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JUNE 2014

Preparing for the unknown Responding to emergencies is focus of Muscatatuck Urban Training Center

JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 1


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Contents

Also inside

ABC-Stewart School page 8

Business security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Chamber Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Spark Columbus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Morton Marcus column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Business Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 On the Move . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Around the Watercooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Business Leads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Mark McNulty column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Comments should be sent to Doug Showalter, The Republic, 333 Second St., Columbus, IN 47201 or call 812-379-5625 or dshowalter@therepublic.com. Advertising information: Call 812379-5652. ©2014 by Home News Enterprises. All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited. Stock images provided by © Thinkstock.

On the cover

National Guard soldiers take part in a simulated mission at Muscatatuck Urban Training Center. Photo by Joe Harpring. Story page 4.

New Ford CEO page 16

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photo by Staff Sgt. Brad Staggs

Firefighters from St. Joseph County battle a trailer fire during an Indiana Department of Homeland Security emergency response exercise at Muscatatuck Urban Training Center.

Muscatatuck Urban Training Center helps prepare people and organizations for the unpredictable

I

By Barney Quick

t’s natural to assume that, in the event of some kind of national cataclysm, some kind of authority would know what to do to begin reversing its effects and restore societal order and our personal safety. But what would such an authority look like and how would it know what to do? Chances are, if such an unthinkable scenario occurred, whatever organization was in a position to respond would have received its preparation at Muscatatuck Urban Training Center. The center is an utterly unique facility dedicated to considering all the uncomfortable details attendant to all possible forms of apocalyptic devastation. “Training is when you go someplace and fail at what you’re trying to achieve,” says the center’s public affairs officer Sgt. 1st Class Brad Staggs. “You want to learn what your limits are. We make it as difficult as possible.” Driving onto the grounds at Muscatatuck is an other-worldly experience. There are certain indications that, until nine years ago, it was a state

4 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

keeping it

real developmental facility for the mentally challenged, such as buildings that clearly had been a hospital, administrative offices, living units and the like. The smashed cars strewn about the streets and the ubiquitous rubble and twisted metal clearly came along when the place assumed its current incarnation, however. Visitors generally begin their look around with a conversation with Staggs in the radio station in Building 30. It’s a modern American radio station in every way, but, like everything else at Muscatatuck, it serves a training purpose. “It’s a 24/7 Internet classic-rock station,” says Staggs, whose speaking


Photo by Staff Sgt. Matt Scotten Photo by Scott Roberson / Daily Journal

At top: Reserve soldiers with the 31st Canadian Brigade Group, Land Forces Central in Ontario provide cover fire for fellow soldiers as they infiltrate a building to search for simulated enemies at Muscatatuck. Left: Rodney Williams of Indianapolis checks his shot placement on targets during annual training at Camp Atterbury. voice indicates years spent in radio. “When the Army goes into another country, we set up a station. In an emergency, it’s how we disseminate information. For instance, Afghanistan has a 72 percent illiteracy rate. Printed material is not the way to reach the populace.” Throughout the grounds of the center are various scenarios, as carefully staged as any Hollywood set, that can be used for training by any number of types of response organizations — military units, police and fire departments, homeland security teams, and even groups from countries with which the United States is allied. A visitor will see a flooded community, complete with submerged automobiles; an Afghan marketplace, the narrow street of which is quite crowded when role players — often from Afghanistan — and trainees are at work; a train wreck that includes a derailed passenger car and other types of train cars; a shantytown; a hospital; a jail; a soccer stadium; and an oil refinery, among others. The Indiana National Guard manages Muscatatuck. It has a triune relationship with Camp Atterbury east of Edinburgh and Jefferson Proving Ground to the south. Atterbury has firing ranges; there is no live ammunition at Muscatatuck. Atterbury also has drop zones by which training groups often enter. Jefferson provides airspace for helicopters and unmanned aerial vehicles that come into play in some Muscatatuck training. Staggs says that, generally speaking, commanders for a given operation are at the area of operation, which is Atterbury, and “worker bees” are at the area of event, which is Muscatatuck. He says that this allows for the most realistic form of training. “In a real-life situation, you would have to see Muscatatuck on page 6 JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 5


photos by Staff Sgt. Brad Staggs

Muscatatuck continued from page 5 have commanders away from the devastated site, and convoys would roll through some communities situated between the two.” Permanent staff at Muscatatuck numbers around 100, half civilian and half military. Others present at any given time are “customers,” as staff refers to those making use of the facility. Customers include NATO, the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, and Army North, which is the unified command responsible for homeland defense and coordination of civil authority support. Army North stages what Staggs calls a “huge annual exercise” at Muscatatuck. Once a year, the International Police Work Dog Association trains there. “For that we get folks from as far away as Korea,” says Staggs. There is growing interest among filmmakers in using the center. National Geographic filmed much of its docudrama series “How to Survive the End of the World” there, and Staggs has had conversations with other such organizations. He notes that every building on the grounds serves more than one purpose. One example would be the way the cluster of houses built since the center assumed its present role is regarded by various customers. “There are different mindsets involved in, say, Iraq and Hurricane Katrina,” he explains. “In the first case, you’re searching the houses for bad guys, and in the second, you’re searching for good guys.” Another example is the fact that the woman who runs the pizza shop, coffee shop and convenience store on the grounds agrees to let training groups use her locations for situations such as holdup scenarios. Training in cultural differences is a big part of what many customers do at Muscatatuck. “In many places in the Middle East, you’re expected to 6 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

At top: Sgt. 1st Class Michael Moore, left, watches to see how the personal security detail he is training deals with a situation at the mock jail at Muscatatuck Urban Training Center. Above: Soldiers from the Army Reserve’s 463rd Engineer Detachment of Houston, Texas, prepare to extract a simulated victim from a rubble pile. The training is a national emergency response exercise designed to create the realism of an American city following a nuclear blast.


Photo by David P. Bonnell, Atterbury-Muscatatuck Public Affairs

take off your sunglasses when speaking to someone, and you don’t want to show the bottom of your foot, a sign of disrespect,” says Staggs. “There are different interpretations of the ‘OK’ sign. Without training, you might not be able to spot attire that is out of place. Mideasterners tend to wear robes in all kinds of weather, for instance. Knowing those customs and courtesies is as important as knowing how to shoot your gun.” He describes the facility as “customer friendly.” He says that Maj. Gen. Omer Tooley, the commanding general for Camp Atterbury-Muscatatuck Center for Complex Operations, “likes to say we’re an iPad, with the basic operating system. Our customers bring in their own apps.” Staggs has become keenly interested in the center’s legacy as a state developmental facility. He maintains a museum in Building 30 that features such exhibits as a 1920s-era wheelchair, 1950s-era dental equipment, patient X-rays, documents and photographs, and occupational therapy items such as musical instruments. He’s putting together an oral history of Muscatatuck, interviewing former employees, some of whom spent their entire working lives there. His working title for the project is “Muscatatuck Speaks.” “I like to be a research facility for those interested in the history of Indiana’s approach to mental health,” he says. Staggs stresses that realism is of primary importance at Muscatatuck. “You can’t go to the mayor of Indianapolis and say, ‘Can I shut down three blocks of your city for four weeks of training?’” he says. You can, however, come to Muscatatuck and learn how to answer the hardest question of all: What do you do when saving anyone or anything looks impossible? Left: Kevin Waters of the Evansville Police Department conducts a luggage search with his dog, Andy. During the International Police Work Dog Association training, Andy searches each suitcase, looking for a banned substance.

JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 7


By Barney Quick

F A study in independence

photo by doug showalter

ABC-Stewart School prepares students to succeed in diverse community

8 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

orty-five years after it began in a local basement, ABC-Stewart Montessori School is recognized as one of the area’s best schools. For students age 2 through 12 and their parents in the Columbus area, ABC-Stewart takes a unique approach that combines an emphasis on independence with a strong dose of school spirit. In one sense, it hearkens back to the one-room schoolhouse concept, yet it encompasses preschool and after-school programs, as well as clubs, field trips, service-learning projects and fundraisers that involve entire families. “The model we use has children moving from room to room throughout the day, like middle school or high school,” says the school’s director, Mike Gorday. The various rooms are designated for certain categories of study, such as geography and history, math and science, music and art, reading and computers. “One distinctive feature of our approach is creating time for a student’s particular interests.” ABC-Stewart consists of a 2-year-old classroom, three classrooms for children ages 3, 4 and 5, a Grade 1 through 6 program, and an extended day program. The student-teacher ratio is 11 to 1, with 6 to 1 for the youngest students. The entire school bases its curriculum on three rotating one-year themes. In the history area, this plays itself out as early man through Egypt or Greece, the Age of Exploration and U.S. history. Lessons in other areas are tied to the theme for a given year. A child who attends ABC-Stewart from age 2 to 12 will go through the threeyear cycle three times. The school’s educational approach is primarily, although not exclusively, based on the methodology developed by the Italian educational theorist Maria Montessori (1870-1952), who believed that education begins at birth and that each environmental stimulus to which a child is exposed has a significant impact. The school’s function in such an approach is to prepare environments that encourage free and uninterrupted inquiry, as well as small group educational opportunities. In a room designated for a particular area of study, materials are lined up on the shelves in order of increasing depth and complexity. The child can take them down and work with them at his own pace, after a detailed introduction and under the supervision of the classroom teacher. ABC-Stewart was founded in 1969 in the basement of Merry and Tom Carmichael’s home. In 1971, it moved to the former officers club at Bakalar air base, now Columbus Municipal Airport. Since 1983, the school has been housed in the former Kent Elementary School building on the city’s west side. Merry Carmichael, the director for many years, remains involved as board president. Linda Becker, the school’s administrator and board treasurer, has been on staff since 1983. She began her involvement as a volunteer when her own children were enrolled. Funding basically consists of tuition. It is supplemented with various fundraisers. The annual walkathon is completely managed by parents. Other recent fundraisers have included a chili supper and a barbecue cook-off. Off-site learning opportunities abound for students. Sixth-graders participate as pages at the Indiana


photo by doug showalter photo by Joey Leo

Above: ABC-Stewart Montessori School. Opposite page: This sign reflects the international focus of the school’s educational offerings. Left: Ben Ellagood leads the pack in a sack race during ABC-Stewart’s American History Day. General Assembly. In May, most older students flew to Washington, D.C., for a field trip that included visits with Indiana’s U.S. senators, Joe Donnelly and Dan Coats, lunch in the Senate dining room at the Capitol, trips to Arlington National Cemetery, Ford’s Theater, the White House, numerous memorials and Mount Vernon. Service learning is a major component of an ABCStewart education. Students collect and deliver goods that agencies such as Love Chapel, Advocates for Children and Turning Point need. Clubs based on various interests are available, as well as an after-school study hour. Those enrichment clubs include drama, art, chess and history. ABC-Stewart has its excellence recognized regularly. Every year for the past eight, the school has been represented among the recipients for the Reams Family Award for Excellence in Teaching, which is presented see ABC-Stewart on page 10 JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 9


photo by Andrew Laker

Above: Adam Saad, from left, Bree Gayman and Rashell Jahenke undergo vision screenings with Autumn Hileman during a school project simulating the Ellis Island experience. Opposite page: Stewart students visited with then U.S. Rep. Mike Pence during a 2005 trip to Washington.

ABC-Stewart continued from page 9 by the Heritage Fund: the Community Foundation of Bartholomew County. Its math bowl team was the 2014 state champion in its division, and its 2013 Indiana Academic Spell Bowl team was No. 3. Athletics is part of the mix of activities as well. The Stewart Suns play teams from other area private schools in basketball each year. Alumni tend to continue feeling an affinity for their alma mater. “As a child, and even as an adult, concepts such as mathematics and scientific principles can seem elusive and difficult to grasp,” says Rick Scalf. “The hands-on approach to these skills made them concrete. I could literally see the numbers — not just in my head but right in front of me. “More importantly, ABC-Stewart instilled in me a love of learning,” Scalf says. “Because I was given the opportunity to advance at my own pace, I never felt as though I was being forced to learn. Because it was my choice, I was able to enjoy the process of advancement. 10 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

This was a feeling that would stick with me as I moved on to advanced classes in public school.” “I liked all of the teachers at Stewart,” says current middle school student Jada Meyer. “Mr. Maulin was one of my favorites because he challenged me and made learning fun and exciting. I remember he challenged students to memorize 10 quotes from Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet,’ a play that we were reading in class. If a student could memorize all 10, he or she was able to go to Indianapolis to see the play, ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream.’ “I liked the rotating three-year history curriculum, because it allowed me to study each topic more in-depth, because we spent the whole year studying it. What I learned at Stewart definitely helps me in my social studies class at Northside. I still think back to what I learned at Stewart, and how it applies now. “I still feel a loyalty to the school.” Meyer says. “I wish I could visit it more. I recently went to their school


submitted photo

dance, where they invite the seventh- and eighth-graders back. It was fun to see my old classmates, teachers and Mr. Gorday, the director. I stay in touch with several of my Stewart classmates.” Adds her mother, Angie Meyer: “Jada was involved in drama club, Spell Bowl and cheerleading. Since it was a small school, she was able to do any extracurricular activity that she wanted (no tryouts). There were many extracurricular activities to choose from. Teachers were easily accessible and very friendly. Teachers encouraged parent involvement. I felt like I got to know the teachers and administrators on a personal level, which is an advantage of a small, private school.” The nine-member board of directors meets twice a year. Ad-hoc committees within the board meet more frequently. Gorday says that current strategic considerations include making more use of technology, continually improving the curriculum and expanding diversity. “We want to make sure families that come here from throughout the world have the option of a more international flavor to their children’s education,” he says. Gorday stresses that the feeling of community at the school extends to all its stakeholders: “One of our parents remarked to me recently, ‘ABC-Stewart is like a village or a family. Everybody takes care of each other.’”

JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 11


associated press photos

Above: Cobb County Police cars block the entrance to a FedEx facility after an early morning shooting in Kennesaw, Ga. Opposite page: FedEx employees console each other after they were evacuated from the building.

Business security a balance of risk, cost By Michael Kanell and Kelly Yamanouchi n The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (MCT)

ATLANTA — Security in the workplace could mean locked doors, metal detectors, electronic badges for employees, cameras and armed guards. But a typical corporate office is simply not ready for a determined, armed assault — and most companies do not want the cost and climate that comes with that kind of protection, said Darrell Mercer, owner of Mercer Protection Agency in Alpharetta, Ga. While many companies put a guard near the door or in the lobby, they are often unarmed, said Mercer, whose company offers protection for executives, as well as corporate and event security. “You can take precautions and you can be alert. But things do happen, unfortunately,” he said after the recent FedEx sorting center shootings in Kennesaw.“If somebody really intends on doing harm and they set their minds on it, you just can’t stop it 100 percent.” Workplaces have been the most common sites for mass shootings, according to a report last year from the Congressional Research Service. An employee or former employee was the shooter in about one12 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

third of 78 mass shootings the report studied between 1983 and 2012. The agency said there were 463 workplace homicides in workplaces in 2012, accounting for 10 percent of all on-the-job fatalities. Yet the number of workplace homicides has decreased since the mid-1990s, said Dan Hartley, workplace violence prevention coordinator at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Moreover, the stereotype of the homicidal employee or bitter ex-worker is in the minority, said Hartley. Three-quarters of workplace homicides involve theft or robbery. Just 17 percent involve a worker or someone with a personal relationship to a worker, he said. Employers have a financial as well as human interest in a secure workplace. From medical bills to attorney fees and lost wages, “the financial implications after a violent event in the workplace can be staggering,” said Loretta L. Worters, vice president of the Insurance Information Institute. “As a result, insurers offer employers workplace safety policies to cover such incidents,” she said. “Premiums range from

$3,000 to $10,000 per year.” The most common sites of workplace violence are service businesses, not factories, she said: Government facilities account for 17 percent; restaurants and bars, 15 percent; schools, 15 percent; and medical facilities, 10 percent. The insurance institute suggests a host of methods to prevent workplace violence, including guidelines for behavior and counseling for troubled employees. Jeffrey Slotnick, chief security officer for OR3M who helped write the industry’s workplace violence standard, said there are typically indicators of violence beforehand. Someone may behave differently, showing sadness, depression, threats, menacing or aggressive behavior, or making reference to weaponry, for example. When those behaviors come in clusters, it should be reported for the company’s crisis management team to offer counseling or other assistance, he said. “That can go a long way toward prevention,” Slotnick said. “When we get to the response side, in a way, it’s too late because they’ve already made up their mind. That’s why they take their own lives.”


Douglas Duerr, an Atlanta attorney specializing in labor and employment, also said there are limits to what security can do to prevent workplace violence. “It would be great if you could have airport security at your work site, but that’s simply not practical,” Duerr said. “It’s not realistic to expect that you’re going to be able to prevent every instance of somebody coming into the workplace who’s heavily armed. The thing to do is to have training on what are the potential indicators of someone who might become violent.” FedEx has a workplace violence prevention program, aimed at increasing awareness of “developing situations and other indicators of workplace violence.” Terri Howard, senior director at FEI Behavioral Health, a crisis management company that provides employee assistance programs and other services for businesses and employees, said employers should consider what they would have done in FedEx’s situation and incorporate lessons learned. “At the end of the day, we can’t always prevent incidents from happening,” Howard said. “Sometimes, these incidents are

violence and where they should go. “If a workplace violence incident occurs and you haven’t prepared for it and haven’t thought it through, then you’re going to panic,” which could lead to bad decisions, Duerr said. If companies plan for their response, “then the way in which people react will be much more orderly and less likely to result in an even greater issue.”

random. … Sometimes issues of domestic violence spill into the workplace.” Duerr said high-volume, competitive situations, such as fast-moving work, can create a stressful environment for workers. “You’ve got to plan for how you are going to deal with stress,” he said. And companies should also have procedures for what employees should do in cases of

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JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 13


chamberc june 2014

Monthly publication of the Columbus Area Chamber of Commerc

Ribbon Cuttings

From the president

Chamber announces Venture Awards event A venture is defined as a risky or daring journey or undertaking. The Chamber is launching a new event: the Venture Awards. It will be a celebration of those who dare to venture into the unmapped territory of entrepreneurship. For decades, Columbus has been fertile ground for risk takers seeking business success. The results of those daring endeavors are some of our best business success stories: Cummins, LHP Software, Blairex, Estep and Co., Johnson Ventures and Columbus Container, just to name a few.

WellConnect 812-343-9840

At the Venture Awards Aug. 18 at Factory 12 Event Loft, the Columbus Chamber will spotlight notable businesses adding jobs and wealth to Columbus. This promises to be a lively event with Cummins Vice President and Chief Technical Officer John C. Wall sharing his unique perspective on risky undertakings. In the coming weeks, we’ll ask for your help in selecting the award winners. Consider your fellow Chamber members. Who would you nominate in the following categories? • Entrepreneur of the Year • Most Innovative Business • New and Emerging Business • Small Business Advocate Plan to be a part of this inspiring event as we salute the “bootstrappers” in our midst.

Family Allergy 812-314-7046

Cindy Frey

14 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

www.columbusa


connection

ce • 500 Franklin Street • Columbus, IN 47201 • 812-379-4457

SPARK Columbus: entrepreneurial networking At 5:30 p.m. June 4 the Columbus Chamber and IUPUC’s Center for Business and Economic Development will host SPARK Columbus at the LHP Building on Washington Street. The keynote speaker is Rick Johnson, president and CEO of Johnson Ventures, a capital investment firm that owns restaurants, convenience stores, construction materials and publishing companies. The Johnson family founded the Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business in Bloomington. Johnson will discuss the importance of entrepreneurial activity in Hoosier communities and share his thoughts on what makes entrepreneurs successful. Also, meet a couple of smart, creative risk-takers who are undertaking new ventures: • Dawn Andrews, Garb2ART Cosmetics • George Devidze and Dr. Carrie Pumphrey, ClariCare • James Gorman, Land Zeppelin

Chamber website Be sure to visit the Chamber’s newly redesigned website. It features: • Tablet and mobile friendly Visit on your tablet or mobile phone • Clean design Fresh, modern look • Easy navigation Site optimized to easily find what you’re looking for • Easy event registration Quickly register for chamber events • Member log-in Members can now log in and update their listings

areachamber.com

Growing BUSINESS. Growing people.

New Members Canteen Services of Kentuckiana 712 Industrial Drive Owensboro, KY 42302 502-445-3683 Cummings Lighthouse 7462 N. U.S. 31 Seymour, IN 47274 812-523-1034 Creative Portrait Studios LLC www.SharonShipley.com Columbus 812-799-0647 Falcon Manufacturing Larry Waskom 6200 S. International Drive Columbus, IN 47201 812-371-2400 JA Benefits Mary Fisher 1630 H St. Bedford, IN 47421 812-279-9500

Calendar June 4 — 5:30 p.m., Spark Columbus: a networking event for entrepreneurs June 11 — 4:30 p.m., Mowin Monster ribbon cutting June 17 — 11 a.m., Champions of the Chamber Golf Outing June 17 — 5 p.m., After Hours networking event at Otter Creek June 26 — 4:30 p.m., Ribbon cutting – Family Chiropractic & Wellness

JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 15


associated press photos

Chief Operating Officer Mark Fields will become CEO of Ford Motor Co. in July.

Task for new CEO is to keep Ford on Mulally’s path By DEE-ANN DURBIN and TOM KRISHER n AP Auto Writers

DEARBORN, Mich. — For Mark Fields, Ford’s newly appointed CEO, the biggest challenge is to stay the course and not let the company drift back into the bad habits that almost sank it a decade ago. Taking over for Alan Mulally on July 1, Fields will inherit a healthy company that most analysts agree is poised for big growth next year and beyond. That wasn’t the case in 2006, when then-CEO Bill Ford hired Mulally away from Boeing, bypassing Fields and other internal candidates. Ford was on its way to a $12.6 billion annual loss and the management was widely seen as dysfunctional. Mulally, 68, achieved superstar status by putting an end to the infighting, keeping the company out of bankruptcy and getting Ford to build cars that people like to drive. Fields was instrumental in that turnaround. As the head of Ford’s North American operations, he drew up the “Way Forward” program that Mulally implemented so successfully. The 53-year-old Fields has been seen as Mulally’s heir apparent since being named chief operating office in late 2012. Mulally is retiring and says while he has gotten several book offers, he hasn’t yet planned his next steps. Fields takes the CEO job during a transition year at Ford. The company expects pretax profit to fall to between $7 billion and $8 billion from $8.5 billion in 2013, as it launches a record 16 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

23 vehicles worldwide and builds seven plants, including four in China. It’s also preparing to launch a new aluminum-clad F-150 pickup truck later this year, which could reap profits down the road but will be expensive to prepare for. Analysts agree that the revolutionary new truck — which will be 700 pounds lighter than the outgoing truck and far more fuel efficient — will be Fields’ first big test. F-Series pickups have been the best-selling vehicles in the U.S. for 32 years and account for about 30 percent of Ford’s North American revenue. The company can’t risk any big mistakes. Another major challenge is the revival of Ford’s luxury Lincoln brand. The company introduced the new MKZ sedan last year and plans a new small crossover, the MKC, in the coming months. But after years of decline, Lincoln isn’t prominent on luxury buyers’ shopping lists. Ford hopes for better luck in China, where it’s introducing the brand this year. More broadly, Fields needs to make sure the company doesn’t fall back into the divisive infighting that paralyzed it in the past. Fields recalled one early meeting under Mulally, where executives spent 45 minutes arguing about an organizational chart. Mulally finally stepped to the white board and wrote, over their scribbles, “Working Together.” “It was one of those light bulb moments,” Fields said. David Whiston, an analyst with Morningstar, said he’s sorry to see Mulally go but thinks Fields is ready to take over and,


President and CEO Alan Mulally is retiring from Ford. Below: Mulally, from left, Executive Chairman Bill Ford and Fields stand next to the new Ford F-150 pickup at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

as a 25-year veteran of the company, knows it even better than Mulally in some ways. “In some cases the CEO’s shoes are impossible shoes to fill, but Mark can just come in and keep doing what he has been doing,” Whiston said. “Some will be concerned, but there were a lot of people underneath Alan making the results happen. Alan was just the visionary and the catalyst to make that change.” Bill Ford told The Associated Press that Fields is humble about his achievements. But he has been an advocate within the company for advanced technology and better products. “Every job the company’s ever asked him to do, he’s done a really good job of it,” Bill Ford said. Mulally relied heavily on the “Way Forward” strategy that Fields initiated in 2005, when Ford’s big North American division was a money pit. Fields’ plan called for closing factories, laying off thousands of workers and using Ford’s design expertise in Europe to build better cars that could be sold globally. Fields embraced Mulally’s call for a cultural change early on, Bill Ford said, adding that Fields’ decision to stay with the company and learn from Mulally showed a lot of fortitude. In turn, Mulally helped smooth some of the rough edges that had sometimes made the Brooklyn, N.Y.-born Fields hard to work with. “I have nothing left to teach or tell Mark about. He knows everything,” Mulally said. Bill Ford said Fields will be a collaborative leader, like Mulally, but “with not as much hugging.” Mulally, a father of five, is famous for his wide grin and bear hugs. This marks the second change in leadership at the top of a Detroit automaker this year. Mary Barra took over as CEO for Dan Akerson at General Motors in January. Supporters say Fields is an excellent strategist with a deep knowledge of the business. His international experience, with stints in Japan, Europe and Argentina, is invaluable as Ford restructures its European operations and focuses on growth in volatile young markets like Asia and South America. Fields, a married father of two college-age sons, wears sharp

suits and has a bit of a swagger. He was raised in Paramus, New Jersey, the youngest of three sons; his father, Gerald Fields, was the purchasing manager at a sprinkler company and often talked business at the kitchen table. His mother is a homemaker. At the New York auto show in April, Fields showed a home movie of his family at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York. He remembered the excitement of the crowd when he was lifted on his father’s shoulders to see the new Ford Mustang. He’s been a car guy since he was 8, when his father bought him his first two Matchbox cars, which he still has. He also still owns his first car, a Datsun 280Z, which he bought in 1983. Fields earned a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University in 1983. He sold computers for IBM before earning an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1989. Like Barra, who became the first female CEO of a big automaker at GM, Fields will be breaking a mold at Ford. He is the company’s first Jewish chief executive.

JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 17


Networking event designed to spark creativity Staff Reports

The Center for Business and Economic Development at Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus and the Columbus Area Chamber of Commerce are hosting Spark Columbus, a networking event for entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, inventors, small business owners, young professionals, students, educators and others interested in start-up and new business ventures. The free event will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. June 4 in the LHP Building at 703 Washington St. A cash bar will be available. According to organizers Greg Knudson, CBED director, and Cindy Frey, chamber president, this first-time Spark Columbus event will celebrate “bootstrapper” entrepreneurs and inventors. Participants can network with creative risk-takers who are launching new business ventures. Keynote speaker is Rick Johnson, president and CEO of Johnson Ventures, a capital investment firm that owns restaurants, convenience stores, construction materials and publishing companies. The Johnson family founded the Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation at

Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business in Bloomington. Johnson will discuss the importance of entrepreneurial activity in Indiana communities and share his thoughts on what makes entrepreneurs successful. Other speakers will include: — Dawn Andrews, founder and CEO of Garb2ART cosmetics, which is a contracted supplier for J Crew stores. The cosmetics are unique because of built-in LED lights in the applicators and packaging that uses recycled materials. — George Devidze and Dr. Carrie Pumphrey, a husband/wife team that founded a mobile first SaaS application for the dental industry called ClariCare. — James Gorman, inventor of the “land zeppelin,” an all-weather, all-season bicycle enclosure designed to enhance the cycling experience for recreational riders, commuters, sports enthusiasts and others without access to motorized transportation. “We hope the June 4 event will be the first in a series of networking opportunities that will bring

the business and university communities together to meet, share ideas, network and help each other become successful,” Knudson said. Frey said the chamber is working to create a healthy entrepreneurial ecosystem where new ventures can find champions, capital and a supportive environment that enables them to thrive. “Working alongside the Center for Business and Economic Development, we hope to expand the support available for start-ups and young ventures in our community,” she said. IUPUC and the chamber are discussing a number of possibilities for future programming, such as entrepreneurial boot camps, sessions on financing for start-up ventures and workshops for new CEOs. To register online, go to columbusarea. chambermaster.com/events. Contact Kami Adams at kadams@columbusareachamber.com for registration questions. For information about the June 4 and future Spark Columbus networking events, contact Greg Knudson (812-348-7301 or gknudson@iupuc. edu) or Cindy Frey (812-379-4457 or cfrey@ columbusareachamber.com).

FOR

INDUSTRIAL • RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL ROOFING SPECIALISTS Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, IN

(812) 372-7829

SINCE 1947

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18 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

Mike Bonham

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mbonham@jwinsurance.com

Dan Fox

dfox@jwinsurance.com


Eye on the pie

Morton Marcus

The ideological battle continues Who should be in charge? Governments or private entities? If government, should it be the feds, the states or the locals? What level of government, if any, should control transportation, education, health care, libraries and almost anything else you can imagine? Hoosiers and all Americans have problems answering these questions. Economists often say that where the actions of one entity result in significant effects on others (externalities), control should go to a larger unit. What happens in one library district probably has little impact on the neighboring district. Libraries are local, and not all communities have one. Some people, however, believe there are lower costs of service in larger systems (economies of scale) and urge the adoption of county-wide or regional library districts. Transportation involves many consequences for land owners, businesses and households. That’s why major decisions about transportation are national (interstate highways) with minor adjustments by states and localities. Bridges across the Ohio River at Louisville and Evansville involve national as well as local traffic flows. The proposed Illiana Expressway,

connecting Interstate 65 in northwest Indiana with Interstate 55 in Illinois, involves decisions about traffic and the environment for major corridors in the Chicago area. Education has been a state concern and a local responsibility. In most places, the job done by schools has not met our aspirations. Unlike highways, schools have not been held to high professional standards. Now with Common Core as a national standard, Indiana asserts it measures performance better than the feds. Should education, traditionally financed by localities, be run and financed by the state? That’s the Indiana trend. Or should there be a major infusion of federal funds along with federal standards? Most folks argue schools should meet the expectations of parents and be locally controlled to meet local values. Others question parental aspirations and the validity of local values. There seems to be no evidence that either bigger or smaller schools are better. So the running of schools could be left to local operators, as McDonald’s franchise holders run their restaurants under a national policy. What about taxes? Are old patterns of

taxation now obsolete? Indiana’s Legislature could not decide. The recently ended session declared business personal property taxes (which are local taxes) should be eliminated in whole or in part. Not, however, before the next session of the Legislature, after the next round of elections, and the next opportunity to raise more campaign contributions from interested businesses. As it stands, the decisions on business personal property taxes are going to be made by county leaders. This pits one county against another in the ever-changing fight for private investment. Of course, if there are no business personal property tax revenues, there is less reason to fight for local investment and to provide development incentives. More jobs in your community might be a nuisance and a cost to local government paid for by higher income/ property taxes on local residents. It might surprise some wizards in our Legislature that they have passed a law that could work against economic development. Morton Marcus is an economist who may be reached at mortonjmarcus@yahoo.com.

Business Indicators for Bartholomew County Dec 2013

Jan 2014 Feb 2014

Mar 2014

Labor Force % Chg from Year Ago

41,242 41,674 41,652 41,888 0.76% 2.46% 2.7% 3.65%

Employed % Chg from Year Ago

39,273 39,610 39,495 39,930 2.63% 5.22% 4.71% 5.85%

Unemployed % Chg from Year Ago

1,969 2,064 2,157 1,958 -26.14% -31.9% -24.02% -27.21%

Unemployment Rate 4.8 5.0 5.2 4.7 Chg from Year Ago -1.7 -2.5 -1.8 -2.0 — Center for Business and Economic Research, Ball State University JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 19


on the move

Betsy Free

Betsy Free, of the financial services firm Edward Jones in Columbus, has achieved the designation of Accredited Asset Management Specialist. She successfully completed the professional education program from the Denver-based College for Financial Planning. Those who complete the program, pass a final exam and sign a code of ethics and disclosure form earn the AAMS designation. This advanced training offers investment professionals the hands-on information needed to provide comprehensive financial services. Study topics include understanding the asset management process to understanding asset allocation and strategies. Vince Moore, of the Vince Moore Agency, recently received the Allstate Insurance Co. Inner Circle Elite Award in recognition of high customer satisfaction, customer retention and profitable business growth in auto, property and commercial insurance and financial services.

Melissa Fairbanks

John Fairbanks

The Columbus area Comfort Keepers office was recently recognized as a Quest for Excellence recipient from CK Franchising Inc., the franchisor of Comfort Keepers. Melissa and John Fairbanks, Douglas Johnson and Ann Kerr, owners of the Columbus office, received this recognition from the company’s support office in Dayton, Ohio. The annual Quest for Excellence award recognizes Comfort Keepers franchisees who adhere to high standards established by the company and are the top sales performers or deliver the greatest percentage year-over-year revenue growth in North America within a category. Melissa Fairbanks, owner/ general manager, was recognized for delivering stellar business performance in 2013. Also, local Comfort Keeper Amy Stover was named a top 24 finalist in the nationwide search for Comfort Keeper of the Year. Comfort Keepers is a franchise offering in-home care and services for seniors and others needing assistance. Therapist Matthew Lucas recently completed a professional development program, “TraumaInformed Practices with Children Who Experienced Domestic Violence,” sponsored by Loyola University Chicago’s School of Social Work. He holds a master’s degree in counseling, with an emphasis on marriage, family and child therapy and specializes in treating children, adolescents and their families.

Allison Zech, an LPL financial adviser at Old National Investments in Columbus, has been recognized as a top financial adviser and named to the LPL Financial Freedom Club based on an annual production ranking of all registered advisers supported by LPL Financial. LPL is an independent, nationwide brokerdealer and consultant to retirement plans. Amy Stover Allison Zech

Laura DeDomenic of Columbus has been appointed Southeast Indiana Small Business Development Center’s new business adviser for Bartholomew, Jennings and Decatur counties. She will assist any business with fewer than 500 employees with securing financing, marketing plans, strategic planning and general business questions, at no cost. She most recently was chief executive officer and owner of Success Business Development and is experienced in launching new businesses, business plan development, strategic planning and development, marketing plan development and implementation, business management and administration. She is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati, with a degree in business administration.

20 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

Thomas L. McKinley, chief engineer at Cummins Inc., has been elected as a 2013-14 SAE International Fellow, the highest level of membership bestowed by SAE that recognizes outstanding engineering, scientific and leadership accomplishments by an individual that have resulted in meaningful advances in automotive, aerospace and commercial vehicle technologies. An average of 20 recipients worldwide are named each year. He is a graduate of Purdue University, with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering, and earned a doctorate from the University of Illinois. At Cummins, he leads systems engineering and validation efforts for heavy-, medium- and light-duty engine lines.


Kaleb Briscoe

Mark A. Smith

Kaleb Briscoe has joined IUPUC as assistant director of student involvement. She is a graduate of Albany State University, with a bachelor’s degree in business management and a master’s degree in business administration. Briscoe also is completing a master’s degree in student affairs and higher education at Indiana State University. She most recently was assistant director of financial aid and adjunct instructor of marketing management at Albany Technical College in Albany, Ga. Mark A. Smith of Carmel has been promoted to vice president of investor relations at Cummins Inc. He joined Cummins in 1995 and has served in multiple roles, most recently as executive director of investor relations. Previously, he served in various roles within the components, filtration, engine and power generation businesses at Cummins. He is a graduate of the University of Kent in England, with a degree in economics, and earned a master’s degree in business administration from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. He will continue to lead investor relations and the business, planning and analysis function for Cummins and will now be responsible for capital management across the company. Rachel and Richard Cruser, local granddaughter and grandfather team, have purchased and are operating Ritter’s Frozen Custard at 710 Creekview Drive. Elizabeth Fugate, an 11-year Ritter’s employee in Southport, is manager.

Jason MacLean

Dr. Jyothi Varanasi

Jason MacLean of Cummins Inc. has been promoted to company officer and vice president of power generation business unit supply chain. He is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, with a degree in English and Russian, and the university’s Wharton School of Business and Lauder Institute, with an MBA in finance and a master’s degree in international studies in Russian. He joined Cummins in 2006 as part of the distribution business unit and since 2010 has been overseeing the development and execution of supply chain strategy across business units and functions. Dr. Jyothi Varanasi has joined the medical staff at Columbus Regional Hospital. She is a neurologist who has joined the practice of Neurology & Sleep Sciences Inc. A graduate of Southern Illinois University, she completed her residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee in neurology and internal medicine. She also completed a fellowship at Indiana University School of Medicine is neurophysiology.

Lisa Siefker Bailey

Erica Berte

Jung Kook Lee

Joan Poulsen

Lauren Burch

The Indiana University Board of Trustees has approved promotions for four faculty members at Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus: Lisa Siefker Bailey has been promoted to senior lecturer in English in the Division of Liberal Arts. She focuses on interdisciplinary approaches to writing, literature and theater. Erica Berte has earned tenure and has been promoted to associate professor of management in the Division of Business. Her areas of research include international business, small technology-based firms and organizational behavior. A native of Brazil, Berte teaches undergraduate classes in international business, organizational behavior and change. She teaches graduate courses on innovation in the MBA program. Jung Kook Lee has earned tenure and has been promoted to associate professor of marketing in the Division of Business. He specializes in marketing management and strategy, with research interests in e-commerce, branding and tourism marketing. He also studies consumer attitudes toward e-business and online privacy. Lee, a native of Seoul, South Korea, has received grants from the National Science Foundation for his work on consumer privacy, data security and digital identities. Joan Poulsen has earned tenure and has been promoted to associate professor of psychology in the Division of Science. She explores the psychology of group processes, especially as they relate to marginalized people/groups. Her research focuses on ostracism and prejudice. She teaches social psychology, research methods, group dynamics and industrial-organizational psychology. In addition, she serves as director of IUPUC’s undergraduate psychology program. In other faculty news, Lauren Burch has been appointed interim director of the MBA program for the Division of Business at IUPUC. A visiting assistant professor of management, she specializes in new media and athletics. She has studied Olympic media coverage, self-portrayals of professional athletes on Twitter, and the short-term effects of violent sport media on human aggression. She has served as a strategic communications and research consultant for Hirons & Co. Communications and has worked for the Lockheed Martin Corp. at the Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center. Eric M. Robbins, an Edward Jones financial adviser in Columbus, qualified for the firm’s 2014 Financial Advisor Leaders Conference at the firm’s headquarters in St. Louis. This conference recognizes financial advisers who are among the leaders in the financial services firm. He was one of only 1,003 who qualified out of the firm’s nearly 12,000 financial advisers in the U.S. and Canada. — Staff Reports

JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 21


Around the WATERCOOLER Columbus Regional Health honored

Columbus Regional Health has received a Lifetime Achievement Award for supply chain management from VHA Inc., a national health care network. The award recognizes Columbus Regional for strong results in lowering supply costs through the VHA PriceLYNX HCO Price Index and maintaining that level of high performance. The award was presented at the recent VHA national conference. “We are always working to find cost efficiencies and reduce the cost of hospital supplies for our patients, and we are honored to receive this recognition for our team’s ongoing efforts,” says Christina Raaf, vice president of hospital operations at Columbus Regional Health. VHA is a national network serving more than 5,100 health system members that work together to achieve new levels of clinical performance and operational efficiency.

Glass plant to pay safety penalty

SHELBYVILLE — A central Indiana automotive glass factory will pay a record $495,500 to settle workplace safety violations that went uncorrected following a worker’s 2010 death. An agreement filed with the Indiana Board of Safety Review settles violations at a Pilkington North America plant in Shelbyville. The Indiana Department of Labor said the penalties for violations and inspections are the most expensive in the history of the Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration. It says Pilkington must correct the safety violations by the end of 2014. Toledo, Ohio-based Pilkington issued a statement saying “it has always strived to maintain the highest standards” when it comes to worker safety. A maintenance worker was fatally crushed in machinery at the plant in September 2010.

Ulta to lease distribution center

GREENWOOD — Beauty products retailer Ulta Inc. will locate a distribution center in Greenwood and create up to 537 jobs by 2018. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. said that the Bolingbrook, Ill.-based company will invest nearly $52 million to lease and equip a 670,000-square-foot plant. The IEDC says it offered Ulta up to $3 million in conditional tax credits, depending on the number of jobs it creates. It says 22 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

Ulta plans to begin hiring warehouse workers, managers and others this summer. Ulta currently operates 675 retail stores nationally, including 13 in Indiana, that offer one-stop shopping for salon products and services. The company has three other distribution centers located in Illinois, Arizona and Pennsylvania.

Company to close warehouse

GREENFIELD — Irwin Tools plans to close a central Indiana warehouse this summer, eliminating the jobs of nearly 80 workers. Irwin has notified state officials that it expects the layoffs to start in July at the company’s distribution center near Interstate 70 and the Hancock County community of Mount Comfort just east of Indianapolis. Company spokeswoman Hannah Van Malssen tells the Daily Reporter that the closing decision comes as Irwin Tools is consolidating distribution operations nationally. She says the work done at the Hancock County warehouse is being transferred to a center in the Atlanta area. Irwin Tools is a subsidiary of Atlanta-based Newell Rubbermaid Co.

Work begins on sports complex

EVANSVILLE — Construction is starting on a new $14 million sports complex in Evansville that officials say will help the city attract many youth baseball and softball tournaments. Several local leaders took part in a groundbreaking ceremony recently for the complex on the city’s northeast side. Plans call for it to have eight baseball or softball fields, along with concession stands, a playground and Wi-Fi towers. Evansville tourism director Bob Warren says construction will continue through the spring and summer, with the fields being ready for play in spring 2015. Money from Vanderburgh County’s motel tax is being used to finance the project. Vanderburgh County commissioners President Joe Kiefer says the complex will help the city compete for youth sports events that draw thousands of visitors.

Solar farm on Superfund site goes online

INDIANAPOLIS — The nation’s largest solar farm built on a federal Superfund site is now generating power above a stretch of Indianapolis tainted by a long-shuttered plant’s woodtreating operations.


The 43-acre Maywood Solar Farm went online in March and is feeding 8 megawatts of electricity into Indianapolis Power & Light’s grid. Property owner Vertellus Specialties Inc. worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, solar panel maker Hanwha Q CELLS, IPL and other partners to develop the solar farm. EPA spokesman Francisco Arcaute says it’s the country’s largest solar farm on a Superfund site. A plant that closed in 1972 had treated railroad ties with the toxic chemical creosote for decades. Vertellus President Rich Preziotti says the project has put idle land into productive use generating renewable energy.

Plant closing could cost 120 jobs

LAPORTE — A northern Indiana metal casting factory is set to close, a move that could eliminate about 120 jobs in the coming months. LaPorte Mayor Blair Milo says ATI Casting plans in June to start shutting the factory in the city about 25 miles west of South Bend. Milo says that local economic development officials will be meeting with the company to see whether any steps are possible to avoid the closure. A letter from the company cites continued poor economic conditions for the closing decision.

Indiana Packers to open warehouse

FRANKFORT — State officials say a pork products producer will open a warehouse in Frankfort, creating up to 98 jobs by 2016. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. said Indiana Packers Corp., a subsidiary of Japan-based Mitsubishi Corp., will invest $2.3 million to buy, renovate and equip a 56,000-squarefoot plant to ship pork products and receive materials. The new plant is expected to begin operations in August. The agency said it offered Indiana Packers up to $400,000 in tax credits and up to $140,000 in training grants based on the company’s job creation plans. The city of Frankfort, about 40 miles northwest of Indianapolis, will consider additional property tax abatement for the company. Indiana Packers operates a large pork processing plant in nearby Delphi. It has 2,000 Indiana employees.

Auto parts plant to add jobs

MOORESVILLE — A Japanese company plans to expand a central Indiana auto parts factory, saying it expects to add about 220 jobs in the coming year. TOA Industries Co. says it will spend about $72 million to build and equip a 360,000-square-foot addition of manufacturing and warehouse space at its existing factory in Mooresville. The company says it now has more than 450 workers in Indiana. The factory supplies suspension and frame parts to customers, including the Subaru factory in Lafayette and Toyota’s plant near Princeton in southwestern Indiana. TOA Industries says its Mooresville expansion is expected to be complete in three phases, with the first phase operational by the end of this year.

The company announced in a news release that it will invest $6.9 million to set up a 220,000-square-foot facility housing its transmission division near its headquarters in Jasper, about 40 miles northeast of Evansville. The new plant is expected to be operational this fall. The employee-owned company remanufactures drivetrain components and has more than 2,600 workers throughout the U.S., including nearly 1,500 in Indiana. It also has remanufacturing operations in Crawford City and in Willow Springs, Mo. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. offered the company up to $1,150,000 in conditional tax credits and up to $200,000 in training grants. These tax credits are contingent upon additional hires.

Young Hoosier to meet with Buffett

GRANGER — A 9-year-old northern Indiana girl with a passion for business has been chosen as a finalist in a business development contest sponsored by billionaire Warren Buffett. Mia Bauer of Granger will present her business idea to the Berkshire Hathaway chief executive as part of his Secret Millionaires Club’s “Grow Your Own Business Challenge.” That contest allows children ages 7 to 14 to submit business ideas for a chance to win $5,000 and present their idea to Buffett in Omaha, Nebraska. Mia will present her idea for “concentration bugs.” Those are stuffed animals that resemble friendly, colorful bugs and which students can keep near them when they’re studying as a reminder to focus on their work if their minds wander.

Door manufacturer will open plant

BUTLER — A Georgia-based maker of roll-up doors plans to open a plant in northeastern Indiana that could employ up to 50 workers within a few years. Janus International signed a lease for a building in the DeKalb County city of Butler. CEO David Curtis says the company had been looking for a Midwest site for about a year and also considered Michigan before settling on northeast Indiana. Janus International makes roll-up doors and metal components, primarily for the self-storage industry and commercial markets. Butler is home to steelmakers Steel Dynamics Inc. and New Process, which are Janus suppliers. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. says Janus buys steel from Steel Dynamics’ Butler mill and wanted a plant closer to the steel supplier. — Staff and Wire Reports

Jasper Engines & Transmission to expand

JASPER — Jasper Engines & Transmission says it will expand its operations in southwest Indiana, creating up to 235 new jobs by 2017. JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 23


BUSINESS LEADS COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS 3780 W JONATHAN MOORE PIKE COMMERCIAL REMODEL $53,939 BUCKLEY, TARA, OWNER T & W CORPORATION, CONTRACTOR COM REMODEL 1356 SF 3220 N NATIONAL RD COMMERCIAL REMODEL $157,855 SONRISAS FAMILY DENTAL, OWNER ALDERSON COMMERCIAL GRO, CONTRACTOR REM/SONRISAS FAMILY DENTAL 2531 EASTBROOK PLAZA COMMERCIAL REMODEL $40,000 FIRST FINANCIAL BANK, OWNER REPP & MUNDT INC, CONTRACTOR FIRST FINANCIAL REMODEL 1825 W 450 S NEW COMMERCIAL BUILDING $16,500,000 CUMMINS INC, OWNER ARCO DESIGN/BUILD, CONTRACTOR CUMMINS WAREHOUSE 428,400 SF 4725 JONESVILLE RD COMMERCIAL REMODEL $350,000 RIORDAN, TODD, OWNER TOVEY-PERRY CO., CONTRACTOR HAPPY STORAGE BUILDING/REM 3888 MIMOSA DR COMMERCIAL REMODEL $5,000,000 BROOKS, DAVID/COURTYARD, OWNER WESTLAKE CONSTRUCTION S, CONTRACTOR COURTYARD HOTEL REMODEL 3490 SF 3045 COLUMBUS CENTER COMMERCIAL REMODEL $60,000 GAD CHEN, OWNER WANG’S CONSTRUCTION, CONTRACTOR LLC RESTAURANT 3095 CARR HILL RD COMMERCIAL ADDITION 02 $4,000 24 The Business Connection JUNE 2014

SPRINT AGENT-KEITH SMITH, OWNER HEARTLAND SOLUTIONS CORP, CONTRACTOR TOWER 50 N US 31 COMMERCIAL REMODEL $4,000 SPRINT KEITH SMITH, AGENT, OWNER HEARTLAND SOLUTIONS CORP, CONTRACTOR TOWER 2660 EASTWOOD DR COMMERCIAL REMODEL $4,000 SPRINT, OWNER HEARTLAND SOLUTIONS CORP, CONTRACTOR TOWER 1621 CALIFORNIA ST COMMERCIAL ADDITION $10,000 VERIZON WIRELESS, OWNER FORTUNE WIRELESS, CONTRACTOR ATENNA ADDN TO CELL TOWER 4895 PINE RIDGE DR COMMERCIAL ADDITION $3,100 GREENTREE AT WESTWOOD, OWNER KIRKHAM MARC, CONTRACTOR 12’ X 14’ SHELTER HOUSE 739 22ND ST COMMERCIAL REMODEL $200,000 CITY OF COLUMBUS DONNER CENTER, OWNER TAYLOR BROTHERS CONSTRUCTION, CONTRACTOR REROOF DONNER CENTER 423 WASHINGTON ST COMMERCIAL REMODEL $65,000 MORAVEC REALTY CORP, OWNER LORAN ROBERTS CONSTRUCTION COM REMODEL 2000 SF 3515 TWO MILE HOUSE RD COMMERCIAL REMODEL $25,000 EXPRESS TWO MILE HOUSE RD, OWNER BEMIS GROUP, CONTRACTOR REMODEL/EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROF

april

3800 W CARLOS FOLGER DR COMMERCIAL REMODEL $127,400 RIVERBEND WEST LLC, OWNER T & W CORPORATION, CONTRACTOR COMMERCIAL REM

LOAHAN DEVELOPMENT LLC, OWNER/CONTRACTOR

2224 25TH ST COMMERCIAL REMODEL $159,900 NEW FAIR OAKS OWNER LLC, OWNER VERSATILE CONSTRUCTION, CONTRACTOR FAIR OAKS MALL REMODEL 270 SF

667 LAKE VISTA DR $268,900 NEW SINGLE FAMILY RES M/I HOMES OF INDIANA, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR

3200 COLUMBUS CENTER COMMERCIAL REMODEL $40,000 BRIXMORE GROUP/BRAD COPP, OWNER ALT CONSTRUCTION, CONTRACTOR COM REMODEL 3200 SF 2025 MERCHANTS MILE COMMERCIAL REMODEL $444,236 WALMART REAL ESTATE BUS TR, OWNER/CONTRACTOR WALMART REMODEL 26650 SF

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS 1973 DEER CREEK CIR $150,000 NEW 5196 SF RES/BMT/GAR PHILLIPS DEVELOPMENT INC, OWNER/CONTRACTOR 1993 DEER CREEK CIR $230,000 NEW 4762 RES/BMT/GAR PHILLIPS DEVELOPMENT INC, OWNER/CONTRACTOR 5143 DELRAY DR $350,000 NEW SINGLE FAM RESIDENTIAL LOAHAN DEVELOPMENT LLC, OWNER/CONTRACTOR 5153 DELRAY DR $260,000 NEW SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING LOAHAN DEVELOPMENT LLC, OWNER/CONTRACTOR 5163 DELRAY DR $275,000 NEW SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING

5173 DELRAY DR $375,000 LOAHAN DEVELOPMENT LLC, OWNER/CONTRACTOR

2090 LAKECREST DR $140,600 NEW 2549 SF 2 STORY RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 14550 N 170 W $315,000 NEW 5101 SF RES/GAR 2 STORY FERGUSON, AARON, OWNER SKAGGS BUILDERS INC, CONTRACTOR 13051 N RIVER GROVE DR $175,000 NEW 2277 SF RES/GAR REYNOLDS BUILDERS, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 2089 PAWNEE TRL $310,000 NEW RESIDENTIAL THOMPSON CONSTRUCTION, OWNER/CONTRACTOR 5281 QUINCY DR $260,000 3118 SF NEW SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING SKAGGS BUILDERS INC, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 3253 RED FOX TRL $220,000 RES/NEW DREES HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 7005 SCARBOROUGH DR $318,000 NEW SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL M/I HOMES OF INDIANA, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 2308 SHADOW BEND DR $157,400 NEW 2549 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR

see leads on page 25


coach’s corner

Mark McNulty

What to do when cash gets tight As an intelligent, high performing business owner, you already know that “cash is king” when it comes to running your business, right? Well, in my experience, too many business owners focus too much energy on profit and loss, or P&L, and not enough on cash. It should never come as a surprise that you are low on cash, and you should always be able to predict (within reason) your near term cash position and have strategies to improve it if the plan puts you too short. The first step is the one too many businesses skip, and that is having a budget based on cash flow, not just the P&L. This means adding in all the things that you pay cash for that aren’t reflected in your P&L, the most common of which are bank loans and any regular (or irregular) draws you take to pay yourself. I’ve worked with businesses that showed tremendous profits but were going broke because they weren’t paying enough attention to the draws the owner was taking to pay personal bills at home. No matter how much he took out, his profits never suffered. It was like magic! If you find yourself in a cash crunch, the time to act is now, and the activities to focus on are those that can find and conserve cash. I recommend a six-week cash flow plan

that shows what you expect to bring into your business in cash each week and shows what you should be paying out to creditors, vendors and employees each week. This will give you the true cash situation for the next six weeks and highlight when and where the shortfalls might be. Then you need to work on strategies for both areas – cash inflows and cash outflows. If you are cash flow negative, you need to look at what bills can be delayed, which can be partially paid and which truly must be paid (utilities to keep the building open, for example). If you are short of cash, know your vendors, tell them your situation and ask for their help. If you are a good customer, they will likely work with you. Do not try to mislead them. Once you have done what you can with your cash outflows, it is time to look at cash inflows. Start with your accounts receivable. Who owes you money, and when do you expect to be paid? Can you accelerate the payment schedule? Who is overdue on their account, when was the last time they were called? Do everything you can to speed up the receipt of payments already owed to you. The last thing to work on is increasing sales, and this is where you need to be strategic. I was recently working with a company in a cash crunch, and the CEO went on a sales trip to try

to drum up business. The only problem is that the prospects being called were the type of customers that will take months to get set up, will pay the slowest and will be the least profitable. While they are good for the long term as they can help get volume up, which will eventually lower some costs, they are not going to help you now. The key is to know which sales channels/ products/services/markets are both the most profitable for you and have the shortest sales cycles. The shortest cycles are often not the strategic accounts that will get you where you want to be in five years, but if you don’t work them now you might not be here in five months. Cash management is like every other aspect of your business. You need to have short-term, medium-term and long-term strategies. When it comes to sales and revenues, be sure you don’t focus too much on the long-term items at the expense of generating the cash you need right now or in three months. Put your cash flow plan together this week, before it is too late to prevent your next sleepless night. Mark McNulty is a business coach with ActionCoach Business Coaching. He can be reached at 350-4903 or mark@coachmark.biz.

leads continued from page 24 2348 SHADOW BEND DR $144,000 NEW 2549 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 2398 SHADOW BEND DR $134,300 NEW 2304 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 2408 SHADOW BEND DR $137,400 NEW 2501 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 2280 W 900 N $210,000

NEW 3416 SF RES/BMT/GAR MYERS, MARK, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR

CERTIFICATES TO DO BUSINESS UNDER ASSUMED NAME Darrell Cox, DBA Sutherland Falls (online clothing sales), 15257 N. Bluff Road, Edinburgh Stephanie and Mark McGaha, DBA S&M Ventures (contract services), 2822 Fairlawn Drive, Columbus Daniel Dailey, DBA Complete Sealcoating Services

(asphalt maintenance), 15370 E. Road 425W, Hope Julie Lashley, DBA Cornerstone Realty (real estate), 419 Rocky Ford Road, Columbus Blake Spann, DBA Inspekt (consulting), 1926 Hawcreek Ave., Columbus Bruce Brock Jr., DBA Brock Builders (construction), 7808 Brooks Lane, Nineveh Douglas and Holly Barrett, DBA Barrett Lawncare (mowing/landscaping), 16791 E. Road 200S, Columbus

Tran Hahn Kim, DBA AA Hair & Nails (hair and nail salon), 10020 N. US 31, Columbus Timothy and Edith Hamilton, DBA Divine Family BBQ (amends from Smokie & The Grill) (mobile food), 3621 Cardinal Court, Columbus Sarah E. Ross, DBA Muddy Paws Pet Salon LLC (pet grooming and retail), 1075 Second St., Columbus Becky Gilroy and Shirley Tingley, DBA StoffordHolder Inc., DBA Ark/Book & Gift (retail), 2622 Eastbrook Plaza, Columbus JUNE 2014 The Business Connection 25


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26 The Business Connection JUNE 2014


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The Business Connection 27


You know the right person is out there. You just don’t know where to look. Through our partnership with Monster, The Republic can help you find the right person, faster. It’s only part of the comprehensive recruiting solution you’ll find with The Republic and Monster. And just one of the ways we’re here to help you keep your business running.

Find the right fit for your next job at www.columbusindianajobs.com. 28 The Business Connection JUNE 2014


Business Connection June 2014