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Front Cover 233 Howard Terpning b. 1927 Calling the Buffalo Oil on canvas 36 x 28 inches Signed lower right and dated 2011; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000

Opposite 230 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Thirty Below and a Blizzard Raging Oil on canvas 27 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000

Back Cover 223 Ernest Blumenschein 1874-1960 Woman in Blue Oil on canvas 27 ¼ x 24 ¼ inches Signed lower left and inscribed “Taos” Estimate: $250,000 - 350,000


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Michael Frost J. N. Bartfield Galleries 30 West 57th Street New York, NY 10019 (212) 245-8890 michael@scottsdaleartauction.com

Jack A. Morris, Jr. Morris & Whiteside Galleries 220 Cordillo Parkway Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 (843) 842-4433 jack@scottsdaleartauction.com

Brad Richardson The Legacy Gallery 7178 Main Street Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 945-1113 brad@scottsdaleartauction.com

Jason Brooks, Auctioneer Online Bidding Arrangements can be made through www.scottsdaleartauction.com

Telephone Bidding Arrangements must be made no later than 5:00 pm on Thursday, April 3. Subject to availability. Absentee Bidding Arrangements must be made no later than 5:00 pm on Friday, April 4. Please call (480) 945-0225 or register online at www.scottsdaleartauction.com

Auction results will be available online Monday, April 14 at www.scottsdaleartauction.com

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7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

480 945-0225


S S A S S A A A

SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION SCOTTSDALE SCOTTSDALEART ARTAUCTION AUCTION SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday • April 5, 2014

Saturday Saturday • •April April5,5,2014 2014 Saturday • April 5, 2014

Friday, April 4 Friday, April 44 10:00am–5:00pm...............................................................................................Registration & Preview Friday, April 10:00am–5:00pm...............................................................................................Registration & Preview 6:00pm–8:00pm Friday, April 4 ..........................................................................................................Cocktail Preview 10:00am–5:00pm...............................................................................................Registration & Preview 6:00pm–8:00pm ..........................................................................................................Cocktail Preview 10:00am–5:00pm...............................................................................................Registration & Preview Preview 6:00pm–8:00pm ..........................................................................................................Cocktail Saturday, April 5..........................................................................................................Cocktail Preview 6:00pm–8:00pm Saturday, April 55 8:30am–9:30am.................................................................................................Registration & Preview Saturday, April 8:30am–9:30am.................................................................................................Registration & Preview 9:30am Saturday, ............................................................................................................. April 5 First Session: Lots 1–120 8:30am–9:30am.................................................................................................Registration & Preview 9:30am ............................................................................................................. First Session: Lots 1–120 11:30am 8:30am–9:30am.................................................................................................Registration ...............................................................................................................................Lunch & Preview Buffet 9:30am ............................................................................................................. First Session: Lots 1–120 11:30am Buffet 1:00pm 9:30am...............................................................................................................................Lunch ............................................................................................................. ....................................................................................................Second First Session: Session: Lots Lots 121–354 1–120 11:30am ...............................................................................................................................Lunch Buffet 1:00pm ....................................................................................................Second Session: Lots 121–354 11:30am ...............................................................................................................................Lunch Buffet 1:00pm ....................................................................................................Second Session: Lots 121–354 Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com 1:00pm ....................................................................................................Second Session: Lots 121–354 Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit Scottsdale Art Auction Award ofof Merit Scottsdale Art Auction Award Merit Registered Bidders will haveScottsdale an opportunity to selectAward the Scottsdale Art Auction of MeritArt Auction Award of Merit Registered to be presented Bidders towill one have contemporary anan opportunity artisttoto who select created the Scottsdale a work of Art art Auction specifically Award forofthis Merit sale. Registered Bidders will have opportunity select the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit toThe bebepresented cash prize to oftoone $15,000 contemporary will awarded artist into recognition created work outstanding ofofart achievement. forforthis Eligible sale. Registered Bidders will have anbe opportunity select theaScottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit to presented one contemporary artistwho who created aofwork artspecifically specifically this sale. The works ofprize art are ofof$15,000 identified will bybe anbeawarded asterisk (*) ininrecognition next to the artist's ofaofoutstanding name in the achievement. cataloguefor and Eligible onsale. the to cash becash presented to$15,000 one contemporary artist who created work of art specifically this The prize will awarded recognition outstanding achievement. Eligible works identification ofof artart areare label identified for the bywill an work asterisk during (*)(*) the next preview. toto the artist's A of ballot name with inin the eligible catalogue works and listed on the will The cash prize ofidentified $15,000 beasterisk awarded innext recognition outstanding achievement. Eligible works by an the artist's name the catalogue and on the identification accompany label registration forforthe bidduring number. A preview. ballot box Aartist's ballot bename with available eligible works thelisted preview will on works of art each are identified bywork an asterisk (*) next to the theduring catalogue and on the identification label thework duringthe the preview. Awill ballot within eligible works listed will accompany Friday, April each 4th registration between bid a.m. and A 5:00 p.m.box and at ballot be the cocktail during preview the Friday evening, on identification label for the10:00 work during the preview. Awill with eligible works listed will accompany each registration bidnumber. number. Aballot ballot boxwill beavailable available during thepreview preview on Friday, April April 4th, from 4th 6:00 p.m.10:00 to 8:00 a.m. p.m. and The 5:00 p.m. will announced cocktail preview prior toFriday commencement evening, accompany each registration bid number. Awinner ballot boxatbe will be available during the preview on Friday, April 4thbetween between 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.and and atthe the cocktail preview Friday evening, April of the 4th, auction from 6:00 Saturday p.m. morning toto 8:00 at 9:30 The a.m. winner will bebe prior totocommencement Friday, April 4th between 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. and atannounced the cocktail preview Friday evening, April 4th, from 6:00 p.m. 8:00p.m. p.m. The winner will announced prior commencement ofof the auction Saturday morning 9:30 a.m. April 4th, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00atp.m. The the auction Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m.winner will be announced prior to commencement of the auction Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m. Hotel reservations at special Scottsdale Art Auction rates Hotel reservations atat special Scottsdale Auction rates are available at: Art Hotel reservations special Scottsdale Art Auction rates are available at: Hotel reservations at are special Scottsdale available at: Art Auction rates are available at: Marriott Suites The Phoenician Marriott Suites The Phoenician Scottsdale Town A Luxury Collection MarriottOld Suites The PhoenicianResort Old Town AA Luxury Collection Resort 7325Scottsdale East Marriott 3rd Avenue Suites • Scottsdale 6000 East Camelback The Phoenician Road • Scottsdale Scottsdale Old Town Luxury Collection Resort 7325 East 3rd Avenue • Scottsdale (888) 236-2427 toll free 6000 East Camelback Road • Scottsdale Scottsdale Old Town A Luxury (800) 888-8234 Collection toll Resort free 7325 East 3rd Avenue • Scottsdale 6000 East Camelback Road • Scottsdale (888) 236-2427 toll (800) 888-8234 toll free 7325 East (480) 3rd 945-1550 Avenue local •free Scottsdale 6000 East (480) Camelback 941-8200 Road local • Scottsdale (888) 236-2427 toll free (800) 888-8234 toll free (480) 945-1550 local (888) 236-2427 toll free (480) 941-8200 local (800) toll free local (480)888-8234 941-8200 (3 (480) blocks945-1550 walking distance) (2 miles) local (480) 945-1550 local (480) 941-8200 local (3(3 blocks walking distance) (2(2 miles) blocks walking distance) miles) (3 blocks walking distance) (2 miles) SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 • • 7176 • • SCOTTSDALE www.scottsdaleartauction.com SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION MAIN STREET ARIZONA 85251 945-0225 • 480 SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION 7176 MAIN STREET SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251• 480 945-0225 SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

www.scottsdaleartauction.com 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com www.scottsdaleartauction.com

480 945-0225 SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION

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Terms and Conditions BUYER’S PREMIUM The purchase price payable by the Purchaser shall be the total of the final bid price PLUS A PREMIUM OF FIFTEEN PERCENT (15%) on any individual lot in the amount up to and including $1,000,000; TWELVE PERCENT (12%) on any individual lot on the amount in excess of $1,000,000. This premium is in addition to any commissions or other charges payable by the consignor. Auction The art illustrated in this catalogue will be offered for sale on April 5, 2014 by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC on premises at 7176 Main Street, Scottsdale, Arizona. Telephone Bidding As a courtesy to clients who are unable to attend the sale, a telephone and order (absentee) bid service will be offered as staff and time allow. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC shall not be responsible for any errors or omissions or failure to execute such bids. Contact Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC at (480) 945-0225 (or register online) early for arrangements as telephone lines will be allocated on a first come basis. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will arrange for telephone lines on lots with a minimum estimate of $5,000 and over. Absentee Bidding and Fax Confidential absentee bid orders for auction items may also be completed and will be executed by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC on behalf of the Purchaser during the auction. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC shall not be responsible for any errors or omissions or failure to execute such intent to purchase orders or auction bids. This catalogue, as may be amended by posted notice or oral salesroom announcement, represents Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s entire agreement with any and all purchasers of the Property listed herein. The following are Procedures, Terms and Conditions on which all such Property listed is offered for sale by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC as agent for various owners or other Consignors: 1. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC reserves the right to withdraw Property at any time before or at the sale and shall have no liability for such withdrawal. 2. All Property will be sold “AS IS”. With respect to each lot of Property, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC does not make any guarantees, warranties or representations, expressed or implied, as to merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, the correctness of the catalogue or the authenticity or description of the Property, its physical condition, size, quality, rarity, importance, medium, provenance, exhibitions, literature or historical relevance. No statement, anywhere, whether oral or written, whether made in the catalogue, an advertisement, a bill of sale, a salesroom posting or announcement, or elsewhere, shall be deemed such a warranty, representation or assumption of liability. In no event shall Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC be responsible for genuineness, authorship, attribution, provenance, period, culture, source, origin or condition of the purchased Property and no verbal statements made regarding the Property either before or after the sale of the Property, or in any bill of sale, invoice or catalogue or advertisement or elsewhere shall be deemed such a guarantee of genuineness, or authenticity. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if within ten (10) calendar days after the purchase of any lot of Property, the Purchaser provides an opinion by a recognized authority on the artist and gives notice in writing to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC that the lot is not authentic, and returns the purchased lot to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, within ten (10) days of its purchase in the same condition as when sold, then Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will refund the full purchase price to the Purchaser. It shall be in the sole discretion of Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC as to whether the opinion provided by the Purchaser is an opinion by a recognized authority on the artist. 3. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC and/or Auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bids. The highest bidder acknowledged by the Auctioneer shall be the Purchaser. In the event of any dispute between bidders, the Auctioneer will have absolute and final discretion to either determine 4

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the successful bidder or to re-offer and resell the Property item in dispute. After the sale, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s record of final sale shall be conclusive. 4. At the fall of the Auctioneer’s hammer, the Purchaser shall (a) be acknowledged by bidder number by the auctioneer, (b) pay the hammer price and a buyer’s premium as outlined above. In addition, Purchaser may be required to sign a confirmation of purchase. All sales are final with no exchanges or returns. 5. Unless exempted by law, the Purchaser will be required to pay any and all Arizona state and local sales tax or, in the event of deliveries outside the state, it is the Purchaser’s responsibility to pay any applicable compensating use tax of another state on the total purchase price. 6. Terms for all purchases will be cash, check or credit card (VISA/MasterCard/American Express) with settlement and payment due in full the day of the sale unless otherwise arranged. All monies shall be made payable to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC. At the discretion of Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, payment will not be deemed to have been made in full until funds represented by checks have been collected or the authenticity of bank or cashier’s checks has been confirmed. Credit cards will not be accepted for purchases in excess of $10,000 on the total amount purchased at the sale. 7. No item of Property may be paid for or removed from Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC during the sale. After the sale has been completed and after the purchase price has been paid in full, Property must be removed from the saleroom at the Purchaser’s expense not later than three business days following the sale. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will, as a service to Purchasers, arrange to have Property packed, insured and shipped, all charges at the expense and entire risk of Purchaser. 8. Some items of Property may be offered subject to a “reserve” or confidential minimum price below which the item will not be sold. In such instances, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC may implement the reserve by bidding through the Auctioneer on behalf of the Consignor. In no event shall the reserve exceed the low estimate in the catalogue. 9. Neither Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, nor Auctioneer, nor Consignor make any representations whatsoever that the Purchaser of a work of art will acquire any reproduction rights thereto. 10. These Conditions of Sale and any other applicable conditions, as well as the Purchaser’s and Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s rights and obligations herein shall be governed by, construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the State of Arizona. If these conditions are not complied with by the Purchaser, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC may, in addition to other remedies available by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the Purchaser liable for the total purchase price stated on the Confirmation of Purchase Invoice, either (a) cancel the sale and retain as liquidated damages any and all payments made by the Purchaser or (b) resell the Property privately or at public auction on three days’ notice to the Purchaser for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs including handling charges, warehousing, the expense of both sales, the commissions, reasonable attorneys’ fees, any and all other charges due and incidental damages. 11. Biding on any item indicates your acceptance of these terms and all other terms announced at the time of sale whether bidding in person, by phone, by Internet, by absentee bid, or through a representative. 12. In most instances, sculpture measurements do not include base. In measurements for two dimensional art, height precedes width and does not include frame. 13. Bidding increments will normally follow the pattern below but may vary at the sole discretion of the Auctioneer. Estimate Increment Under 2,000............................. 100 2,000–5,000 ............................. 250 5,000–10,000............................ 500 10,000–20,000....................... 1,000

Estimate Increment 20,000–50,000 ...................... 2,500 50,000–100,000..................... 5,000 over 100,000 ........................ 10,000


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121 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Remington’s Four Best Paintings Lithographs with original folder Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500 Literature: Literature: Peggy and Harold Samuels. Remington: The Complete Prints. New York: Crown Publishers, 1990, illustrated.

Evening on a Canadian Lake Lithograph 10 s x 15 ½ inches

Caught in the Circle Lithograph 10 s x 15 ½ inches

His First Lesson Lithograph 10 s x 15 ½ inches

Coming to the Call Lithograph 10 s x 15 ½ inches

122 Thomas Moran 1837-1926 Head of the Yellowstone River Chromolithograph 9 ½ x 13 ¾ inches Signed lower left in the plate and dated 74 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Literature: Katharine M. McClinton. The Chromolithographs of Louis Prang, New York: Clarkson N. Potter, 1973, p.159. Joni L. Kinsey. Thomas Moran’s West: Chromolithography, High Art and Popular Taste. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2006, pp. 113-117, illustrated. Already a successful artist, it was Thomas Moran’s journey West with the Hayden Survey in 1871 that presented him with the landscapes that would inspire him for the rest of his days: Green River, Yosemite, the Grand Canyon. But it was Moran’s views of the Yellowstone, rendered magnificently in chromolithographs by Louis Prang that broadcast the artist’s imagery far and wide. In Prang’s process, separate stones are etched and inked for each color in the litho. The brightly delineated result suited Moran’s vision of the American West in which nature is idealized and romanticized—the very stuff of the dreams of the nation.

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124 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Last of His Race Oleograph on canvas 18 x 12 ½ inches Signed in the print and dated 1908 Estimate: $1,000 - 2,000 Literature: Peggy and Harold Samuels. Remington: The Complete Prints. New York: Crown Publishers, 1990, pp. 113, 121 (illustrated on p.121). 123 Alexander Phimister Proctor 1860-1950 Pony Express Bronze, cast number 50 16 ¾ inches diameter Signed lower center Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000 Alexander Phimister Proctor was raised rough and ready on the frontier near Denver. His affinity for the history of the American West and the fate of American wildlife translated into an interest in sculpture and led to a lengthy sojourn in Paris, studying art. The combination of knowledge of the forms of men and animals in the West and a classical beaux-arts education proved a winning one, and Proctor quickly made a name for himself on his return to the States. Large public commissions in Denver and elsewhere followed, making Proctor perhaps the best known American sculptor of his time. Pony Express, a heroic bronze medallion, commemorates the lone riders who moved the mail in the days before the telegraph and railroad tamed the West.

The Last of His Race is unique among prints produced from Frederic Remington’s paintings during his lifetime. It is the only print of his work done on canvas, the only one printed with oil paint instead of ink and the only one printed in Chicago by the Brown and Robertson Company. In Remington: The Complete Prints, Peggy and Harold Samuels hint that Remington’s Chicago art dealer, W. Scott Thurber—for whom the original painting, now at the Yale Art Museum, was done—may have commissioned the prints without the artist’s knowledge. Anecdotal evidence suggests that noted Remington scholar Rudolf Wunderlich believed that Remington himself commissioned the prints and that only 50 were ever struck. Wherever the truth lies, only a handful of these rare oleographs have ever come to market.

126 Edward Borein 1872-1945 Grass Hunters No 1 Etching & Drypoint 7 d x 9 d inches Signed lower right 125 Edward Borein 1872-1945 Mexican Carreta Etching & Drypoint 3 b x 10 z inches Signed lower right; rermarque lower left Estimate: $1,500 - 2,000 Literature: John Galvin. The Etchings of Edward Borein. San Francisco: John Howell Books, 1971, number 149, illustrated.

Estimate: $2,000 - 3,000 Literature: John Galvin. The Etchings of Edward Borein. San Francisco: John Howell Books, 1971, number 28, illustrated. Flicks of a pen or brush, the scratch of the etcher’s needle—the economy with which Edward Borein could convey horse, rider and environment is almost an arcane skill, a mystery. Often based on sketches made in the saddle, Borein’s work, a virtual chronicle of Old California and the Old Southwest, gathers the tensions between the calm of the landscape and the restless activity of the weathered figures that people his work.

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127 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Roping Pen & Ink, Watercolor 12 x 10 inches Signed lower left

128 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Cowboy Pen & Ink, Watercolor 12 x 11 inches Signed lower left

Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

129 Frank Hagel b. 1933 Pipes in the Morning Sun Oil on board 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right and dated 1993 Estimate: $2,500 - 3,500

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130 Tom Gilleon b. 1942 Pemmican Oil on board 20 x 20 inches Signed lower center; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

131 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Crow Camp Gouache 12 x 8 inches Signed lower right

132 Cyrus Afsary b. 1940 The Potter Oil on canvas 18 x 14 inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $3,000 - 6,000

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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133 Nicholas Eggenhofer 1897-1985 Stagecoach Gouache 14 ½ x 25 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

134 Tom Ryan 1922-2011 Color Carpet Colored Pencil 16 x 28 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Exhibitions: “The Brotherhood of Man and The Cowboys of The 6666 Ranch,” National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City, OK, October 13 - December 21, 2001.

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135 Charlie Dye 1906-1972 Roping Wild Ones Oil on paper 9 x 11 inches Initialed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

136 Charlie Dye 1906-1972 Heading Out Oil on paper 5 ½ x 7 inches Initialed lower left Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

137 Charlie Dye 1906-1972 Fresh Catch Oil on paper 9 x 11 ½ inches Initialed lower right Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

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138 James Boren 1921-1990 The Oil Field Watercolor 14 x 21 ½ inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1987 Estimate: $2,000 - 4,000

139 James Boren 1921-1990 Longhorn in the Hill Country Watercolor 25 x 38 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1977 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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140 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Supply Wagon Oil on board 6 x 15 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1984 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

A particular favorite of President Lyndon Johnson, Melvin Warren saw the Old West as a richly textured, earth-toned world, a world his paintings sought to illustrate and evoke. Flowers bloom in the desert spring in Supply Wagon. Three men finish hitching the team. The bonnet is off, revealing the bent bows that arch over the wagon. Seeing through the bows, into the distance, makes this an airy picture and Warren adds to this by painting the light cool and fresh. This isn’t a hot day. It’s a just right day, a day to breathe and look and work—but not too hard.

141 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Unexpected Pastel 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1988 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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142 Gordon Snidow b. 1936 The Drinking Cup Gouache 32 x 15 inches Signed lower left and dated 2000 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

143 Gordon Snidow b. 1936 Most Times a Tomboy...Some a Girl Oil on board 33 x 17 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated 1996 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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144 Bill Anton b. 1957 Dust Storm Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 09 verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

145 Robert Lougheed 1910-1982 A Tesuque Afternoon Oil on board 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and Tesuque, New Mexico verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Canadian born Robert Lougheed came to be known as “the painter’s painter.” Lougheed’s philosophy of art had two tenets. One: work from nature rather than photographs. Two: when all else fails, draw a horse. Two horses, two goats and dog take their ease in the sun in A Tesuque Afternoon, a composition of creamy colors and wide brushstrokes painted en plein air, fast, before the horses move the dog away from their water barrel and the dog decides it’s time to herd the goats. For the moment, it’s a moment of interspecies harmony, or at least tolerance.

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146 Tim Solliday b. 1952 Taos Travelers Oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

147 Jim Norton b. 1953 The Signal Oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 1-08 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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148 John Moyers b. 1958 The Offering Oil on canvas 40 x 50 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1998 Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

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149 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Rocky Mountain Bighorn Oil on board 18 x 27 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 Literature: Tom Davis. Patrons Without Peer: the McCloy Collection. Dallas, TX: Collector’s Covey, 2009, p. 88, illustrated.

150 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Winter Whitetails Oil on board 24 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

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151 Tucker Smith b. 1940 Morning Fog Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right and dated 99 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

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152 Luke Frazier b. 1970 A Threat and Danger Oil on board 40 x 48 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $18,000 - 28,000

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153 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Salmon Season Oil on board 22 x 44 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

154* Dan Metz b. 1951 Water of Life Oil on canvas 30 x 46 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 16,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

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155 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 A Look Around Acrylic 8 x 9 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

156 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 South Texas Gold-Whitetails Acrylic 7 ¾ x 12 inches Signed lower center Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Literature: Tom Davis. Patrons Without Peer: the McCloy Collection. Dallas, TX: Collector’s Covey, 2009, p. 100, illustrated.

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157 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Browsing Etching & Drypoint 7 d x 10 d inches Signed lower right Estimate: $3,500 - 4,500

158 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Old Man of the Mountain Oil on canvas 10 x 10 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 Majestic, proud, noble: these are some of the adjectives, human adjectives, that spring to mind when looking at Carl Rungius’ magnificent bighorn sheep portrait, Old Man of the Mountain. It was part of Rungius’ gift, borne of years of patient observation, stalking, hunting in the high peaks of North America, to find the expressiveness, the soul in the animals he painted. Through his art, we connect with these animals, whose ways of life differ so vastly from ours. Old Man of the Mountain is a mature work. From the curl of the horns to the glint in the eye, to the fall of light on the ram’s white muzzle, not a stroke is wasted. And there is daring in the lime green of the background, a green that, in less assured hands, might distract us from the animal. Here, however, it gives the head shape and dimensionality, pulling the profile out and away from the picture plane.

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159 James Reynolds 1926-2010 Family Portrait Oil on masonite 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

160 James Reynolds 1926-2010 Another Time Oil on board 30 x 48 inches Signed lower left and dated 1984 Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

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Jim Reynolds’ Another Time doesn’t need a title. The Frederic Remington spotted longhorns against a dark ridge, the Charlie Russell skull at bottom left and the blue green Frank Tenney Johnson night speak not only to the West that had passed but to the Western artists of the past. Despite these allusions, it’s clear at a glance that Reynolds isn’t out to copy anyone. If anything, this painting is a sort of deconstruction of the masters. The cattle are artlessly (deliberately so) arrayed in the picture plane, overlapping and obscuring the horse and the tired cowboy leans forward over the pommel of his saddle, in a decidedly unheroic pose.


161 Tom Ryan 1922-2011 Sunset Stroll Oil on board 17 ½ x 22 ¼ inches Signed lower right and dated 1980 Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000 Exhibitions: “The Brotherhood of Man and The Cowboys of The 6666 Ranch,” National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City, OK, October 13 - December 21, 2001. Tom Ryan enjoyed a long and successful career in illustration before turning his attention to Western easel paintings. An early member of the Cowboy Artists of America, Ryan’s paintings always emphasize the humanity in a scene, bringing simple emotions to the surface. Sunset Stroll is the story of a friendship between a man and a horse. Bathed in pink orange light, the rider leans over to whisper to his equine friend, easing him into the creek, telling him it isn’t too deep. You get the feeling that they’ve done this before, taken the after dinner air this way, that perhaps they’re headed home, to the ranch in the distance. You know this isn’t work; it’s a form of rest, a stretch of the legs at the end of the day.

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162 Jim Norton b. 1953 Along the Rim Rock Oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches Signed lower left/CA; Signed, titled and dated 1989 verso Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000

163 Jim Norton b. 1953 Cross Muddy Creek Oil on canvas 24 x 32 ½ inches Signed lower left/CA; Signed, titled and dated 1990 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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164 G. Harvey b. 1933 Rainy Day Oil on board 10 x 8 inches Signed lower left and dated 1979 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

165* Glenn Dean b. 1976 Descending Cowboy Oil on canvas 30 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit Literature: March 2014 Western Art Collector, cover illustrated. A copy of the March 2014 Western Art Collector will accompany this lot.

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166 Bill Owen 1942-2013 Early Morning at Cedar Ranch Oil on canvas 36 x 24 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2008 Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000 Michael Duty, in his book Cowboy Artists of America, writes that Bill Owen referred to cowboys as “watchers” because “they always have to be aware of what’s going on around them.” (p. 94). Owen was a working ranch hand from the time he could ride a horse, but his desire to see the lives of cowboys—as they are—represented in art, caused him to transfer his expertise at “watching” from the range to the studio. Owen once said, “My objective is to chronicle the modern, working cowboy as he lives and works today. People sometimes feel the working cowboy is a thing of the past. That’s not so! Someday it may well be, and I want to record today what may be history tomorrow. Not only is my public acceptance, and my fellow artists’ acceptance a tremendous compliment, but when my working cowboy friends drop by and say ‘Bill, that’s the way it really is, then I know that what I’m putting on canvas is truly worth the effort.” (Howard, Ten Years with the Cowboy Artists of America, p. 187.)

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167 Mehl Lawson b. 1942 On the Losing End Bronze, cast number 2/25 46 inches high, 30 inches wide Signed/CA, titled and dated 2001 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

168 Mehl Lawson b. 1942 When Winter Winds Blow Bronze, cast number 8/35 36 inches high, 28 inches wide Signed/CA and titled Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 When Winter Winds Blow is installed in monumental size at the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville, GA.

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169 Jim Norton b. 1953 Cheyenne at Sunset Oil on canvas 28 x 40 inches Signed lower left/CA; Signed, titled and dated 06/02 verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

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170 David Mann b. 1948 The Captive Oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

171 David Mann b. 1948 To the West Wind Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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172 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Night Song Bronze, cast number 7/30 20 inches high Signed/CA Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Literature: Don Hedgpeth. Joe Beeler: Life Of A Cowboy Artist. Vail, CO: Diamond Tail Press, 2004, p 192, illustrated.

173 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Thanks for the Rain Bronze, cast number 3/30 18 inches high Signed Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 A monumental version of Thanks for the Rain can be seen outside the Desert Caballeros Museum in Wickenburg, AZ.

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174 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Spellbound Oil on canvas 30 x 54 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000

John Singer Sargent 1856-1925 El Jaleo, 1882 Oil on canvas, 91 x 137 inches Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum


174 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Spellbound (detail) Oil on canvas 30 x 54 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000 Spellbound is an excellent title for this painting, referring as it does both to the figures in thrall to the medicine man’s ritual and to us, spellbound as we are by Joe Beeler’s artistry. It’s a simple composition, an arrangement of seated Indians against a backdrop of skins inside a longhouse watching and listening as a medicine man chants and dances and singles out the man at far right. It’s the atmosphere of the tent revival with the shadows and drumming and the sense that some of those present are losing themselves in the spiritual frenzy. The medicine man’s robe, draped and trailing, makes him seem larger than he actually is and the positions of his hands and feet, one dragging a fetish, make this a stunning piece of theater as well as a serious religious ceremony. Something in the gestures recalls Javanese puppet theater as well as the Noh Theater of Japan, enacting age-old curative stories in performances handed down precisely over centuries. With great subtlety, Beeler paints the seated Indians with highly individual responses to the ritual. None look directly at the medicine man; each is in his own world. In a final gesture to the power of the ritual, the medicine man does not directly touch the Indian at right—whose hands have raised themselves to the sky—but his hand, the shadow spirit of it, thrown against the screen, touches the shadowed hand of the man at right. The shadow of his near hand, curved like a claw, touches the head of the Indian seated second from the right. Something in his posture and eyes suggest that he is just about to turn toward the medicine man, that he is about to feel the spirit of the ritual. But yet another spell has been cast: the spell that seeing a masterwork, a painting by a Carvaggio or Titian—or John Singer Sargent—can cast over an artist. Consider El Jaleo, one of Sargent’s early masterpieces. Consider the line of musicians and their shadows. Look at the face of the singer, turned up in ecstasy. Breathe in the Flamenco dancer, her arm extended. Lastly, move to the woman in orange with her arm raised in sympathy and its shadow on the wall. Oh yes, there’s another spell at work in Beeler’s Spellbound, a spell that the artist fell under, a spell that swept through his studio and left its indelible mark.

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175 William Acheff b. 1947 Prince of the Plains Oil on canvas 21 ½ x 28 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2010 verso Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000

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176 William Acheff b. 1947 Home Run - Oklahoma Land Run Oil on canvas 16 x 25 inches Signed lower right and dated 2008; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

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177 Scott Christensen b. 1962 Shade of Summer Oil on canvas 40 x 72 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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178 George Carlson b. 1940 Fragment of Light Oil on canvas 38 x 30 inches Signed lower left and dated 2010 Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000

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179 G. Harvey b. 1933 Texas Bonnets Oil on board 36 x 48 inches Signed lower right and dated 1981 Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

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180 Jose Arpa 1858-1952 Blue Bonnet Landscape Oil on board 26 x 35 inches Signed lower right and inscribed “San Antonio, Texas” Estimate: $30,000 - 60,000 Jose Arpa was born in Spain and studied art in Seville and Rome. His paintings were exhibited in Chicago at the World’s Fair in 1893 and he was hired to head the Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. Arpa declined the position, but stayed to paint in Mexico and made his way to San Antonio, Texas where he lived for many years, paintings and teaching. Porfirio Salinas was one of his best known students. Arpa was known as the “Sunshine Man” because of his love of—and skill at—handling bright light. Blue Bonnet Landscape is a classic Texas subject handled beautifully in a delicate, impressionistic style.

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181 Robert Wood 1889-1979 Refreshing Stream Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

As a young artist newly arrived from England, Robert Wood fell in love with the American landscape. Known for his paintings of Texas bluebonnets and the California mountains and coasts, prints of Wood’s dreamily realistic works and copies of his instructional texts could be found everywhere once upon a time.

182 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 Cattle Country Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 From his earliest years in Massachusetts, Gerard Curtis Delano always seemed to be facing West. The American West was a place of dreams for Delano, a goal, a destination, in the sense of destiny. Eventually, Delano did go West, only to return to the East when he had the opportunity to study with the great Brandywine artists N. C. Wyeth and Harvey Dunn. Fully prepared at last, Gerard Curtis Delano moved West for good, coming to rest in Colorado, where he devoted his career to painting scenes of Western life in a brilliant, high, mythical key.

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183 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 Sheep on the Desert (Navajo) Oil on canvas 30 x 36 inches Signed lower right; Inscribed “Locale Monument Valley, Navajo Reservation Arizona” verso Estimate: $75,000 - 125,000 Provenance: The artist Richard G. Bowman (author of Walking With Beauty: The Art and Life of Gerard Curtis Delano) Private Collection Literature: Raymond Carlson (ed.). Gallery of Western Paintings. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1951, p. 58, illustrated. Sheep on the Desert is a windswept canvas, filled with solitude, but somehow devoid of loneliness. With only the small shepherdess and the smaller sheep, and the desert running up the bottom three-fifths of the canvas to a hazy mirage—above which a huge, almost abstract mesa looms—and sweeping round to even more distant hills and up to a wide open sky, it should be lonely. But something in the warmth of the sand, the red of the rocks, and the cerulean blue of the sky set a mood that is the opposite of spiritual desolation. On the contrary, the Navajo shepherdess tending her flock in this setting has an almost religious calling, like an artist herding viewers into an appreciation of nature, and a larger world.

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184 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Medicine Whip’s Coup Oil on canvas 24 x 48 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

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185 George Phippen 1915-1966 Strenuous Moments Oil on canvas 28 x 36 inches Signed lower left; Titled verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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186 Charlie Dye 1906-1972 Busting a Steer Oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Literature: Paul E. Weaver. Charlie Dye: One Helluva Western Painter. Los Angeles, Petersen Prints, 1981, p. 105, illustrated, and p. 134, no. 74, painted in 1961.

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187 Charlie Dye 1906-1972 Spring Roundup Oil on board 24 x 48 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000


187 Charlie Dye 1906-1972 Spring Roundup (detail) Oil on board 24 x 48 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

188* Andy Thomas b. 1957 Clay Allison’s Deadly Aim Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right

Spring Roundup is a superb example of Charlie Dye’s masterworks, combining a soft light, rounded forms and earthy muscularity. It’s in the rocks and cactus, in the flanks of the cattle and horses, uniting men and animals in a spinning movement against the undulant peaks, falling away into infinity like waves. A working cowboy, it was Dye, along with Joe Beeler and John Hampton, who came up with the idea of the Cowboy Artists of America while on a roundup in 1964. Of his own art, Dye said, “I have always tried to paint what I can remember of a life I led before I became dishonest and studied art. My old man could have forgiven me if I had turned out playing piano in a whorehouse, but artists rated one step below pimps in his book.” Whatever Charlie Dye depicted of cowboy life is something he experienced, not as an observer, but as an active participant.

Estimate: $40,000 - 50,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit “In December, 1876, Deputy Charles Faber entered the Olympic Dance Hall in Las Animas, Colorado with two special deputies. Without warning, he fired his shotgun at John Allison. Clay Allison, his brother, immediately pulled his pistol and shot Faber four times, killing him. The deputies fled. For this and many other actions, Clay Allison earned a reputation as a deadly killer. To his circle of friends, he was a respectable cattleman. “ Andy Thomas January, 2014

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190 G. Harvey b. 1933 Streets of New York Oil on canvas 12 x 9 inches Signed lower left and dated 85; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

191 G. Harvey b. 1933 The Theater Crowd, NYC Oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

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192 G. Harvey b. 1933 Trolley Lines on Broadway Oil on canvas 36 x 30 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2007 verso Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000 It’s a cold night in the gaslit city, but everyone is out, heading to the theater or just taking in the sights of old Broadway. Flags, patriotic bunting and birds adorn the wires that carry the current to the new electric street car, side by side with the older horse drawn trolley. Carriages troll for fares as cabs do to this day. In the vein of French painters like Edouard Cortes and Eugene Gallen-Laloue, G. Harvey’s work—whether the scene is urban or Western—intends to take us back in time, to an era of elegance and simplicity.

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193 Morgan Weistling b. 1964 Stagecoach Oil on canvas 24 x 18 inches Signed lower left and dated 2012; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Literature: 2013 Art of the West Guidebook of Art, cover illustration. A copy of the 2013 Art of the West Guidebook of Art will accompany this lot.

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194 Morgan Weistling b. 1964 Lonesome Trail Oil on canvas 30 x 25 inches Signed lower right and dated ‘05 Estimate: $22,000 - 28,000

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195 G. Harvey b. 1933 The Changing of Horsepower Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right and dated 1985; Signed, titled and dated 1985 verso Estimate: $90,000 - 130,000 Like so many of G. Harvey’s major paintings, the nostalgia on the surface belies a deeper irony. In The Changing of Horsepower, the trolleys and flivvers in the background will soon displace, and exchange places with the horses that dominate the foreground of the picture. Streetcar tracks, multistory buildings, electric lights and poles strung with wires hem the horses and rider in with an invisible, inexorable web of modernity and progress.

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196 G. Harvey b. 1933 Morning Silence Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 1989 verso Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Literature: G. Harvey Jones, Randy Best, Susan McGarry. The Golden Era, The American Dream: G Harvey. Somerset House Publishing, 1992, p 77, illustrated.

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197 Harvey Dunn 1884-1952 Desperado 1913 Oil on board 21 ½ x 37 inches Initialed lower left and dated ‘13 Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000 Provenance: Grand Central Art Galleries, NY. Biltmore Gallery, AZ.

Exhibitions: “The Popular West: American Illustrators, 1900-1940.” April 1 - November 21, 1982. Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, AZ; Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, CA. Catalogue number 14, illustrated. Literature: Woman’s Home Companion, 1913. Student of Pyle, contemporary and friend of N C Wyeth, teacher of Cornwell, Von Schmidt and countless others, Harvey Dunn was an exceptional illustrator, known for his ability to work in a quick, stark monochrome, a style that dovetails beautifully with the austere, moral absolutes in the dark side of the Old West. The two men in Desperado seem to have emerged from emptiness and come into existence for this fateful moment.

198 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 Reward of Virtue Oil on canvas 30 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000

A copy of the November/December 2004 issue of Gray’s Sporting Journal will accompany this lot. Literature: Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews, “The Reward of Virtue,” in Scribner’s Magazine, vol. XLIV, no. 4, October, 1908, pp. 395-404.

Gray’s Sporting Journal, vol, XXIX. no. 6, November/ December, 2004, back cover illustration.

Mary Andrews’ charming story, “The Reward of Virtue,” features a colorful French Canadian guide who cannot understand why his best client would give his chance at his first trophy moose to his friend, a neophyte in the woods—and a terrible shot to boot—who does not feel he is ready to take on such an animal. Through a clever ruse, the guide gets his way, but all is well that ends well. Painted in black, white and shades of gray, Reward of Virtue is a particularly painterly illustration, as a glance at the softness of the grasses, trees and sky will show. As well, there is much more in the patient hunch of the hunter and the steady gaze of the guide than one usually sees in art for hire. Painting en grisaille, taking color out of the equation, sometimes lets an artist concentrate on shape and texture, mood and motion.

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199 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 Where Men are Men Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $90,000 - 120,000 Provenance: Harmsen Collection, Golden, CO. Exhibitions: Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, October 6 - November 6, 1972. Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO. Colorado State University Exhibition, September 22 - October 14, 1973. “Harmsen’s Western Americana,” Arvada Center, Arvada, CO. 1974 (listed as #80 in exhibition catalogue.) Texas Tech University Museum, January-March, 1976 “The Pulps and the Slicks: The Golden Age of Western Illustration,” National Cowboy Hall of Fame and Western Heritage Center, Oklahoma City, OK, November 22, 1991 - March 15, 1992. Literature: Larry Len Peterson. Philip R. Goodwin: America’s Sporting and Wildlife Artist. Hayden, ID: Coeur d’Alene Art Auction, 2001. pp. 308, 316, illustrated. Where Men Are Men is a classic Philip R. Goodwin predicament painting. The two sportsmen in this work are truly roughing it. Their raft is homemade, a makeshift craft designed to get them down this unruly wilderness river. They haven’t got much with them: a couple of duffel packs, axe, cooking pot, weapons. Set the scene: meat, in the form of deer, appears round a rocky bend. But our alfresco duo isn’t the only hunters eyeing up that venison. The mountain lion, a big one, stalks the same quarry—though haunch of middle-aged man would do as well. So the rifleman has to shoot, or at least scare the cat and hope to be quick enough, and good enough, to take down a buck or doe for the pot. This is the predicament. As usual, Goodwin knows what he’s about. The two men, the lion, and the deer are quite tight in the picture plane, though they are at different distances moving in different directions. This arrangement heightens the tension. In this beautiful but rugged wilderness, where the forest is dark, the river is wild, and the mountain is high and far off, anything can happen.

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200 Charles M. Russell 1864-1926 Forest Friends Watercolor 16 x 21 a inches Signed lower left and skull, also partial signature and skull under frame Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Provenance: Oklahoma Publishing Company, Oklahoma City, OK. Literature: B. Byron Price, Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonne. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007, no. CR.UNL.511. Forest Friends is an animal kingdom equivalent of one of many of Charlie Russell’s paintings depicting friendly meetings between cowboys and Indians, cowboys and cowboys, Indians and Indians. Like them, this one has its beginnings in wariness as the young bucks protect their does from this strange, albeit tiny, intruder. It isn’t that the deer haven’t seen rabbits before; it’s the sudden proximity that alerts them. We know all is well here, but they don’t. In tones of brown, yellow and gray, Russell emphasizes the sweetness of the encounter on a late autumn day. This deftly executed drawing might easily serve to illustrate a children’s poem or a Native American legend.

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201 William Gollings 1878-1932 Bucking Bronco, 1913 Oil on board 20 x 15 inches Signed lower right and dated 1913 Estimate: $100,000 - 200,000 Provenance: Private Collection, OH. Literature: William T. Ward and Gary L. Temple. Elling William “Bill” Gollings: A Cowboy Artist. Buenos Aires: Patagonia Publishing, 2007, p. 75, illustrated. Like so many Western artists, Bill Gollings found his calling in a mail-order paint set. Born in Idaho, but raised in Michigan and Chicago, after the death of his mother, Gollings spent two years at the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago before heading West, heeding a second call, the call of the cowboy. The life of Bill Gollings in many ways typifies the lives of many artists—not just artists of the American West. A shy, retiring man, far more interested in art than making a living from his art, Gollings absorbed criticism and technique from his contemporaries—Frank Stick, Hans Kleiber, Joseph Sharp, and others—and labored in solitude to apply their lessons to his art. By an effort of sheer will, Gollings earned a meager living as an illustrator by day and worked to improve his art in the spans between contracts. There is more than a little of that sheer will in Bucking Bronco, a gravity-defying painting from 1913. Gollings knew the life of the “horse outfit” first-hand, for he had been a cowboy in a number of these outfits. At the time Bucking Bronco was painted, Gollings was writing many letters to artist friends stating that he was having trouble with his colors and soliciting advice. This is interesting in light of the fact that the colors in Bucking Bronco work extremely well. The small slashes of electric blue on the horse and in the rider’s hair suggest the sheen of sweat. The related blues in Gollings’ palette, sketching the sage, the ridge and the sky, impart a sense of unity to the work. Between the bronc and the shadow on the dirt is a cloud of dust, something a genie would conjure to levitate man and mount. The moment of the painting is a critical one—the rider is out of one stirrup and sliding off to the left. It’s anyone’s match now.

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202 William Gollings 1878-1932 Winter Country Oil on canvas 34 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $75,000 - 125,000 Provenance: Harmsen Collection, Golden, CO. Private Collection, OH. Literature: Dorothy Harmsen. Harmsen’s Western Americana. Flagstaff, AZ: Northland Press, 1971, pp. 84-85, illustrated.

William T. Ward and Gary L. Temple. Gollings: More of the Story. Buenos Aires: Patagonia Publishing, 2009, p. 57, illustrated.

Despite the child, the companion outriding at left and the coyote-dog heeling and snuffling, the woman at the heart of Winter Country seems solitary. Maybe it’s the steel gray mastering the weak sun, a sun not so much setting as being smothered by the clouds. Maybe it’s the snow, unrelieved save for a few hardy trees and the scruff of vegetation being nosed by the thin hound. Maybe it’s the cold wind at their backs, made manifest in the ruffling of the pony’s coat and the tail whipping around. Maybe, most of all, it’s the pace at which the horses and dog move that Gollings captures, the slow, measured drum beat, heartbeat, a steady, perseverant pace, noting the time and elements, but without fear. Gollings did paint a few historic scenes of battles between Indians and whites, but for the most part he preferred to depict Native Americans—many of whom were his friends and neighbors—in their ordinary, daily activities: making and moving camp, cooking, bedding the horses down for the night, rounding them up at dawn. In this, Gollings’ Indians are special aspects of the rhythms of the day, the season, life itself.

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203 George Phippen 1915-1966 Set of two works of art

Cowboy in a Storm Bronze, cast number 39/50 17 inches high Signed

Bustin’ a Covey Oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Signed lower left and dated 1954

Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

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204 Howard Terpning b. 1927 Good Times All Gone Mixed Media 34 x 22 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1985 Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000

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205 Howard Terpning b. 1927 The River’s Gift Oil on board 24 x 40 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1998; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000


205 Howard Terpning b. 1927 The River’s Gift (detail) Oil on board 24 x 40 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1998; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000 206 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Horse Roundup Oil on canvas 28 x 38 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso

Exhibitions: Prix de West. 1988. Winner of the Frederic Remington Award Literature: Don Hedgpeth. Spirit of the Plains: Howard Terpning. Greenwich, CT: Greenwich Workshop, 2001 p. 109, illustrated.

Harley Brown. Howard Terpning: A Tribute to the Plains People. Greenwich, CT: Greenwich Workshop, 2012, pp. 153-54, illustrated.

Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

In Spirit of the Plains, Don Hedgpeth wrote the following in regard to The River’s Gift:

One cowboy chases a small herd of wild horses. The horses: powerful, muscular animals, have the upper hand. What Olaf Wieghorst is celebrating in Horse Roundup isn’t the roundup at all: it’s the essential untamed nature of these magnificent creatures. We’re meant to notice the hill behind them and marvel at what nature has made, what living free has done to them. Their long manes flow as they run and their legs, like pistons, drive them through the canyons. We’re meant to notice the hill, encrusted with rocks that look like gems where they jut from close grass. It’s a rare scene in a rare place. The cowboy is too busy to take note, but we do it for him.

“There is an unspoken tragedy implicit in this scene alongside the rocks and the river. Where are the ones who came west with this wagon? What became of their dreams and desires? Did they reach the end of their trail forsaken and forlorn, like the shattered wood of their wagon? None of this concerns or matters to the two Cheyenne warriors who will strip the iron rim from the wheel and reshape it into sharp arrow points to be used against the others who will come west in their wagon. The West was a wild place, and those who left their version of civilization behind were too often too frail for the frontier. Countless unmarked shallow graves were the milestones that led into the West along the perilous path toward something the travelers had never seen and knew nothing about. The People would marvel at their ignorance—but there were so many of them, and they kept coming.”

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207 Theodore Van Soelen 1890-1964 Ghost Ranch Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right/NA Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000 Provenance: The artist Private Collection (circa 1950) Theodore Van Soelen was born in Minnesota and studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and in Europe just before World War I. Venturing West for his health, Van Soelen crisscrossed New Mexico absorbing the culture of cattlemen and Indians. A realist with a flair for formal composition, ranch life was one of Van Soelen’s favorite themes. Ghost Ranch, made famous by Georgia O’Keeffe, receives a more straightforward, though decidedly impressionistic treatment at Van Soelen’s hands. Here, three ranch hands take a moment to chat and smoke while their horses water at a manmade watering hole. The contrast between the arc of the metal rim, containing a reflection of horses and sky—the kind of circumscribed reflection you might see in a skyscraper window—is an interesting and deliberate contrast to the pink mountains carved over time in the background.

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208 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Crazy Horse Bronze, cast number 20/25 28 inches high Signed/CA and titled Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Literature: Don Hedgpeth. Joe Beeler: Life of a Cowboy Artist. Vail, CO: Diamond Tail Press, 2004, p 40, illustrated.

209 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Algonquin Chief & Warrior Bronze, cast ACWP16P 29 ½ inches high Signed and date 1971; Signed in paint and dated 1980 Estimate: $15,000 - $25,000 Literature: Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. pp. 229, illustrated.

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210 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 John Wayne (First Model for the Monument) Bronze, cast number WUB12 38 inches high, 26 inches wide Signed and dated 1981 Estimate: $20,000 - 40,000 Harry Jackson’s monumental bronze of John Wayne stands on Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills in front of the Great Western Financial building.

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211 Howard Terpning b. 1927 Chiricahua Scouts Oil on canvas 10 x 14 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1995 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

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212 John Clymer 1907-1989 Winters End Oil on board 15 Âź x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1981; Titled verso Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000


212 John Clymer 1907-1989 Winters End (detail) Oil on board 15 ¼ x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1981; Titled verso Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 A portion of the proceeds, from the sale of this painting, to benefit the Scottsdale Museum of the West, Scottsdale, AZ.

213 Charles Humphriss 1867-1934 Appeal to the Great Spirit Bronze 31 inches high Signed and dated 1906, Gorham Co. Founders

In the Mountain Man era, the time before the cowboy, John Clymer’s favorite period to paint, winter was more than an obstacle. Winter was an adversary, an enemy to be prepared for, battled, suffered, endured. Winter’s End celebrates the quiet joy this Native American family expresses as they look around at the new colors—russets, ochres, and pale greens—of spring. The child riding in front of her mother is a sign of youth and vitality. All of them are healthy. So there is pride in the way they move through the new growth, well-deserved pride at having not merely survived the winter, but thrived in it.

Estimate: $20,000 - 40,000 Charles H. Humphriss was an important sculptor of Native American subjects. Born in Great Britain, Humphriss emigrated to the United States, where he lived and worked in New York, inspired by his trips to the West. In contrast to many of his peers, who preferred fierce Indians in bellicose situations, Humphriss was fascinated by the Indian at peace, enacting ancient rituals whose purpose is to appeal to the deities for succor, for answers, for patience, for good fortune. Appeal to the Great Spirit is perhaps Humphriss’ most celebrated table bronze. And though it shares a title with a very famous bronze by his contemporary, Cyrus Dallin, Humphriss’ take on the subject is very different. Where Dallin’s Appeal depicts a mounted warrior’s entreaty to heaven, Humphriss sculpts his subject striding open-armed and level-gazed, leaning in to his ritual, his deity. It’s a bold choice, handled with simplicity and exceptional grace, echoing early Greek statuary.

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214 Henry C. Balink 1882-1963 Chief Shortman Oil on canvas mounted on board 37 ½ x 34 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 His rifle covered with a beaded buckskin sleeve that matches his chief’s shirt, Chief Shortman squints against the bright sun that rakes his left side. His hand covering the muzzle of the sleeved rifle (a gesture of peace?) he nonetheless seems to hunch and lean into the picture plane, as if trying to make something out (the viewer?) across the hazy green plain. Often, in portraits like these, there is some echo between the figure and the landscape. Here, with subtle handling, Balink employs the same shade of purple to delineate the creases in the mountains and the shadows in and on Chief Shortman’s shirt. The effect unifies the composition, locates the chief in his land, yet it also somehow humanizes him. Shadows—like all men—pass, even when those men are chiefs. Dutch born Henry Balink received no encouragement from his parents when he began to take an interest in art. Indeed, so hostile were they to the idea that young Henry ran away from home, making a living and paying for classes by skating in competition, entering bicycle racing contests and doing stunts in silent movies. Balink finished school and sailed for America, finding work doing drawings of artifacts at the Met in New York. Now married, Balink and his wife moved from Chicago to Taos to Santa Fe, where he settled in 1923. He is especially noted for his portraits of Native Americans in bright pastels and earth-shaded primary colors.

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215 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 In Front of the Well House Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Like a film director using thumbs and forefingers to frame a scene, frames and framing devices form the underlying pattern in In Front of the Well House. Diamonds, tree trunks, wooden pathways, blue walls, thick hanging leaves: all these delineate spaces, creating paintings within the painting. Even the woman, the central subject of the canvas, is framed by the branch she leans on, the trunk she stands beside, a second, smaller branch above her and a fence post partly obscured by leaves. Even in a painting of this size, Sharp wants to move your eye around and through it, to make you pause here and there to take in the shadows and imagine the gentleness of the breeze. What he achieves through manipulating space, he reinforces through the rhythms of color, drawing your eye first to the bright trunk and yellow shawl, then to the geometry of the light blue walls, the darkness around the diamond of light in the fence and the light around the dark diamond at right. With the shadows on the lawn at far left, Sharp suggests the volume of the gazebo, its hidden dimensionality that defies the apparent shallowness of the space.

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216 Nicolai Fechin 1881-1955 Portrait of Mrs. Dean Cornwell, 1925 Oil on canvas 24 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Literature: Mary N. Balcomb. Nicolai Fechin. Flagstaff, AZ: Northland Press, 1975, p. 55, full page illustration in color. Nicolai Fechin was born in the rugged Tartar forest in Czarist Russia. His father was a noted woodcarver and maker of icons. At 13, Nicolai entered the Art School of Kazan and would further his studies in St. Petersburg. Fechin’s talent earned him a six-year scholarship to the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh where he began to employ some of the techniques of Impressionism, dividing colors and working with a palette knife. His work came to the attention of prominent institutions and collectors who helped him elude the hardships of the Bolshevik Revolution after his return to Russia, now the Soviet Union. In 1923, Fechin and his wife sailed into New York. Dean Cornwell met Fechin “at the ship, helped him to settle in New York, and studied with him one evening a week for several months.” (Broder, Dean Cornwell, Dean of Illustrators, p. 19). Mrs. Dean Cornwell, born Mildred Kirkham, came from a prosperous middle-class Chicago family that frowned on the notion of an artist as a son-in-law. Mildred was attached to the finer things, while Dean was frugal, even after his work became popular. As a consequence, their marriage was a tempestuous one. Despite this, they had two children. In 1935, the couple would separate, though they would never formally divorce. Indeed, as Broder writes, “Dean lived and worked in his apartment on SixtySeventh Street and periodically visited and dined with his family. Throughout Dean’s life, Mildred took an active interest in his career, and he in turn supported her and their children.” (Broder, p. 19) Dated 1925, Mrs. Dean Cornwell has a good grasp of the subject’s inner life. Mildred is a classical beauty. Her small, fine features and elegant, graceful neck recall the fresh “Gibson girls” of the early 1900’s. But unlike those frank, confident women, Mildred’s gaze is turned away, far away. Her eyes, averted, hint at elsewhere thoughts and her mouth and chin, set in firm conviction, lend her just a touch of arrogance. With a few strokes of the palette knife, Fechin outlines her dress, which perhaps isn’t quite couture; with a few wide strokes of the brush, Fechin arranges Mildred’s hair, which isn’t perhaps as perfect as she would have it. Fechin’s signature style, combining soft and hard lines and forms, spikes and curves, slashing flicks and sensual pauses, is brilliantly manifest in this canvas. By 1926, Fechin had developed tuberculosis, and an American doctor suggested he move to the Southwest for his health. John Young-Hunter, an artist and friend, suggested he try Taos. Fechin did, finding the countryside healthful and reminiscent of the Tartar and Siberian woods and mountains of his youth. He also found the Taos Indians close in spirit to the people he had grown up among. But it was works like Mrs. Dean Cornwell—one of a number of exquisite portraits Fechin painted in New York—which cemented his fame and reputation.

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217 Leon Gaspard 1882-1964 Sketch of Noula Kararas Pastel 16 x 13 inches Signed lower right and dated 1957 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

218 Leon Gaspard 1882-1964 Jicarilla Indians on Horseback Oil on canvas mounted on board 10 他 x 16 inches Signed lower left and dated 1917 Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 Provenance: The Artist Private Collection

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219 Leon Gaspard 1882-1964 Winter Scene of a Village Oil on board 18 x 13 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000 Born near Moscow, Leon Gaspard studied at the art school in Vitebsk alongside Marc Chagall. Gaspard furthered his training in Paris, where he met and married an American woman, Evelyn Adell. During World War I, Gaspard joined the French Air Corps. As a result of the serious injuries he sustained when his plane was shot down, Gaspard’s wife urged him to seek treatment in America. By 1916, Gaspard was in New York, recuperating and making a name in the tumult of the city’s art scene. He exhibited scenes from the war in France and Russia at Reinhardt’s, one of the most important galleries of the era, and received excellent notices. The New York Times called these works, “fresh and brilliant and infinitely the better for complete lack of sentimentality.” Artist friends told him of the healthful climate in Taos, and in 1919, he moved there. Gaspard was moved by the ways in which the people and landscape of Taos seemed to echo the wild Tartar countryside in the Russia of his boyhood. In Taos, Gaspard befriended Buck Dunton. From Taos, Gaspard sketched and painted his way around the globe. Like his classmate Chagall, Gaspard builds frosted layers of broad strokes, infusing his works with the mythic quality of a vivid dream. He had studied alongside the great Modern master Marc Chagall and similarities crop up in their swirling impastos, vivid colors, and an approach to composition, especially in problems of perspective, that integrate a deliberate folk art naivete. In Winter Scene of a Village, Gaspard forces perspective to allow the viewer to see deep into the snowbound village. In the foreground, and again just above the center, lines of villagers wind toward stores receiving sleighborne goods, relief from the harsh weather. In a touch of pathos, a wounded war veteran, still in uniform, hobbles on crutches at the end of the line. As the village slants up the mountain, snow gradually displaces dwellings, meeting a sky composed of the same colors. Only at the upper left do we see a stand of tall thin trees and the green onion domes of the church. As much as the eye is drawn to the people, it’s the half-hidden, buried houses that attract the viewer’s eye. Their windows are like unblinking eyes, and they seem to huddle against the storm.

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220 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Taos Fisherman Oil on board 10 Ÿ x 14 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000 Like most of Bert Phillips’ paintings, Taos Fisherman puts a frame around an Arcadian paradise. Beneath a small cascade, an Indian, using a slender branch, fishes in a pristine pool. He stretches along the bank, as if he is part of the earth. Sun dapples the leaves and close cropped grass. Nature tends this place. Phillips’ modeling of the Indian as an emblem of youth, health and vigor, dreaming rather than fishing, implies that this place cares for him, tends to him, that he belongs to it as much as it belongs to him.

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221 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Aspen Forest Near Taos Oil on board 19 x 16 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Bert Phillips only had to see Taos once, in 1898 on a trip with Ernest Blumenschein, before he decided to pitch his tent there forever. In fact, once Phillips moved to Taos, he rarely left. The most vocal enthusiast for founding an art colony in Taos, Phillips became one of the original members of the Taos Society of Artists. Of all the Taos artists, Phillips was perhaps the most unrepentant romantic, seeing the poetry in the people and landscape as twin aspects of an idyll. The subjects of his works, while realistically presented, seem to have been selected for their beauty and ability to convey the romance of the area as he saw it. Aspen Forest Near Taos captures summer beginning to give way to fall as green gives way to yellow in the leaves. The fallen trees— the broad X in the bottom third of the work—and the scarred, black tree at left suggest the wheel of life: generation, flourishing, decay, rebirth. Phillips may not have been there to hear the trees fall in the forest, but he records their fall for us to see (and hear?); the feeling is that we are looking at a painting that has just happened, or is just about to.

222 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Leaf Down in the Doorway Oil on canvas 19 ¼ x 15 ½ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000 Joseph Sharp is considered the father of the Taos School because he was the first of the Founders to visit the area in 1893. Trained in Cincinnati, Paris and Munich, he painted in the Northwest, Montana, Hawaii and elsewhere, though Taos was where he made his home and kept his studio. …In the shaded doorway, draped in a gossamer yellow shawl, a Taos Indian woman leans. Sun through leaves makes patterns on the walls as well as the benches and latticework seen through the house. But it’s the hollyhocks, exploding with life and color, that take up most of the canvas, as if we are peeking round them, spying on the scene so the woman doesn’t move. It is a Leaf Down in the Doorway, a day to paint lights and darks, sunshine and shadows, a day to experiment with near and far and spaces within spaces, defining them with light and color rather than perspective, and to hide all this science inside simple beauty.

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223 Provenance: The artist Paul Grafe, Los Angeles, CA (circa 1946) Private Collection Exhibitions: “30 Paintings by Ernest L. Blumenschein.” February 7 - 19, 1927, Grand Central Art Galleries, NY. The exhibition traveled to numerous locations between 1927-31, including Dayton, Ohio; Toronto, Canada (November, 1927); Denver Art Museum, Colorado, 1928. Literature: El Palacio, Vol. 25, no. 25, June 23, 1928.

Peter J. Hassrick and Elizabeth J. Cunningham. In Contemporary Rhythm: The Art of Ernest L. Blumenschein. Norman OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2008, pp. 170, 263.

Robert W. and Carole B. Larson. Ernest L. Blumenschein, The Life of An American Artist. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2013, p. 279.

It’s tempting, looking at Ernest Blumenschein’s Woman in Blue, to start with the eyes, the mouth, the crossed hands, the velvety deep sea turquoise of her dress. But it might be more illuminating to begin with what’s behind her—around her, really, in the single dimension of the picture plane that we shouldn’t forget even when we are lost in the illusion of depth that perspective creates. The beautiful woman is brilliantly lit from our right; the small shadow at her left tells us this. Blumenschein doesn’t outline her in halos of contrasting, expressionistic colors, as his contemporary, the famous painter of Native American portraits, Winold Reiss, might do. He wants us to see the woman against a shallow backdrop, a backdrop that appears to be a Plains Indian tepee liner, a decorated swath of muslin used to regulate the temperature inside a tepee. She is a Taos Indian; the liner is Plains. One might simply note that and say that Blumenschein’s intent here is purely pictorial. The ledger-style paintings on the liner add visual interest. But to leave it at that might shortchange the impact and deeper meaning of the work. The glyphs on the liner tell a tale of the past: of battle, of new growth (see the corn behind the woman’s right shoulder), of home (note the tepees above her and at her left). Even the three yellow shields at first seem like suns rising from her right elbow to just above the level of her eyes. Time is in these glyphs as well. The tomahawk in the hand of the brave at left becomes a rifle fired from the shoulder of the mounted warrior at right. The folds in the tepee liner are like ripples on water and it is as if—if we can think of the liner as a visible representation of the woman’s thoughts—a pebble has been tossed into her imagination. Now the crossed hands, inward, distant eyes and pursed, reflective mouth, despite their apparent neutrality, describe a gesture when combined with the glyphs that is penitent and touching but also amazed, transported, her breath taken from her, not by something she’s seen or heard, but by something she has remembered, thought, imagined. Everything we feel flows from the mystery of this; we intuit rather than know. Woman in Blue was one of over thirty paintings included in Blumenschein’s 1927 retrospective that began in New York at the Grand Central Art Galleries and travelled to galleries and museums across the United States and Canada. This exhibition, perhaps the most successful solo show the artist would ever enjoy, would remain on the road until 1931. Amid a host of major paintings like The Extraordinary Affray, Superstition and Sangre de Cristo Mountains, 1925, Woman in Blue did not go unnoticed in the exhibition. For example, according to El Palacio’s art critic, “One of the best paintings in the show is, to my mind, the “Woman in Blue,” an Indian woman in a blue velvet dress, her hands with the big turquoise ring crossed over her chest. This portrait is striking thru its simplicity and the realization of forms and volumes thru color.” (El Palacio, June 23, 1928, p. 492). And even though Woman in Blue was not in “In Contemporary Rhythm,” the 2008 Blumenschein exhibition at the Denver Art Museum, Peter Hassrick, in the accompanying catalogue, wrote about the work: “In the mid1920s Blumenschein began a series featuring a single Pueblo Indian model. The beauty of Taos women had been proclaimed from the days of the French fur trappers in the 1700s. The model for Girl in Rose, whose name has not yet been discovered, appears in two other paintings, Woman in Blue and Indian Girl Seated by Oven. Audiences across the country were exposed to the beauty that Blumenschein captured when these three portraits traveled throughout the United States from 1927 to 1931 as part of the Grand Central Art Galleries’ exhibition of his work.” (p. 170) Blumenschein: from the German: blumen (flowers) + schein (glow, glimmer, glint, gleam). The glimmer of flowers; flowerglow; flower gleam. By the simple deconstruction of his name, Ernest Blumenschein seemed marked, somehow, for art. He might have been a famous musician. After all, he was a skilled violinist who played in the New York Philharmonic when the celebrated Czech composer Antonin Dvorak was its principal conductor. Or he might have been a star athlete, an artist on the court. After all, his tennis game was tournament caliber. In Woman in Blue, Blumenschein moves our eyes from the red stone on the necklace to the curve of the red piping on the dress, congruent with the curve of the turquoise necklace. It’s tennis and it’s a string quartet, with the racket, bow, brush in the hand of a master. …Last, the tiny white line that splits the red stone signals the symmetry of the work but also divides the woman’s outward shape from her inward state, her appearance from her essence, her body from her soul.

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223 Ernest Blumenschein 1874-1960 Woman in Blue Oil on canvas 27 ¼ x 24 ¼ inches Signed lower left and inscribed “Taos” Estimate: $250,000 - 350,000

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224 Laverne Nelson Black 1887-1938 The New Foal Oil on canvas 17 x 16 inches Signed lower right and NM Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000 Friends in the Kickapoo tribe, on a nearby reservation in southwestern Wisconsin, introduced Laverne Nelson Black to Native American culture. After his family moved to Chicago, Black studied at the Academy of Art there. A career in newspaper illustration followed, but Black used his time away to travel and paint the West, especially Taos, then the center of Western art. Poor health caused Black to relocate to Taos where he developed a style that made extensive use of the palette knife. Black died at the age of 51 as a result of the lead content in the paints he used while executing a WPA mural commission in the Phoenix post office. The New Foal combines broad brushstrokes and Black’s trademark knife work in a beautiful bravura work that shows the little horse nestled tight to its dam on what looks to be a spring day. With deft economy, Black sets the sagebrush scene with the adobe tucked into the trees at left, the mass of the Taos Mountains gently reaching down and a blue sky with regular towers of white clouds. Little things—the pattern of horizontals and verticals in the sage, the riverine shadow on the mountain, the hesitation in the foal’s front legs—swirl around the rider’s broad hat and red cloak. And the way the rider holds the reins suggests that he is easing the little horse into the world.

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225 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Indian Council Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000 Two artistic decisions inform J. H. Sharp’s Indian Council. The first is Sharp’s decision to place us close to the council circle, as if we are just outside it. We are, in fact, seated, just to the left of the drummer. Because of this, the Indians are a collection of overlapping shapes: ovoid heads and cylindrical torsos (the nude back of the Indian nearest us has the greatest weight in the picture) that gives the painting the aspect of a still life. Sharp’s second decision places us to the left of the light source, the fire. This serves the composition, drawing the faces into sharp relief, while also serving one of the themes of the work: inspiration. These men look into the fire, seeking an answer to the problem that necessitated this convocation. To reinforce this, the Indian whose back faces us holds the council stick, meaning that it is his turn to speak, though at the moment he is keeping his own counsel.

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226 Walter Ufer 1876-1936 Spring Morning Oil on board 10 ½ x 12 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated Taos NM 1922 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Provenance: The Artist Private Collection

Born in Germany, Walter Ufer emigrated with his family to Kentucky when he was a boy. Following in the footsteps of his father, a master engraver and gunsmith, young Walter was apprenticed to a lithography firm. With the strong support of his parents, Ufer traveled to Europe, completing his studies at the Royal Academy in Dresden. In Europe, Ufer met and became friends with Joseph Sharp and Ernest Blumenschein. When he returned to the States, Ufer, now married, settled in Chicago where he met the mayor, Carter Harrison, who became the artist’s first patron. Harrison sent Ufer to Taos, where he found Sharp, Blumenschein and his subject—the landscape and Indians of the New Mexico Pueblos. A founding member of the Taos Society of Artists, Ufer’s legacy of paintings that combine strong composition, elegant impasto work and vibrant light and color make him one of the most striking figures in early 20th century American art. In the beautiful small oil, Spring Morning, diagonals from left (new grass on the hill) and right (a small creek) narrow and meet at a clump of young green aspens then veer left and right in lines of white blossomed apple trees. the Taos Mountains rise beyond like dark overturned shells. Nature, expressed in broad strokes and a bright palette, seems to be hiding its mathematics in spring splendor.

227 Victor Higgins 1884-1949 View Toward Twining Watercolor 15 x 18 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 View Toward Twining is one of Victor Higgins’ little gems—in watercolor. Among the Taos Founders, Higgins was the one most concerned with arranging abstract forms to create a concrete landscape. Here, Higgins pares away everything but stroke and color, yet the vista is sweeping and dramatic as storm clouds surround a blue eye above layer upon layer of mountains and hills.

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228 Oscar E. Berninghaus 1874-1952 Under the Sangre de Cristos Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left and dated 44 Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000 The Sangre de Cristo Mountains get their name from the red of the setting sun when it tints the snow-capped peaks. In Under the Sangre de Cristos, by contrast, the mountains are a hazy bluish purple under an all but cloudless blue sky. In this and in similar paintings, Berninghaus seeks nature on a human, benign scale. The middle distance is green with short grasses and sage. In other paintings by Berninghaus and the Taos artists, the mountains seem more like fierce giants guarding their treasure. But here, this pastureland is a kind of Garden of Eden, or Shangri-la, enfolded and hidden, protected by the mountains from the ravages of time and the outside world. The riders, in such a place, are themselves removed from history. Of course these are ideas rather than truths, but Berninghaus was keenly aware of the fragility of Taos and he lamented the changes that came to the area during his lifetime.

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229 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Bronco Buster Bronze, Cast No 127 22 ¼ inches high Signed, Roman Bronze Works, N.Y. Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Provenance: I.H. Brookstone, NY. J. N. Bartfield Galleries, NY. Private Collection.

Literature: Michael Edward Shapiro. Cast and Recast: The Sculpture of Frederic Remington. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institute Press, 1981, pp. 37-69, 95, and throughout.

Michael D. Greenbaum. Icons of the West: Frederic Remington’s Sculpture. Ogdensburg, NY: Frederic Remington Art Museum, 1996, pp. 51-65, 178 and throughout. As early as 1893, Frederic Remington was worried—rightly—that the era of the cowboy and the free range was vanishing fast. Seeking what was left of the cowboy way of life, he traveled to the Southwest and crossed over into Mexico, where he lighted on “Patron Jack’s” enormous San Jose de Bavicora ranch, situated in rugged Apache country some 200 miles northwest of Chihuahua. America’s foremost illustrator of life in the West, Remington was searching for something, something he found south of the border, something that would take him back in time. Bavicora would point out the road from pen and ink, watercolor and oil paint, to wax and bronze. Bavicora would lead to the creation of his best known, and perhaps his greatest work—Bronco Buster. Earlier, Remington had written in his notes: “[The cowboy] was a combination of the Kentucky or Tennessee man with the Spanish.” Remington would find this combination in “Patron Jack” Follamsbee (Jack Gilbert). Jack had been born into a Kentucky racehorse family, but, in a spirit of adventure characteristic of the time, he wrested Bavicora from the Mexican wilderness, earning the loyalty of his vaqueros and foreman through sheer audacity. On his return to New Rochelle, NY, a friend of Remington’s, a playwright, came to visit him in his studio. Observing the ease with which Remington moved figures around in the picture plane, the playwright advised him that since he worked in three dimensions in his paintings, he should try his hand at sculpting. His imagination fired, Remington went to work, creating the Bronco Buster in sculptor’s wax. What remained was to find a foundry to cast the piece. The problem, according to Remington’s sculptor friends, was that the piece was so top heavy it would not stand… Remington rejected this and when he found the Henry Bonnard Works, run by French immigrants, and then, later, the Roman Bronze Works run by the dashing Riccardo Bertelli, the solution presented itself. These French and Italian artisans had brought with them techniques dating back to the Greeks, techniques lost to Rome and rediscovered in Renaissance Italy, techniques that would allow a work like the Bronco Buster to be cast in bronze and stand freely. Every image, every piece of footage of the Oval Office in the White House features Theodore Roosevelt’s Bronco Buster. Remington’s image of the rider trying to master the bucking bronc is undoubtedly the single most recognizable artistic conception of the American West.

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230 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Thermometer from Ten to Thirty-Three Degrees Below Zero Oil on canvas 27 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000

Provenance: Young Gallery, NY. Robert MacArthur, WI. Sotheby’s, London, 1962. Private Collection. Literature: W. J. Carney, “With Troop M on the Frontier,” in McClure’s Magazine, June 1899, p. 126, illustrated. Harold McCracken. The Frederic Remington Book. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, 1966, p. 158, illustrated. Peter H. Hassrick & Melissa J. Webster. Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne of Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings. Cody, WY: Buffalo Bill Historical Center, 1996. Vol. II, no. 2433, p. 686, illustrated.


231 Herman Hansen 1854-1924 Running for Cover (Apaches) Watercolor 18 ½ x 28 ¾ inches Signed lower right; Signed verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

Make no mistake, Remington sees the men in The Thermometer from Ten to Thirty-Three Degrees Below Zero as real heroes, the men who do their jobs and follow orders, even when those orders come from an inept and contemptuous commander. The way they lean into the wind, grimly determined, ennobles them, even in what will ultimately prove a futile quest. Their powerful mounts, manes flowing in the blast, echo the steadfastness of their riders. But the trooper second from the left looks with questioning eyes at the leader—another trooper perhaps—who hugs himself, husbanding warmth that isn’t there. Another trooper walks beside his horse, hoping the exercise will improve his circulation. Night, in a blizzard; no grand landscape; nothing to conquer: the elements have the upper hand. Even the individual identities of these men are subsumed in the larger narrative. This is the approach Remington will build on as he enters the period of the great nocturnes.

Herman Hansen, one of many German expatriate artists to find the allure of the American West irresistible, came to the States in 1877 and settled in San Francisco in 1882. He spent his summers sketching his way through the Southwest and became fast friends with Edward Borein and Maynard Dixon. It was Hansen who famously lamented the rapid civilizing of the West, observing as early as 1908 that: “Tucson is killed from my point of view. They have shut down all the gambling houses tight, and not a gun in sight. Why, the place hasn’t the pictorial value of a copper cent any longer.” Two of Hansen’s trademarks: wild-eyed horses and headlong chases are what Running For Cover is all about. Having done something—what is left to the viewer’s imagination—a group of Apache braves races to safety. By dividing the picture in two with the diagonal running from top left to bottom right, Hansen imparts a sense of before and after, a just then and a just now, to the subject. The shadows beneath the near horses make the horses themselves, and their riders, appear to be suspended in mid-air. We wait, holding our breath, for them to land, for the race to resume.

In 1897 and 1898, Frederic Remington served as correspondent and artist on scene for Harper’s, the Chicago Tribune and William Randolph Hearst’s New York Morning Journal in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Coming from a military family and in full support of America’s aim to expand her influence and aid Cuba in becoming a democratic nation free of Spain’s imperial dominance, Remington wanted the Spanish-American War to be “his war,” one that would make him a true American hero. But Remington had neither the taste nor the stomach for war, and the artwork and dispatches he sent back were too journalistic and documentary. Though his painting Charge of the Rough Riders at San Juan Hill, painted in 1899, surely helped Roosevelt’s campaign for Governor of New York, Remington’s on site wash drawings and paintings of American infantrymen cringing when they heard shrapnel and falling in unheroic skirmishes with unseen enemies did nothing to convince the public that Cuban hearts and minds could be won, whatever the outcome of the war. Worse than this, Remington’s journalist colleagues found him physically unfit for front-line work and often derided him. After his return, Remington experienced his first doubts about authority. His allegiance, which had always been with gallant officers and leaders, turned instead to the ordinary soldiers who did the fighting and suffering. Roosevelt himself felt some of this, enlisting his artist friend’s help to get the Rough Riders sent home from Cuba, where their needs had been sorely neglected by the War Department. Remington, eager to put Cuba behind him, refused Harper’s entreaties to write and illustrate more of his experiences and Harper’s dropped him (Peggy and Harold Samuels. Frederic Remington: A Biography, pp. 262-292) Seeking new opportunities, Remington began to work for Collier’s and McClure’s magazines. His first job for McClure’s, illustrating W. J. Carney’s “With Troop M on the Frontier,” provided him with an outlet for some of the new emotions he was experiencing. Carney’s story, a personal reminiscence, is simple. In the winter of 1866-67 in Fort Sedgwick, Colorado, thirty-seven U.S. Cavalrymen head into dangerous weather on an ill-fated mission to rescue a party of government lumberjacks besieged by hostile Indians. Their leader, Lieutenant Keene, seeing to his own creature comforts, denies his men any rest or warmth. They do not rescue the lumberjacks, are incapable of pursuing the Indians, and nearly mutiny against the Lieutenant. The moment in the story that Remington chooses to depict is this: “About midnight we came upon a trail, and it gave us some hope of getting out of our terrible sufferings. Imagine our despair when, on closer inspection, we found it to be our own trail, and that we had been going around in a circle!” (Carney, p. 127) Of the thirty-seven who leave the fort, twenty-eight are counted as casualties.

232 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Sioux Sentry Oil on board 14 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 78 lower right

Interestingly, this painting may have been the inspiration for one of Remington’s finest bronzes, The Norther, executed in 1900. The Norther was his first using the lost wax process and the first of his bronzes cast at the Roman Bronze Works. Remington took advantage of the exquisite detailing that the lost wax, or cire perdue, process allows. Wind ruffles the horse’s coat and the long hairs on his fetlocks in ways that even the finest impastos can’t bring to life.

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Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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233 Howard Terpning b. 1927 Calling the Buffalo Oil on canvas 36 x 28 inches Signed lower right and dated 2011; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000 Literature: Harley Brown. Howard Terpning: A Tribute to the Plains People. Greenwich, CT: Greenwich Workshop, 2012, pp. 24-25, illustrated. In Howard Terpning: A Tribute to the Plains People, Harley Brown wrote the following in regard to Calling the Buffalo: “The object in the Blackfoot’s right hand is an ancient fossil they call iniskim—today we know it as an ammonite—in the shape of a buffalo. It was used in prayers to call for the buffalo herds to come. In his left hand is a stone wrapped in buckskin and beads with a hide thong dangling down. A large medicine bundle is tied to the pole. This man’s concerned expression and worn hands come from years of hardship. We see in his expression that he has faith that this time the iniskim will bring good favors to his people.” “Howard spent a great deal of time reworking the color of the man’s shirt, finally giving it the cool hue in contrast to the tepee. The shirt’s war drawings, the position of the red trade cloth across his collar and the shadows of poles on back of the tepee are all carefully thought through by the artist.”

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234 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 Indian Scout Oil on board 8 x 6 inches Signed lower left

235 E.S. Paxson 1852-1919 Cheyenne Brave Watercolor 20 x 15 inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

236 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Vengeance Bronze, cast number 8/35 28 inches high, 34 inches wide Signed/CA Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Provenance: The Artist Private Collection Literature: Don Hedgpeth. Joe Beeler: Life Of A Cowboy Artist. Vail, CO: Diamond Tail Press, 2004, p 106, illustrated.

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237 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 Hazing Out Badland Stragglers Watercolor 9 ¾ x 13 ½ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 20,000

A signed original letter affixed to the back of the painting reads: Great Falls, Montana October 21st, 1955 Dear Mr. Chase, I have finished your water-color and will send it on to you on the 24th and hope it reaches you safely. This picture depicts “Hazing out Badland Stragglers” with a typical Western country background. I will anxiously await your approval and reaction to this subject. Mrs. Seltzer joins me in regards to you and Mrs. Goodwin. Sincerely, O. C. Seltzer

238 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 Two Warriors on Horseback Oil on board 10 x 12 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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239 A copy of the August, 1953 issue of Arizona Highways featuring the work on the cover will accompany this lot. Provenance:

Estate of the Artist Nancy Russell, Pasadena, CA Homer E. Britzman, Pasadena, CA Hammer Galleries, NY (circa 1957)

Exhibitions: Western Canada Art Circuit, Calgary Allied Arts Council. Summer, 1957. Tower Gallery, Department of Municipal Art, City Hall, Los Angeles, CA. August 29 - September 13, 1957. “Charles M. Russell.” California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, CA. September, 1957. “Charles M. Russell.” Historical Society of Montana, Helena, MT. October 1 - 12, 1957. Trigg C. M. Russell Foundation, Great Falls, MT. October 24-26, 1957. Literature:

Homer E. Britzman. “Charles M. Russell, Friend of the Indian,” in Arizona Highways, August, 1953. Cover illustration. Great Falls Tribune, October 6, 1957, illustrated. Montana, The Magazine of Western History, Autumn, 1958, p. 51, illustrated. Montana, The Magazine of Western History, Spring, 1960, illustrated. John Willard. Adventure Trails in Montana, Helena, MT., 1964, illustrated. Der Wilde Westen. Bresigau, West Germany, 1966. Karl Yost and Frederic Renner. A Bibiliography of the Published Works of Charles M. Russell, Lincoln, NE, 1971, pp. 49, 77, 91, 93, 121, 149, 164, 260, 263. B. Byron Price, Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonne, Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007, no. CR.PC.9

Born into relatively comfortable circumstances in 1864, just as the Civil War was coming to a close, young Charlie Russell’s hometown, St. Louis, was a bustling city, the gateway to the West, borderland between “civilization” and the rapidly filling “frontier.” Never much for formal education, the people and horses that lit out for the open range and the stories that swirled around them captured Russell’s imagination, while his mother’s interest in and aptitude for painting flowers—in watercolor—seemed to plant the seed that would become a vocation. Still in his teens, Russell convinced his parents to allow him to head West and try his hand at punching cows. He did, making a go of it even as he made fast friends among the characters of the Montana Territory’s Judith Basin. Soon, he began to try to capture cowboy life in art, principally, at first, in watercolor. Russell’s work was being published regularly in Harper’s Weekly and had been acclaimed as original, fresh and real even before he married Nancy Cooper in 1896. Nancy took responsibility for the business end of Russell’s art and proved to be a tough, shrewd agent for her husband. A career was born. Early on, Russell painted the life of the cowboy. It was all new to him and he had a natural interest in realism, in chronicling the hardships and adventure of life on the range. But the Old West, evan as Russell was first encountering it, was already receding into history. Russell receded with it. The journalist became the bard. The chronicler became the myth maker. Russell shares this trajectory with Remington, but accepts it even more fully than Remington did. Gradually, Russell’s body of work, his oeuvre, becomes a single saga, a sagebrush saga, an epic of wandering, crisscrossing, occasionally clashing tribes: Indians, cowboys, vaqueros. Artworks rise out of the whole cloth of his mind, memory, imagination, fashioning a single entity of the fabric of the West. By 1899, Charlie Russell’s project—recording the vanished and vanishing West—was already well underway. But where other artists (J. H. Sharp, Eldridge Ayer Burbank and Grace Hudson, to name three) painted portraits of individual Native Americans, Russell sought to capture “types” of cowboys, Indians and vaqueros. Nobleman of the Plains, though at first glance appearing to be a portrait of a mounted warrior, is, in fact, a portrait of an attitude, a study in confidence. The low horizon stretching into the distance, obscured by the dust kicked up by his mount, indicates the warrior’s mastery over the land. The horse, festooned with feathers, holds his head high, prancing across the plain. The warrior’s gaze is steady and relaxed, level with the viewer, and his lance, held crossways, is, to borrow a knight’s term, “in rest,” yet ready at a moment’s notice to be deployed. Russell often used the words “When the...” in his works. Nobleman of the Plains might well have been titled, When the Red Man Ruled the Plains, or, to continue the metaphor, Knight of the Plains.

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239 Charles M. Russell 1864-1926 Nobleman of the Plains Watercolor 15 x 11 inches Signed lower left with skull and dated 1899 Estimate: $175,000 - 225,000

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240 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 Heeling a Bolter Oil on board 16 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Provenance: The artist Berk Berkner, Great Falls, MT (circa 1935) C. M. Russell Museum, Great Falls, MT (circa 1954)

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241 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 The Angry Cow Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $75,000 - 125,000 Provenance: Bernard Ellingson, MT. Private Collection. Exhibitions: C. M. Russell Museum, Great Falls, MT. There are at least two angry cows in The Angry Cow. And two angry horses. And two not very happy cowboys. And one very foul rope, which certainly would be angry, if ropes could be angry. If any painting can be said to be a Western predicament painting, The Angry Cow is it. With the rider on the right attached to the bucking cow down the draw, and the near rider at left cat’s cradled in the rope, and the really angry cow—head down, horns out—heading towards the rider on the right, what looks like comedy might in the next instant be tragedy. It all rests on what happens with the lariat in the near rider’s hand. Can he throw it in a way that defuses the tension? It was one of Olaf Seltzer’s gifts, catching a moment of ranch hand drama at its most precarious. What is interesting here, and very successful, is the contrast between the scene and the setting, which is very still, very vast and very beautiful.

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242 E.S. Paxson 1852-1919 The Last Shot Oil on canvas 26 x 20 inches Signed lower left and dated 1902 Estimate: $70,000 - 100,000 Labels verso: Jim Fowler’s Period Gallery West, Scottsdale, AZ (circa 1976) Sydney Shoenberg, Jr., St. Louis, MO. Sotheby’s New York, May 22, 2002.

Literature: William Edgar Paxson, Jr. E. S. Paxson: Frontier Artist, Boulder, CO: Pruett Publishing Company, 1984, Color Plate 6, p. 108. E. S. Paxson was one of the last Western artists who lived the life he painted. He was a scout in the Nez Percé Indian war, rode guard on the Overland Stage and took part in the American war in the Philippines. He was also a staunch friend to many Native American leaders and celebrated their dignity and honesty. A self-taught artist, his work was known from coast to coast and beyond, yet he painted saloon signs in Montana when he had to. His good friend Charlie Russell envied him for having been there before the Old West ended. 1902, the year Paxson painted The Last Shot, was a good year for the artist. He just finished his monumental rendering of Custer’s Last Stand and Outdoor Life had commissioned him to write and illustrate some of the colorful tales of his scouting days and the characters he had known. In this painting, one “last shot” has been fired, by the pursuing whites, wounding, perhaps killing the Indian at left, who has not yet fallen from his horse. But this shot in the back will shortly be followed by a second “last shot” that is about to be fired by the Indian at right. We don’t know what the Indians did, or what their pursuers thought they did, so we are left with the existential facts of the chase: racing clouds, frothing horses, the twisting forms of the braves in their wild flight. But it is the mounts, caught mid-air, between strides, that really capture our attention. Paxson’s choice of point of view for the painting, straight on but slightly up from under, makes it seem as though the Indians are riding into the sky. This, perhaps a subtle metaphor both for the waning of their way of life and their exalted status in Paxson’s mind, recalls the ascension of the Norse warrior heroes to Valhalla.

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243 William H. Dunton 1878-1936 Watering the Horses, 1913 Oil on canvas 32 x 25 inches Signed lower right and dated 1913 Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 Labels verso: Fenn Galleries, NM. Trailside Americana, WY. Edwin A. Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State University, KS. Gerald Peters Gallery, NM. Santa Fe Art Auction, NM. 1996 Nedra Matteucci Galleries, NM. Mitchell Brown Fine Art, NM.

Literature: Julie Schimmel. The Art and Life of W. Herbert Dunton, 1878-1936. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 1984, p. 210. Young Buck Dunton’s hometown, Augusta, Maine, was one of the East Coast’s publishing centers in the exploding market for mail order weeklies, dime novels, and advertising broadsheets, and his father was a photographer who may have done work for the presses. Saturated with illustrations of life in the open, Dunton succumbed to the lure of the outdoors, the American West, and art. As early as 1896, he began to travel the West in the summers, making a name illustrating articles and books–including many of Zane Grey’s classic Westerns. It was Ernest Blumenschein, at the Salmagundi Club in New York in 1912, who urged Dunton to move to Taos, where he would become a founding member of the Taos Society. Dunton favored cowboy, shepherding and wildlife subjects composed in strong patterns and vivid colors. Watering the Horses, 1913 employs electric, impressionistic brushwork to provide contrast within the overall serenity of this idyllic scene. Framing the riders against the tall green Arizona cypress from a low vantage point looking up places them on a level with the towers of clouds, above the line of mountains in the distant lavender haze. The riders’ hats and heads are the still center around which the entire canvas shimmers. It’s hard to say whether the light or a light breeze accounts for the shimmer, but the artist achieves it through patterns of tight, pontilistic strokes that, when seen up close, are a myriad of colors that melt into the overall whole at a distance. Even the white chaps are a layered affair of juxtaposed grays, whites, tans, yellows, blues. In the end, Watering the Horses, 1913 isn’t about horses, or men or the landscape, it’s about how light finds and travels around the shapes they make and how those shapes suggest color. It is a simultaneously delicate and robust painting, simultaneously soft and vivid, still and in motion, earthy and dreamy. Water trickling around the rocks, the faint sound that makes, somehow encapsulates the entire floating world of the canvas.

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244 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Man of Many Honors Oil on canvas 36 x 24 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $35,000 - 45,000 Exhibitions: Cowboy Artists of America, 2013.

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245 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Dust in the Distance Oil on canvas 48 x 64 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2006 Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000


246 Kenneth Riley b. 1919 The Algonquin Family Acrylic 5 ¾ x 6 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000

245 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Dust in the Distance (detail) Oil on canvas 48 x 64 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2006 Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 Exhibitions: Prix de West, 2006 “Rendezvous Artists’ Retrospective,” Thomas Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, OK, 2013, p. 47, illustrated. The mounted warriors watch and wait for the brave to report on what he’s seeing through the white man’s telescope. What’s interesting in Dust in the Distance is that the way the brave handles the scope, steadying it on the rifle barrel, the moment Grelle chooses is past any notion of the magic of the device. The telescope, in his hands, is a tool, a useful piece of technology that will bring an image of what is far away up close. So this is a painting about adaptation, even within the bounds of the traditions as they are expressed by the Indians’ dress and weapons. Whatever is out there, kicking up dust in the distance, it’s something these three can prepare for and react to.

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166

247 Kenneth Riley b. 1919 Fire of the Ancients Acrylic 5 x 4 ½ inches Signed lower right

248 Kenneth Riley b. 1919 In Mandan Lodge of Four Bears Acrylic 5 ¼ x 3 ½ inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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249* Kenneth Riley b. 1919 Shadow Canyon Oil on board 16 ½ x 15 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $30,000 - 45,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit The walls aren’t actually closing in on Shadow Canyon, are they…? From light to darkness, the two Indians move. The first leads his horse. The second wishes he had eyes in the back of his head. Nothing has happened. There’s nothing to fear. But every sound, every scrape of a hoof, every footfall, echoes off the rocks and along the narrow pathway. The way Riley poses them: the standing Indian with his head cocked, frozen mid-stride; the rider looking over his shoulder; some sound has them on the alert. It would be tough to fight here, especially if trouble came from above. It would be tougher to fight ghosts, or demons, or anything unnatural that haunts this canyon. Ken Riley is one of the treasures of American Western Art. Having been a student of Harvey Dunn and Thomas Hart Benton, and having been a member of the Cowboy Artists of America since 1982, Riley is the through line between the early masters of the West, the Golden Age of American Illustration and the contemporary Western scene characterized by the artists of the CAA. His work can be found in important public and private collections across the nation and around the world, including the White House, the Smithsonian Institution, the Booth Western Art Museum, and the Phoenix Art Museum.

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250 Kenneth Riley b. 1919 The Bone Whistle Acrylic 16 x 12 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000

251 Kenneth Riley b. 1919 Summer Pasture Oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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252 Kenneth Riley b. 1919 Sharing a Drink Acrylic 5 x 7 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 253 Kenneth Riley b. 1919 The Traders Acrylic 4 x 5 他 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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254* Jay Moore b. 1964 Autumn Currents Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $13,000 - 17,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

255 Clyde Aspevig b. 1951 View from Double Top Mountain Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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256 Curt Walters b. 1950 The Granite Gorge, Grand Canyon Oil on canvas 60 x 48 inches Signed lower right; Titled verso Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000

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257 Ed Mell b. 1942 Expanding Rose Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Signed and dated 1995 verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

258 Ed Mell b. 1942 Converging Nature Oil on canvas 24 x 32 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2004 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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259 Ed Mell b. 1942 Eye of the Storm Oil on canvas 42 x 48 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1991 verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Literature: Donald J. Hagerty. Beyond the Visible Terrain: The Art of Ed Mell. Flagstaff, AZ: Northland Publishing, 1996, p. 107, illustrated.

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260 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Mule and Cart with Red Pitcher Oil on canvas 12 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 1978 Estimate: $20,000 - 25,000

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261 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Blonde Girl in Sicily Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right and dated 1970 Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

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262 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Stone Bridge Oil on canvas 8 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 1987 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

263 Donald Teague 1897-1991 A Canal in Chioggia Watercolor 6 x 9 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $2,000 - 4,000

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264 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Old House Near Annecy Oil on canvas 18 x 27 inches Signed lower left and dated 2005 Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Exhibitions: “Timeless Beauty: Pursuing Life’s Textures,” Morris & Whiteside Galleries, SC and J. N. Bartfield Galleries, NY, May, 2007. Literature: Clark Hulings. Timeless Beauty: Pursuing Life’s Textures. Hilton Head, SC: White Burro Publishing, 2007, p. 38-39, illustrated. Of Old House Near Annecy, Clark Hulings wrote: “Originally, I felt the need to include figures in this scene. First an old man sat on the bench. Then a woman approached with her grandchild. Finally an old cat appeared in the doorway. Eventually it struck me that the beautiful old house was the star of the picture. I had painted its portrait and that was interesting enough.”

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265 Mian Situ b. 1953 Morning Chores Oil on canvas 22 x 28 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

266 Mian Situ b. 1953 Yangwu Market Day, Yun Nan Province Oil on canvas 34 x 42 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

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267 Mian Situ b. 1953 My New Bandana Oil on canvas 12 x 9 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

268 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Lisa Oil on board 8 x 12 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1988 verso Estimate: $6,000 - 8,000

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269 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Tina Oil on canvas 16 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1985 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

270 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Spring Lilies Oil on canvas 8 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 2010; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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271* David Leffel b. 1931 Anasazi Vase with Mayan Plate & Chinese Lanterns Oil on canvas 18 x 22 inches Initialed lower right and dated 08; Signed, titled and dated 3/08 verso Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit David Leffel, one of America’s preeminent realists and a master of the nature morte painted in the kind of Dutch light that Rembrandt made famous, turns his talents to Native American artifacts in Anasazi Vase with Mayan Plate & Chinese Lanterns. Raking light in the paintings creates a dramatic spotlit areas swathed in darkness. Just as the moving shadows of a sundial’s gnomon tell time, so the shadows in this painting tell a story about time. Around the vase, the elements in the painting speak to the seasons. The empty bowl at left is potential, possibility, and the eggs suggest spring, fertility, new life. By contrast, the dried jack o’lantern pods, berries and branches are indicative of Fall. Against this, the Anasazi Vase, focus of the light and painting, is both in time, in history, and outside of time, a mute survivor and witness to the wheel of the seasons.

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272* Stephen Scott Young b. 1957 The Japan Scarf Oil on paper 17 他 x 12 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $50,000 - 70,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

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273* Dan McCaw b. 1942 Afternoon Glow Oil on board 30 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $7,000 - 9,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

274 Jeremy Lipking b. 1975 Chelsey Oil on board 20 x 16 inches Signed upper right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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275 John Moyers b. 1958 Family Treasures Oil on canvas 28 x 18 inches Signed upper right/CA; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000

276 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Cheyenne Sundown Oil on canvas 36 x 22 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2013; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

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277 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Days of the Coldmaker Oil on canvas 38 x 48 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2011 verso Estimate: $130,000 - 230,000


277 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Days of the Coldmaker (detail) Oil on canvas 38 x 48 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2011 verso

278 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 Running Them Off Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right and dated 70; Signed and titled verso

Estimate: $130,000 - 230,000 In Days of the Coldmaker, Martin Grelle tells a tale of wariness and survival. As a woman fills buckets with fresh water from a running stream, a man, perhaps her husband, watches warily. His gun rests easily on his shoulder but his finger is inside the trigger guard. He looks over his right shoulder; his gaze seems to want to penetrate the tree line, the failing light, the squall clouds rolling down the mountain. The dogs mirror the man and woman. One stands head down, snuffling under the snow while the other is ears up, looking where the man looks. The feeling that someone—or some thing, some spirit—might be out there has just begun to insinuate itself. This is a good place to camp, out of the wind, with fresh water running right beside the tepees. They could spend the whole winter here. But they might not be the only ones who know about it, this place, a place that might be worth fighting for. But it’s just a feeling—isn’t it?

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Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000 Exhibitions: “Frank McCarthy Retrospective.” R.W. Norton Art Gallery, Shreveport, LA, April 22-June 5, 1977. Frank McCarthy began his career alongside any number of now famous illustrators who made the leap to easel art in what was called “The Bullpen,” a building in Midtown Manhattan that, in the late 50’‘s and early 60’s, was a hive of artists who lived from assignment to assignment as the Mad Men of the day dreamed up campaigns for dime novels, cigarettes, lingerie and Oldsmobiles. McCarthy illustrated books and magazine stories and did posters for Hollywood—James Bond films, in particular. In 1974, McCarthy shed his journeyman artist role and moved to Arizona to paint action scenes out of the Old West. In a McCarthy oil, the rocks are rocky and the dust looks as if it had blown in off the street and settled on the wet canvas.

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279 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 Escorting the Supply Wagon Oil on canvas 20 x 40 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1983; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

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280 George Browne 1918-1958 Study of Ruffed Grouse Oil on board 10 x 14 inches Signed lower right

281 George Browne 1918-1958 Mallards Drifting In - Field Study Oil on board 10 x 14 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

George Browne’s untimely death in a tragic hunting accident at the age of 40 remains one of the great “What Ifs” in American Sporting Art. Looking at his masterful paintings of big game animals and game birds, one wonders how much more proficient he would, or could, have become. The son of a very fine painter—Belmore Browne—young George abandoned formal education at an early age, receiving his training in woodcraft and painting at his father’s side.

282 Frank Benson 1862-1951 Wetlands Watercolor 12 ¾ x 10 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated 1924 Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

A native of Salem, Massachusetts, Frank Benson’s interest in art took him to Paris, where he studied at the famous Academie Julian amid the fervor of the Impressionist movement there. On his return to the States, he rose to fame as a painter of portraits. Along with Childe Hassam, Thomas Dewing, and others, Benson formed a group of artists known as The Ten, whose fame and influence spread rapidly throughout the art world. In 1900, Benson began to summer in Maine where, recalling his youthful rambles in the woods and marshes near his home—and perhaps also inspired by Homer’s Adirondack watercolors— he began to paint sporting scenes in that medium and to embark on a series of masterful etchings of gunners, anglers and wildfowl.

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283 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Oasis Acrylic 18 x 26 inches Signed lower left and dated 93; Signed and dated verso Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000 In Oasis, Bob Kuhn constructs three Cape Buffalo out of building blocks to heighten the effect of their muscle and mechanical menace. Armored cars with attitude, the trio here seems to have noticed the viewer; our gaze is returned with a steadier gaze that almost makes us want to look away. The reputation for fierceness, for capricious violence that the Cape enjoys, is on full display here, and yet the white egrets flit around, lighting on the hulking beasts, without a care in the world. The egrets take the weight off the painting, imparting movement and lightness, and the abstract layering of the background, with the layers getting thinner and lighter in tone, both draws attention to and relieves the sheer mass of the Capes. A prominent wildlife illustrator until he turned full-time to easel painting in 1970, it was Bob Kuhn who inherited the mantle worn by Wilhelm Kuhnert and Carl Rungius as the finest interpreter of big game animals. Kuhn’s ability to capture an accurate likeness of nature belies two less apparent but very real strengths. The first is an unerring sense of design. The second is his vast and deep experience in the outdoors observing wildlife.

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284 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Birdwatching-Bobcat Oil on board 6 x 18 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Literature: Tom Davis. Patrons Without Peer: the McCloy Collection. Dallas, TX: Collector’s Covey, 2009, p. 84, illustrated.

285* William Alther b. 1959 Big World Oil on board 25 x 36 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

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286* Ken Carlson b. 1937 Thin Air Oil on board 27 x 18 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

287 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Moose Country Oil on board 24 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $35,000 - 45,000

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288 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Young Buck with Doe Acrylic 22 x 33 inches Signed lower right; Signed and dated 2000 verso Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

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289 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Autumn Season Oil on board 36 x 48 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000

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290 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Pony Express Bust Bronze, cast number 73/160 10 ½ inches high Signed and dated ‘72 Estimate: $2,500 - 3,500 Literature: Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. pp. 244-245, illustrated.

291 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Iroquois Guide Bronze, cast number 9 19 ½ inches high Signed, titled and dated 1969 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Harry Jackson. Lost Wax Bronze Casting. Flagstaff, AZ: Northland Press. 1972. Pony Express is featured throughout the book.

292 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Frontiersman Bronze, cast number 8 20 ½ inches high Signed, titled and dated 1965; Pennsylvania Woodsman 1750 Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

Literature: Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. p. 220, illustrated.

Literature: Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. pp. 288-89, illustrated.

Possibly the only figure in American art to claim friendship with Jackson Pollock and John Wayne, the iconoclastic Harry Jackson was born in Chicago and grew up in his mother’s diner near the stockyards where men of the range brought their cattle to market. Jackson went West in his teens, served in the Pacific in World War II, went East to meet Pollock, then rediscovered realism and made the West his subject while he lived and worked in Italy. Jackson’s bronzes convey the energy of a single moment in time, as that moment existed inside the larger sweep of history.

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293 John Clymer 1907-1989 Beaver Sign Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000


294 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Navajo Madonna Bronze, cast number 5/10 Heritage Bronze, Inc., CA. 23 inches high Signed and dated 86 Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000 Provenance: Malcolm C. Mackay, 1986

C. M. Russell Museum, Great Falls, MT.

Deaccessioned from the C. M. Russell Museum; proceeds to benefit the museum’s acquisition fund.

293 John Clymer 1907-1989 Beaver Sign (detail) Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Provenance: Al Mengert, Tacoma, WA. Oklahoma Publishing Company, Oklahoma City, OK. A label signed by the artist verso reads: “BEAVER SIGN. A trapper wearing a capote, leading his two horses, has just come up on fresh beaver cuttings at the edge of an open grove. John Clymer” A capote, often seen in mountain man pictures, was a common winter garment. Fashioned from a single wool trade blanket, it offered warmth as well as rudimentary camouflage. Winter was a good time for thick beaver pelts, but the icing over of the ponds often made trapping difficult. It was a difficult time for the trappers as well, who had to find food for themselves and their pack animals, open water, and shelter from the elements. John Clymer’s trajectory from commercial art to America’s chronicler of the Fur Trade and Mountain Man Era is itself a tale of exploration and adventure. In 1960, abandoning a successful and lucrative career in illustration, Clymer devoted himself to painting the wildlife and Western subjects that truly interested him. At the same time, the galleries that represented him began to ask for more history paintings. Clymer and his wife set out to trace what was left of the early trails—the Oregon, Bozeman, Chisholm, Overland Stage, Pony Express—as well as the path Lewis and Clark had taken. Clymer studied the terrain, dress, manners, horses, dwellings, weapons and lives of the men and women, trappers and Indians, and poured this knowledge onto his canvases with the same kind of energy that characterized the period of Westward Expansion.

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295 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Blackfoot Warrior Oil on board 12 x 10 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso

296 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Old Apache Chief Oil on board 14 x 12 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 1959

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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297 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Cold Hunt Oil on canvas 18 x 20 inches Signed lower left and dated 75 lower right Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 A copy of the November/December 1992 Art of the West magazine featuring Cold Hunt will accompany this lot. Literature: Hadley House print, 1987. Art of the West. November/December 1992, illustrated. James E. Drye. A Collector’s Guide to the Prints of Olaf Wieghorst, 2000, p. 43, illustrated. No doubt these hunters would rather be by the fire. But they have to feed their people, so here they are, wrapped in blanket coats, draped with skins, doing what they can to keep warm. So far there’s no meat tied to the horses. The pickings are slim. At the top of a hill they sit, looking in different directions for any sign of game. The clouds build behind a mesa. A squall might be in the offing. New snow would obliterate any tracks. The problem the hunters in Cold Hunt face makes for a very striking painting. The sunlit hill crest, with its textured grasses and patches of snow, the hunters on their mounts, and the atmospheric mesa and the vista beyond make the viewer want to construct an accompanying narrative.

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298 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Lookout Point Watercolor 16 x 15 inches Signed lower left and dated ‘85 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

299 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Distant Riders Watercolor 16 x 15 inches Signed lower left and dated ‘85 Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

300 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Ropin’ Watercolor 14 ½ x 14 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated ‘85 Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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301 Anton Otto Fischer 1882-1962 Afternoon Ride Oil on canvas 30 x 20 inches Signed lower right and dated ‘21 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Best known for his marine paintings, Anton Otto Fischer was also a prolific and widely heralded illustrator. Fischer painted for The Saturday Evening Post and specialized in stories by Jack London, Jules Verne and other writers of tales of adventure. In the illustrator’s tradition, Fischer’s realism is heightened, taut and tight on tension and action. In this work, the action is potential as the boy looks up, wondering what the older man is thinking, and thinking of doing. Fischer relocates the man’s restrained emotions in the turbulent sky—half sun, half storm— a naturalistic touch characteristic of early 20th century art and illustration.

302 John Hampton 1918-1999 Race for the Wagon Bronze, cast number 35/50 24 ½ inches high, 41 inches long Signed/CA Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 In the small yard in his Brooklyn boyhood home, John Wade Hampton practiced roping cows with his mother’s clothesline. With earnings from the “Red Ryder” comic strip, which he helped draw, Hampton moved West, to Scottsdale for a time, where he raised and punched a few head—mostly as models for his art—and helped found the Cowboy Artists of America. In the mode of Remington’s Coming Through the Rye and countless others, Race for the Wagon is Hampton’s entry in the “hell bent for leather” Western bronze motif, whose unstated goal seems to be to make the cowboys and horses appear to fly as if on air. Hampton’s nifty solution anchors the rear legs of the front horses and the front legs of the rearmost horse on a small round base so that at least half of each horse is unsupported. Having the horse nearest us bow his head allows us to see through the composition. The cowboys seem to levitate between strides.

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303 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Home of the Navajo Oil on board 16 x 20 inches Signed lower left/ANA and dated 1932 Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000 Looking through the hogan door at the fire and the figure bathed in its light, looking at this frame within the frame of the picture, master nocturnist Frank Tenney Johnson seemed to be channeling his inner Couse or Sharp. Under Johnson’s trademark moonlight, a Navajo unsaddles his horse. The horse casts a deep shadow, the darkest area of the painting, which balances the composition in two ways: from lower right to the mesa sloping upward at left and from the lower edge of the middle of the canvas to the towering mesa outlined in the distance. The hogan itself is a wondrous, Hobbit-like structure that seems like the earth in miniature, made of earth and of the earth. Where Sharp or Couse often painted firelight and daylight, in Home of the Navajo Johnson gives us firelight and moonlight, inside and outside, dwelling and landscape. Like the composition, the elements in the painting create a balance that echoes the harmonies of the Navajo model of the universe.

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304 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 The Rustler Oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000 This is the dark side of the night scene. The rustler, waiting for the fall of night, willing the night, almost bringing it on—see the pale orange light on the horse’s head and the rocks at right. It is as if he brings the shadows. He likes the building clouds that will obscure any moon that rises. He likes his vantage point; high, looking down, out, across—for miles. He likes his chances. And yet… something in the way he leans away from the edge of the cliffside trail, something in the way he positions his hand on the flank of the horse, suggests an impulse to flee, or at least to slide off his mount, down and behind, so as not to be seen. He makes a good living at this, this rustler, with his close cropped beard and decent duds, and, in particular, with those white calfskin gloves. As he would no doubt tell you, he didn’t get where he is by being reckless. As Frank Tenney Johnson would tell you, there are many masters of the dark cloak of night, of brushes of sorts other than paint (especially brushes with the law). Oh yes, Frank Tenney would say, there are masters of the nocturne who never touched a brush.

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305 Kathryn Leighton 1875-1952 Chief Brown Eagle Oil on canvas 36 x 28 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Provenance: Vanguard Collection: American Western Art, TX. In a field dominated by men, Kathryn Leighton made her mark. Born in New Hampshire, Kathryn Woodman studied art before she married Edward Leighton, a young lawyer. Edward endorsed his wife’s interest in art without reservation, and when the couple moved to Los Angeles in 1910, Kathryn opened her own studio. By 1918, Leighton had begun to paint portraits of Native Americans, and these established her reputation. At a party given in Los Angeles by artist Jack Wilkinson Smith, Leighton met Charlie Russell, who encouraged her to visit Montana’s Glacier Park. In Montana, she was introduced to the elders of the Blackfeet tribe and officials of the Great Northern Railway. Subsequently, the railroad commissioned a series of portraits of the elders to illustrate a nationwide lecture tour on the tribe. Leighton would travel coast to coast for the remainder of her career, painting portraits of Indians from a vast range of tribes. Chief Brown Eagle, like many of her portraits, is frank and unlabored. Leighton’s style might best be described as a kind of bright, rugged realism.

306 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Study for Allegory Charcoal 16 ½ x 7 ¾ inches Signed lower right and dated 1930 Estimate: $2,500 - 3,500 Provenance: Schenck Southwest Gallery, NM. Exhibitions: Booth Western Art Museum, GA. The Great Depression sent Maynard Dixon into a depression of his own. While his wife, photographer Dorothea Lange, was turning her lens to the people of the Dust Bowl in unforgettable ways, Dixon was looking for ways to paint what he saw as the breakdown of humanity in the face of grinding poverty and hopelessness. He would paint the forgotten men and striking workers with deep shadows and jagged forms but he also began to work on a painting that would eventually be called Allegory. In Allegory a shrouded figure stands behind a nude Indian woman beside a boulder on a barren hill. The last light of day glows in a pale way around the rock and hilltop. Death shadows innocence, American innocence, personified in the unblushing Native American Eve. Study for Allegory establishes the innocent woman and the solidity of the rock—a symbol of the land, especially the West—as aspects of the American experiment that should be remembered and turned to, even—perhaps especially—in times of crisis.

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307 Kenneth Miller Adams 1897-1966 Taos Woman Conte Crayon 14 x 12 inches Signed lower right/Taos and dated 26 Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000 The last, youngest member of the Taos Society, Kenneth Adams is best known for the application of Modernist practices in his vision of the Southwest. As evidenced in this conte crayon of a young woman in Taos, he was also capable of great sensitivity in portraiture. Adams is the connection between the academically trained Founders and the artists who came to Taos armed with the tenets of the new in the second wave.


308 Grace Carpenter Hudson 1865-1937 Hu-he-a Oil on canvas 14 x 10 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and inscribed “Ukiah, Cal” verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Literature: Searles R. Boynton. The Painter Lady: Grace Carpenter Hudson. Eureka, CA: Interface California Corporation, 1978, p. 183, illustrated. Listed as Ukiah 666, Baby Head, painted in 1933. Grace Hudson could not have known that the project she and her husband undertook when she began to paint portraits of the Pomo and he began to amass a fine collection of their exquisite baskets and other artifacts would amount to nothing less than the record of a vanishing people and way of life. Her paintings and the captions she wrote and affixed to them bear witness to the daily lives of a people who, despite their years of suffering, laughed and loved and played, worked and worshipped and prayed, a people who continue, to this day, to seek the recognition we see in her work. In Grace Hudson’s portraits—particularly in those of Pomo children like Hu-he-a—we see beyond the randomness of ethnicity to the common humanity that binds us. From the outset of his career, St. Louis native Oscar Berninghaus was a respected draftsman. When the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company commissioned him to do the artwork for series of advertising lithographs based on scenes from the settlement of West, his reputation soared and his interest in the West mounted. Then, on his first real trip West, a chance encounter led him to Taos. The picturesque people and landscape and the quality of light and color enthralled him. Berninghaus would eventually move there and become one of the founders of the Taos Society. In Mining, a delicate transparent watercolor, Berninghaus lightly paints a collection of old boards banged together to create what some poor prospector calls a cabin. Precariously perched, this dwelling seems on the verge of tumbling down the hillside, where it would smash apart and come to rest like broken dreams of gold.

309 Oscar E. Berninghaus 1874-1952 Mining Watercolor 13 x 17 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

310 Leon Gaspard 1882-1964 Taos Landscape with Gray Sky Oil on board 11 x 14 inches Signed lower left; Estate Stamp verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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311 Z.S. Liang b. 1953 Pueblo Man Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right; Initialed, titled and dated 2008 verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

312 Roy Andersen b. 1930 Where Only the Otter Can Follow Oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Exhibitions: Exhibited: National Academy of Western Art, Cowboy Hall of Fame, Oklahoma City, OK, June 12 - September 13, 1992. Literature: Jan Adkins. Dream Spinner: The Art of Roy Andersen. Tucson, AZ: Settlers West Gallery, 1999, pp. 148-149, illustrated.

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313 Roy Andersen b. 1930 Above the Rio Bravo Oil on canvas 42 x 60 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $90,000 - 120,000


313 Roy Andersen b. 1930 Above the Rio Bravo (detail) Oil on canvas 42 x 60 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $90,000 - 120,000 The echo of the ragged unbroken line of mountains with the ragged unbroken line of men and horses (draw a line in your mind up and down the horses‘ heads and backs and the outlines of the warriors from the nose of the horse at far left to the pack on the horse at far right and you will see what I mean) in Roy Andersen’s Above the Rio Bravo invites comparison. Thematically, the two lines suggest continuity, tradition, and an affinity between the land and these men. The dust they raise as they pass over this ridge above another ragged line—the line of the river implied in the title—will settle back when they are gone. The work oscillates between now and forever, between the present and the eternal.

314* Joe Velazquez b. 1942 An Intrepid Breed of Men Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right and dated 2014 Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

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315* Gary Lynn Roberts b. 1953 The Chosen One Oil on canvas 36 x 50 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

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316 John Hauser 1859-1913 Quiet Return from the Hunt Oil on canvas 15 ¼ x 25 inches Signed lower left and dated 1913 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Provenance: Harmsen Collection, CO. Owings-Dewey Gallery, NM.

Literature: Dorothy Harmsen. Harmsen’s Western Americana. Flagstaff, AZ: Northland Press, 1971, p. 93, illustrated. An important Cincinnati artist, John Hauser studied in Munich, Dusseldorf and Paris, developing a kind of thoughtful yet lush realistic style that suited his interest in Indian portraiture and scenes of Native American life. Though he is often overshadowed by fellow Cincinnati native, Henry Farny, Hauser at his best more than holds his own. Hauser is the genuine article: he made yearly trips West and in 1901 he was adopted into the Sioux nation and given the name “Straight White Shield.” Framed by the reflections and the lilypads that dot the water, the successful hunters (see the moose and elk racks peeking over the gunwales) and one very alert dog make for shore and home in Quiet Return from the Hunt. The beauty of the sunset is like a benediction and the reward for their diligence is a time of plenty.

317 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Quiet Passage Bronze, cast number 16/30 12 inches high, 33 inches wide Signed Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Literature: Don Hedgpeth. Joe Beeler: Life of a Cowboy Artist. Vail, CO: Diamond Tail Press, 2004, p 229, illustrated.

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318 John Hauser 1859-1913 Winter Hunt - Sioux 1909 Oil on board 14 x 10 inches Signed lower right and dated 1909 Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000

319 John Hauser 1859-1913 Indian Camp Gouache 10 x 14 Âź inches Signed lower left and dated 1900 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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320 Frank Schoonover 1877-1972 It Was A Duel Between Them and the Two or Three Rear Men of the Enemy Oil on canvas 22 x 40 inches Signed lower right and dated ‘18 Estimate: $20,000 - 40,000

Literature: James Willard Schultz. “The White Blackfoot,” in American Boy. April, 1918, page 11, illustrated. Caption: “All Three Had Guns and Were Firing—Doing Terrible Execution.”

John R. Schoonover et al. Frank E. Schoonover Catalogue Raisonné. New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2009, p. 281, #834, illustrated.

James Willard Schultz’s serialized story, “The White Blackfoot,” tells the story of Hugh Monroe, a Canadian born in 1798. Monroe’s family was instrumental in the Hudson’s Bay Company and in 1814, he was sent to Mountain Fort, at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, to live with the Pi-kun-i, or Piegans, to learn their language and to scout out the best beaver lodges for the trappers. In the incident described in the painting, the Pi-kun-i have found their rivals, the River People, poaching buffalo on their lands. A fierce battle follows. The three warriors depicted are Lone Walker, Chief Bear Head and Chief Bull-Turns-Around. Frank Schoonover is one of the great Brandywine School illustrators. Schultz writes, “...as the River People’s guard retreated and our men advanced, I did ride on, dreading to see men fall, but withal so fascinated by the fight that I could not remain where I was.” Schoonover fills the canvas with the dread and fascination Monroe felt, capturing the uncertainty of the fight.

321 Donald Teague 1897-1991 The Bunkhouse Gang Oil on canvas 28 x 42 inches Signed upper right and dated 1927 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Provenance: The artist H. G. Stacy (circa 1928) Donald Teague is best known for his superb handling of watercolor and an ability to convey complex, thickly-peopled scenes, but The Bunkhouse Gang, painted during Teague’s early years as an illustrator, narrates a tense moment: a visiting card shark smiles to himself while the other players try to read him, wondering if he really has a winning hand, or if it’s just a bluff.

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322* William Ahrendt b. 1933 Jeremiah Johnson Oil on canvas 40 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $18,000 - 25,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

323 Bill Nebeker b. 1942 Rough String Rider Bronze, cast number 4/15 16 inches high Signed and dated 1976 Estimate: $2,500 - 3,500

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324* Luke Frazier b. 1970 Sweet Grass Pointers Oil on board 24 x 40 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2014 verso Estimate: $16,000 - 20,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

325 Luke Frazier b. 1970 In the Heat of the Night Oil on board 36 x 36 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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326 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Mother’s Care Oil on board 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

327 Michael Coleman b. 1946 West of Hudson Bay Oil on board 18 x 31 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

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328 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Boss Carabou Shagging Interloper - Alaska - 1956 Acrylic 8 x 17 inches Signed lower right, titled lower left in mat Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

329 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Cougar on Rock Bronze, cast number 16/20 12 inches high, 28 inches wide Signed and dated 1999 Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

330 John Banovich b. 1964 Winter Chill Oil on canvas 11 x 14 inches Signed lower left and dated 2007 Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

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331* John Banovich b. 1964 An Elephant Under Her Bed Oil on canvas 24 ¼ x 36 inches Estimate: $30,000 - 45,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit “Every child goes through a life stage when they are irrationally afraid of monsters. Even animals may have this experience. The title “An Elephant Under Her Bed” tells the story about why this tiger cub is afraid of an unidentified noise while her mother has remained calm. The cub is following its’ instincts to be fearful of something it cannot identify and the mother knows, it is only an elephant, something she has seen many times before. The painting also opens the door to an important and much larger conversation, as the elephant represents the real monster under her bed…large-scale habit loss and humantiger conflict with a significant increase in poaching.” – John Banovich

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332 David Shepherd b. 1931 Jumbo Country Oil on canvas 7 x 11 Âź inches Signed lower right and dated 86; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

333 Carl Brenders b. 1937 Shadows in the Grass Gouache 24 x 35 inches Signed lower right and dated 90 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Literature: Carl Brenders. Wildlife: The Nature Paintings of Carl Brenders. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1994, p. 47, illustrated.

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334* Steve Burgess Lady in Waiting Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 20,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

335 John Fery 1859-1934 Moose on Jackson Lake Oil on canvas 22 x 36 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

In the 1890’s, the work of German born and trained John Fery—who was earning his living guiding wealthy patrons on hunting trips to the Northwest, while trying to make his way as an artist—came to the attention of Louis W. Hill, president of the Great Northern Railway. Over the next thirty years, Hill would commission Fery to adorn his stations and hotels with over three hundred canvases depicting the dramatic scenery and wildlife along the rail line. Moose on Jackson Lake captures a large bull moving through the shallows as a fiery stippled sky signals sunset. Like most of Fery’s pantings, the influence of the German romantics—dark, brooding, Brothers Grimm woods, magnificent, almost unreal animals, and dynamic, magical atmospheres—shimmers in the elements of the work.

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336 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 The Last Crossing Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right and dated 72; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000 Literature: Frank Storz. The Western Paintings of Frank C. McCarthy. New York: Ballantine Books, 1974, Plate 2, illustrated. The Last Crossing is vintage McCarthy. Two would be bandits approach the stage as it hurtles across a shallow ford on a late winter day. The lead horses, urged on by the driver, who wants them to maintain their speed, leap up the bank. The driver and shotgun rider ready themselves for a confrontation, but the bandits seem to have missed their moment, pulling up and around as if they are hesitant. The stage does seem like a force to be reckoned with. Little things that really work in this painting are worth mentioning. The frosty rime at the river’s edge gently delineates the space where the action takes place and the subtle, sulphur-colored reflection of the stage at the edge of the broken water forms a narrow v with the stage itself, helping to propel the movement of the paint from left to right.

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337 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Four Sixes Morning Oil on canvas 28 x 32 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

338 Clark Kelley Price b. 1945 The Ford Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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339 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Mountain Man Oil on canvas 12 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 1990 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

340 Bob Scriver 1914-1999 The Winchester Rider Bronze, cast number 205/250 15 ½ inches high, 21 ¼ inches wide Signed and dated 1979 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Commissioned by the Buffalo Bill Historical Society and the Winchester Arms Company in 1979, The Winchester Rider celebrates the men and rifles that typify the Old West. Cradling his level action in a gesture that signals its importance, the buckskinned rider and his horse leap over a buffalo skull into history. A natural heir to the realistic tradition in Western bronzes characterized by the work of Remington and Russell, Bob Scriver’s first career was as a musician. He turned to taxidermy in the early 1950’s and sculpture in 1956, devoting his life to depicting his friends, the cowboys and Blackfoot Indians of his native Montana, in rhythmic, vital works in bronze.

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341 Gary Carter b. 1939 One Night Stand Oil on canvas 32 x 52 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1997 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Exhibitions: Cowboy Artists of America, Phoenix Art Museum, October 18 - November 22, 1997.

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342 Edgar Payne 1883-1947 Canyon de Chelly Gouache 11 x 14 ¾ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

Edgar Payne left home at 14 when his father disapproved of his desire to be an artist. With little formal training, Payne moved to Chicago and found limited success. A visit to California in 1909 convinced him that the Pacific coastline and the Sierra Nevada Mountains were subjects fit for a lifetime of paintings. In 1912, Payne and his wife Elsie settled in Laguna Beach. The Paynes, and, later, their daughter Evelyn, traveled and painted in Europe and throughout the Southwest. The Navajo and the timeless beauty of their home in Canyon de Chelly often found their way into Payne’s paintings. This painting is an etude in tones and the shadows that make tones. The eye wanders from near to far and back again through the haze of a crystal clear day.

343 Carl Oscar Borg 1879-1947 Hopi Village (Walpi) Oil on canvas board 12 x 16 inches Signed lower right; Titled verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 In his lifetime, Carl Oscar Borg was perhaps best known as one of Hollywood’s first art directors, often working with silent adventure star Douglas Fairbanks to create a “look” for adaptations of Robin Hood, Sinbad and The Three Musketeers. Beyond the silver screen, Swedish born Borg was a superb and gifted painter who learned his craft from William Wendt and was sponsored in his European studies by Phoebe Hearst. Settling in Santa Barbara, Borg became fast friends with Edward Borein and the two often traveled together throughout the Southwest, sketching and painting what he called the “wilderness of color and form” there. In Hopi Village (Walpi), Borg’s brushwork is easy, seeking to capture a moment in the craggy antiquity of the pueblo. A white burro sleeps. A figure crouches, working at something we can’t see. Another figure, having just scaled the steps, is silhouetted against the racing, gray eyed clouds.

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344 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Heritage, 1976 Alabaster 12 inches high Signed Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 As the first child born in Oklahoma to Geronimo’s Chiricahua Apache after their release from decades of detention in Florida, it should come as no surprise that strength and dignity should exude from Allan Houser’s sculptures. Combining Modernist approaches with traditional Native American elements, Houser’s works are distinctive and timeless. His simplified figures take the shapes of the gods they worship and the vessels they bear, as if life, work and worship were of a piece, aspects of divinity that cannot truly be separated. Houser taught art for many years and many solo shows of his work were mounted not only in the United States, but in Europe and Asia as well. Though he is best known for his bronzes, Houser also worked in stone, creating unique pieces that have a totemic quality, as if they are waiting patiently for a fitting ritual to unleash their power. A strong geometric bust in alabaster, the high cheekbones, closed eyes and upturned face in Heritage recall Eastern heads of Buddhas achieving inner tranquility.

345 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Thrill of the Challenge Bronze, cast number 14/20 6 ½ inches high Signed and dated 78; Lifetime cast Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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346 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Buffalo Dance Bronze, cast number 3/20 13 inches high Signed Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

347 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Spiritual Guard Bronze, cast number 3/24 15 inches high Signed Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

348 William Acheff b. 1947 Santa Rosa Plums Oil on canvas 10 x 15 inches Signed lower right and dated 1995 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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349 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Favorite Pastime Oil on canvas 10 Ÿ x 18 ½ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

350 David Leffel b. 1931 Green, Gold & Madder (Protea & Honeydew) Oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 87; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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351 Fred Fellows b. 1934 No Bed of Roses Bronze, cast 2/50 22 inches high Signed/CA and dated 83

352 Loren Entz b. 1949 Colts Conte Crayon 23 x 17 inches Signed lower right/CA

Estimate: $3,000 - 4,000

Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500

353* Nelson Boren b. 1952 Milk Man Watercolor 43 x 27 他 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Merit

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354 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 Jedediah’s Trek Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1982; Signed and dated verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday • April 5, 2014 Bid Form Index – Absentee Alphabetical by lot number

As a courtesy to Absentee Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will execute your bid if you are unable to be present

at the auction. Please complete this form andLot forward of our staff. A disinterested party will bid on Artist # it to a member Artist

Acheff,

Lot #

your behalf, not necessarily to your maximum bid, but to the next bid above what is offered, provided that your bid the first bid received will take precedence. Mailed or is in excess of the reserve, if any. In the event of identical bids, Dixon, Maynard.....................................................306 William. 348 faxed...................................175, bids should be confirmed by email at 176, info@scottsdaleartauction.com

Dunn, Harvey.........................................................197 Adams, Kenneth Miller..........................................307 Absentee Bidder Information: Dunton, William H...............................................243 Afsary, Cyrus..........................................................132 Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Dye, Charlie...........................135, 136, 137, 186, 187 Ahrendt, William.................................................322* Address______________________________________________________________________________________ Alther, William....................................................285* City ______________________________________________________State _________________ Eggenhofer,__________Zip Nicholas............................................133 Andersen, Roy................................................312, 313 Email _______________________________________________________________________________________ Entz, Loren.............................................................352 Anton, Bill.............................................................144 Phone ______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ Arpa, Jose...............................................................180 Fechin, Nicolai......................................................216 Shipping Information: (if different than above) Aspevig, Clyde.......................................................255 Fellows, Fred..........................................................351 Address______________________________________________________________________________________ Fery, John...............................................................335 Balink, HenryCityC...................................................214 ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Fischer, Anton Otto................................................301 Banovich, John.............................................330, 331* Credit Card Information: Frazier, Luke.........................................152, 324*, 325 Beeler, Joe..............172, 173, 174, 184, 208, 236, 317 Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ Benson, Frank.Card ........................................................282 The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Gaspard, Leon...............................217, 218, 219, 310 Berninghaus, Oscar E.....................................228, 309 Same as Bidder Same as Shipping Billing address: Tom..........................................................130 invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunityGilleon, to change the card or payment method. Black, LaverneAnNelson............................................224 Gollings, William..........................................201, 202 bid on my behalf for the following lots up BC to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for Blumenschein,Please Ernest......................................223, verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Goodwin, Scottsdale ArtPhilip Auction,R.........................................198, LLC Terms and Conditions of 199 Borein, Edward. ..............................................125, 126 Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 4 and that Grelle, 245, 276, absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that Martin................244, my bid, if successful, will be subject to the 277, 337, 339 Boren, James..................................................138, 139 standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Boren, Nelson.......................................................353* Signature __________________________________________________Date Hagel, Frank.........................................................129 Borg, Carl Oscar.....................................................343 Hampton, John......................................................302 Maximum Bid Brenders, Carl.........................................................333 Lot # Description (Does not include Buyer’s Premium) Hansen, Herman....................................................231 Browne, George..............................................280, 281 Harvey, G...............164, 179, 190, 191, 192, 195, 196 Burgess, Steve.......................................................334* Hauser, John..........................................316, 318, 319 Higgins, Victor......................................................227 Carlson, George.....................................................178 Houser, Allan.................................344, 345, 346, 347 Carlson, Ken.........149, 150, 153, 284, 286*, 287, 289 Hudson, Grace Carpenter.......................................308 Carter, Gary............................................................341 Hulings, Clark...............................260, 261, 262, 264 Christensen, Scott...................................................177 Humphriss, Charles................................................213 Clymer, John..................................................212, 293

Coleman, Michael. ..................................131, 326, 327 Absentee bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Friday, April 4. Jackson, Harry.......................209, 210, 290, 291, 292 Please fax your completed Absentee Bid Form to (480) 423-4071. Johnson, Frank Tenney...................................303, 304 Dean, Glenn.......................................................165* SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

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Delano, Gerard Curtis....................................182, 183 www.scottsdaleartauction.com 68

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SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday • April 5, 2014 Bid Form IndexAbsentee – Alphabetical by lot number

As a courtesy to Absentee Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will execute your bid if you are unable to be present

at the auction. Please complete this form and forward it to#a memberArtist of our staff. A disinterested party will bid on Artist Lot

Lot #

your behalf, not necessarily to your maximum bid, but to the next bid above what is offered, provided that your bid bid receivedCarl.................................................157, will take precedence. Mailed or is in excess of the reserve, if any. In the event of identical bids, the firstRungius, uhn, faxed Bob...................155, 156, 283, 288, 328, 329 bids should be confirmed by email at info@scottsdaleartauction.com

K

Absentee Bidder Information:

Lawson, Mehl................................................167, 168

158 Russell, Charles M..........................................200, 239 Ryan, Tom......................................................134, 161

Name _______________________________________________________________________________________

Leffel, David.................................................271*, 350 Address______________________________________________________________________________________ Schmid, Richard...................................268, 269, 270 Leighton, Kathryn..................................................305 City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Schoonover, Frank...................................................320 Liang, Z.S.. .............................................................311 Scriver, Bob............................................................340 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Lipking,Email Jeremy.....................................................274 Seltzer, Olaf C........................234, 237, 238, 240, 241 Phone ______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ Lougheed, Robert...................................................145 Sharp, Joseph H......................................215, 222, 225 Shipping Information: (if different than above) Shepherd, David.....................................................332 Mann, David................................................170, 171 Address______________________________________________________________________________________ Situ, Mian..............................................265, 266, 267 McCarthy, Frank.............................278, 279, 336, 354 City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Smith, Tucker.........................................................151 McCaw, Dan.........................................................273* Credit Card Information: Snidow, Gordon..............................................142, 143 Mell, Ed.................................................257, 258, 259 Solliday, Tim..........................................................146 Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ Metz, Dan............................................................154* The.above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Moore, Jay. ..........................................................254* Same as Bidder Same as Shipping Billing address: Teague, Donald.............................................263, 321 Moran, Thomas......................................................122 An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Terpning, Howard................... FC, 204, 205, 211, 233 Moyers, Please John..................................................148, bid on my behalf for the following lots up to the 275 bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for Thomas, Andy. verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC.....................................................188* Terms and Conditions of

Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 4 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an Nebeker,absentee Bill........................................................323 bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the Uanyfer,applicable Walter.........................................................226 standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and taxes. Norton, Jim...................................147, 162, 163, 169 Signature __________________________________________________Date

Owen, Bill............................................................166 Lot #

Description

Paxson, E.S...................................................235, 242 Payne, Edgar..........................................................342 Phillips, Bert G..............................................220, 221 Phippen, George.............................................185, 203 Polzin, Kyle.................................................189*, 349 Price, Clark Kelley.................................................338 Proctor, A.P............................................................123

Van Soelen, Theodore...........................................207

Maximum Bid Velazquez, Joe......................................................314* (Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Walters, Curt.......................................................256 Warren, Melvin..............................................140, 141 Weistling, Morgan.........................................193, 194 Wieghorst, Olaf.....127, 128, 206, 232, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300 Wood, Robert.........................................................181

Young, Stephen Scott.........................................272* Remington, Frederic.............IFC, 121, 229, Absentee bidding arrangements must be 124, made no later230 than 5:00pm, Friday, April 4.

Please fax your completed Absentee Bid Form to (480) 423-4071. Reynolds, James.............................................159, 160 *Eligible for the Scottsdale Art Auction Award of Riley, Kenneth.... 246, 247, 248, 249*, 250,MAIN 251,STREET 252, 253 • 7176 • SCOTTSDALE SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION ARIZONA 85251 480 945-0225 Merit. See page 73 •for more details. www.scottsdaleartauction.com Roberts, Gary Lynn..............................................315* 68

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SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday • April 5, 2014 Absentee Bid Form

As a courtesy to Absentee Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will execute your bid if you are unable to be present at the auction. Please complete this form and forward it to a member of our staff. A disinterested party will bid on your behalf, not necessarily to your maximum bid, but to the next bid above what is offered, provided that your bid is in excess of the reserve, if any. In the event of identical bids, the first bid received will take precedence. Mailed or faxed bids should be confirmed by email at info@scottsdaleartauction.com Absentee Bidder Information: Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Email _______________________________________________________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ Shipping Information: (if different than above) Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Credit Card Information: Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Billing address: Same as Bidder Same as Shipping An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Please bid on my behalf for the following lots up to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC Terms and Conditions of Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 74 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Signature __________________________________________________Date

Lot #

Description

Maximum Bid (Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Absentee bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Friday, April 4. Please fax your completed Absentee Bid Form to (480) 423-4071. SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

68

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7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

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SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday • April 5, 2014 Telephone Bid Form

As a courtesy to Telephone Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will arrange for telephone lines on lots with a minimum estimate of $5,000 and over. For lots under $5,000, please use our Absentee Bid Form. Please complete this form and forward it to a member of our staff. Bidders are encouraged to make arrangements early as telephone lines will be allocated on a first come basis. Telephone Bidder Information: Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Email _______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________Alternate Phone __________________________________ Shipping Information: (if different than above) Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Credit Card Information: Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Billing address: Same as Bidder Same as Shipping An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Please bid on my behalf for the following lots up to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC Terms and Conditions of Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 74 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Signature __________________________________________________Date ______________________________

Lot #

Description

Maximum Bid (Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Telephone bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Thursday, April 3. Please fax your completed Telephone Bid Form to (480) 423-4071. SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

480 945-0225

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Writer: James Balestrieri Photography: Rob Kaufman Hilton Head Island, SC (843) 290-8883 www.kaufmanphotography.com Design & Production: Cindy & Paula Moser Ridgeland, SC (843) 441-3686 www.xmsdesigns.com Printing: O’Neil Printing Phoenix, AZ (602) 258-7789 www.oneilprint.com


Scottsdale Art Auction 2014  

Session 2

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