to write in new county policy he was suspended board president. Roeger was By MARIBETH VAUGHN county policy, said otherwise. ter. r- early October. While Mohr said he believes fforf rmed of the new polifo info f’s Merit Board fo mvaughn@greenfieldrepor ff’ ff Sheriff’s at never informed The Sheriff ficials say the Roeger ffi ff officials him to Roeger, who wasn’t resigna- local off com so it’s best not to hold the mally accepted Roeger’s meeting, waited cy, f er resignation marks ft aft after strenuous Wednesday’s year to submit a the new standard. Wednesday, one week end of an expensive, rst of ffirst GREENFIELD — Embattled tion f er the fi ft after until the new has it was turned in. “It came out aft department’s hisjust so he eputy Scott Roeger Deputy fective chapter in the ffe ff eff effective letter of resignation fforr The resignation is om the Hancock ffrom it’s better to accept Roeger’s could get his vacation time fo A7 signed fr resigned f Mike Shepherd tory, ff SEE DEPUTY, PAGE than to go through a f’s Department, Jan. 8, but Sheriff ff’ ff Sheriff’s ounty Sheriff County an addi- resignation 2014. fforr unused said Roeger will be paid hearing that could termination of ut he will be paid fo but weeks f r three fo despite a tional $2,236 for acation and sick time vacation

Scott Roeger will Despite new county policy, sick time for 2014 be paid for unused vacation,

Offices to close for holiday

C R A Z Y L A K E

HANCOCK COUNTY — The following offices, busibe nesses and schools will closed for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday. All federal, state, county and city government offices The U.S. Post Office will will be closed, but the lobby only be open for P.O. boxes The Bureau of Motor Vehicles also closed on

PRO D U C T I O N

TO

Banner fforr year y ar fo ye i rary in ib library lib o s ok books the book

O PE N

Music, movie, book downloads drive up circulation in 2013

Saturday All banks and credit unions All county libraries Eastern Hancock Schools but are closed for students, day will have a teacher work at Walker Career Center Warren Central High School Elmore is closed as is the Pat Senior Center, Greenfield and Parks and Recreation Office Purdue Extension 4-H Greenfield-Central, Mt. Vernon and Southern Hancock schools, St. Michael Catholic School and Zion open Lutheran School will be

By MARIBETH VAUGHN

Reporter photos Tom Russo / Daily

“Laughter on the Company’s latest show, for the CrazyLake Acting Dennis Cole (left), Amy comedy is the setting downtown Greenfield. The early days of television Centre for the Arts in are based on Woody Friday night at the Ricks play, whose characters for the show. 23rd Floor,” which opens the cast in the Neil Simon going through final rehearsals Vetters (right), are among Studabaker and Chris This week, the cast was Mel Brooks, among others. Allen, Carl Reiner and

ut shows ut a out ab A show abou

Director Christine Schaefer watches the cast rehearse a scene from the show, which is set in the 1950s and is based on the reallife writing team of Sid Caesar’s “Your Show of Shows.” Showtimes and other information can be found in Just4Fun, Page A5.

THE DAILY KUDOS The Daily Reporter today salutes subscribers Paula Schramm of New Palestine and Lori Wallace of day! Greenfield. Have a great

LET US KNOW

Have a milestone or an achievement that deserves Email mention on Page One? ter.. dr-editorial@greenfieldrepor com or call (317) 467-6022.

INDEX

A3 . . . .A3 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . A5 A4-A5 Just4Fun. . . . . . . . . . . A6 . . . .A6 Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . B2 B1-B2 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 B3-B4 Classified . . . . . . . . . . B6 . . . .B6 Amusements . . . . . . .

ST ALL-DAY FORECAST 7 a.m. Noon 3 p.m. 6 p.m.

Mostly cloudy Snow showers Show showers Snow showers

23 29 33 32

A2 EXTENDED OUTLOOK

can Draw the weather! Kids e the send in artwork to illustrateded Daily Reporter’s A2 extended New forecast. Mail to: 22 W. 46140. Road, Greenfield, Ind.,

plays Helen, the office Amy Studabaker, who for team, gets a 1950s styling secretary for the writing Floor.” “Laughter on the 23rd a dress rehearsal for

les yle yl f styl fe life h lifestyle l hy lt alt healthy h o e he ot n s promot vent ve eevents ay ev a May Organizers seek sponsors for 2 activities that stress fun, fitness By JIM MAYFIELD

er. jmayfield@greenfieldreport com the GREENFIELD — With plunge temperature’s recent f ll, an outfa snowfall, and record snowfa door heart health competition the and a 5K run to benefit not y Pennsy Trail are probably the o to the first things that jump but front of people’s minds, are s organizers for the events ary’s January’s getting ready despite bite.

Heart American The of Association and a coalition f eld business and health fi Greenfi Greenfield two sepagroups are planning to rate events in May designed on acting get county residents healthy and thinking about f styles. fe life lifestyles. f eld has fi Greenfield On May 10, Greenfi Heart been tabbed by the its annual Association to join HeartChase, a communitythat pits based competition ve-member teams ffive-member two- to fi n event h iin an each other g against The “The that is a cross between to Amazing Race” and “Minute Parker, Win It,” said Carmen HeartChase director. to event “It’s an excellent lks together to have ffolks bring fo

FIND OUT MORE

More information is available about the two upcoming events to promote health and wellness in Hancock County: HeartChase: Go to www.heartchase.org or contact local director Stacy West at (765) 2389103 or by email at swest9103@gmail.com Healthy Strides: Joanie Fitzwater, city planning director, (317) 325-1329

n, but also to learn ffun, some fu Heart about the American

ter.com mvaughn@greenfieldrepor was the GREENFIELD — It fforr the Hancock best year yet fo director County Public Library, board this Dave Gray told the a recordweek, pointing out f r fo for breaking 906,984 check-outs 2013. of music, Digital downloads certainly movies and books are f r the boost in fo the main reason for marked the circulation, as this printtraditional that f rst year fi first than half ed books made up less of the materials circulated. patrons But Gray says as more digital conare leaning toward its best tent, the library is doing the trends at keeping up with fering traditional ffe ff offering while still off materials. is 1 mil“Now, our next goal Gray lion (items circulated),” hard to said. “We’ll be working achieve that.” out in The materials checked om the ffrom fr 2013 mark a big jump f re. There were 92,457 fo before. year befo out in more materials checked – an 11 2013 compared to 2012 percent increase. 12 Of the 906,984 check-outs, downloads; percent were digital mate40 percent were non-print and CDs rials such as DVDs, were video games; and 48 percent printed books and magazines. time ever rst f fi first the marks That the items that less than half of were checked out at the library were printed materials. There out in 437,655 books checked was more 2013, and while that in 2012, than the 429,040 books pie is smallthe total piece of the er. f ct, circulation statistics fa In fact, trend show a steady downward of printed in the percentage om the library. ffrom books borrowed fr circulated In 2010, 61 percent of in 2011, 57 materials were books; percent. percent; and 2012, 53 said It’s a sign of the times, his secGray, who’s entering director. In ond year as library f w years, HCPL has fe the past few availupped the ante on content and able to computers, tablets

to Association and something f style fe life a lifestyle take back and make change,” Parker said. will navParticipating teams oneigate an approximately that mile, 10-checkpoint course will combine competitive a bit of activities as well as to smartphone geocaching tag locate hidden donation points. sponsors to accumulate year The event is in its third said. Last nationally, Parker year, the Heart Association throughpresented 140 events in country, with three outt the country Indiana. fforr fo HeartChase is designed outlying smaller communities

A7 SEE HEALTHY, PAGE

A7 SEE LIBRARY, PAGE

CHECK IT OUT

ever 2013 was the first year that less than half of items checked out at the Hancock were County Public Library printed materials.

40% Non-Print

48% Print

12% Electronic

Source: HCPL

Your town. Your community. Your media company.

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s P e c i a l

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DISCOvER HANCOCK COUNTy

area arts 52 Da ily rep o rter

hancock county arts and cultural council 20 n. State St., Greenfield hancockcountyarts.com Mission statement: “To foster, support and promote the arts, humanities, education and cultural events in Hancock County and its surrounding areas.” Showcasing gallery shows and events promoting local art and artists in addition to the Will Vawter Fine Arts Competition and collaborative participation in the annual Chalk Fest and other community events.

• D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015


The mission of the Hancock Regional Hospital Foundation is to support the advancement of health care and wellness in the communities we serve. Hancock Regional Hospital does not receive tax dollars, so philanthropy efforts of the Foundation help to bridge budget gaps, support ongoing community outreach efforts and care for those with limited resources or without insurance. The HRH Foundation provides grants to support health-related programs and offers scholarships to local students entering medical and wellness fields. Our Foundation also plays an integral role in many of the hospital’s capital projects. Over the past 30 years, the hospital foundation has raised millions of dollars to support the new Emergency Department, Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, James T. Anderson Center for Women’s Health, inpatient hospice care, and most recently, the Hancock Cancer Center. To learn more about the Foundation and how you can support our efforts, visit hancockregionalhospital.org/ foundation

Hancock Regional Hospital Foundation Board of Directors

The mission of the Hancock Regional Hospital Foundation is to support the advancement of health care and wellness in the communities we serve.

Hancock Regional Hospital does not receive tax dollars, so philanthropy efforts of the Foundation help to bridge budget gaps, support ongoing community outreach efforts and care for those with limited resources or without insurance. The HRH Foundation provides grants to support health-related programs and offers scholarships to local students entering medical and wellness fields. Our Foundation also plays an integral role in many of the hospital’s capital projects. Over the past 30

years, the hospital foundation has raised millions of dollars to support the new Emergency Department, Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, James T. Anderson Center for Women’s Health, inpatient hospice care, and most recently, the Hancock Cancer Center.

To learn more about the Foundation and how you can support our efforts, visit hancockregionalhospital.org/foundation

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s P e c i a l

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DISCOvER HANCOCK COUNTy

tHeater Groups buck creek Players 11150 Southeastern ave., indianapolis (317) 862-2270 info@buckcreek players.com buckcreekplayers.com Volunteer community theater. 2015-2016 productions: “Cliffhanger” Sept. 25-Oct. 4; “Scrooge! The Musical” Dec. 4-20; “The Property Known as Garland: A Portrait

of a Legend” Jan. 22-31; “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” March 18 -26; “Assassins” May 27June 12; “Bugsy Malone Jr.” July 29-Aug. 7. crazylake acting company P.O. box 672, Greenfield (317) 477-arTS crazylake.com Volunteer community theater. Rehearsals held in Greenfield’s Memorial Building at 98 E. North St. Recent productions include: “Legally Blonde,” “Moon Over Buffalo.”

Smith Insurance

53 West Main St. New Palestine, IN

317-861-6861

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hancock county children’s theater workshop 1440 n. Franklin road, Greenfield (317) 477-4616 ex. 43502 Pjohnson@gcsc.k12.in.us Hancock County Children’s Theater Workshop on Facebook.com. A collaborative among the county’s school systems for children in fourth through eighth grades, it puts on one production a year in early summer. kidsPlay inc. P.O. box 672, Greenfield (317) 477-arTS KidsPlay, inc. children’s theatre on Facebook.com.

Volunteer theater organization for children in the third through eighth grades. Rehearsals held in Greenfield’s Memorial Building at 98 E. North St. Recent productions include: “C.S.I. Neverland” and “Elvis Ate Here.” Sponsors of the Greenfield Zombie Walk and Greenfield Idol. ricks-weil theater company H.J. ricks Centre for the arts, 122 W. Main St., Greenfield (317) 477-7469 ricksweilinfo@gmail.com ricks-Weil Theatre Company on Facebook.com. Volunteer community theater group. Recent productions include: “The Sound of Music” and “Dad’s Christmas Miracle.”

GREAT FOOD AT AFFORDABLE PRICES Mike’s is Good to Go...For Those on the Run Fresh-Cut Steaks • Award Winning Ribs Chicken • Seafood • Pasta • Desserts • Full Bar

Open for Lunch & Dinner Sunday–Thursday 11 AM–10 PM

Friday-Saturday 11 AM–11 PM

Banquet Room • Gift Certificates Available 1945 N. State St. Greenfield

6370 Scatterfield Rd. Anderson

317-468-1000

765-649-8000

Winter Hours Sunday–Thursday 11 AM–9:30 PM

Friday-Saturday 11 AM–10:30 PM

D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

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arts venues creative arts and event center 2 W. Main St., Greenfield (317) 477-2288 artsandevent@gmail.com artsandevent.com One of a kind historic space with top floor grand ballroom in the heart of downtown, hosting weddings, receptions and banquets. Also home to SoupHerb Restaurant, Red Banana gift shop, Studio 2 Photography, Cross Creative Marketing, Rhythms by Stacey Dancing and numerous

Dance

individual art studios. Two gallery areas with juried exhibitions. Greenfield banking company Gallery Second floor, 1920 n. State St., Greenfield Rotating art exhibits on the second floor of the bank building. ten west center for the arts 10 W. Church St., Fortville (317) 403-0323 andrew@tenwestcenter.org tenwestcenter.org and on

Wilkerson Dance Studio Professional Instruction for over 40 years Ballet • Tap • Jazz • Modern • Hip-Hop Pre-Dance • Contemporary • Tumbling Ages 2-Adult

Facebook.com With focus on young people, offers art, music and dance classes. Recent stage productions include: “Songs for a New World” and “The Little Mermaid, Jr.”

dance east ballet academy 28 n. East St., Greenfield (317) 318-9266 info@danceeastballet.com danceeastballet.com Classes for all ages in ballet, jazz, modern and tap. Performances planned for Christmas and spring. hearts ablaze clogging team directed by Cristy Corwin-Howard 3254 West 400 South,

Great Movies at Great Prices

Digital 3D & Dolby Digital Sound Stadium Seating In All Auditoriums Check out our website for time & listings

Performance

May Spring Showcase

1114 W. North Street • Greenfield, IN 46140 317-462-1673 • wilkersondance@gmail.com www.wilkersondance.com

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www.LegacyCinema.com

2347 W. Main • 317-462-2006

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featured on the Circle of Lights at Monument Circle in 2014. Private piano and violin lessons are also available within the studio.

Greenfield; (317) 498-5566 knowhimjc@heartsablaze.me heartsablazeclogging.com Clogging for ages six through adults, beginner and

recreational, teams for all ages. Classes are four nights a week. The Hearts Ablaze Inferno team is three-time national champs and was

ricochet cloggers Friends Church, 323 W. Park ave., Greenfield 260-409-3005 anniewing1@hotmail.com ricochet Cloggers on Facebook.com Classes available for ages 3 and up. Competitive and recreational levels available. Available for performance. rhythms by stacey directed by Stacey Poe 2 W. Main St., Suite 9, Greenfield; (317) 627-4750

rhythmsbystacey.com Rhythms by Stacey is a dance and fitness studio specializing in social ballroom dancing, Zumba fitness, Booty Barre and POUND Fitness. wilkerson dance studio 1114 W. north St., Greenfield (317) 462-1673 wilkersondance@gmail.com wilkersondance.com Classes for all ages in ballet, jazz, hip-hop, modern, tap and tumbling. Performances include: Riley Festival, annual Nutcracker and Holiday Spectacular and Spring Showcase. Also sponsor of Greenfield Golden Girls and Jr. Blue Fusion dance teams.

Serving All Your Memorial Needs. Monuments ❖ Markers ❖ Mausoleums Statuary ❖ Columbariums Etched Portraits ❖ Ceramic Pictures Vases ❖ Flowers D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

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music

appearances thoughout the year.

brandywine wind Jerry bell (317) 462-7838 or Gary Davis (317) 440-0834 Greenfield’s all-volunteer community orchestra, it regularly performs in various venues throughout the county. Greenfield community choir nancy Moore (317) 431-4909 greenfieldcommunity choir.com and on Facebook Performs four major concerts a year, including during the Riley Festival and makes many other

Greenfield community orchestra angela Mickler (317) 467-7510 Rehearses at Trinity Park United Methodist Church, Greenfield. hancock county children’s choir Hancockcounty childrenschoir.org info@hancockcounty childrenschoir.org Performances include: Riley Festival, Christmas Festival of Lights and International Children’s Choir Festival in England in 2016.

WE’VE ALWAYS BEEN ON YOUR PORCH. NOW YOU CAN TAKE US EVERYWHERE ELSE, TOO.

READ THE DAILY REPORTER ON YOUR iPAD, iPHONE OR OTHER MOBILE DEVICE GET STARTED AT:

GREENFIELDREPORTER.COM/APPS

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1726 N. State St., Greenfield (Located on State Road 9, 1 mile south of I-70)

317-462-8200

Wilson & Associates

Roy Wilson Broker/Owner (317) 409-5857

Visit our office website at www.C21Wilson.com Each Office Independently Owned & Operated.

HOMES & CONDOS TO BUY OR RENT, FARMS & LAND, BUILDING LOTS, COMMERCIAL

Ben Crouch (317) 691-0184 and Rita Fish (317) 727-0458

Roger Wilson Broker/Owner (317) 407-7816

Kelly Bogigian (317) 498-5833

Allen Kemper (765) 748-1639

Michele Willard (317) 649-0096

CENTURY 21 Wilson & Associates

Irene Helton (317) 714-3084

OUR MISSION IS TO PROVIDE CONSISTENT, PROFESSIONAL, PERSONAL SERVICE. OUR GOAL IS TO EXCEED YOUR EXPECTATIONS.

Marla Shockley (317) 409-7993

Benefits with CENTURY 21 Wilson & Associates:

Our EXPERIENCED agents and staff can offer 24/7 access and communications with cell, texting, email, websites, and fax.

Connie Kemper (765) 748-4355

Tom Harvey (765) 639-3082

Our agents will NEGOTIATE the best deal for you! Becky Hibbert (317) 319-1403

We will COUNSEL you through the process: home inspections, repairs, financing, and contingencies.

Ryan Nelson (317) 448-8782

We offer MARKET ANALYSIS to determine the fair market value on your home or property. Jeff Herbert (317) 491-3609

317-462-8200

OUR REPUTATION…we’ve been in business for more than 50 YEARS! So go ahead, ask anyone…

www.C21wilson.com

D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

Deborah Buonfante (317) 224-8001 Each Office Independently Owned & Operated.

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46038

46048

46037 fortville

46040

eDe

46256 mccorDsville

46216

46235

marion co

46236

46055

maxw mt. comfort

46140 46229

Green

pHilaDelpHia

cumBerlanD

sprinG lake

46163 46239

new palestine

46176


46064

46055

madison co hancock co

nasHville

en

47384

46186

46140 willow BrancH

sHirley

wilkinson

henry co

well

46117

nfielD

kniGHtstown

cHarlottesville

46148

46140 cartHaGe

46115

shelby co

46161

46104


numBers fiGures proviDe peek at consumers, proDucers

Generally speaking Hancock County’s current population estimate, according to the latest updates from the U.S. Census Bureau, stands at 71,978, up from 70,002 in 2010 and a 58 percent increase from 1990. Women account for just fewer than 51 percent of that number. The largest demographic in terms of age includes the 45-49 bracket, accounting for 8.4 percent of the county’s total population. Nearly 9 percent of county residents drive a car, truck or van to work; 86 percent of those commuters drive to work alone. 7.6 percent of the county’s population is below the poverty level, which is less than half the statewide poverty level rate of 15.8 percent.

county croP value

current county Farms

averaGe acres Farmed

110m

604

275

$

agriculturally rooted The country’s last comprehensive agriculture tally showed Hancock County following the national trend of dwindling farms but increased efficiency. There were 604 farms tallied in the county, a 12 percent drop from 2007 when there were 686 Hancock County farms. Land and total acres in farms also dropped by 3 percent over that five-year span; however, the market value of the county’s crops jumped a significant 27 percent to $110.4 million. Consolidation increased the average size of the local farm from 250 acres to 275 acres, and top crops continued to be corn for grain, soybeans, hogs and pigs. Hancock County farming continues to be a male-dominated endeavor with only 57 female ag operators of the county’s 604 farms. New blood in the farming sector continues to lag with the average age of a Hancock County farmer standing at almost 57 years old.

HEDC

,LLC

Estate Planning, Probate, Divorce Real Estate, Business Law and Family Law

Sarah M. Wolf

swolf@wolf-lawfirm.com

J. Scott Wooldridge mba jswooldridge@wolf-lawfirm.com

www.wolf-lawfirm.com Six East Main St. P.O. Box 495 | Greenfield, IN 46140 Phone (317) 462-9225 | Fax (317) 462-9220

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compileD By Jim mayfielD


b y

t h e

n u m b e r s

business & commerce

100 men 100 women

Nearly 6,500 companies call Hancock County home. Significantly more men comprise the county’s workforce, with almost 46,000 punching the clock daily compared to 31,000 women. Workers in Hancock County have median earnings of $38,749. Median earnings are that number halfway between the top and bottom reported salaries. The Census Bureau estimates Indiana’s statewide median earnings for a family of four is $72,299 in 2013 inflation-adjusted dollars.

real estate on tHe rise The number of rooftops sprouting in the county continued to increase last year, with 350 single-family home building permits issued. That number is up solidly from the 264 permits issued in 2013 and a marked increase from the slow recovery of 2012 when 195 homes were permitted. McCordsville continues to lead the county’s incorporated areas in home building and is the fastest-growing with 132 permits issued in 2012 2013 2014 2014, up by 32 from 2013.

195

264

350

Hancock county JoBs The county’s top employers include: Keihin IPT, Hancock Regional Hospital, Eli Lilly & Co. (Greenfield), Indiana Automotive Fasteners and Direct USA (Greenfield). Leading occupations include sales, office, management, business and financial jobs. Despite the amount of open land in the county, only 52 full-time agriculture and forestry professionals were tallied.

Sprinkle CPA, LLC

- Tax Preparation - Individual & Business - Tax Planning & Payroll Processing - Accounting And Compilation Services - New Business Consulting - QuickBooks ProAdvisor¨ Consultant

Michele D. Sprinkle, CPA Jessica A. Smith, CPA Mark Fuqua, CPA Leo Burkhardt April Ashley

Ò Over 70 Years Combined ExperienceÓ

4056 S. Arbor LAne, Suite 200

new PALeStine 317-861-8742

32 S. StAte St GreenfieLd 317-477-1040

www.sprinklecpa.com

GrapHics By kyle lewis

“We treat you like family!” 2260 W. Main St. • Greenfield

(317) 467-1555

www.grayauto.com

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youtH services bGchc eastern hancock eXtension Coordinator: Kayla Moreland, kmoreland@ easternhancock.org

boy scouts oF hancock county crossroadsbsa.org Contact: Keri Roby (765) 489-4552 ex. 340 krobi@crossroadsbsa.org boys and Girls clubs oF hancock county bgchc.com P.O. Box 115, 715 E. Lincoln St., Greenfield, IN 46140 Executive Director: Chad Hudson (317) 462-3704; chudson@bgchc.com Board of directors: President/CVO, Steve Menser; First vice president, John Zimmerman; Second vice president, Christine Rapp; Third vice president, Andrea Mallory; Secretary, Linda

Zimmerman; Treasurer, Ryan Reed Members: Jim Andrews, Debra Carnes, Tim Retherford, Bob McDonald, Nick Dellen, Jason Effing, Doug Apple, Steve Elsbury, Tim Horsman, Melissa Ison, P.J. Robbins, Derek Rogers and Jerry Rogers bGchc GreenField Jim andrews Unit Director: Candace Sexton (317) 4622404; csexton@bgchc.com Coordinator: Jen Angel

Girl scouts oF hancock county hancockcountygirlscouts.org girlscoutsindiana.org 230 W. North St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5402, or Girl Scouts of Central Indiana 2611 Waterfront Parkway, East Drive, Suite 100, Indianapolis, IN 46214 (317) 924-6800 hancock county 4-h ag.purdue.edu/counties/ hancock/Pages/4-Hyouth

Development.aspx Contact: Sarah Burke, Purdue Extension 802 N. Apple St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-1113 burkes@purdue.edu hancock-henry community youth center Shelterhouse, Shirley Park (765) 498-4361 director: Donna Love dlove62us@yahoo.com Board of directors: Jerry Duke, Lori Liming, Brian Pryor

nameless creek youth camP namelesscreekyouthcamp.com Southeast of intersection of county roads 600E and 250S President: Jerry Bell P.O. Box 452, Greenfield (317) 652-2033 jbding1952@att.net

Sweet Shop Family owned and operated since 1971.

High quality, trendy and affordable apparel, accessories and shoes for women and children. 1929 Melody Lane, GreenďŹ eld

317.376.2632 | www.lucycoutureboutique.com HOURS: Monday - Saturday 10 am - 8 pm

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1309 W. Main Greenfield

462-6470

4 a.m. - Noon, 7 Days A Week!

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715 East Lincoln Street, Greenfield, IN 46140

P: 317.462.3704 Chad Hudson Executive Director/CPO - chudson@bgchc.com P: 317.462.2404 Candace Sexton Unit Director - csexton@bgchc.com

Are you looking for a SAFE and POSITIVE place for your child? Are you looking for individuals to give your child a SUPPORTIVE RELATIONSHIP? Are you looking for a place for your child to have FUN? Are you looking for a program in which your child will have OPPORTUNITIES and EXPECTATIONS? Are you looking for a place where your child will receive RECOGNITION?

LOOK NO FURTHER THAN THE ...

S top B y F or A tour o F o ur F Acility! While your child is in our state-licensed center, families can be assured our exceptional teaching staff will offer any support & encouragement your child needs to learn & thrive. Children will be able to play, explore, create & investigate in their developmentally & age-appropriate classrooms, in our indoor gym & in our 11,000 square foot outdoor environment!

• Degreed ECE teachers • Daily preschool curriculum • School transportation • Enriching after school & summer programs for school-agers • 6-foot privacy fence surrounding outdoor play area • Secured front entrance • Video security system We

“ExpEriEncE thE quality, ExpEriEncE thE caring, ExpEriEncE thE diffErEncE!” welcome children with special needs! All staff members (full-time) are over 21 years old. Lead teachers have either a Bachelor’s degree, Associate’s degree, or CDA. Assistant teachers have a minimum of 3 years experience in the early Childhood education field. All staff members are CPR, First Aid, and Universal Precautions trained. our cooks are SERVSafe certified, with additional USDA & DOE nutritional training. For added safety, all staff members have been through rigorous pre-employment screenings.

1295 N. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (Across from Marsh in State Street Centre) PhoNe (317) 477-KIDS ★ FAX (317) 462-STAR

CCDF Accepted

D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

We know you have a choice in Preschool AND child care...let us show you why we are different from the rest! LEVEL 3

Children ages 6 weeks through 12 years old welcome. A safe & secure environment specially designed & created just for children.

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sports eastern hancock youth Football league Grades K-2 (flag) and 3-6 (tackle). President: Clayton Shultz. Games played in conjunction with Greenfield Youth Football League. For information, contact Shultz at cshultz@bgchc.com. Greenfield youth Football league Grades K-2 (flag) and 3-6 (tackle). Cheerleading is also offered. Commissioner: Darryck Dorman. Games are played at the GreenfieldCentral High School practice field at 810 N. Broadway. For information, visit eteamz. com/GYFL or contact Darryck Dorman at (317) 498-6744 or at dedorman@myninestar.net. marauder youth Football league Grades K (flag) and 1-6 (tackle). Cheerleading is also offered. Director: Tom Payne. Games are played at Fortville Elementary, McCordsville Elementary and Mt. Vernon High School practice fields, depending on the league. For more information, visit myflweb.org. new Palestine cadet Football league Grades K (practice only) and 1-6 (tackle). President: Matt Hook. Located on the property of the Southern Hancock School Corporation near South County Road 600W and West County Road 200S, south of Doe Creek Middle School and east of Sugar Creek Elementary. For more

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information, visit npcfl.org or email thenpcfl@gmail.com.

practices will be held at New Palestine High School. For information, contact Brian Kehrt at bkehrt@newpal.k12. in.us.

Greenfield-central little cougar league (Girls basketball) For first- through sixth-grade girls, the opportunity to play in a league designed to develop their skills. Normally running from early September through the middle of October, the goal of this league is to build a fundamental feeder system for Greenfield-Central. Grades 1-3 is an instructional league. Volunteer coaches welcome, fill in information at the bottom of registration form. Contact coach Doug Laker dlaker@gcsc.k12.in.us or (317) 448-0853.

eastern hancock lady royals (Basketball League) Girls’ basketball league for Eastern Hancock players in grades K-6. Feeds directly into the Eastern Hancock High School program. League is organized by the director of elementary basketball operations, high school players and high school coaches. Contact Eastern Hancock varsity head coach Shari Doud at at sdoud@easternhancock.org.

new Palestine little lady dragons (Basketball League) The New Palestine Little Lady Dragons Basketball League is open to all girls in grades 1-6 living in the Southern Hancock district or attending Southern Hancock schools. The league focuses on fundamental skill development. All games and

Greenfield-central youth boys basketball (Gcybb) GCYBB Little Cougar Recreational League: To offer other alternatives to travel basketball, the Little Cougar Recreational League runs from the first of November to the week before Christmas break. Typically, the teams will practice one time per

• D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015

week and play games on Saturdays. This league is offered for all boys in grades K-6. Download form or register online at gcybb. com. Registration begins in September and closes approximately the second week of October. GCYBB Travel League: For those players interested and who demonstrate advanced basketball skills, a travel league exists for grades 1-6. The evaluations will be performed by independent evaluators watching the tryouts. Register through your son’s school office, through the mail, or online. The registration form can be downloaded or register online from the GCYBB website at gcybb.com. little cougar volleyball league/cougar summer volleyball camp LCVL: For girls in grades 5-6. Tentatively scheduled for five Wednesdays in February. LCVL is feeder program into Greenfield-Central junior high and high school programs. Fees to be announced.


A r e A

CSVC: For girls in grades 1-8. Camp is held in the summer. Contact G-C varsity coach Kim Wildman at (317) 431-2354 for more information. New palestine Dragon Flyers Running program sponsored by New Palestine High School cross country team for youths in grades 3-6. In addition to conditioning, running-related topics such as flexibility, shoes, nutrition, training and racing will be discussed. Dragon Flyers are led by New Palestine cross country varsity head coach Daniel Weimer. Contact Weimer at (317) 861-4417 ext. 122 or (317) 861-5287 ext. 104.

y o u t h

GreAt sports

s p o r t s

Bandits Baseball Club An indoor facility at 2033 W. U.S. 40 in Greenfield will provide two full infields, six batting cages and two bullpens with heating and air conditioning for yearround use.The Bandits Youth Foundation sponsors teams for players ages 8-17. For more information on the facility, lessons and team and league playing opportunities, visit indianabandits.org. Dream Big Baseball Indoor and outdoor facility at 2274 North Fortville Pike in Greenfield offers baseball and softball fields, year-round batting cages and other amenities for players ages 8-17. Lessons are offered and Dream

To submit a local youth sports organization information for a future Daily Reporter Discover issue, or to report your daily scores and news, contact sports editor Rich Torres at rtorres@ greenfieldreporter.com or (317) 477-3227.

Big will also host leagues and sponsor teams. For more information, contact Mike Gibson at (317) 339-6805. Greenfield Community Aquatic Club Affiliated with USA Swimming and Indiana Swimming, GCAC is a year-round competitive swim team offering coaching and technique instruction for all ages and abilities. All coaches, as members of the American Swim Coaches Association, have access to comprehensive training and certification. They provide assurances that the time children spend in swimming will be quality time. GCAT is a non-profit club. For more information visit gcatswimming.org.

Greenfield Area soccer Club A not-for-profit club supported by the Greenfield Parks Department offering youth Pele, recreation, travel and futbal programs. For the soccer player who is 18 years or older, the club offers adult recreation leagues and summer camps for recreation and travel players. Contact Michael Reeves at President@greenfieldsoccer. org for more information.

Greenfield Dental Health Care, P.C.

Todd M. Kaminski, D.D.S. Jeff M. McQuinn, D.D.S.

737 W. Green Meadows Dr. Suite 100 Greenfield, Indiana 46140

TOTAL HEALTH DENTISTRY MAKING YOUR MOUTH, MIND & BODY HEALTHY

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME! Emergency Service Available

(317) 462-2849

www.GreenfieldDentalHealthCare.com D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

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V I s I t o r s

B u r e A u

DIsCoVEr HAnCoCk CounTy CoNtACt the VIstors BureAu

The Hancock County Vistors Bureau is located at 122 W. Main St. in Greenfield. Dave Scott is the executive director. The organization can be reached by phone at (317) 477-8687, toll-free at 866-384-8687 and by email at info@hcvb.org. Visit the HCVB online at visithancockcounty.com.

Hoosier Hospitality ‘Discover’ wHat tHe county’s all aBout

Where to stay, places to eat, museums, golf courses, antiques, shopping, parks and much more are highlighted in this section of the 2015-16 edition of “Discover Hancock County.” hether you’re a visitor, a situated on the “Historic recent move-in or a long-time national road,” also known as u.s.40, Greenfield and resident, Hancock County is Hancock County played a a special place. It key role in the nation’s developcombines the best By Dave scott ment and grew of Hoosier Hospitality with small-town HcvB executive from scattered pioneer settlements charm, modern amenities, safe streets Director into a modern and plentiful opportunities for shopping, suburb of metropolitan Indianapolis. recreation, entertainment and a large serving of History plays an important history thrown in for good measure. part in the Hancock County experience with features that The Hancock County Visitors Bureau is pleased to include the boyhood home of be partnering with the Daily Reporter once again Hoosier Poet James Whitcomb riley, the old Log Jail to provide a complete, one-source answer book for and Chapel in the Park anything and everything that is Hancock County. museums in Greenfield; the

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Courthouse square national register Historic District; The Jane ross reeves octagon House, shirley railroad Museum and Dr. Wilson’s office museums in shirley; historic architecture; a blossoming downtown arts district for visual and performing arts; and lots of antique shopping along the famous “Antique Alley” that stretches from Indy’s east side all the way to richmond. There are plenty of golfing opportunities, parks facilities, quaint shops and big stores. Whether you need information about these attractions or details about houses of worship, places to eat, lodging, government, schools and much more, Discover puts it all at your fingertips. so. Browse these pages... and enjoy your stay.


D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

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store listings GreeNFIeLD the spArroW’s Nest 113 W. Main St., Greenfield (317) 462-2900 (317) 462-6386 CyNthIA’s hALLMArK 1584 N. State St. (317) 462-6749 J.W. rILey’s eMporIuM & DoLL repAIr 107 W. Main St. (317) 462-5268 orphAN ANNIe’s MerCANtILe & posey shACK 16 W. Main St., Greenfield (317) 462-5089 the reD rooster 1001 W. Main St., Greenfield (317) 462-0655 treAsures to CAsh 401 N. State St (Ind. 9) (317) 462-6999 VINtAGe VAuLt 14 W. Main St. (317) 477-1088 BLACK CAt VINtAGe & ANtIQue FurNIture 708 W. CR 100 N, Greenfield (317) 441-7106 McCorDsVILLe ALICe’s ANtIQues & strIppING 5444 W. Ind. 234, McCordsville (317) 335-2452 MCCorDsVILLe MerCANtILe 6288 W. Broadway, (formerly Ind. 67), McCordsville (317) 335-3355 closed Sun. and Mon.

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sHoppers' Dream

them, hold them, feel their history and take them home. But whether they’re connecting with the past, adding to a prized collection or simply acquiring antiques for investment purposes, there’s something for everyone in local antique stores. Equally fascinating are Hancock County’s numerous collectibles shops. Catering to somewhat more modern hether shoppers are searching and sometimes more modfor fine antique furnishings or estly priced items, collectibles are rapidly becoming like to comb through racks and one of the fastest-growing boxes of curious items aspects of the in the hunt for smaller antiques market. By Dave scott Hancock County treasures, they’ll find HcvB executive offers a wide selecplenty of opportunities here. tion of these opporDirector tunities. From Located on the western end of Indiana’s excellent handfamed “Antique Alley” which stretches some crafted items to those niche 50 miles from Indianapolis to Richmond along historic collecting areas, we’re a top destination for treasure U.S. 40, Hancock County is rich with heritage. And it’s hunters of all types and all also rich in possibilities for finding that perfect item or interests. Visitors are encouraged to the elusive piece needed to fill out a prized collection. take their time, meander through the shops and fine stores, explore Hancock From fine furniture and all within less than a halfCounty’s history, touch its glassware to collectible hour’s drive. There’s everypast and experience Indiceramics and rustic primithing from heirloom quality ana’s “Antique Alley” from tives, Hancock County furnishings to bargains the Heart of the Crossroads promises a treasure huntgalore and they’re just – Hancock County. er’s playground with shops waiting for collectors to find

Browse area for antiques, collectiBles

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D o W N t o W N

DINING

BBQ’n Fools .....................................................41 Carnegie’s.........................................................34 Carol’s Cornerstone Cafe .........................35 Hometown Classic Pizza...........................38 Kenneth Butler Mem. Soup Kitchen ......104 Lincoln Square Pancake House.............74 Hey Cafe ............................................................40 Pizza King .........................................................39 SoupHerb .........................................................37 Tour of Italy......................................................33 Wooden Bear Brewing Co......................10

LANDMArKs & puBLIC BuILDINGs

Bradley United Methodist Church.......78 Community Corrections Center ...........79 County Courthouse.....................................80 County Courthouse Annex......................81 County Jail........................................................82 County Prosecutor.......................................83 Fire Station.......................................................84 First Presbyterian Church.........................95

Garden Chapel ...............................................85 Girl Scout House ........................................107 Greenfield Central Schools Admin......87 Greenfield Christian Church ...................86 Greenfield Area Chamber of Commerce .....89 Greenfield City Hall .....................................88 H.J. Ricks Centre for the Arts..................90 Hancock Co. Sheriff’s Department ..108 Hancock Co. Veterans Memorial..........96 James Whitcomb Riley Home................91 James Whitcomb Riley Museum .......109 Memorial Building .......................................92 Police Station..................................................93 Post Office........................................................94 St. Paul’s Anglican Church.......................52

serVICes

2 Blondes Salon.............................................77 4th Quarter Advisors ..............................55 Advantage Home Health Care ..............42 Al Brown Attorney .......................................66 Allen Wellman McNew Harvey .............43 Baker-Reimer Insurance ...........................45 Brand & Morelock .......................................46

G r e e N F I e L D

Brandywine Dental Group.......................47 Creative Arts & Event Center .................. 5 Cross Creative Marketing........................... 5 Cross Insurance .............................................49 Crosscuts Hair Salon..................................... 7 Dance East Ballet Academy.....................48 Debits n’ Credits Inc....................................51 Dickmann Reason & Bogigian ..............50 Edward Jones..................................................53 Greenfield Automotive Co. .....................44 Greenfield Banking Co. .............................55 Greenfield Fitness ........................................15 Greenfield Main Street Inc. .....................89 Greenleaf Hearing Healthcare Services ..... 9 Hancock Co. Arts ............................................ 8 Hancock Co. Humane Society ...............57 Hancock Co. Visitors Bureau .................90 Hancock Econ. Development Council ......89 Irish Ink Tattoos.............................................70 The Other Side ...............................................14 Joyner Homes .................................................. 4 Kelmar Safety Inc.......................................105 Katherine Jack Attorney............................89 Leadership Hancock County ..................89

Leejen Mortgage ..........................................60 Linde Alterations ..........................................61 Lyn O’Neal Attorney ...................................64 Mike’s Barbershop .......................................62 Patriot Insurance Group ...........................63 NASA...................................................................92 Office Pride Commercial Cleaning......75 Payne Dispute Resolution.....................106 Posh Salon & Spa .........................................20 Revolutions Salon ........................................99 Lamb’s Books ................................................69 Something New at Tiffany’s Salon ......67 Sonicu ................................................................54 Sprinkle CPA ....................................................71 Strahl & Apple Attorneys .........................72 Summers Heating / Air..............................56 Tyner Pond/The Mug offices .................26 United Way of Central Indiana ..............89 Vapor Lock .......................................................65 Vectren Energy ..............................................73 Eagle Creek Counseling ............................89 Williams Attorney office ........................106 Williams Cone Billings.............................106 Wolf Law Firm.................................................76

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WowLinx............................................................60 Youth as Resources .....................................89

shoppING

Two Sisters Cakery .......................................12 Andree’s Florist................................................ 1 Baskets on Main .............................................. 2 Four Sharp Corners ....................................... 6 Greenfield Chocolates ..............................58 Highsmith Guns & Range .......................... 3 JW Riley’s Emporium ...............................100 LRF Electronics ...............................................11 Lucy Couture...................................................17 McCleerey’s Sporting Goods ................13 NAPA Auto Parts...........................................16 Nutty Mutt .......................................................98 Posey Shack.....................................................19 Team Image.....................................................24 The Acorn Tree...............................................25 The Red Banana ............................................36 The Sparrow’s Nest .....................................27 Touch of Home ...........................................100 Vintage Vault ..................................................18 Willowe’s Basketry .......................................30

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V I s I t o r s

B u r e A u

DIsCoVEr HAnCoCk CounTy

From swimming in July to sledding in January, Hancock County’s Parks and Recreation facilities are focused on celebrating the great outdoors.

fun, facilities, nature sHare parks space greenfielD BrANDyWINe pArK 900 E. Davis Road. This 52-acre sports complex offers soccer fields, softball fields, sand volleyball courts and playground equipment. BeCKeNhoLDt FAMILy pArK 2770 N. Franklin St. As Greenfield’s newest park addition, this environmental park offers a fishing pond, paved walking trails, prairie areas with interpretive signage, a picnic shelter, outdoor amphitheatre and Hancock County’s first “bark park” for canines. The park’s 60-acre tract has been fully developed. ChApeL IN the pArK Riley Park, North Apple Street. The Hancock County Historical Society manages the rental of this facility located just off Apple Street on the east side of Riley Park. It can handle up to 100 people and may be rented for weddings, receptions, meetings, etc. Call Greg Roland at (317) 462-0631 for rentals and further information.

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eLMore CeNter 280 N. Apple St. The Patricia Elmore Center is home to the Greenfield Parks and Recreation administration, preschool program (plus various others) and the Greenfield Senior Center. Areas available for rent include a multi purpose room (1376 sq. ft., adequate for up to 80 people) and the Senior Center dining room/kitchen (978 sq. ft., adequate for up to 40 people). For rental fee information call (317) 477-4340. MeMorIAL BuILDING GyMNAsIuM 98 E. North St. The gym floor is lined for volleyball, basketball and badminton. The facility may be rented by the hour. Payment for the first hour’s rent is due at the time the reservation is made. Call (317) 477-4340. peNNsy trAIL CR 150W to CR 400 E. This linear park is the result of a “Rails to Trails” project. The Trail is 6 miles long, paved and to be used for walking, jogging, biking, and in-line skating. Historical markers are located along the trail.

rILey pArK North Apple Street and U.S. 40. This 40-acre park includes a swimming pool, shelter house and picnic pavilion along with many individual picnic sites. Tennis courts, basketball courts, baseball fields, playground equipment and open areas for play and fishing are also available. rILey pArK pAVILIoN 333 N. Lincoln St. The pavilion, located at the north end of Riley Park, consists of 16 covered picnic tables on a concrete slab with two outdoor cooking grills. Inquire also about the new East Pavilion near the Old Log Jail. Call (317) 477-4340 for rental fee information. rILey pArK sheLter house 210 N. Apple St. This facility is rented by the day (9 a.m.11 p.m.), year round. It is fully carpeted, has a full kitchen and male/female handicap accessible restrooms. It is ideal for reunions, receptions, meetings, etc. with up to 100 people. A $100 damage deposit is due at the time the key is picked up. The damage deposit will be refunded after the rental given the facility passes

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inspection by park personnel. Reservations may be made up to one year in advance of the date desired. If the date desired for the following year falls on a Saturday or Sunday, then a reservation cannot be made until the following Monday. Call (317) 477-4340 for rental fee information. rILey sWIMMING pooL 300 N. Apple St. Open late-May thru mid-August. Public Swimming: Monday Sunday Noon - 7 p.m. Sunday 1-7 p.m. Lap Swimming: Mon., Tues., Wed., Fri 11 a.m. - noon and 6-7 p.m. Free Swimming: Thursday and Sunday 5 - 7 p.m. Fantastic Fridays: 1:15 Fridays Riley Pool is available for rental from 8:30-10:30 p.m. Fridays & Saturdays. Lifeguards are provided. Call (317) 477-4348 for rental fee and other information. MIsCeLLANeous reNtALs Softball fields at Brandywine Park, tennis courts at Riley Park, the Beckenholdt Park Shelter, and Elizabeth Ann’s Kitchen in the Riley Home are available for rental. Call (317) 477-4340 for rates and reservations.


V I s I t o r s

B u r e A u

fortville

hAMptoN FIeLD 400 W. Church St. Call (317) 485-7327 for more information. LANDMArK pArK 201 E. Staat St. A gazebo, football/soccer field and picnic areas highlight this 3.2 acre park. Call (317) 485-4044 for more information. MeMorIAL pArK 400 W. Church St. Offers 25 acres with picnicking, three playgrounds, tennis, baseball, softball, basketball, foot trails and four shelters. Call (317) 485-4044 for more information.

mccorDsville

MCCorDsVILLe pArK CRs 600W and 750N. Call (317) 485-7327 for more information.

sHirley

MALCoLM GrAss MeMorIAL pArK 201 Main St. This small park features seating area, a war memorial and a memorial to slain former Hancock County Sheriff Malcolm Grass. Call (765) 738-6561 or 6381 for more information. shIrLey pArK East South Street. Shirley Park features playground equipment, wooden swings, picnic benches and tables, volleyball and tennis courts, one Babe Ruth and one softball diamond and an open shelter house. An enclosed shelter house is also available for rental. More info at (765) 7386561 or 6381.

wilkinson

WeIr CooK MeMorIAL pArK North Main Street. This park features picnic areas, playground equipment, a monument to flyer Weir Cook. Call (765) 781-6055 for more information.

Hotels/motels GreeNFIeLD BuDGet MoteL 1310 W. Main St. (317) 462-4493 20 Rooms

CoMFort INN 258 E. Martindale Drive (317) 467-9999 60 Rooms

Be our guests Big or small, loDging options are plentiful hether visitors prefer the familiar accommodations of a modern hotel or motel or the unique “at-home” comfort of a quaint bed and breakfast or farmhouse, Hancock County offers travelers several options. With more than 530 rooms available in the county, visitors have plenty of choices – all within easy access to Hancock County’s many amenities and By Dave scott Indianapolis’ variety. HcvB executive Business travelers can enjoy Director the comfort of Hancock County and still be only 20 minutes from downtown Indianapolis on Interstate 70. Greenfield/Hancock County also makes a perfect lodging spot for those attending major sporting and other events in Indianapolis.

D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

GreeNFIeLD INN 2180 N. State St. (317) 467-0065 50 Rooms CouNtry INN & suItes 2070 N. State St. (317) 467-0999 63 Rooms hAMptoN INN 2271 William Way (317) 467-0700 78 Rooms hoLIDAy INN express & suItes 321 Barrett Drive (317) 318-9859 74 Rooms QuALIty INN & suItes 2270 N. State St. (317) 462-7112 100 Rooms super 8 MoteL 2100 N. State St. (317) 462-8899 80 Rooms

BeD & Breakfasts IVy house 304 N. Merrill St., Fortville (317) 485-4800 Three Rooms For hyMN B&B 25 W. Walnut St. (317) 462-5441 Two Rooms

otHer

tyNer poND FArM 7408 E 200 South (317) 446-5886 Four Bedroom Farmhouse

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arts District grows menu

entertainment ust starting its 10th year of operation, Hancock County’s centerpiece performing arts facility continues its role of providing artistic and cultural offerings to the delight of By Dave scott visitors and residents alike.

Restored in the unique Art HcvB executive Director Deco/Art Moderne style of its 1946 founding, the H.J. Ricks Centre for the Arts at 122 W. Main St., in Greenfield, has established itself as Hancock County’s focal point for the performing arts.

The renovated former Weil/Village Theatre movie house is now a facility for live performances and arts and cultural events and the facility is under the guidance and ownership of the Hancock County Visitors Bureau.

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The ricks Centre boasts a 390-seat auditorium with new lighting, A/V and sound reinforcement systems. The performance area is host to live theatre productions, concerts, music and dance recitals,

lectures and literary presentations, business conference sessions, special cinematic presentations and much more. no less than four theatrical groups (adults and children) including ricksWeil Theatre Co., Crazy Lake Acting Co. And kidsPlay Inc., all call the ricks Centre home. Their productions bring together the outstanding talents of the area’s finest actors and actresses, singers, dancers, musicians and technical staff. Concerts ranging from rock ‘n’roll to the Big Band era are also popular attractions at the ricks. In the lobby area, visitors and arts patrons benefit from completely renovated restrooms and other amenities, while at the same time, enjoying the restoration of the original terrazzo floors and the curved plaster walls that hallmarked the the-

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atre’s original construction. The ricks Centre has hosted many varied events -- mostly brought to the Centre by others. Concerts, political debates, theatre productions, stand-up comedy, dancers, film festivals and much more have graced its stage. Event scheduling information is available by calling the Bureau or by checking its website. Marry the H.J. ricks Centre’s full schedule with downtown Greenfield’s burgeoning arts and entertainment facilities and programming and visitors and residents alike should have no trouble funding something arts-related to do. Art galleries, outdoor concerts, the Creative Arts and Events Centre, second Friday celebrations and many more opportunities provide a widely varied menu of special leisuretime activities.


V I s I t o r s

local farmers markets

CuMBerLAND Cumberland Town Hall 11501 E. Washington St. Sat.: 8 a.m. - noon (May - Oct.)

At the FAIrGrouNDs 620 N. Apple St., Greenfield Sat.: 8 a.m. - noon (May-Oct.) Wed.: 8 a.m. - noon (July-Sept.) Winter: 1st & 3rd Sat. 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Nov. - April)

GreeNFIeLD Main St. just east of Griggsby’s Station Sat.: 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. (May 17 - Sept.)

B u r e A u

FortVILLe Fortville Church of the Nazarene 701 S. Maple St. Thurs.: 4 - 7 p.m. (May 15 - Sept.)

agriculture plays role in local faBric ArtesIAN FArM 1934 S. Morristown Pike, Greenfield (317) 357-4539 artesianfarm@att.net 100% grass fed Angus beef BLue rIVer NAturAL FooDs 6001 E. 500 South, Greenfield (765) 763-0246 dairyman_br549@usa.com Beef, pork, chicken, eggs, butter, honey, maple syrup BrAWNer's GreeNhouse (317) 409-8000 brawnergreenhouse.com Bedding plants, poinsettias, wreaths, Christmas trees, fairy gardens, eggs Coe’s proDuCe 2098 E. Ind 234, Greenfield (317) 326-3935 Fairgrounds Farmers Market Assorted produce eNGLeKING’s CouNtry BeeF shop 9842 E. CR 350N, Charlottesville (765) 785-2842 englekingscountrybeefshop.com Beef, pork, eggs

FAIr’s FArM & proDuCe FArMs

3490 E. 900N, Greenfield (765) 635-7974 Fairdad@hotmail.com Plants, fruits, vegetables, eggs, chicken, turkey GLACIer roCK FArM

5784 E. 250N, Greenfield (317) 462-0844 speedyatindy@lycos.com Nuts, eggs hILLCrest tree FArM

4420 E. 500 South, Greenfield (317) 462-7694 hillcrest102@gmail.com Christmas trees and wreaths hoosIer hArVest MArKet

On-line food hub hoosierharvestmarket.com MArLIN pLANt KINGDoM

3333 S. Ind. 9, Greenfield (317) 462-7915 www.marlinplants.com Greenhouse: vegetableplants, annuals, perennials

MIthoeFer proDuCe Cumberland Farmers Market (317) 861-8103 gnmithoefer@comcast.net Produce, rhubarb, white sweet potatoes

the porK shoppe

pAxtoN FArMs 48 E. CR 600N, Fortville (317) 326-2838 joepaxton@hotmail.com Sweet corn

tuttLe orChArDs

orChArD VIeW herItAGe FArM 1713 S. 675 East, Greenfield (317) 690-4161 luv2fish6319@yahoo.com Perennials, annuals, vegetable plants, eggs, honey pINey ACres 1115 E. 1000N (317) 326-1700 pineyacresfarm.com Agritourism, Christmas trees, gourds, popcorn, pumpkins suNNysIDe GreeNhouses 3185 E. CR 700N (317) 326-3129 sunnyside.greenhouses@yahoo.com Greenhouse, vegetable plants, annuals, perennials, produce, eggs

3501 S. 275E, Greenfield (317) 462-1561 debi@hillfarmsllc.com Pork products 5717 N. 300W, Greenfield (317) 326-2278 www.tuttleorchards.com Agritourism, greenhouse, annuals, perennials, hanging baskets, fruits, vegetables, vegetable plants tyNer poND FArM

7408 E. 200S Greenfield (317) 345-3099 www.tynerpondfarm.com Pastured pork, poultry, grass fed beef WeLLs Nursery & GreeNhouses

3710 W. U.S.40, Greenfield (317) 463-2228 wellsgreenhouse@aol.com Bedding plants, annuals, perennials, seeds, Christmas trees, produce

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GreeNFIeLD JAMes WhItCoMB rILey hoMe & MuseuM 250 W. Main St. Open 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tues.-Sat. April through October, Special events and By-Request Tours. Closed Sun., Mon. & Major Holidays; Adm Charge $1.50 to $4 (317) 462-8539 or (317) 477-4340 www.jwrileyhome.org hIstorICAL soCIety’s oLD LoG JAIL MuseuM 28 N. Apple St. Open April -October. Call for hours. Adm. $2 adults, $1 children (317) 462-7780 www.hancockhistory.org hIstorICAL soCIety’s ChApeL IN the pArK 28 N. Apple Street Open April -October. Call for hours. Adm. $2 adults, $1 children (317) 462-7780 hancockhistory.org FortVILLe Dyer orGAN WorKs By Appointment. Free. Donations accepted. (317) 485-5524 shIrLey shIrLey rAILroAD MuseuM Railroad Street. Call for hours. Free. Donations accepted (765) 738-6000 or (765) 738-6561 Dr. WILsoN’s oFFICe: A CouNtry DoCtor MuseuM Main and Railroad Streets Call for hours. Free. Donations accepted (765) 738-6000 or (765) 738-6561 JANe ross reeVes oCtAGoN house 400 S. Railroad Street. Call for hours and other info. (765) 445-0062

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glimpses of History Hancock county offers museums

nowhere however, is that history, that heritage, better recalled than in Hancock County’s museums. There, the pieces of our past are preserved and shared with visitors and residents alike he rich history of Hancock who yearn to know more County is visible everywhere – about a young America and this community’s role in it. in its architecture, its traditions, Consider the James Whitits institutions and comb riley Home, its people. Created where the beloved By Dave scott “Hoosier Poet” and in 1828 and named HcvB executive creator of such for the Declaration of Independence’s first characters as Director “Little orphant signer, John Hancock, the forested pioneer Annie” and “The community was enhanced in 1835 when U.S. raggedy Man” spent his 40, the “Historic National Road,” passed through the boyhood years, gaining the experiences that would later, county’s midsection – carrying wagons westward and through the popularity of his livestock to market cities. works, propel him onto the

• D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015


V I s I t o r s

stage beside the likes of his good friend Mark Twain. The riley Home and the adjacent Museum provide many artifacts of riley’s life and times and offer a glimpse into the origin of his works. There’s the old Log Jail, whose nail-spiked wooden cells housed the outlaws of the 1850s through early 1870s and the Chapel in the Park, a restored 19th Century church. Both these museums house substantial collections of early Indiana artifacts from the pioneer days, through the Civil War and into the 20th Century. Historic Fortville is home to Dyer organ Works, housing an impressive collection of elaborate wall-sized calliopes and crank-operated mechanical organs, playing music from folded card mechanisms. sitting on the county line, shirley is the site for “Dr. Wilson’s office: A Country Doctors Museum,” where the world of early rural medicine and its practitioners are well preserved; the shirley railroad Museum, recalling the days of the locomotive when steam power ruled the rails; and the Jane ross reeves octagon House. Whether visitors -- from out of state or just out of town -- spend just a few hours or several days touring these museums, they are likely to be surprised how much there is to see and learn about the heritage and the development of Central Indiana right here in the cities and towns of Hancock County -- a history-laden county that is bisected by the young nation’s very first “interstate” highway, the Historic national road.

B u r e A u

on par nthusiasts who are looking for a unique golfing experience, hunting for a new and different course to play or just searching for a way to relax on the links for a few hours between business commitments are in luck. Hancock County’s fine golfing facilities can provide a casual, yet challenging, opportunity to get away from it all in scenic surroundings and a friendly atmosphere. Hancock County offers a By Dave scott variety of courses, from Par 3 and Executive layouts to fullHcvB executive sized 18-hole courses to test Director players’ golfing skill. And they’re all open to the public. Whether they choose Arrowhead with its tight, picturesque layout; Hawk’s Tail (formerly Greenfield Country Club) which has hosted numerous state tour events; The Links which features undulating terrain and ample water hazards and sand traps; or any of the other locations, they’ll find a diversity of experiences — all well-maintained and ready for play. So don’t forget your clubs whenever you visit with us here at the Heart of the Crossroads —Hancock County.

GreeNFIeLD hAWK’s tAIL GoLF Course 145 S. Morristown Pike (317) 462-2706 18 holes, 6,773 yards Highlights: Old-style course with old trees, water hazards and out of bounds. Scenic and challenging. Back tees are 6,800 yards long. Three different sets of tee markers for all abilities. www.hawkstail.com heArtLAND resort 1613 W. CR 300N (317) 326-3181 Nine-hole par 3 course Highlights: Holes ranging in length from 85-155 yards. Natural water hazards. Tee times not necessary. Pull carts available for rent. heartlandresort.com information@heartlandresort.com MAxWeLL ArroWheAD GoLF Course 3974 Club House Drive (317) 326-2226 18 holes, 6,004 yards Highlights: This course features a variety of terrain and will challenge the most experienced level of player. Water hazards come into play on four holes, and large trees line many fairways. The signature hole is #15, a 543yard, par 5, requiring a tee shot up a very narrow dogleg fairway. arrowheadgc.com NeW pALestINe the LINKs 11425 N. R. Links Lane (317) 861-4466 18 holes, 7,046 yards Highlights: Open year-round. Tee times recommended on weekends. Flat course with plenty of hazards and a choice of tee boxes. Wind is a normal hazard. linksindy.com Mt. CoMFort MuLLIGeN’s DrIVING rANGe 1587 N. CR 600W (317) 891-2880 30 stalls Highlights: Stalls feature mat and grass turf tee boxes with mat tee elevations at 8-10 feet. Challenge hole-in-one bucket shot featured. Open year round, weather permitting, with limited cold-weather heating. In inclement weather, call ahead for availability.

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eDucation going Digital

young learners Benefit from tecHnology trenD

By Daniel morgan staff writer

he past year has seen steady progress on the effort to equip young learners with devices to enhance their education. As students across the county prepare for the start of school, all districts are now embracing some form of digital curriculum that will place computers in the hands of thousands of students this fall. Two county school systems – Eastern and Southern Hancock – have advanced one-to-one programs.

Every southern Hancock student has a device to use for study; at Eastern, students from sixth grade through high school have computers, and the district plans to expand the program. Proponents of the programs argue they level the playing field for students who might not have access to technology at home and enhance the learning environment within the classroom. Greenfield-Central school Board approved the purchase of 1,500 MacBook Air laptops for its high school students for the 2015-2016 school year last December. Though the MacBooks are restricted to high school students, in July, the school board agreed to purchase an additional 192 Chromebooks for its two intermediate schools in an attempt to ease the students’ transition into digital learning environments. Those laptops are expected to be reserved for fi fth-graders initially, but the district plans to purchase more computers for fourth- and sixth-graders as general funds become available.

BRADLEY PRESCHOOL 210 W. Main Street Greenfield, IN 46140 Teaching ages 3-5 since 1976. Go to

www.bradleypreschool.com or call 462-8858 for additional information or to register your child.

78 Da ily rep o rter

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G-C aims to eventually outfit all students k-12 with computers. The district’s first foray into one-to-one computing – a fancy way of saying every student will have a device – will cost an estimated $1.6 million for the MacBooks and an additional $51,372 for the Chromebooks, but the benefit to students, administrators say, will be incalculable. “Before this point, teachers had to go through the challenges of trying to schedule time inside one of our computer labs and getting all their kids from the classroom to the lab,” said Jim Bever, principal at Greenfield Intermediate school. “This way, they’ll be right there in the classroom ready for them to use. Connecting to the Internet in the classroom opens a virtually unlimited number of resources for our students.” To ensure the district can handle the technical responsibility that comes with a digital integration plan, administrators have restructured their technology departments. Apple-certified technicians have been working to get teachers up to speed with the computers, and each school building will have at least one technology specialist, said Greg Thompson, the district’s technology operations director. Mt. Vernon Community school Corp. followed suit in mid June after the school board permitted a $2.5 million loan to issue computers to all grade levels for the 2015-2016 school year. The district is just the second in the county to issue laptops to students at all age levels, trailing only southern Hancock school Corp. The loan will be used to purchase 1,800 iPads for elementary students and 2,300 Chromebooks for

middle and high school students. Greg rollo, technology director for the district, said that’s enough to issue a computer to each student enrolled plus 10 percent to accommodate for growth, as well as one for every teacher. Additional infrastructure will be purchased to support the new technology, including 85 iPad charging carts and five Chromebook charging carts. Each classroom will also receive a wireless access point. As students and teachers grow comfortable with the technology, the district will likely make more purchases in the future, rollo said. The $2.5 million loan, issued through Greenfield Banking Co., will come with a 1.4 percent interest rate, which is the lowest of three banks that submitted proposals, said Brian Tomamichel, corporations business manager. The loan will be paid off through the school’s capital projects fund, which comes from property taxes and textbook rental fees. All students in the district will see a flat $135 textbook rental fee for the laptops, while middle and high school students might pay additional fees depending on the courses they take. Mt. Vernon has also hired a new curriculum coordinator who will make sure teachers have a firm understanding of how the technology works. The shift to a digital learning environment also presents an opportunity for districts to implement online learning days, when students work from home during snow days instead of missing classwork altogether and be forced to make up a day. southern Hancock was the first county corporation to try an online learning day last January.

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eDucation eastern Hancock

2013-14 P.L. 227 accountability grade

A

10370 E. County Road 250N, Charlottesville, IN 46117 • (317) 936-5444 2014-15 Enrollment: 1,177 • 2015 Graduates: 86 • 2014-15 Graduation rate: 93.5 percent

scHool BoarD

aDministration

sCott petry President

steVe WeLsh

Interim Superintendent swelsh@easternhancock .org (317) 936-5444

MIChAeL LeWIs Vice President

eAsterN hANCoCK MIDDLe sChooL 10380 E. County Road 250N, Charlottesville, IN 46117 (317) 936-5324 or (317) 467-9759 David Pfaff, principal dpfaff@easternhancock.org

Director of technology and administrative services trIshA ArMstroNG

thoMAs youNts Assistant Vice President

tarmstrong@easternhancock.org (317) 936-5444

JAMes r. JACKsoN Secretary

Corporation secretary

sCott W. JohNsoN Assistant Secretary

jgoble@easternhancock.org (317) 936-5444

The school board meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of the month at the administration office.

Information technology

JeN GoBLe

eAsterN hANCoCK eLeMeNtAry sChooL 10450 E. County Road 250N, Charlottesville, IN 46117 (317) 936-5829 or (317) 467-0056 Amanda Pyle, principal apyle@easternhancock.org

VICKIe osBorNe vosborne@easternhancock.org (317) 936-5444

Wallace

Brown

Well Drilling, Inc.

894-4400 5823 W. US 40, Greenfield, IN 46140 80 Da ily rep o rter

eAsterN hANCoCK hIGh sChooL 10320 E. County Road 250N, Charlottesville, IN 46117 (317) 936-5595 or (317) 467-0095 David Pfaff, principal dpfaff@easternhancock.org

Jackson Blue River

tHe District

Children in Blue River, Brown and Jackson townships attend Eastern Hancock schools.

DiD you know?

Eastern Hancock is Hancock County’s largest school system by geography but its smallest by enrollment.

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“Still The Original”

Two Locations to Serve You!

Greenfield

McCordsville

• Fast Friendly Service • Great Value Buffet Lunch Mon. through Fri. 11:00 am - 1:30 pm Mon. Tues. Wed. Nights 5:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Call ahead for our convenient drive-thru service for lunch or dinner!

Owners

1031 N. State St. • Greenfield

5917 W. Broadway • McCordsville

M -Th: 11am-9pm • F-Sat: 11am-10pm Sun: 11am-9pm

M -Th: 11am-9pm • F-Sat: 11am-10pm Sun: 11am-9pm

462-3131

335-3131

Sign up up to to receive receive emergency emergency Sign notifications helping helping keep keep notifications you better better informed informed.. you 1Go To https://HancockCountyAlert.bbcportal.com (PUP  2(PUP Click Sign Me Up! $MJDL4JHO.F6Qþ  3$MJDL4JHO.F6Qþ Provide your contact information 1SPWJEFZPVSDPOUBDUJOGPSNBUJPO

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Be informed. Get emergency Be informed. Get notifications andemergency stay involved. notifications and stay involved.

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eDucation greenfielD-central

By tHe numBers

110 W. North St., Greenfield, IN 46140 • (317) 462-4434 2014-15 Enrollment: 4,576 • 2015 Graduates: 311 • 2014-15 Graduation rate: 88.6 percent

scHool BoarD

aDministration

Number of teachers with at least 20 years of experience (37 percent) (2013)

Assistant superintendent ANN VAIL avail@gcsc.k12.in.us (317) 462-4434

rAy KerKhoF First Vice President steVe MeNser Second Vice President

Assistant superintendent, human resources ChrIsty hILtoN chilton@gcsc.k12.in.us (317) 462-4434

DAN LeAry Secretary

Green

Center

Business manager toNy ZurWeLL tzurwell@gcsc.k12.in.us (317) 462-4434

KAthy DoWLING Assistant Secretary

Technology director GreG thoMpsoN gthompson@gcsc.k12.in.us (317) 462-4434

The school board meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of the month at various locations.

The first step to finding the home of your dreams is choosing a Realtor you feel at home with. Amy Borgmann Broker/Owner

39

Superintendent hAroLD oLIN holin@gcsc.k12.in.us (317) 462-4434

rettA LIVeNGooD President

35.1

Percentage of students on the free and reduced-cost lunch program (2013-14)

Melissa Ewald Sales Associate

tHe District

Children in Center and Green townships attend Greenfield-Central schools.

EXPERIENCE THE VERY BEST IN TANNING! 26 BEDS!

Super Clean Facility. Best Prices. Bulbs Routinely Changed. Over 30 Different Lotions In-Stock at the Best Prices Around! We Open Early & We Stay Open Late. Stand-Up Beds, Mega Beds & Face Tanners Available.

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Look for our Anniversary Specials in February and our Fall Specials in September!

(317) 462-4216 1133 W. Main St., Ste. E, Greenfield, IN 46140

info@borgmannrealty.com • www.borgmannrealty.com

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1129 N. State St., Northgate Shopping Center

462-3063

(Next to Walgreens)

Store Hours: Mon-Thurs 7am-10pm; Fri 7am-9pm; Sat 8am-8pm; Sun Noon-8pm

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2013-14 P.L. 227 accountability grade

A

GreeNFIeLD-CeNtrAL hIGh sChooL 810 N. Broadway, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-9211 Steve Bryant, principal sbryant@gcsc.k12.in.us GreeNFIeLD CeNtrAL JuNIor hIGh sChooL 1440 N. Franklin St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 477-4616 Dan Jack, principal djack@gcsc.k12.in.us GreeNFIeLD INterMeDIAte 204 W. Park Ave., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-6827 James Bever, principal jbever@gcsc.k12.in.us MAxWeLL INterMeDIAte 102 N. Main St., Maxwell, IN 46154 (317) 3263121 Jobie Whitaker, principal jwhitaker@gcsc.k12.in.us

Family of Companies

Now offering the Fastest Gigabit Internet Speeds in Indiana

eDeN eLeMeNtAry 8185 N. Ind. 9, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 3263117 Devon Marine, principal dmarine@gcsc.k12.in.us hArrIs eLeMeNtAry 200 W. Park Ave., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 467-6731 Jan Kehrt, principal jkehrt@gcsc.k12.in.us J.B. stepheNs eLeMeNtAry 1331 N. Blue Road, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-4491 Matt Davis, principal mdavis@gcsc.k12.in.us WestoN eLeMeNtAry 140 Polk St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 4621492 Shane Bryant, principal sbryant@gcsc.k12.in.u

ninestarconnect.com

317.326.3131

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eDucation mt. vernon

2013-14 P.L. 227 accountability grade

1776 W. Ind. 234, Fortville, IN 46040-9707 • (317) 485-3100 2014-15 Enrollment: 3,556 • 2015 Graduates: 255 • 2014-15 Graduation rate: 93.8 percent

scHool BoarD

aDministration Superintendent

shANe roBBINs

toNy MAy President

Shane.Robbins@mvcsc.k12.in.us (317) 485-3100 Assistant superintendent

MIKe MCCArty First Vice President

MIKe hortoN

Mike.Horton@mvcsc.k12.in.us (317) 485-3100

KeLLIe FreeMAN Second Vice President

Business manager

BrIAN toMAMICheL

JAsoN sheLtoN Secretary

brian.tomamichel@mvcsc.k12.in.us (317) 485-3100 Technology director

shANNoN WALLs Assistant Secretary

GreG roLLo

greg.rollo@mvcsc.k12.in.us (317) 485-3100

The school board meets at 7 p.m. the third Monday of the month at the administrative office.

Corporation nurse MICheLLe shAW

michellle.shaw@mvcsc.k12.in.us (317) 485-3100

Vernon Buck Creek

PUBLIC WELCOME • 18 Holes • Driving Range • Specialize in Golf Outings and Fundraisers Availability 7 days a week • Children’s Clinics

600 N 400 E • Greenfield 326-2226

Ask about our Customer Value Card

tHe District

Children in Buck Creek and Vernon townships attend Mt. Vernon schools.

www.arrowheadgc.com

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A

Mt. VerNoN hIGh sChooL 8112 N. County Road 200W, Fortville, IN 46040 (317) 485-3131 Bernie Campbell, principal Bernie.Campbell@ mvcsc.k12.in.us Mt. VerNoN MIDDLe sChooL 1862 W. Ind. 234, Fortville, IN 46040-9709 (317) 485-3160 Scott Shipley, principal scott.shipley@mvcsc.k12.in.us FortVILLe eLeMeNtAry 8414 N. County Road 200W Fortville, IN 46040 (317) 485-3180 Heather Noesges, principal heather.noesges@ mvcsc.k12.in.us MCCorDsVILLe eLeMeNtAry 7177 N. County Road 600W, McCordsville, IN 46055 (317) 336-7760 Stephanie Miller, principal stephanie.miller@ mvcsc.k12.in.us Mt. CoMFort eLeMeNtAry 5694 W. County Road 300N, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 894-7667 Heather Whitaker, principal heather.whitaker@ mvcsc.k12.in.us


Looking For an Exceptional Patient Experience? Family Medicine and Pediatric Care – Geist

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• MyChart online patient portal for results, Now accepting new patients • Same-day appointments • Sports physicals • MyChart online Suzanne M. Grannan, appointments, etc. patient portal for results, appointments, etc. • Early morning and Saturday appointments MD Pediatrician • Early morning and Saturday appointments Affordable skin rejuvenation procedures •

Affordable skin rejuvenation procedures

Family Medicine and Pediatric – Geist Family Medicine & Pediatric CareCare – Geist 8150 Oaklandon Road, Suite 130 (at Fox Road) 8150 Oaklandon Rd., Suite 130 (at Fox Rd.) 317.621.1111 Suzanne M. Grannan, MD 317.621.1111 • geistfamilymedicine.com geistfamilymedicine.com Pediatrician

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Contact us today (317) 462-3455 • Same-day appointments www.awmlaw.com email: kgh@awmh.net • Sports physicals Five Courthouse Plaza • Greenfield • MyChart online patient portal for results, Call today to learn more! (317) 844-0433 appointments, etc. Serving Greenfield & Hancock www.Westport-Home.com • Early morning and Saturday appointments County Since 1918 •

Now accepting new patients

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Family Medicine and Pediatric Care – Geist Suzanne M. Grannan, MD Pediatrician

8150 Oaklandon Road, SuiteD130 (at Fox Road) i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 0 1 5 • Daily rep o rter

317.621.1111 geistfamilymedicine.com

85


eDucation soutHern Hancock P.O. Box 508, New Palestine, IN, 46163-0508 • (317) 861-4463 2014-15 Enrollment: 3,354 • 2015 Graduates: 260 • 2014-15 Graduation rate: 95.9 percent

scHool BoarD

aDministration

CrAIG WAGoNer President

LIsA LANtrIp

Superintendent llantrip@newpal.k12.in.us (317) 861-4463, ext. 117

BrIAN MCKINNey Vice President

Assistant superintendent roBert L. yoDer

BArBArA sNyDer Secretary

byoder@newpal.k12.in.us (317) 861-4463, ext. 111

WILLIAM NIeMIer Board member

Director of instructional services

thoMAs tuCKer Board member

rpeterson@newpal.k12.in.us (317) 861-4463, ext. 118

The school board meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Monday of the month at various locations.

Corporation nurse

rhoNDA petersoN

JeANette pINeDA jpineda@newpal.k12.in.us (317) 861-4487

New Palestine Vet Clinic Sugar Creek Brandywine

tHe District

86 Da ily rep o rter

861-4423

Children in Brandywine and Sugar Creek townships attend Southern Hancock schools.

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Discover New Palestine Vet Clinic 1/8th

A

NeW pALestINe hIGh sChooL 4485 S. Victory Drive, New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-4417 Keith Fessler, principal kfessler@newpal.k12.in.us Doe CreeK MIDDLe sChooL 5613 W. County Road 200S, New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-4487 Jim Voelz, principal jvoelz@newpal.k12.in.us BrANDyWINe eLeMeNtAry 413 E. County Road 400S, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-7396 Mark Kern, principal mkern@newpal.k12.in.us NeW pALestINe eLeMeNtAry 4801 S. County Road 500W, New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-5287 Katy Eastes, principal keastes@newpal.k12.in.us

Full Service Vet Clinic • Grooming Available Monday - Friday 7AM-6PM • Saturday 8AM-12PM

5237 West US Highway 52 New Palestine

2013-14 P.L. 227 accountability grade

suGAr CreeK eLeMeNtAry 2337 S. County Road 600W, New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-6747 Kari Shelton, principal kshelton@newpal.k12.in.us


IndianaGentleDentist.com

MOWERS IT’S SO MUCH MOWER

4267 East US 40 • Greenfield, IN

(317) 462-2555

www.mid-statetruck.com Solid D i s c o v e r H a Hancock n c o c k cCo oun t y 2 Waste 015 • SS wn

Discover 2013 -

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eDucation st. micHael scHool 515 Jefferson Blvd., Greenfield, IN 46140 • (317) 462-6380 2014-15 Enrollment: 283 (Grades K-8)

aDministration Principal pAtty MAVer (317) 462-6380, pmaver@stmichaelsgrfld.org Office assistant LINDA soLtes (317) 462-6380, lsoltes@stmichaelsgrfld.org

18

Number of teachers at St. Michael School

scHool commission David Berty, Peggy Hays, Becky Garcia, Randy Kerkhoff, Joanna Mulligan and Jenny Thorpe

You have a Choice... for your children’s education St. Michael Catholic School Pre-Kindergarten through 8th Grade Children of all Faiths Welcome Send your child to a faith based school that provides a quality learning experience!

Government vouchers are accepted at St. Michael. Call us to find out how you can use your voucher at St. Michael.

For More information contact Patricia Mauer, Principal 317-462-6380 www.stmichaelsgrfld.org 88 Da ily rep o rter

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SHOE STORE

Get Measured. Get Fit.

90 W. McClarnon Dr., Greenfield, IN 46140

Locally Owned & Operated

Big Lots

Foot Remedy

Miller’s Jewelry

Monday - Friday: 9:00am-6:00pm Saturday: 9:00am-2:00pm

Highway 9

(317) 462-2274 KFC

W. McClarnon Drive

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eDucation Zion lutHeran scHool 6513 W. County Road 300S, New Palestine IN 46163 • (317) 861-4210 2015-16 Enrollment: 185 (Grades PreK-8)

aDministration Principal KrIstIe soMBKe (317) 861-4210, ksombke@zionnewpal.org School secretary trACy turNer (317) 861-4210, tturner@zionnewpal.org

19

Number of teachers at Zion Lutheran School

scHool BoarD Andrea Engler, Nathan Werner, Linda Schulenburg, Belinda Hayes, Debbie Mitchell, Emily Pass, Trice Greene and Brian Mitchell

39

Average age of teachers at Zion Lutheran School

We would like to invite the Hancock County community to these great events! German Dinner - October 03 [4:00-7:30]

Spaghetti Dinner - March 11 [5:00-7:00]

Preschool Open House - February 02 [10:00-7:00]

Spring Dinner & Silent Auction - TBA

Children’s Museum Night - February 03 [6:00-8:00]

Earth Day Celebration - April 15 [3:30-5:00]

Kindergarten - 8th Grade Open House February 18 [2:00-7:00]

Vacation Bible School - June 06-09 [6:00-8:00pm]

Saturday Praise Service 6:00pm | Sunday Traditional Services 8:00 & 10:30am Sunday School - Adult & Children 9:15am

6513 W. 300 S., New Palestine | 317-861-4210 | www.zionnewpal.org Sessions offered ffered throughout the year. ff

Zion Lutheran Page 90 1/2 Da ily rep o rter Discover 2015 wn

Dinners are Free Will Donation. All events marked with are presented by Dani’s Dreams

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aDult

eDucation

hancock county aduLt Literacy coaLition 900 W. McKenzie Road, Greenfield, IN 46140 c/o Hancock County Public Library (317) 462-5141 ext. 210 President: Mary Lynn Burrows The Hancock County Literacy Coalition is a group of people of all backgrounds who share an interest in supporting Learning Center students in their effort to help themselves. Primarily that involves raising money to help pay for High School Equivalency (HSE)

Hancock County Senior Services

317.462.3758 In-home non-medical support service for older adults and those with disabilities. Homemaker, Telephone Reassurance, Respite/Assisted Care, Outreach, Volunteer Services, Information & Referral, and Handyman

testing, supplies, rewards and for scholarships to help graduating students continue their education. The coalition also hosts a graduation ceremony for students who earned their HSE at the Hancock County Learning Center. Their primary source of income is the Adult Bee for Literacy held each September. hancock county Learning center 840 S. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 318-1006 Hours: 9 a.m.-noon and 5:308:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

More and more people of all ages are turning to the Hancock County Learning Center to improve their educational skills and employability in an increasingly demanding workforce. The Hancock County Learning Center is operated by the state of Indiana Department of Workforce Development in conjunction the Metropolitan School District of Warren Township’s adult education program at the Walker Career Center. In August 2013, it was announced that the GED test would be replaced by TASC (Test Assessing Secondary Completion). It is being referred to as the HSE (high school equivalency) test. This test will be aligned to the College and Career Readiness Standards over the next few years. It will gradually increase in rigor to better meet industry demand. Instruction is offered in: Adult Basic Education, Reading, Math, Writing, High School Equivalency Preparation, Basic Workforce

Link – Leaders in navigating knowLedge 312 E. Main St., Suite A (317) 477-0745 Education development director: Danielle Daugherty, ddaugherty.hcea@icloud.com LINK assists individuals at least 18 years old, organizations and businesses in Hancock County with achieving their educational goals. LINK provides a network of postsecondary education providers: degree programs, certifications, vocational/ technical training, financial aid and other resources. LINK’s services are free and span from developing employerbased training, to individual meetings with residents to support certification/degree completion. waLker career center 9651 E. 21st St., Indianapolis, IN 46229 (317) 532-6155 Director of adult education: Brenda Owen

Hancock Area Rural Transit

317.462.1103 Transportation for county residents birth to 100+ years of age.

You may see 5 to 8% fuel mileage increase.

Passenger transportation to appointments, grocery shopping, food pantries, and other destinations.

Join our wholesale buyers program for a 25% discount.

Serving older adults and disabled residents of Hancock County since 1978 with special services and programs to help them maintain their pride, self-worth, and independence. 1870 Fields Boulevard, Greenfield, IN 46140 www.hcssi.org

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Skills and Post-secondary Education Preparation.

• D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015

Call Linda Evans today!

317-462-6781


Rural Living & Local Food

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4-H clubs extension.purdue.edu • Hancock County Extension Educator - Youth • Sarah Burke (317) 462-1113

blue river bLue river guys & gaLs Kathi Riggs (317) 450-0082; Tarra Youngclaus (317) 450-0081; Amanda Locker (317) 498-0195 royaL rambLers Janet Sickle (765) 785-2527; Tara Tague (317) 462-0758

branDyWine brandywine’s best Debi Hill (317) 462-1561; Heather Hill (317) 462-2919; Joannie Bowen (317) 861-5265 cLiP cLoP cLovers Joannie Bowen (317) 861-5265; Linda Petty (765) 938-2145; Amanda McNicholas (317) 3262789; Jody Roth (317) 417-5110

broWn barnyard buddies Tina Gibson (765) 624-6196; Belinda Stamper (864) 367-5938

94 Da ily rep o rter

buck creek 4-h friend-Z Deb Cochard (317) 326-2030; Cheryl Cochard (317) 326-1696

center bLue Jays Harry Tracy (317) 462-4290; Laura Tracy (317) 498-1367; Nina Stotler (317) 750-8355

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country kids Pam Kerkhof (317) 326-1054; Holly Shore (317) 326-4328; Elyse Cory (317) 326-4328; Julie Elsbury (502) 498-6932 fantastic 4-hers Teresa Bever (317) 462-3332


RESPONSIVE WEBSITE DESIGN RETARGETING

d i s c o v e r

h a n c o c k

Create the bestRegain user experience on all devic lost customers.

c oSayugoodbye nWEBSITE t Don’t y miss RESPONSIVE DESIGN to spending money onlost multiple websiT RETARGETING out on business.

Today, more local customers are searching for your business This cutting-edge technology provides one website Create the bestRegain user experience on all devices. lost customers. with their smartphones. Are you losing customers searching for size and resolution to the every device - automa Now youfor can keep in touch and s Say goodbye to spending money on multiple website updates. Don’t miss out on lost Today’s custom your business on the go? Give customers anywhere access to features you all the need on business. one platform. customers throughout their buyin Today, more local customers are searching for your business your website while generating more business for This you.cutting-edge technology provides one website that adjusts

with their smartphones. Are you losing customers searching for size and resolution to the every device - automatically! Get to Now youfor can keep in touch and stay relevant MOBILE WEBSITE DESIGN your business on the go? Give customers anywhere access to features all the you need on one platform. DIRECT EMAIL customers throughout their buying decision. your website while generating more business for you.

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suGar specialty Reach the right people at the MOBILE WEBSITE DESIGN DIRECT EMAIL are searching for your Today, more local Build customers your email marketing campa their smartphones. you losing creek Reach the people at thecustomers right time.s Help your business become more credible and visible to with customer base! Using your most bicycLe cLub rightAre bLue ribbon your business on the go? Give customers anywher

Lucky cLovers Erika Matthews (317)

326-0600; Ashley Schultz (317) 326-5501; Chrissy Paxton (317) 498-4577

Today, more local customers are searching forcampaigns your business RESPONSIVE WEBSITE DESIGN potential customers with professional Logo Creation. Create RETARGETING your campaigns reach active Build your email marketing andand exp

Jay and Stephanie Jones bunch Help consistent their smartphones. Are base! you losing customers searching foryo your website while generating more business for your business become more credible and visible to with branding across all platforms and stand out from customer Using your current data e Direct Email willmost help to micro-tar sugar creek 4-h Create best user experience onactive all devices. Regain lost customers. (317) 946-2576 your the business on the go? Give customers anywhere access to m potential customers with professional Logo Creation. Create your campaigns reach and high-quality l provide you with real-time email Dawn Wallace (317) Mariann and Meyer (317) your website while generating business for you. consistent branding across all platforms stand out from Direct Email will to micro-target your custo audie Say goodbye to spending money onhelp multiple website updates. Don’t miss outmore on lost business. Today’s LOGO CREATION 752-4880; Kim Blue (317) 861-1903; Long provide you with real-time email metrics. Today, more local customers are searching forStephanie your business This cutting-edge technology one MEDIA website that adjusts goats r usprovides SOCIAL OPTIM Make a strong impression. (317) 861-4766searching LOGO CREATION 498-6567; Traci Carter Are you losing with their smartphones. customers for to the size and resolution every device - automatically! Get Now youfor can keep in touch and stay relevant Cheryl Overman (317) 326SOCIAL MEDIA OPTIMIZATION your business toMake all the features you need on one platform. How many places do youvisib sh customers throughout their buying decision. your business become more credible and (317) 467-0609on the go? Give customers anywhere access a Help strong impression. 2650 customers your website while generating more business for you. potential with professional Logo Creation Social media is the new word-of-m Build, manage, and grow your online business with How many places do and youvisible shine? Help your business become more credible to

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competitors with a faster unique logo design. country kritters grow than those who consistentyour branding across all platforms and stand fromdon’t. businesses who engage theirout customers v bitsthat and Pieces horse E-Commerce. With the ability to reach customers 24/7, you

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more potential customers, and eliminate missed revenue grow faster4-h thancLub those who don’t. Now it’s easy Cathie Hickerson (317) and Pony cooL cLovers Today, more local customers are searching forcampaigns your Build your email marketing and ex loyal customers updated and gain business new ones. RESPONSIVE WEBSITE DESIGN RETARGETING more potential customers, and eliminate missed revenue E-COMMERCE 326-4193; Tristan Blach with their smartphones. Are you losing customers searching for 462-6670; Vickie Ramsey Wyneta Duncan (317) 462Help your business become more credible visible to 326Laura and Phares (317) customer base! Using your most current data E-COMMERCE REPUTATION MONITO Create the bestRegain user experience on all devices. lost business customers. (317) 462-7080 your on the go? Give customers anywhere access to Manage your store fromMONITORING anywhere. potential customers with professional Logo Creation. Create 9224 and Barb Pescitelli (317) your campaigns reach active and high-quality (317) 753-4144 2573; Rhonda Beeker (317) REPUTATION SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION Say goodbye to spending money onlost multiple website updates. Manage your store from anywhere. Don’t miss out on business. Today’s customers take your website while generating more business for you. Know what your customers consistent branding across all platforms and stand out from Direct Email will help to micro-target your with auda Build, manage, and grow your online business 462-5376; Molly Elsbury 891-8913 OPTIMIZATION Today, more local customersSEARCH are searchingENGINE for your business This cutting-edge technology provides one website that adjusts Know what your customers are saying Build, manage, and grow your online business withmetrics. provide you with real-time email E-Commerce. With the ability toreviews reach customers 2a Don’t let bad shut you do (317) 326-3808 Are you losing customers searching for size and resolution to the every device - automatically! Getto Now youfor can keep in touch and stay relevant to your Arlyne (317) 341E-Commerce. With theLayton ability reach customers 24/7, provides you uP north cLub with their smartphones. Don’t let bad reviews shut you down. Everyone Jackson achievers LOGO CREATION opinion and the Internet your business on the go? Give customers anywhere access to features you all the need on one platform. customers throughout their buying decision. 1308; Candy Trout opinion and the(317) Internet provides the megapho potential customers, and eliminate missed rev 70% of consumers trusting online your competitors? you SOCIAL your website while generating more business for you. If search engines don’t know you exist,more MEDIA OPTIMIZATION Lisa Colles (317) 778Karen Campbell (317) more potential customers, and eliminate missed revenue Make a strong impression. 70% of consumers online reviews, you shakin’ 331-1035; Heather Seibtrusting (317) your competitors? If search engines don’tshamrocks know you exist, you

0503; Stacey Valentine (317) 326-3495

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4-H clubs hancock co. 4-h LLama and aLPaca cLub Jesse Melton (317) 462-9431 bunnies hoP-a-Lot (Hancock Co. Rabbit Club) David Wildman (317) 467-4889 Robert Branscum (317) 462-2074; Kellie Goad (317) 335-7544; Amanda Stiffler (317) 508-7322 mini 4-h cLub Helen Roney (317) 326-8488; Mike Roney (317) 326-8488 Paws & PaLs (Hancock Co. 4-H Dog Club) Jan Cochard (317) 691-3038;

Carla Nelson (317) 498-6633; Melissa Anderson (317) 3353702; Gwen Cochard (317) 6913038; Karen and Robert Frost (317) 326-5547; Judy Schroeder (317) 902-5415; Diane Jackson (317) 417-5909 shooting sPorts Greg Hall (317) 433-0468 Rifle I: John Sullivan (317) 433-1765 Rifle II and Pistols: Robert Jordan (317) 363-4199 Rifle III and Pistols: Mary & Keith Raisor (317) 694-2336 Archery I and II: Deb Cochard (317) 326-2030 Muzzle Loading: Rusty Hansen (317) 281-4942

Shotguns: Keith Parker (765) 714-2249 beef cattLe: Steve Wilson (317) 326-3240

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comPact tractors: Kevin Quick (317) 610-6349

rabbits: David Wildman (317) 467-4889

dairy cattLe: Jon Sparks (317) 491-3965

sheeP: John Apple (317) 326-1780

dairy goats: Amberlee Hudson (317) 462-6624

suPreme showmanshiP: Debbie Vansickle (317) 326-1442

meat goats: Jordan McPherson (317) 504-8712

swine: Jeff Jones (317) 936-5322

Brand & Morelock

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cities&toWns government 11501 E. Washington St., Cumberland, IN 46229 (317) 894-6201 town.cumberland.in.us • Clerk-treasurer (317) 8946201 • Town manager (317) 8946213 • Police chief (317) 894-3525 • Planning and Development Administrator (317) 894-6202 • Department of Public Works (317) 894-6210

Note: All locations have 911 emergency service.

charlottesville Located along the eastern edge of Hancock County on U.S. 40. government • Under jurisdiction of Hancock County Commissioners. Zoning by Hancock County Area Planning Commission. education Eastern Hancock Community School Corp.

utilities Electricity: Duke Energy Telephone: SBC Cable: Cablevision Knightstown services • Hancock County Sheriff’s Department • Jackson Township Fire Department

cumberland Located in the western part of Hancock County and east side of Marion County on U.S. 40. 2010 census: 5,169.

• Council meets at 7 p.m. on the first and third Wednesday of each month in the Cumberland town hall. education • Warren Township Schools • Southern Hancock Schools • Mt. Vernon Community Schools utilities Sewer: Municipal Water: Citizens Water Natural Gas: Citizens Gas, Vectren Electricity: Duke Energy, Indianapolis Power and Light Telephone: SBC

Fortville Located between Anderson and Indianapolis on U.S. 36 (Ind. 67), Ind. 238 and Ind. 13. I-69 is four miles north of the corporate limits. I-70 is 12 miles south and I-465 is 12 miles southwest. The town is situated on a major CSX Transportation line. 2010 census: 3,929 government Fortville Municipal Building 714 E. Broadway St., Fortville, IN 46040 (317) 485-4044 fortvilleindiana.org • Clerk-treasurer (317) 4854044 • Town manager (317) 4854044 • Police chief (317) 485-4044 • Fire chief (317) 485-5354 • Streets and parks foreman (317) 485-4044 • Water-Sewer superintendent (317) 485-4044 • Town attorney (317) 6845302 • Council serves staggered four-year terms and meets at 7 p.m. on the first and third Monday of each month at Fortville Municipal Building.

Flowers & Boutique Please visit our website for information about our town, community events, organizations, and the heart of our town - the people. Strawberry Festival - Third Saturday in May Christmas Walk - Saturday Following Thanksgiving

51 W. Main Street • New Palestine

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The seat of Hancock County, 15 miles east of Indianapolis. I-70 intersects the northern edge of the city; U.S. 40 and Ind. 9 intersect at the center of town. I-74 is 15 miles south of city. 2010 census: 20,602 government 10 S. State St., Greenfield IN 46140 (317) 477-4310 greenfieldin.org • Mayor (317) 477-4300 • Clerk-treasurer (317) 4774310 • City attorney (317) 4625577 • Police chief (317) 477-4400 • Fire chief (317) 477-4430

• Parks and Recreation Superintendent (317) 325-1453 • Zoning Administrator (317) 477-4320 • City Engineer (317) 4774320 • Director of Utilities (317) 325-1338 • Council meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month at City Hall. education • Greenfield-Central schools utilities Water and Sewer: Municipal Natural Gas: Vectren Electricity: Greenfield Power and Light (municipally owned); NineStar Connect and Duke Energy serve some areas.

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Discover Hancock county Telephone: NineStar Connect, SBC Cable: Comcast, NineStar Connect services • Police force, fire department

mccordsville Located in northwest Hancock County, near the shores of Geist Reservoir, on Ind. 67, minutes away from I-465, I-70 and I-69. 2010 census: 4,797. government McCordsville Municipal

Building, 6280 W. County Road 800N, McCordsville, IN 46055 (317) 335-2810 mccordsville.org • Clerk-treasurer (317) 335-2810 • Town manager (317) 335-3151 • Police chief (317) 335-2812

• Fire chief (317) 335-9256 • Town attorney (317) 4627787 • Council meets at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month in the municipal building.

education • Mt. Vernon schools utilities Natural Gas: Citizens Gas, Vectren Electricity: NineStar Connect, Indianapolis Power and Light Telephone: NineStar Connect Cable: Bright House, Comcast, NineStar Connect services • Police, volunteer fire department operated by Vernon Township, weekly trash pickup by a private contractor (paid by city), Independent sewer billing (317) 335-1044

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mt. comfort Located in western Hancock County, north of I-70 and 5 miles east of I-465. government Under jurisdiction of Hancock County Commissioners education • Mt. Vernon schools utilities Water: Indianapolis Water Sewer: Western Hancock Natural Gas: Vectren Electricity: NineStar Connect, Duke Energy Telephone: NineStar Connect, SBC, Sprint Cable: Insight, Time/Warner

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services • Mt. Comfort Airport, Western Hancock Sewage Utility, Hancock County Sheriff’s Department, Buck Creek Township Fire Department (317) 894-4564

new palestine Eight miles southeast of Indianapolis on U.S. 52. I-465 is minutes to the west, and I-74 lies to the south. 2010 census: 2,065. government 42 E. Main St., New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-4727 townofnewpalestine.org • Clerk-treasurer (317) 8614727

• Town manager (317) 8614727 • Town marshal (317) 8614425 • Fire chief (317) 861-5721

• Town attorney (317) 4627787 • Council meets at 8 a.m. on the first Saturday and 7 p.m.on the third Wednesday of the month at town hall.

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education • Southern Hancock schools utilities Water: Citizens Water Sewer: Town treatment plant Natural Gas: Vectren Electricity: Duke Energy Telephone: SBC Cable: Comcast, NineStar Connect services • Police force, fire department. Trash pickup included in tax rate. Nearest landfill: 8 miles to east

shirley On the Hancock-Henry county line, 5 miles north of I-70 and 33 miles east of Indianapolis. 2010 census: 830. government

409 Main St., P.O. Box 90, Shirley IN 47384 (765) 738-6561 • Clerk-treasurer (765) 7386561 • Town marshal • Town attorney • Council meets 6:30 p.m. the

first Monday of the month in the town hall. education

• Eastern Hancock schools • Charles A. Beard schools

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• Police force, EMS, fire department; weekly trash pickup included in tax rate.

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cHurcHes Fortville Christian Church member Dave Griffey helps local children with their crafts during Vacation Bible School. The church members connected with youths during a mission trip to the Dominican Republic.

ricH in Joy

mission builDs relationsHips abroaD hey traveled to the Dominican Republic with by anne soccer balls, fingernail polish, stickers and DurHam smitH markers tucked into their suitcases. They staFF Writer returned to Fortville with photos, tears and a new perspective on what makes a meaningful life. Nineteen members of Fortville Christian Church traveled to the Dominican Republic recently with tasks in mind: benches to build, vacation Bible school to lead and walls to paint at a church and several houses. “Different trips have had different work projects,” said tim Flick, an elder at the church and coordinator of this year’s trip. “our main purpose, though, was to go down and love the pastor and his family and the kids in the community.”

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they did this work in a setting of eye-opening poverty. Dorinda arnold said she thought she had seen enough news reports and documentaries to make her aware of poverty. “i thought i knew what

poverty was, but i didn’t,” she said. “the first night, all i could see was poverty; the second day and on, i saw the people.” Beyond the jobs they performed and the great needs they saw, she and her teammates forged relationships

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with people who showed them moving examples of great love, deep gratitude and exuberant faith. there was the boy who brought a mango to a team member each day after he saw the man searching for one early in the trip. there was the hospitality offered by homeowners inviting the group in. there was the wholehearted singing by people in the local church, a sight remarkable enough to bring residents of surrounding homes “out on their porches watching the christians worship,” said Dain anderson in a video. (He and other team members shared thoughts on the trip in Fortville christian church’s June 28 service, which was posted online.) “they were there to praise the Lord and to worship God,” he told the local congregation. “they weren’t there to check a box.” in her words to the congregation on the video, nikki Privett voices a similar observation. “they celebrate Jesus in a way that churches in america just have no idea,” she said. “they celebrate with their whole mind, their whole heart, their whole body — just everything. they are dancing and shouting praise to the Lord. “it is the most beautiful, most authentic, most joyful worship experience i have ever seen or been a part of in my entire life, and it makes me sad that we don’t celebrate Jesus, the way they do, in america,” she continued, her voice breaking with emotion.


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“He is their everything.” the church the group visited in the Dominican republic is led by Pastor Gregorio thomas of Pata de Gallina. He and his wife, Josefa, and their three children feed about 75 children six days a week. the meals were cooked over an open flame until a couple of years ago, when an earlier mission team helped build a kitchen. the meal — often chicken, rice and beans — is “either the only meal they get, or it’s the best meal of the day,” Flick said. the mission team helped with feeding the children each day, and after the meal, they held vacation

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Bible school classes for a couple of hours. team members shared lessons with the children, and the children worked on crafts such as banners with dowel rods that they could decorate or tambourines made with paper plates, beans and streamers. one evening, the women of the group organized Ladies’ night at the church for women of the community. they painted fingernails, served fancy cookies with punch, made scarves out of t-shirts and enjoyed each other’s company. “We humble ourselves and serve them, and we get so much more back,” said team member Margie Whitaker.

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she was on her second trip to the Dominican republic. the people there “witnessed to me as much as i blessed them. it’s a mutual blessing.” While the women gathered, the men played dominoes. they gathered around three or four tables, with teams from the Dominican taking on teams from Fortville. “apparently, they love dominoes and are very good at it,” Flick said. He laughs. “they crushed us, really.” still, he said, it was good to be together and continue building relationships. He said when the church was choosing an additional mission site to support sev-

eral years ago, it wanted one close enough to travel to, one church teams could return to, building deeper relationships over time. “you get to know the people,” said Brenda ayers, who has made three trips to the country. “they become like family.” the church partners with Go Ministries, whose staff members raise their own support. that means all the money donated by Fortville christian goes to the actual work of the feeding center for the children. “to see these kids so happy and joyful, … it’s a gut check,” Flick said. “it makes you really evaluate yourself and what’s important in life.”

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HelpinG HanD FunD supports ministry-minDeD stuDents onathan Roller spends his work days organizing Sunday morning services for young children, Sunday evening youth gatherings, and activities for the fifth- and sixth-graders in between.

by anne DurHam smitH staFF Writer

He serves as family minister at Fall creek christian church in Pendleton, a position he assumed not long after graduating from Johnson university in tennessee. the transition from college to the ministry was eased for him by a scholarship from a Greenfieldbased foundation that has awarded more than $2 million to aspiring ministers and missionaries in the 50 years since it began. “it defi nitely made college more possible for me and … reduced what i would have had to pay back in student loans,” roller said. “it defi nitely eased the weight a little.” aside from the college cash, the scholarship gave roller a boost by “people recognizing where my heart was and what i was passionate about.” that recognition came from the alexander christian Foundation, which awards scholarships to students involved in an independent christian church/church of christ who want to pursue a career in ministry.

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1.5 Miles East of S.R. 9 on 700N, Greenfield, IN• 317-326-3129

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it was the dream of Bill Duncan, an insurance salesman and a deacon at southport Heights christian church in indianapolis. He wanted to set up a fund that offered money for Bible college for young people who felt called to ministry. in the early 1970s, he was at the hospital while a family member had surgery. two pastor friends came to sit with him. as they talked in the waiting room, he shared the idea. Ministers Bruce Miller and ken arnold liked the concept. Duncan contributed some of his own profits and contacted business leaders around the state,

who also made contributions. the alexander christian Foundation was born. “the word, alexander, means helper,” said David Woods, senior minister at Park chapel christian church and foundation vice president. “the early directors landed on that — that it would be a helping organization.” the first scholarship was awarded in 1964 to Mary Faith Hall of Bedford. she would become a college classmate of Woods’ at Johnson university (then Johnson Bible college), but that was before he knew about the foundation. in the earlier years of the foundation, Woods was

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organizing a youth rally when he crossed paths with some minister friends involved in it. they invited him to join its board; he later served a 25-year tenure as president. During that tenure, the foundation’s headquarters, which had once been in Duncan’s insurance office on the northwest side of indianapolis, moved to Hancock county. twenty years ago, the headquarters were moved into an office near u.s. 40 and county road 600W; for the past 14 years, the foundation has occupied an office in the Hancock county community Foundation building on east Main street. that’s not all that has

changed; the amount awarded and the number of recipients in a year have grown. the foundation offered a single scholarship in the beginning of about $300 per semester. a laywoman at one of the christian churches urged a larger scholarship, Woods said; today, first-year college students receive $1,500, with the potential to earn a $2,000 scholarship in later years if they maintain a B average. there are graduate-level scholarships these days, too. according to the foundation’s office manager, Judith colip, 817 students have received scholarships over the past 50 years, totaling $2.1 million.

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the foundation grew by not only addition but also multiplication. about 25 years ago, Duncan asked Gene Mcelroy to travel for a year for the foundation to try to establish foundations in other states. about seven or eight were formed, Woods said, and not all of them lasted, but several are still in existence. each has its own scholarship structure and does its own fundraising. that is how an insurance salesman’s dream became more than $3 million in scholarships for future ministers and missionaries. “Many of (the recipients) have become really amazing workers in mission fields,” Woods said.

others have found their calling closer to Greenfield. Danny curry, spiritual development minister at Park chapel, was a scholarship recipient from the foundation and also served it as a summer intern. tom scott, senior minister at cumberland christian church, was also a recipient and became president of the foundation in 2011. scott remembers 1964 recipient Mary Faith (Hall) enyart from his days at college, where her husband was a professor. according to scott, she’s a “great christian lady … highly respected,” part of a long list of remarkable recipients. “students have gone on to

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every part of the world, every part of the country, and are doing amazing things,” he said, and the foundation exists to help free them to do those amazing things sooner. “Huge student loans are a huge shackle,” he said. “through acF, we try to lighten that load a little. that’s why it’s important to keep it going.” scott writes letters thanking individuals and churches who donate to the foundation and tries to spread the word by making sure ministers and students in independent christian churches/ churches of christ know about the scholarship. roller is trying to do that,

too. He said some of the students he works with are considering ministry, and he’ll be ready to tell them about the scholarship. When roller was a teenager, he was involved in Wilkinson church of christ. His minister there was ryan Mccarty, himself a past scholarship recipient. He nominated roller for the award. While some colleges and universities will match contributions from churches, “i don’t know of any other foundation that offers a scholarship for specifically targeting mission and ministry-minded students,” Mccarty said. “the acF is definitely in its own genre.”

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spiritual Journey neW priest to settle in at st. micHael cHurcH

During his growing up years, long before The Rev. Aaron Jenkins’ spiritual journey led him to assume leadership in by anne Greenfield, he felt DurHam God might be calling him to be a pastor. smitH The new priest of St. Michael Catholic staFF Church remembers that, as a child growing Writer up in Rush County, he and his family were regulars at Zion United Church of Christ in Shelbyville. Later, he became a college student at Anderson University, a Church of God-affiliated school. He said during those years he fell away from faith.

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“i really believed this was it,” he said. During his senior year of college, he entered the rite of christian initiation for adults, the series of classes for adults who choose to join the catholic church, at st. ambrose catholic church in anderson. after college, Jenkins became an elementary school art teacher in the Washington, D.c., area.

some life experiences helped bring him back, though, and he thought long and hard about various expressions of the christian faith and which church he should join. During this season of consideration, he was working with a stained-glass artist who was catholic. Jenkins talked with him and with some cousins who are also catholic.

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Discover Hancock county But thoughts of being a pastor stayed with him. eventually, he entered st. Meinrad school of theology to further explore if the priesthood was God’s calling for him. “i think i finally reached that moment a couple years in,” he said. Jenkins was ordained in June 2008. seven years later, Jenkins has come to Greenfield as the new priest of st. Michael catholic church. that’s the same time that his successor assumed duties at st. teresa Benedicta of the cross in Bright, the church Jenkins has served

for four years. it’s a newer congregation, less than 20 years old, that meets in a worship space not originally built to be a church. kim sprague, who coordinates religious education and youth ministry for the parish, remembers that one of her early conversations with Jenkins was about the best use of the building for its various ministry functions. “His fresh perspective and ability to look at the big picture brought some new ideas,” sprague wrote in an email. “He was open to conversation and suggestions, which i appreciated,

and the final changes in how to best utilize office and meeting space were very effective for parish life, ministry and staff.” sprague said Jenkins is a wonderful shepherd and encouraged st. Michael parishioners to get to know him beyond Mass attendance, describing him as a person of wisdom, wit and humor. she also described ways in which he helped deepen the spiritual lives of people in the parish at Bright, citing Bible study groups and other faith formation efforts he helped establish and other ways he chal-

lenged them to deeper devotion. “His encouragement for everyone in the parish to live through the scriptures was truly transforming,” she wrote. “you could tell that he read and prayed the scriptures and spent a lot of time preparing his homilies, but he also reflected on them in how he lived his vocation.” the parish in Bright said farewell to Jenkins on June 14 at a pitch-in after Masses. “this is the longest place i’ve ever lived (since school),” he said. “there are good people here.”

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More importantly, “i trust God is guiding me to this place,” he said. He’s excited to serve a parish with a school. in the years right after he was ordained, he was a chaplain for Father thomas scecina Memorial High school. other roles he juggled at various times from 2008-11, before he went to Bright, included being an associate pastor at Holy name of Jesus in Beech Grove, a chaplain for indianapolis Fire Department, associate director of vocations for the indianapolis archdiocese and sacramental minister for a handful of churches. in addition to leading the st. Michael parish, he will

still, he said he’d had time to prepare himself for the possibility of moving. He realized after the rev. Bill stumpf was chosen for a job with the indianapolis archdiocese, creating a vacancy at st. Michael, that it was possible he would be selected for the job. the two once worked together in the past; in 2007, when stumpf served st. charles Borromeo catholic Parish in Bloomington, Jenkins ministered there during the summer. and being from rushville, “Greenfield is not unfamiliar to me,” he said. it places him between his parents in rushville and his sister in noblesville.

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serve as a chaplain coordinator at scecina. While art continues to be a passion of his, Jenkins also enjoys fly fishing and hunting, including dove hunting and archery hunting for deer. “it’s just kind of nice to be out there” in nature, he said. He estimates half of these excursions are solo outings, but other times he goes with his father or with fellow priests. “He’s a person of many interests, varied interests,” said Deacon Wayne Davis at st. Michael. “i think he’ll relate very well to our young people. “i think there’s a lot of excitement in the parish.” Before he assumes his

duties at st. Michael, Jenkins has been on a previously planned trip to ireland. a time to relax, see sites of interest to his faith. “you can’t go to ireland and it not be infused with catholicism,” he said in an interview before the trip. He anticipated seeing the Book of kells, a Marian shrine and other sites. at the same time, “it provides a nice little retreat in between – space and time to pray.” after that, it’s time to “get there and get to know the community and see where it’s at,” he said. “i just want to give people beautiful Mass and help them see God.”

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Calvary Baptist Church 1450 W. Main Street Greenfield, IN 46140 317-462-4586 Pastor Roger Kinion cbc@cbcgreenfield.org www.cbcgreenfield.org

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Pastors of stringtown church of the naZarene Listed are the men and women who have served as pastor or associate pastor at Stringtown Church of the Nazarene, which became New Hope three years ago. 1915-17 Rev. A.F. Balsmeier 1917-18 Rev. Sadie McNeese Hoover 1918 Rev. McCullon 1918-1920 Rev. Stephen C. Johnson 1920-21 Rev. Ira Sherrow 1921-22 Rev. Henry W. Cornelius 1922-25 Rev. Harry C. Carter 1925-26 Rev. Stephen C. Johnson 1926-28 Rev. L. Richard Rahrar 1928-29 Rev. George Gatecliff 1929-30 Rev. J.D.P. Cowan 1930 Rev. Wines 1930-32 Enos Haggard 1932-39 Rev. Forest E. Crider 1939-44 Rev. G. Essel Cooper 1944-48 Rev. J.H. Baughman 1948-50 Rev. L.H. Listenberger 1950-52 Rev. Lee Bates 1952-54 Rev. Calvin Wheeldon 1954-56 Rev. W.R. Miracle 1956-59 Rev. Paul Cable 1959-64 Rev. James W. Ford 1964-65 Rev. Linard O. Wells 1965-67 Rev. Samuel Hawn 1967-73 Rev. David Craig 1973-74 Rev. Raymond W. Hann 1975-76 Rev. Marshall T. Lambert Associated Rev. Gale Ashby 1976-86 Rev. Keith A. Sparks 1986-89 Rev. Forrest F. Harvey 1989-94 Rev. Herman R. Pieper Associate Rev. Eric Fritz Associate Rev. Glenn Tucker 1995-2004 Rev. Michael L. Tapscott 2004-2010 Rev. William J. Bean 2010-present Rev. Josh Robertson

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century celebration

cHurcH marks 100-year anniversary he worshippers on this corner have gathered under a tent, within walls of wood or brick, and for short times away from the site.

by anne DurHam smitH staFF Writer

But when members and friends gathered recently at New Hope Church of the Nazarene, for many years known as Stringtown Church of the Nazarene, they celebrated not the building where they meet but what has happened inside it for 100 years. the church started in a tent, said longtime member carolyn Pitts, who has heard the story of the church’s beginning. those who have been part of the church through the decades suggest the passion that birthed the

church continued into the years that followed. they tell stories of intense encounters with God, of calls to life change or to ministry heard and answered and of deep love among the worshipers gathered at the northeast corner of u.s. 40

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and county road 500 east. ‘How they testified’ in the “History of Hancock county,” published in 1916, George J. richman referred to the fledgling congregation as Pentecostal church of the nazarene.


c h u r c h e s

(Pictured at left) Kevin Price removes the cover on a new sign bearing the name, New Hope Church of the Nazarene, in a ceremony three years ago at the former Stringtown Church of the Nazarene.

“this little congregation was organized at stringtown in February, 1915 …” he wrote, noting that Grover van Duyn and his wife had donated land for a church building, which was to be completed in 1916. Pitts has been going to the church since her family moved to the area when she was 2 years old. she recalls that as a small child she and a cousin would race the aisle once the service ended

to see who could reach the kindly pastor first.“He just loved us and paid a lot of attention to us when we were young,” she said. not even tragedy — twice — could keep the congregation down. on Jan. 2, 1960, a fire destroyed the church building. Pitts remembers a friend calling her and saying if she wanted to see the church to hurry, because it was on fire. she packed up her babies and hurried over. “the last post fell in when we got there,” she said. Members met for services in the Memorial Building on north street in downtown Greenfield, while a new structure was built.

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Fourteen years later, that building was ravaged by a tornado that ripped off one side of the sanctuary. once again, “the church people held together like a family,” remembers Martha Mae cooper. this time the congregation worshipped in the seventh Day adventist church’s building while its own building was repaired. cooper has been attending the church since the late 1930s, around the time she married Marion chapman. He was a sunday school superintendent for the church. after his death, she and her second husband, robert cooper, moved to rushville and worshipped there for

several years. they moved back in 1959 and became active at stringtown again; she taught sunday school until she was 91. “God has been faithful to the church, with many people accepting christ as their savior,” cooper said. one of those revivals happened in 1987. kent Pitcher remembers it, and the path leading up to it, well. ‘He set me free’ Pitcher was a 15-yearold attending high school in knightstown when a neighbor invited him to the church.He had been to church before, but when he started attending at stringtown, “that’s where i first experienced Jesus in a real way,” he said.

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Discover Hancock county When he got to church, he learned it was also the last day of a series of revival services. “i realized i’d been set up,” he said, but he’s sort of laughing as he tells this story, as if he doesn’t really mind. “they’d been praying for me.” Pitcher walked down the aisle at the end of the service. “that sunday i got saved,” he said. “i went to the altar that day and … asked the Lord to set me free from addictions, and he set me free.” Pitcher said he figured if God did that for him, God could do anything. He came

He remembers thinking “these people know something about God that i don’t know about God.”He played on a church league basketball team. Doris sparks, wife of the rev. keith a. sparks, was like a mother to him. He never forgot the way the people of the church “just kind of took me in under their wing.” still, Pitcher said for about 10 years, he went his own way, and “it wasn’t really pretty.” Mired in addiction to alcohol and other drugs, he nevertheless agreed to go to church one sunday with his mom. it was Mother’s Day.

back at stringtown and had once again found a family of support there. Later, Pitcher went to a district camp meeting in camby with the church. there, he felt God was telling him to become a pastor. Back in Hancock county, he struggled for two weeks before nervously telling the rev. Forrest F. Harvey what he thought God had said. Harvey recommended nazarene Bible college in colorado springs, colorado. so in February 1989, Pitcher packed his car and left town — but not without one more expression of love and support

from the church. as he drove north on state road 9 to catch the westbound ramp onto interstate 70 and his long journey to colorado, he found some church members parked on the ramp, waving to him as he left. some even followed him eight miles to the Mt. comfort exit, where they got off the interstate and headed back to Greenfield. Pitcher would later transfer to Midamerica nazarene university in olathe, kansas. after graduation he would minister in Missouri before serving on the mission field for six years in Guatemala and costa rica.

St. Michael Catholic Church 519 Jefferson Boulevard Greenfield, IN 46140 Office 462-4240

Faith Lutheran Church 200 W. McKenzie Rd.

Gathering in Hope • Receiving God’s Grace Responding in Love • Living in Christ

The Members of Faith Invite You to Worship:

Weekly Divine Service: Sunday School: Adult Bible Study:

Sunday, 9:15 a.m. Sunday, 11:00 a.m. Sunday, 11:00 a.m.

For more information phone us at:

Sunday Mass Schedule 5 P.M. Saturday • 8 A.M. & 10:45 A.M. Sunday Fr. Aaron Jenkins, Pastor

Find us on the web at: www.faithgreenfield.org

St. Michael School since 1954 Serving Grades Pre-K - 8 Patricia Mauer, Principal • (317) 462-6380

(317)462-4609

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c h u r c h e s

today, he is senior pastor of southside church of the nazarene in tilton, illinois. Pitcher will speak at new Hope church of the nazarene as part two of a four-week celebration of the church’s centennial. the series, in true stringtown/ new Hope fashion, will kick off with a revival. the rev. Jim chapman will lead services of spiritual renewal from sunday through Wednesday. the rev. kent Pitcher speaks aug. 30 and will be followed by the covenant Players, a christian repertory theater ministry, on sept. 6. Dr. David W. Graves, a general superintendent in the church of the nazarene, will speak sept. 13 about

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“the word ‘hope’ kept coming up in our conversations — that we wanted to offer people hope.” embracing the future. ‘offer people hope’ the church has embraced some changes in recent years, said the rev. Josh robertson, the church’s current pastor. it has transitioned to a more contemporary style of worship and three years ago changed its name from stringtown to new Hope.robertson, who became pastor in 2010, said he knew the church had a fund for a new sign.“if we’re going to do this, i would like to consider changing the name,” he remembers

saying to church members. “the word ‘hope’ kept coming up in our conversations — that we wanted to offer people hope.” the church also recently launched a revamped Wednesday night children’s ministry and is trying to attract young families. Dan tutrow, his wife and two children were among those younger families. they came to the church 12 years ago after a grandmother at one of their children’s soccer games invited them to the church.

“i remember … everyone was very loving,” tutrow said. “a genuine caring.” tutrow said robertson has a good vision for the church and is encouraging members to dream boldly about its future. “We’re hoping for a church where we can go on a weekly basis,” he said, “and every week, we come to see someone be saved in our church.” Pitcher knows what it’s like to be one of those people. When he speaks to the congregation, he said, “it’ll be ‘Look how God has used this church in the last 100 years’ — the impact that that little local church had on a little country boy from indiana.”

BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 1610 S. State Street, Greenfield www.BethelBCG.org

Service Times

Sunday School Sunday Worship Sunday Evening Wednesday Awana Clubs Wednesday Prayer Meeting & Youth Services

9:30am 10:30am 6:00pm 6:15pm - 8:15 pm 7:00pm

Home of

"The Living Word"

Pastor Randall Parker

Broadcast every Sunday morning 10:30 am on WHMB

"Your source for old-fashioned Gospel preaching!" D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015 •

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HealtHcare HealtH services

Hancock Regional affiliated services include:

hancock county heaLth dePartment hancockcoingov.org 111 American Legion Place, Room 150, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 477-1125 The department provides health education and immunizations.

Hospitals hancock regionaL hancockregional.org 801 N. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5544 Hancock Regional Hospital provides a full range of services, including emergency medicine, modern obstetrics, diagnostics, advanced oncology and physical therapy, as well as inpatient hospice and long-term acute care.

cancer center 801 N. State St., Greenfield (317) 462-5544 Prime time urgent care 124 W. Muskegon Drive, Greenfield (317) 468-HELP (4357) medicaL office 8535 N. Clearview Drive, McCordsville (317) 335-6930 home care and hosPice 801 N. State St., Greenfield (317) 468-4522 home medicaL equiPment 1117 N. State St., Greenfield (317) 477-6463 surgery center 801 N. State St., Greenfield (317) 325-2500

amg sPeciaLty hosPitaL 801 N. State St., Greenfield (317) 477-6789

Located on the third floor of Hancock Regional Hospital, AMG Specialty Hospital is a long-term acute care center. The 23-bed unit offers specialized care, including ventilator management; treatment of nonhealing wounds; treatment of surgical and cardiac complications and oversight of other conditions of chronic, acutely ill patients. suburban home heaLth care 1560-B N. State St., Greenfield (317) 468-4523

senior livinG goLden Living center - brandywine

goldenlivingcenters.com 745 N. Swope St., Greenfield (317) 462-9221

kindred transitionaL care and rehabiLitation regencygreenfield.com 200 Green Meadows Drive, Greenfield (317) 462-3311 PLeasant view Lodge 7476 Lane Road, McCordsville (317) 335-2159 sPringhurst heaLth camPus trilogyhs.com/campuses/ springhurst_health_campus 628 N. Meridian Road, Greenfield (317) 462-7067 sugar creek convaLescent center & chateau sugarcreeknursingandrehab.com 5430 W. U.S. 40, Greenfield (317) 894-3301 crown Pointe senior Living crownpointecommunities.com 831 Swope St., Greenfield (317) 467-9317

Discover Your LocaL MeDicap pharMacY® store • Full Service Retail Pharmacy • Fast, Friendly Service • Private Patient Consultations • Competitive Prices • Most Insurance Plans Accepted • Easy Access • Convenient Drive-thru Hours: 8:30am-6:30pm, M-F 8:30am-12:30pm, Sat

Dave Bush, P.D. Local owner

317-462-7877 www.Medicap.com/8190 1588 N. State St. • Greenfield

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We Treat Your Eyes Like Family • Comprehensive Eye Exams • Optomap Retinal Exam: No Dilation • Contact Lens Exams • Pediatric Eye Care

• Cataract Patient Care • Lasik Surgery Consultation and Care • Treatment of Eye Diseases & Emergencies

Austin D. Potter, O.D. 5953 West Broadway, McCordsville • (317) 747-9263 • potterfamilyeyecare@gmail.com

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www.potterfamilyeyecare.com


a n i m a L

greenfieLd-hancock county animaL management 809 S. State St. Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 477-4367 greenfieldin.org/ government/animal-control Kennel hours for viewing adoptable animals: • 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday • 9:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday Office hours: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday The Greenfield/Hancock County Animal Management department is responsible for enforcing all city, county, and state laws with regard to the treatment of animals. The department serves all of Hancock County.

hancock county humane society 214 E. Main St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5404 hancohumane@yahoo.com members.petfinder.com/ ~IN34/index.html Shelter hours for visiting adoptable pets: • 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursday • 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday Hancock County Humane Society is a no-kill, nonprofit animal shelter staffed by volunteers and funded with community donations. frenZy animaL rescue (Dogs/Birds) 37 1/2 W. Mill St., P.O. Box 194, New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 414-5662

w e L f a r e

birdfrenzy.us ladyindy@comcast.net Adoptions/food bank: 6-7 p.m. Wednesday, otherwise, by appointment only. Obedience training: 1-7 p.m. Monday-Tuesday 6-8 p.m. Wednesday 1-6 p.m. Thursday Saturday and Sunday by appointment Partners for animaL weLfare society inc. (P.A.W.S. Adoption Center) 3141 W. U.S. 40, Greenfield pawshancock.org pawshancock@aol.com Mailing address: 1547 N. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140

Retail store and adoption center open 4-7 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays

Mission is to promote animal welfare through humane education and population control by: • Developing and providing humane education programs that teach kindness to and respect for all living things. • Helping animals housed in animal care shelters by promoting shelter adoptions and by providing improvements to shelter facilities, training for shelter staff and volunteers • Promoting shelter and community based pet sterilization programs.

A TRUSTED LOCAL NAME FOR OVER 65 YEARS! Growers of Fine Quality Annuals, Perennials & Flowering Plants We stock Northern Grown Nursery Stock FULL LINE GARDEN CENTER

SM

STEVE • MILLIS • ELECTRIC • INC

(317) 462-7225

One of The Largest Retail Greenhouses in the Midwest

Large or Small - We Do It All 3710 W. US 40 • Located 3 Miles West of Greenfield on US 40

317-462-2228 • Gift Certificates Available

Commercial • Industrial • Residential

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Discover Hancock county

community orGanizations american Legions

aLZheimer’s suPPort grouP (317) 462-6979 Contact: Della Turnbill

Dale E. Kuhn Post 119

278 S. Center St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5352; Contact: Tony Cross

america in bLoom greenfieldin.org/parks (317) 477-4340

Post 391

american cancer society - hancock unit Contact: Enos Dotson (317) 344-7842; enos.dotson@ cancer.org american heart association of hancock county Contact: Susan Holmes (317) 873-3640

207 S. Merrill St., Fortville, IN 46040 (317) 485-4992 New Palestine Post 182

5242 W. U.S. 52, New Palestine, IN 46163; Contact: Dave Espich (317) 861-6577 american red cross of greater indianaPoLis 441 E. 10th St., Indianapolis, IN 46202 (317) 684-1441

arc of hancock county 141 Green Meadows Drive, Suite 3, Greenfield IN 46140 (317) 462-3727; Executive Director: Dennis Porter chambers of commerce FORTVILLE/McCORDSVILLE fortvillemccordsville chamber.com 104 N. Main St., Fortville, IN 46040 (317) 485-0410 Contact: Nancy Stickland GREENFIELD AREA greenfieldcc.org 1 Courthouse Plaza,

Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 477-4188

Contact: Retta Livengood

NEW PALESTINE

newpalestinechamber.com

P.O. Box 541, 42 E. Main St., New Palestine, IN 46163 (317) 861-2345 Contact: Caralee Griffin

cougar booster cLub Contact: Rick Kennedy (317) 448-6943 cosmoPoLitan cLub 5214 S. Ind. 9, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 861-5265; Contact: Joannie Bowen

Century & A Half Club Sponsor of Fall Creek Heritage Fair

September 11 & 12, 2015 2015 Will be our 39th Year For booth space phone Lana Barton at 765-778-3183

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One Courthouse Plaza Greenfield, IN 46140

(317)477-4188 www.greenfieldcc.org


c o m m u n i t y

cumberLand g.a.P. (Growth and Progress) 11819 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, IN 46229 (317) 894-0257; Contact: Mark Reynold fortviLLe business and ProfessionaL women Contact: Carole Stevens (317) 946-1135 fortviLLe veterans of foreign wars Post 6904 206 S. Main St., Fortville, IN 46040 (317) 485-4582; Contact: Tim Hunt friends of the hancock county PubLic Library hcplibrary.org/about/friends.htm 900 W. McKenzie, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5141; Contact: Mary Cross fuse (famiLies united for suPPort and encouragement) fuseinc.org 1133 W. Main St., Suite E, Greenfield, IN 46140 info@fuseinc.org Contact: Denise Arland (317) 462-9064 greenfieLd eLks Lodge 1720 820 S. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5301 Contact: Mike Jack greenfieLd historic Landmarks greenfieldhistoriclandmarks.org P.O. Box 153, Greenfield, IN 46140 Contact: Rosalie Richardson

o r g a n i Z a t i o n s

greenfieLd Parks

hancock county

and recreation

bar association

greenfieldin.org/parks 280 N. Apple St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 477-4340 Contact: Ellen Kuker greenfieLd

hancockbar.org Contact: Christopher Isom (317) 462-7787 hancock county

senior center 280 N. Apple St. Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 4774343 Contact: Kim Voorhis

buiLders counciL

hancockcountybuilders.com P.O. Box 44670, Indianapolis, IN 46244-0670 (317) 236-6330

greenfieLd toastmasters Meets at 11:45 a.m. second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at Ameriana Bank, 1810 N. State St. Contact: Meg Claxton (317) 379-4311

hancock county cemetery commission Contact: Nancy Leach wensleach@comcast.net

hancock county democratic Party Contact: Phil Hunt (317) 4399872; hunts@hrtc.net hancock county emergency management agency 640 S. Franklin St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 477-1188 Contact: Misty Moore hancock county eXtension homemakers www3.ag.purdue.edu/ counties/hancock/Pages/ ExtensionHomemakers.aspx 802 Apple St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-1113 Contact: Bert Jones

greenfieLd youth footbaLL League Contact: Darryck Dorman (317) 498-6744; dedorman@ myninestar.net hancock amateur radio cLub

w9atg.org P.O. Box 335, Greenfield, IN 46140 hancock county 4-h

www3.ag.purdue.edu/ counties/hancock/Pages/4-H YouthDevelopment.aspx 802 N. Apple St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-1113 Contact: Sarah Burke hancock county aduLt Literacy coaLition Contact: Mary Lynn Burrows (317) 462-5141

mburrows@hcplibrary.org

Handcrafted by Indiana Artisans Chocolatier Jayne (317) 213-7414 Chocolatier Suzanne (317) 371-6392 15 W. Main St., GreenďŹ eld

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Discover Hancock county hancock county herb society

easysite.com/HCHS

Contact: Carolyn Swinford (317) 326-2274. hancock county historicaL society

hancockhistory.org

P.O. Box 375, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-7780 hancockhistory@live.com Contact: Brigette Jones

hancock county humane society

hancockhumane.petfinder. com

214 E. Main St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5404 hancohumane@yahoo.com

hancock county rePubLican Party Contact: Janice Silvey (317) 402-1356

hancockgop.net

hancock county rePubLican women’s cLub Contact: Jane Klemme (317) 524-8512 hancock Lodge no. 101 f & am

hancocklodge101.org

661 W. Tague St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-5134 Also meeting site of Greenfield York Rite

Mailing address: Hancock Lodge No. 101, 623 E. Main St., Greenfield, IN 46140

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hancock regionaL hosPitaL and voLunteer services guiLd Contact: Dawn Earlywine

801 N. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 468-4252; dearlywine@hancockregional. org hancock regionaL hosPitaL foundation

hancockregional hospital.org/foundation 801 N. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 468-4583 Contact: Nancy Davis hoosier modeL t ford cLub 630 N. County Road 600W, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 894-0829 Contact: Robert Cook

internationaL adoPtion suPPort grouP, hancock forever famiLies (317) 440-9948, or April Arts Grass, (317) 695-1438 Contact: Beth Virt

James whitcomb riLey festivaL association

rileyfestival.com 312 E. Main St., Suite C, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 4622141; info@rileyfestival.com Contact: Linda Lowe Jane ross reeves octagon house foundation Shirley, Indiana (765) 4450062; President: Darrell Deck

kaPPa kaPPa kaPPa inc. UPSILON CHAPTER P.O. Box 963, Greenfield, IN 46140; President: Patty Dresser (317) 402-3483

NEW PALESTINE

nplions.com

Contact: Mark Kennedy (317) 417-3050 Love inc of greater

kaPPa kaPPa sigma sorority ALPHA KAPPA CHAPTER 210 N. Pennsylvania, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 4629293; Contact: Laura Rhodes

hancock county

kiwanis of greenfieLd 1700 E. County Road 300N, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-7960 Contact: Susan Billings

mealsonwheelsonline.org

LeadershiP hancock county leadhc.org One Courthouse Plaza, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 4774188, ext. 280 President: Donieta Ross Libertarian Party of hancock county Contact: Andrew Smith (317) 525-3566; hancocklibertarians@gmail. com Lions cLubs FORTVILLE facebook.com/ FortvilleLionsClub 400 W. Church St., Fortville, IN 46040 GREENFIELD facebook.com/ greenfieldlionsclub Contact: Chuck Condra (317) 462-9192

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loveinc-ghc.org P.O. Box 192, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 468-6300; Executive director: Jim Peters meaLs on wheeLs 1133 W. Main St., Suite C, Greenfield (317) 477-4345 Executive director: Kathleen Vahle neighborhoods against substance abuse (nasa)

nasa-hancock.com 98 E. North St., Suite 104, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 4770200 Contact: Tim Retherford Partners for animaL weLfare society (Paws)

pawshancock.org 1547 N. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140; pawshancock@aol. com; Contact: Nancy Rubino (317) 445-9924 Purdue eXtension hancock county

ag.purdue.edu/counties

/hancock/pages/default. aspx 802 N. Apple St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-1113

Contact: Sarah Burke or Roy Ballard


c o m m u n i t y

questers oLd nationaL road 1364 Contact: Connie Lange, president (765) 392-0770 regreening greenfieLd greenfield.in.org/parks (317) 477-4340 retired teachers association 7324 W. County Road 100N, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 894-7765 mbholzhausen@juno.com President: Nancy Holzhausen

great grouPs

o r g a n i Z a t i o n s

riLey oLd home society jwrileyhome.org 250 W. Main St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-8539; jwrileyhome@live.com

rotary cLub of greenfieLd sunrise greenfieldsunrise.org Contact: Josie Henneke (317) 462-6781

riLey wrangLers square dance cLub Contact: Steve and Shirley Rifner (765) 763-6289 (317) 459-1319

sertoma cLub President: Benny Eaton, (317) 462-2058

rotary cLub of greenfieLd Contact: Jim Greig (317) 467-9470

d i s c o v e r

shares inc. Brandywine Industries, 645 S. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-4824; rbethel@ sharesinc.org; Contact: Ryan Bethel

h a n c o c k

SERVICE ABOVE SELF

DONATE.

To submit your local group/organization information for a future Daily Reporter Discover issue, or to report your updates and news, contact dr-editorial@ greenfieldreporter.com.

sister cities of greenfieLd inc. sistercitiesofgreenfield.org 10 S. State St., Greenfield, IN 46140 women’s association Hawk’s Tail Country Club, 145 S. Morristown Pike, Greenfield, IN 46140 (317) 462-2706

c o u n t y

SHOP. CHANGE LIVES.

1141 W US 40 Greenfield

317.318.9458

WHAT WE DO:

You Can Make a Difference

in your community and your world

The ReStore is a home improvement thrift store that sells donated new and gently used merchandise to the general public. All proceeds benefit the Habitat mission.

ReStore Hours:

Become a part of the Rotary Club of Greenfield

Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

(Meets at Noon on Thursdays at Ponderosa)

Learn more about the Rotary experience… contact Kevin Horrigan at 317-508-7740 Visit us at www.rotaryclubgreenfield.org

www.indyrestore.com

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inDex

oF Discover aDvertisers

A Total Tan...............................................................82

Greenfield Banking Company ..........................19

Nutty Mutt ...............................................................50

Action Collision Repair..................................... 102

Greenfield Chamber of Commerce ............. 118

Adkins Electric, LLC ...............................................37

Greenfield Chocolates ...................................... 119

Optivision 20/20 ....................................................33

All Pets Go to Heaven Crematory ...................94

Greenfield Dental Health Care, P.C. ...............67

Allen Wellman McNew Harvey, LLP ...............85

Greenfield Granite Co.., Inc. ..............................57

Amsoil ........................................................................92

Greenfield Parks & Recreation Dept. ............48

Another Addison Auction ..................................24

Guadalajara Grill ................................................. 108

Armstrong Garage Doors, Inc. .........................94

Habitat for Humanity ReStore ...................... 121

Arrowhead Golf Course ......................................84

Hancock County Arts ...........................................54

Avery Dennison Fasson.......................................97

Hancock County Community Foundation ...25

BBQ'N FOOLS .........................................................48

Hancock County Public Library........................78

Bell Mortuary & Crematory...............................50

Hancock County Senior Services.....................92

Bethel Baptist Church ....................................... 115

Hancock County Sheriff's Department .........81

Borgmann Realty, LLC .........................................82

Hancock County Solid Waste Management .... 87

Boys & Girls Clubs of Hancock County ........65

Hancock County Visitors Bureau.............. 68-77

Bradford Builders, Inc. .........................................96

Hancock Hope House .........................................24

Bradley Preschool .................................................78

Hancock Physician Network .............................79

Bradley UMC ........................................................ 107

Hancock Regional Hospital ............................ 123

Brand & Morelock ................................................96

Hancock Regional Hospital Foundation ......53

Butler Financial Services ....................................... 6

Hancock Wellness Center ..................................99

Calvary Baptist Church ..................................... 111

Hancock Economic Development Council......62

Carrington Homes ................................................95

Highsmith Guns .....................................................97

Century & A Half Club ..................................... 118

HNE Digital ..............................................................95

Century 21 - Wilson & Associates ..................59

Homeplace Catering ............................................38

CGS Services, Inc. ..................................................51

HRM Insurance.......................................................37

Chicago's Pizza.......................................................81

Indiana Carpet Care .......................................... 101

Comfort Inn .............................................................13

Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance .......................91

Community Physician Network ......................... 3

Inskeep Ford ........................................................ 103

Couch's Auto & Truck Repair ...........................38

Insurance Professionals ......................................23

Custom Exteriors ...................................................29

Jackson Well Drilling ............................................11

Daily Reporter .......................................51, 58, 105

Jaycie Phelps Athletic Center............................47

Erlewein Mortuaries .......................................... 108

Jensen's Pawn Shop .......................................... 103

Faith Lutheran Church ...................................... 114

J.R. Wortman Co. Inc. ...........................................99

Farm Indiana ...........................................................93

Kemper CPA Group ..............................................36

FC Tucker Company Inc. ....................................17

Kinsey's Italian Cafe........................................... 102

FC Tucker - Gina Rininger .................................... 2

Legacy Cinema .......................................................56

Fletcher Dental & TMJ Clinic ............................97

Lucy Couture Boutique .......................................64

Foot Remedy...........................................................89

Medicap Pharmacy ............................................ 116

Fortville Church of the Nazarene ................. 106

Mid-State Truck Equipment ..............................87

Fortville Tire Center, Inc......................................67

Miller's Jewelry .................................................... 110

Frady's Lawn and Landscape, Inc. ...................45

Montana Mike's Steakhouse ............................55

Geist Family Medicine .........................................85

Moore's Repair Service .......................................40

Gentle Dentist.........................................................87

Muegge Heating/ Plumbing/ Electric ...........43

Golden Living Center - Brandywine ...............16

New Palestine Veterinary Clinic .......................86

Ye Olde Head Shoppe ...................................... 105

Gray Auto Brokers.................................................63

NineStar Connect ..................................................83

Zion Lutheran Church and School ..................90

122 Da ily rep o rter

• D i s c o v e r H a n c o c k c o u n t y 2 015

Pampered Chef - Jane Barton ..........................32 Pence Brooks Bolander & Shepherd Insurance...18 Penny's Florist.........................................................11 Personal Finance Company ...............................41 Ponderosa ................................................................42 PostNet .....................................................................40 Potter Family Eye Care ..................................... 116 Qdoba........................................................................42 Re/Max Realty Group ....................................... 124 Richards Insurance Agency ...............................22 Rotary Club of Greenfield ............................... 121 Rusty Low's Collision Center.......................... 101 Salsbery Garden Center ................................... 103 Shining Stars Childcare Academy ...................65 Shirley Visionaries .................................................98 Signarama ................................................................51 Smith Insurance .....................................................54 Springhurst Health Campus........................... 113 Sprinkle CPA, LCC .................................................63 St. Michael Catholic Church ........................... 114 St. Michael School ................................................88 State Farm Insurance ...........................................51 Steve Millis Electric, Inc. .................................. 117 Sunnyside Greenhouses .................................. 106 Superior Mowers ...................................................49 Sweet Shop..............................................................64 The Rose Lady ........................................................98 TJ's Chimney Service ......................................... 100 Town & Country Hospital ..................................10 Trinity Park UMC ................................................ 110 Two Sisters Cakery ................................................36 Union Savings & Loan Association .................. 5 Wallace Well Drilling............................................80 Wal-mart ..................................................................39 Wells Nursery & Greenhouses ...................... 117 Westport Homes ...................................................85 Wilkerson Dance Studio .....................................56 Wilkinson Church of Christ............................. 109 Wolf Law Firm, Attorneys ...................................62 Woodland Group Properties ......................... 100


1797 N. State St. Greenfield

5040 W. US 52 New Palestine

462-5533

www.remax.com

861-5533

Outstanding Agents • Outstanding Results

Mark Dudley 409-5605

Judy Alcorn 285-8379

Julie Dishman 727-7033

Sandy Alender Team Coordinator Mark Dudley Team

Toni Dudley 409-5735

Jamie Kise 503-5321

Star Team Rod Brown & Brittany Burke 468-5466 & 498-7847

Chris Boerner 697-4691

Megan Ennis 937-4312

Sue Miller 213-5533

Sue Mize 947-8334

Bev Strahl 607-4041

Jean Graham Group

Jeff Clark 318-5539

Mark Dudley Team

Eileen Gibson 431-0225

Sharon Muncy 508-5701

Jean Graham 519-4000

Lynn Gottschalk 752-8622

Steve Sanford 716-8679

Susan Tebbe 765-561-0910

Jill Collins 586-0121

Mike Hancock 498-0188

Sharon Smith 496-3870

Leigh Turner 538-5288

Linda Cox 627-4241

Nick Spegal 498-0986

Bill & Debbie Yozipovich 498-5879

462-5533 • 861-5533

Lance Hollan 462-4662

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