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Saturday • April 10, 2021 • Session II


Front Cover 278 William Gollings 1878-1932 Cheyenne Winter Camp (detail) Oil on canvas 24 x 18 inches Signed lower right and dated 1922 Estimate: $300,000 - 500,000

Opposite 268 Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902 Starr King Mountain Oil on paper mounted on board 14 x 19 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $300,000 - 500,000

Back Cover 305 Charles Schreyvogel 1861-1912 A Close Call Oil on canvas 25 ¼ x 34 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $750,000 - 1,250,000


12:00pm Lots 164 - 402

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Saturday • April 10, 2021 • Session II

MICHAEL FROST

JACK A. MORRIS JR.

BRAD RICHARDSON

j.n. bartfield galleries PO Box #2400 New York, NY 10021 212.245.8890

morris fine arts 79 Baynard Cove Road Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 843.247.2217

legacy gallery 7178 Main Street Scottsdale, AZ 85251 480.945.1113

Jason Brooks, Auctioneer Online bidding arrangements can be made through

www.scottsdaleartauction.com* *with no additional buyer’s premium

Download our Scottsdale Art Auctions app today!

Telephone Bidding Arrangements must be made no later than 5:00 pm on Wednesday, April 7. Subject to availability. Absentee Bidding Arrangements must be made no later than 5:00 pm on Thursday, April 8. Please call (480) 945-0225 or register online at www.scottsdaleartauction.com

Auction results will be available online Monday, April 19. www.scottsdaleartauction.com

SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225

www.scottsdaleartauction.com

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Saturday • April 10, 2021 • Session II

Friday, April 9 10:00am - 1:30pm.............................................................................................Registration & Preview 1:30pm.............................................................................................................First Session: Lots 1-163 Saturday, April 10 9:00am - 12:00pm.............................................................................................Registration & Preview 12:00pm.................................................................................................. Second Session: Lots 164-402 This is an invitation-only event, RSVP to attend is required to comply with Local, State and Federal Restrictions. Pre-Registration, facial coverings and social distancing are required.

Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com

Special discounted hotel rates available: Make reservations on our website www.scottsdaleartauction.com or call for the Scottsdale Art Auction Corporate Rate. Marriott Suites Old Town Scottsdale 7325 E. 3rd Ave • Scottsdale (480) 945-1550 select option 1 Reference: M-L891ZC6

Canopy by Hilton Scottsdale Old Town 7142 E. First St • Scottsdale (480) 590-3864 Reference: Client ID N3198273

Limited Space Available

SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225

www.scottsdaleartauction.com S C O T T S D A L E A R T AU C T I O N

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Terms and Conditions

BUYER’S PREMIUM The purchase price payable by the Purchaser shall be the total of the final bid price PLUS A PREMIUM OF SEVENTEEN PERCENT (17%) on any individual lot in the amount up to and including $1,000,000; TWELVE PERCENT (12%) on any individual lot on the amount in excess of $1,000,000. This premium is in addition to any commissions or other charges payable by the consignor. Auction The art illustrated in this catalogue will be offered for sale on April 10, 2021 by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC on premises at 7176 Main Street, Scottsdale, Arizona. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC is not responsible for any postponements of the sale due to conditions out of their control. Telephone Bidding As a courtesy to clients who are unable to attend the sale, a telephone and order (absentee) bid service will be offered as staff and time allow. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC shall not be responsible for any errors or omissions or failure to execute such bids. Contact Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC at (480) 945-0225 (or register online) early for arrangements as telephone lines will be allocated on a first come basis. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will arrange for telephone lines on lots with a minimum estimate of $5,000 and over. Absentee Bidding and Fax Confidential absentee bid orders for auction items may also be completed and will be executed by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC on behalf of the Purchaser during the auction. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC shall not be responsible for any errors or omissions or failure to execute such intent to purchase orders or auction bids. This catalogue, as may be amended by posted notice or oral salesroom announcement, represents Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s entire agreement with any and all purchasers of the Property listed herein. The following are Procedures, Terms and Conditions on which all such Property listed is offered for sale by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC as agent for various owners or other Consignors: 1. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC reserves the right to withdraw Property at any time before or at the sale and shall have no liability for such withdrawal. 2. All Property will be sold “AS IS”. With respect to each lot of Property, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC does not make any guarantees, warranties or representations, expressed or implied, as to merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, the correctness of the catalogue or the authenticity or description of the Property, its physical condition, size, quality, rarity, importance, medium, provenance, exhibitions, literature or historical relevance. No statement, anywhere, whether oral or written, whether made in the catalogue, an advertisement, a bill of sale, a salesroom posting or announcement, or elsewhere, shall be deemed such a warranty, representation or assumption of liability. In no event shall Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC be responsible for genuineness, authorship, attribution, provenance, period, culture, source, origin or condition of the purchased Property and no verbal statements made regarding the Property either before or after the sale of the Property, or in any bill of sale, invoice or catalogue or advertisement or elsewhere shall be deemed such a guarantee of genuineness, or authenticity. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if within ten (10) calendar days after the purchase of any lot of Property, the Purchaser provides an opinion by a recognized authority on the artist and gives notice in writing to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC that the lot is not authentic, and returns the purchased lot to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, within ten (10) days of its purchase in the same condition as when sold, then Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will refund the full purchase price to the Purchaser. It shall be in the sole discretion of Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC as to whether the opinion provided by the Purchaser is an opinion by a recognized authority on the artist. 3. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC and/or Auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bids. The highest bidder acknowledged by the Auctioneer shall be the Purchaser. In the event of any dispute between bidders, the Auctioneer will have absolute and final discretion to either determine the successful bidder or to re-offer and resell the Property item in dispute. After the sale, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s record of final sale shall be conclusive.

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4. At the fall of the Auctioneer’s hammer, the Purchaser shall (a) be acknowledged by bidder number by the auctioneer, (b) pay the hammer price and a buyer’s premium as outlined above. In addition, Purchaser may be required to sign a confirmation of purchase. All sales are final with no exchanges or returns. 5. Unless exempted by law, the Purchaser will be required to pay any and all state and local tax pertaining to sales (sales tax, transaction privileged, etc...). It is the Purchaser's responsibility to pay any applicable use tax imposed by their state of residence on the total purchase price. In the event that sales tax has not been included in the invoiced amount and it is subsequently determined that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC was required to collect sales tax in connection herewith, Purchaser shall reimburse Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC upon demand for any sales tax (or equivalent) accessed or due as a result of goods or services proveded by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC hereunder, unless Purchaser provides Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC evidence of exemption from such taxes. 6. Terms for all purchases will be cash, check or credit card (VISA/MasterCard/American Express) with settlement and payment due in full the day of the sale unless otherwise arranged. All monies shall be made payable to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC. At the discretion of Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, payment will not be deemed to have been made in full until funds represented by checks have been collected or the authenticity of bank or cashier’s checks has been confirmed. An additional 3% will be charged on all credit card payments. 7. No item of Property may be paid for or removed from Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC during the sale. After the sale has been completed and after the purchase price has been paid in full, Property must be removed from the saleroom at the Purchaser’s expense not later than three business days following the sale. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will, as a service to Purchasers, arrange to have Property packed, insured and shipped, all charges at the expense and entire risk of Purchaser. 8. Some items of Property may be offered subject to a “reserve” or confidential minimum price below which the item will not be sold. In such instances, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC may implement the reserve by bidding through the Auctioneer on behalf of the Consignor. In no event shall the reserve exceed the low estimate in the catalogue. 9. Neither Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, nor Auctioneer, nor Consignor make any representations whatsoever that the Purchaser of a work of art will acquire any reproduction rights thereto. 10. These Conditions of Sale and any other applicable conditions, as well as the Purchaser’s and Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s rights and obligations herein shall be governed by, construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the State of Arizona. If these conditions are not complied with by the Purchaser, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC may, in addition to other remedies available by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the Purchaser liable for the total purchase price stated on the Confirmation of Purchase Invoice, either (a) cancel the sale and retain as liquidated damages any and all payments made by the Purchaser or (b) resell the Property privately or at public auction on three days’ notice to the Purchaser for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs including handling charges, warehousing, the expense of both sales, the commissions, reasonable attorneys’ fees, any and all other charges due and incidental damages. 11. Biding on any item indicates your acceptance of these terms and all other terms announced at the time of sale whether bidding in person, by phone, by Internet, by absentee bid, or through a representative. 12. In most instances, sculpture measurements do not include base. In measurements for two dimensional art, height precedes width and does not include frame. 13. Bidding increments will normally follow the pattern below but may vary at the sole discretion of the Auctioneer. Estimate Increment Estimate Increment Under 2,000............................. 100 20,000–50,000 ...................... 2,500 2,000–5,000 ............................. 250 50,000–100,000..................... 5,000 5,000–10,000............................ 500 over 100,000 ....................... 10,000 10,000–20,000....................... 1,000


12:00pm Lots 164 - 402

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164 Carl Oscar Borg 1879-1947 Food Bearers Oil on board 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right/A.N.A. Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000

In 1903, the Swedish-born, self-taught artist Carl Oscar Borg was a seaman on board the S.S. Arizonan when he made a fortuitous decision to jump ship in San Francisco. Later, while walking the railway lines from San Francisco to Los Angeles, Borg discovered Santa Barbara, where he would spend much of the rest of his life. The artist started studying under influential California landscape painter William Wendt, and later became a protégé of Phoebe Hearst, the art-loving mother of newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst. Borg had sojourns to Paris, Rome and Honduras, and also taught at the California Art Institute in Los Angeles and at the Santa Barbara School of the Arts. In addition to becoming fast friends with Charles M. Russell, Thomas Moran and Edward Borein, Borg was also a Hollywood art director and worked with Samuel Goldwyn, Douglas Fairbanks and Cecil B. DeMille. Although known for a great variety of work, it was his paintings of Native Americans that have linked him affectionately to the Southwest and its cultures. After his death in 1947, his ashes were scattered at the Grand Canyon.

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165 Carl Oscar Borg 1879-1947 Cloudscape Watercolor 15 x 21 inches Signed lower left

166 Warren Rollins 1861-1962 Pueblo Oil on board 10 x 15 inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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167 Joseph Fleck 1892-1977 Jim Mirabal (White Eagle) Oil on board 16 x 12 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000 Born in Austria-Hungary in 1892, Joseph Fleck received his art education in Vienna and was later involved with the Vienna Succession movement—along with Gustave Klimt, Egon Schiele and others—that distanced itself from more traditional painting. After service in World War I, Fleck emigrated to Kansas City, where he briefly worked for Tiffany and Co. as a designer. After seeing a Taos Society of Artists’ show in 1924, the painter traveled to New Mexico, where he painted numerous portraits, as well as more modern and abstract work. Jim Mirabal (White Eagle) features one of the great Taos models, who can be seen prominently in the work of Walter Ufer.

168 Robert Griffing b. 1940 Defined by his Ancestors Oil on board 10 x 8 inches Signed lower left and dated 13 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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169 Tom Lovell 1909-1997 Visitors Pastel 6 ½ x 9 ½ inches Signed lower right and dated 1976 Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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170 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Trapper II Bronze, cast number TRII10 15 inches high Signed and dated 1982

171 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Where the Trail Forks Bronze, cast number 7.P. 19 ½ inches high Signed and dated 64

Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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172 R. Brownell McGrew 1916-1994 She Bidalkai, a Navajo Oil on board 18 x 14 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Although he did many large paintings with multiple figures amid the desert Southwest, R. Brownell McGrew’s unique paint quality shines brightest in his portraits of Native Americans. He painted in a high-contrast, realistic style that tended to exaggerate and emphasize facial details, including wrinkles, scruff on chins and jawlines, and old scars long since healed over. He also preferred to paint his figures in contemporary Hopi and Navajo clothing and accessories, from velvet shirts and hand-woven wool coats to silver and turquoise jewelry.

173 Allan Houser 1914-1994 This Was Our Home Bronze, cast number 13/15 15 ½ inches high Signed and dated 93 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Literature: Allan Houser: An American Master (Chiricahua Apache, 1914-1994), W. Jackson Rushing III, Harry N. Abrams Inc., Publishers, New York, New York, 2004, p. 235. Created just a year before he died, This Was Our Home clearly embodies Houser’s late-period modernism. The work bears many similarities to the more realistic Blessing a New Day from 1978, but This Was Our Home strips it of nearly all detail in order to render the motherdaughter forms as faceless spirits walking in lockstep amid the sand and sage. “His solid, stable, enduring forms, which are simultaneously tender and strong, are from and of the American Southwest,” writes W. Jackson Rushing III in Allan Houser: An American Master. “But, spring as it does from a cosmopolitan vision, his art seeks to be both universal and local, and Houser’s work extends to us a sensuous invitation to consider not only our essential differences, but also our essential unity.”

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174 Lanford Monroe 1950-2000 Yampa Valley Spring Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1995 verso Estimate: $3,500 - 5,000

Misty mornings and a moody atmospheric haze are prevalent in many of Lanford Monroe’s calm and tranquil landscapes. And yet, her works are also hopeful and filled with color—refreshing qualities that add another dimension to her somber and evocative compositions. Raised by artists—with some help by the neighbors, Bob Kuhn and John Clymer—Monroe had completed her first commission at the age of 6. After attending the Ringling School of Art in Sarasota, Florida, on a Hallmark Scholarship, she traveled heavily and documented what she laid eyes on. Early work was done in watercolor, though she later switched to oil painting. She also completed sculpture pieces early in her career. Her paintings won numerous awards, including from the Society of Animal Artists, American Academy of Equine Art, the Grand Teton Natural History Association and the Salmagundi Club. After she died, in 2000 at the age of 50, her family set up an artist-in-residence program in her name at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

175 William A. Walker 1838-1921 Low Country Cabin Oil on board 7 ¼ x 13 ½ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

William Walker is most prominently known for his post-Civil War scenes of African Americans in the South. He was born in Charleston, South Carolina, but like so many other artists in the mid- to late-1800s, he was drawn to Düsseldorf, Germany, where he studied. By the time he returned, America was in a Civil War, during which Walker fought briefly for the Confederates, and later was a cartographer for the South. Though he lived and died in Charleston, Walker also spent time painting in Maryland and in New Orleans.

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176 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 In the Open Oil on canvas 10 x 14 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1992; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

177 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Navajo Raiders Oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Literature: Joe Beeler: Life of a Cowboy Artist, Don Hedgepeth, Diamond Tail Press, Vail, CO, 2004: p. 203 S C O T T S D A L E A R T AU C T I O N

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178 Tom Lovell 1909-1997 Homage to the Bison Oil on canvas 12 x 17 inches Signed lower left and dated 1989; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

Tom Lovell cut his teeth in illustration with Redbook, Cosmopolitan, Life and Collier’s, but later journeyed into the world of pulp magazines with titles such as Ace-High Western, Detective Tales, Dime Mystery, Rangeland Romances, Top-Notch, Star Western and famously in Maxwell Grant’s The Shadow. In 1975, Lovell moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he would use his unique storytelling ability to paint sympathetic and nuanced pictures of Native Americans in the West.

179 John Hauser 1859-1913 War Eagle’s Camp Gouache 11 ½ x 19 ¾ inches Signed lower left and dated 1903 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000 When Joseph Henry Sharp set sail for Europe in 1886, traveling on the boat with him was John Hauser, who was ultimately bound for the same destination, the Royal Academy of Art in Munich, Germany. The son of German immigrants, the Cincinnati-born Hauser studied art and then traveled around Europe before eventually returning to Ohio in 1890. The following year he traveled to Arizona and New Mexico and was captivated by the people. Like Henry Farny, a fellow Cincinnatian who he was often compared to, Hauser was captivated by Native American subjects. He spent time on the Pine Ridge reservation, and was later adopted by the Sioux and given the name “Straight White Shield.” When he built a home in Cincinnati in 1904, he named the house Pine Ridge.

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180 Charles Partridge Adams 1858-1942 Pack Outfit in Middle Tank Oil on canvas 17 x 27 inches Signed lower right and dated 1891 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Charles Partridge Adams moved to Denver from Massachusetts when he was 18, and began studying under Helen Chain, a student of George Inness. After a lengthy camping trip in the Rocky Mountains, he was inspired by the towering peaks and distant mountain ranges that were so easily accessible to him in Denver. Mountains, particularly the Rocky Mountains, would become staples in his work until he moved to Laguna Beach, California, in 1926, when he would begin painting coastal scenes.

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181 Laverne Nelson Black 1887-1938 Indian on Pinto Pony Facing Right Mixed Media 11 x 9 ¾ inches Signed lower right

182 Laverne Nelson Black 1887-1938 Indian on Pinto Pony Facing Left Mixed Media 11 x 10 ½ inches Signed lower left

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Born in Wisconsin and educated in Chicago, Laverne Nelson Black would become a prominent illustrator in Chicago and New York, and would create bronze works offered at Tiffany’s, which had only previously shown bronzes from Frederic Remington. An illness would eventually force Black to relocate to Taos, New Mexico, in the 1920s, a particularly robust period for the Western town. It was in Taos where Black was drawn to the Pueblo people, their customs and their lands. Using his quick, painterly style, Black painted evocative works that were full of life and humanity. Further illness would eventually force him from Taos to Phoenix, where he took commissions for the Santa Fe Railway and he worked with Oscar E. Berninghaus on WPA murals for the Phoenix Post Office.

183 William R. Leigh 1866-1955 Stampede (study) Pen & Ink 14 x 9 5 inches Signed lower left and dated 1914 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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184 Robert Lougheed 1910-1982 Southwest to Dogger Flat Oil on board 12 x 24 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 1971 verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Southwest to Dogger Flat was completed in 1971, just one year after Robert Lougheed and his wife, Cordy, relocated to New Mexico. He had previously visited the Southwest in the early 1960s on assignment from National Geographic. “In early 1970, Bob and Cordy found the perfect place, an old adobe hacienda in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains just a few miles outside of Santa Fe,” writes Don Hedgpeth in Follow the Sun: Robert Lougheed. “While Cordy unpacked and dealt with minor remodeling and the construction of a new studio space, Bob set up his easel in a spare bedroom and started to paint. He was rejuvenated by his new surroundings and delighted in every new day.”

185 James Reynolds 1926-2010 The Boys from the Box H Oil on board 20 x 30 ¾ inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1979 Estimate: $16,000 - 20,000 Heads down, gloves out and knees in the dirt, The Boys from the Box H is classic James Reynolds in that it is not romanticized, and yet magnificently true to the cowboy way of life. It was unglamorous work, but Reynolds made cowboying larger than life by showing its quiet authenticity. After serving in World War II, Reynolds studied in Los Angeles and went to work in illustration, and later in dozens of films in many different positions. But the West was calling to him, so he abandoned Hollywood to go to Sedona, Arizona. In short time he was asked to join the Cowboy Artists of America—the invitation would come from Joe Beeler and Charlie Dye—and he quickly made a name for himself with his honest and thoughtful depictions of cowboys and Native Americans.

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186 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Cowpokes Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

Olaf Wieghorst’s story reads more like a Hollywood epic, and yet it’s all true: born in Denmark and performing as an acrobat at age 9, Wieghorst was a sailor on a steamer when he jumped ship in New York to become a rodeo star, New York City mounted police officer and later a cavalryman in the fight against Pancho Villa. He had lived several full lives by the time he moved to California to become an artist. His works, almost all with horses, reveal a deep love for the creature. He reportedly cried when the U.S. Cavalry retired horses. “Any measure of success that I now enjoy, I owe to them,” Wieghorst said in William Reed’s book Olaf Wieghorst. “Horses have been my life.”

187 Tom Ryan 1922-2011 You Bet He’ll Buck Pastel 24 x 30 inches Signed lower right and dated 80 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

Don’t let the lightness and playfulness of the pastel fool you here, because these are monumental subjects for Tom Ryan, who devoted his entire career to capturing horse and rider in the West, that great struggle and partnership of man and beast in the brushy plains of Texas. Before he was an artist, Tom Ryan was a World War II veteran and illustrator. After coming out West, he joined the Cowboy Artists of America, where he commanded great respect during a vital period after its founding. A great deal of his career was spent at the famous 6666 Ranch, where he documented cowboy life, big and small.

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188 Gordon Snidow b. 1936 Smellin’ the Coffee Oil on board 24 x 34 inches Signed lower left and dated 2008 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

189 Jim Norton b. 1953 Springtime on the Diamond Tail Oil on canvas 28 ½ x 38 ½ inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 1996 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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190 Bill Anton b. 1957 Spring in the Bradshaws Oil on board 16 x 20 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

191 Richard Thomas 1939-2019 Charge Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 04 verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Exhibitions: Scottsdale Museum of the West Richard Thomas was something of a late bloomer when it came to art, first taking up painting as a hobby in his 30s after a stint in the Marines and service in Vietnam in 1965. After the war, and after several devastating personal and professional setbacks, the Californiaraised, self-taught artist turned to art full time and quickly started soaring. His works—complexly composed and filled with figures, including cowboys, mountain men and Native Americans—would go on to win top prizes at the Masters of the American West, Prix de West and many other prominent museum shows.

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192 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 In Hostile Country Oil on canvas 26 x 40 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso

When Frank McCarthy was 5 years old he saw Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and was immediately hooked on the storied myth of the “Cowboys & Indians.” He later enrolled at the Art Students League in New York City, studied under George Bridgman and Reginald Marsh, and moved into illustration, including doing posters for The Great Escape and Once Upon a Time in the West. But he would soar once he started painting the West. His work would be instantly recognizable for its high-action, large compositions of figures and his realistic textures, particularly the rock of the desert Southwest.

Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

193 Robert Pummill b. 1936 Running with Four Oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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194 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Night Watch Oil on canvas 24 x 26 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 The patient cowboy waiting silently on the range is a favorite painting of Olaf Wieghorst, and Night Watch is a lovely example of that subject. One noteworthy element unique to this work, besides the exquisite nighttime light, is the cowboy’s left leg thrown over the saddle. Surely this would have been a more comfortable position after hours under the moonlight, and you can almost hear the crack and creak of the leather as the figure swings his leg over to better watch the ponies below him.

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195 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Apache Scout Oil on board 14 x 12 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

196 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Spooks Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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197 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Clay County Birds Oil on board 30 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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198 William Acheff b. 1947 Back Home Oil on canvas 16 x 18 inches Signed lower right and dated 1999; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

199 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Mountain Bird Oil on board 11 ¾ x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 1995; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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200 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Clash of Thunder Bronze, cast number 14/25 30 ½ inches high, 40 inches wide Signed, titled and dated 10 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

201 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Mother’s Watch Bronze, cast number 10/35 24 ½ inches high Signed Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

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202 Luke Frazier b. 1970 Wide Open Spaces Oil on board 36 x 48 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2004 verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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203 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Standing Bison Bronze, cast number AP2 25 inches high Signed Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

204 Chad Poppleton b. 1976 Too Good to be True Oil on board 26 x 40 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2021 verso Estimate: $10,000 - 14,000 “Too Good to be True is my little idea of what might have happened to spark the fire of passion Roosevelt had in preserving wild places and also providing an exciting story to tell around a campfire leaving guests to speculate if it really was ‘Too Good to be True.’” - Chad Poppleton

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205 Luke Frazier b. 1970 Spectacle Oil on board 48 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $18,000 - 28,000

206 Richard Loffler b. 1956 Exalted Bronze, cast number 12/18 25 inches high Signed, titled and dated 01 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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207 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Rams on a Ridge Acrylic 11 ¾ x 11 ¾ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $32,000 - 38,000 Literature: Patrons without Peers: The McCoy Collection, Tom Davis, Collectors Covey, Dallas, 2009: p. 96, illustrated.

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208 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Encounter Acrylic 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $75,000 - 125,000 Provenance: Private collection, WY Private collection, TX Wildlife painter Bob Kuhn knew he was pushing his palette when he painted these luscious fields of magical and vibrant color, so he was ready when it was asked of him. “Anyone who thinks that I’ve lost control of my color palette…should visit the Alaskan tundra in early fall, before snow and cold work their will,” Kuhn says about a similar work, A Study in Scarlet, in his book Wild Harvest: The Animal Art of Bob Kuhn. “I happen to like red, and I enjoyed immersing [my subjects] in a sea of crimson hues.” Of course, the color is only half the story—Kuhn was a master of exciting composition, and he knew how to pose his animals, including these bull moose battling amid the Alaskan splendor in Encounter. Notice the striations of blue skipping across the red in the distance; it was this kind of paint that drew comparisons to abstractionists and color field painters like Josef Albers, Mark Rothko and others. For Kuhn, though, what brought him to the wilderness were the animals themselves, and the moose was one of his finest subjects. “Some people think moose are ugly,” he writes in Wild Harvest. “They haven’t seen a prime bull on his own turf, where he looks and acts like a king.”

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209 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Walpole Farm Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower left and dated 2008; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Literature: Patrons without Peers: The McCoy Collection, Tom Davis, Collectors Covey, Dallas, 2009: p. 156, illustrated.

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210 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Penelope’s Garden Oil on canvas 24 x 15 inches Signed lower right and dated 2005; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Literature: Patrons without Peers: The McCoy Collection, Tom Davis, Collectors Covey, Dallas, 2009: p. 162, illustrated.

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211 John Coleman b. 1949 Unvanquished Bronze, cast number 3/20 23 ¼ inches high Signed/CA and dated 2017 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

212 John Coleman b. 1949 Two Ravens Bronze, cast number 8/20 26 inches high Signed/CA and dated 2014 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Awards: Gold Medal for Sculpture, Cowboy Artists of America, 2014 Exhibition, Phoenix Art Museum.

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213 John Coleman b. 1949 He Who Jumps Over Everyone Bronze, cast number 8/9 46 ½ inches high, 22 inches wide Signed/CA, titled and dated 2018 Estimate: $45,000 - 55,000

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214 John Coleman b. 1949 Silver Buttons Bronze, cast number 48/50 15 inches high Signed/CA and dated 03 Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

215 John Coleman b. 1949 Walks with Beauty Bronze, cast number 16/20 22 inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 2012 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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216 John Coleman b. 1949 War & Peace Bronze, cast number 10/15 48 inches high, 44 inches wide Signed, titled and dated 2001 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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217 Don Oelze b. 1965 Wagon Tracks Oil on canvas 40 x 46 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $16,000 - 20,000 “Warriors have come across wheel tracks in the heart of their hunting grounds. This is not the first time these men have seen the signs of the white man’s wagons; however for years these wagons had stayed on the main trail heading west towards where the sun sets. In recent days, the white men seeking yellow metal have made their way into country that is sacred to these warriors and they fear that this is only the beginning of what may lead to a loss of this land of plenty.” - Don Oelze

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218 Don Oelze b. 1965 Apprehensive Oil on canvas 26 x 44 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 12,000

219 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Sharpshooter Oil on canvas 23 x 36 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

“Concentrating on the trappings of the mountain men, the tools of their trade and the product of it. The Sharpshooter tells a tale of the fur trade. On a trade blanket that covers a battered, half-seen wooden chest, empty possible bags blackened with age and use, a yellow powder horn, it's strap repaired with a bit of twine, snow shoes with hand tanned and twisted thongs, a skin of a fox perhaps and the meticulously cared for black powder rifle tell a tale without naming a single character in fur trade history. The gun made by Kenner, a Maryland gunsmith, is the focus of the painting. The rubbed walnut of the stock, the blued engraving on the lock plate, the painted brass patch box cover, an ornate trigger guard and the lancewood rammer do more than attest to the gunsmith's art. The rifle was the mountain man's most important possession. His rifle fed and protected him. but if the rifle is the most prominent element in this composition, the chest on which the still life is arranged, barely visible at lower left and right, is of interest as well. Elevating everything else in the painting, it is a subject for speculation, what is in there? A mountain man's wealth? His maps and journals? Or nothing more than a musk of the past, the faintest tang of wood smoke and whiskey, sweat and saltpeter, pelts and peril.” - Kyle Polzin

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220 Robert Griffing b. 1940 Speaker for the Onondaga Oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 2007 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Literature: The Narrative Art of Robert Griffing, Volume II: The Journey Continues, Tim J. Todish, Paramount Press Inc., Gibsonia, Pennsylvania, 2007, p. 11, illustrated.

221 Robert Griffing b. 1940 Keepin’ an Eye on the Forest Oil on canvas 18 x 28 inches Signed lower left and dated 2007 Estimate: $35,000 - 45,000 Literature: The Narrative Art of Robert Griffing, Volume II: The Journey Continues, Tim J. Todish, Paramount Press Inc., Gibsonia, Pennsylvania, 2007, p. 70, illustrated.

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222 Robert Griffing b. 1940 The Winter Trade Oil on canvas 30 x 50 inches Signed lower left and dated 2001 Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Exhibitions: Scottsdale Museum of the West


222 Robert Griffing b. 1940 The Winter Trade (detail) Oil on canvas 30 x 50 inches Signed lower left and dated 2001

223 C. Michael Dudash b. 1952 A Desert Dust Up Oil on board 18 x 32 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 10/28/16 verso

Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Literature: The Narrative Art of Robert Griffing, Volume II: The Journey Continues, Tim J. Todish, Paramount Press Inc., Gibsonia, Pennsylvania, 2007, pp. 72, 92-93, illustrated. While much has been painted of the desert tribes in Arizona, the Plains Indians and the Pueblo People of New Mexico, Robert Griffing found many art opportunities in his own backyard, particularly with the Eastern Woodland Indians of the 18th century. The Pennsylvania-based Griffing, who remembers scanning the shores of Pymatuning Lake as a boy looking for stone artifacts, started his career as an illustrator but devoted his life to Eastern Indian and frontier art beginning in 1991. Since then, he’s become one of the most respected storytellers in Western art, due in large part to his ability to convey history through paint. “The real measure of his artistic genius, it seemed to me, lay in his capacity for showing the intimate dimensions of life among the Native and colonizing people who met and interacted—in curiosity, self-interest, violence, tenderness, wariness, fear and scores of other emotional registers—on the 18th century frontier,” writes Fred Anderson, professor of history at University of Colorado, Boulder, in the forward of The Narrative Art of Robert Griffing, Volume II. “…Robert Griffing’s unique vision of the period and the Eastern Woodlands frontier is an immense gift for anyone who cares about the colonial past.” In The Winter Trade, the artist paints a large scene with nearly a dozen figures gathering indoors as they exchange goods. “This scene of Indians and traders meeting at a trading post to exchange goods has been repeated literally thousands of time from the beginning of colonization to the present day at Hudson’s Bay Company stores,” writers Tim Todish, author of The Narrative Art of Robert Griffing. “Establishing a two-way trade with the Indian was one of the primary objectives of all of the colonial powers. The Natives served as lucrative outlets for European and even Asian-made items, while at the same time providing a source for desirable North American goods and resources, particularly animal skins and furs. This interchange was not just economic; it promoted an understanding of each other’s cultures, and at times even led to lasting friendships. These encounters would play an important part in shaping the new America.”

224 Gary Lynn Roberts b. 1953 Many Warriors Oil on canvas 30 x 46 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $18,000 - 22,000

Griffing notes about the work: “This painting represents a typical trading house you might find in the larger fortifications like Fort Niagara, Ticonderoga, Fort Pitt, Fort Detroit and Fort Michilimackinac,” he writes. “It shows the interaction between Natives and traders. It was also a warm place just to relax during these cold winter days and nights.”

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“The strength and valor of the Indian tribes of the Great Northwest is something to be admired and respected. Considering the elements in which they lived and their means of survival it is an awesome reflection of their heritage. In Many Warriors I wanted to depict these virtues while considering the many challenges they had to overcome.” - Gary Lynn Roberts

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225 C. Michael Dudash b. 1952 The Search for Tatonka Oil on linen on board 34 x 48 inches Signed LL/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2-4-21 verso Estimate: $25,000 - 30,000

“A painting of three Native Americans on horseback from the 19th century is a common theme in my work, and I am always inspired to search for something special in each new piece. A great start often involves a beautiful and dramatic western landscape, in this case one dominated by an intense and distant sky. When thinking of a title for this particular painting, the serious attitude and iconic look of the three warriors led me to imagine that they were on an intense search... And knowing that finding buffalo was always necessary for their survival, I felt led to call the painting The Search for Tatonka.” - C. Michael Dudash, CA

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226 R.S. Riddick b. 1952 Only One Brother Returns Oil on board 24 x 46 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 2012; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

227 John Moyers b. 1958 Headed Home Oil on board 20 x 40 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 07 Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

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228 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Waiting Oil on canvas 12 x 12 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2019 verso Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000

229 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Watcher on the Greasy Grass Oil on canvas 18 x 14 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2018 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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230 Howard Terpning b. 1927 Hunting Oil on board 20 x 27 inches Signed lower right and dated 2012; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $275,000 - 325,000 A student of the great illustrator Haddon Sundblom, Howard Terpning laid the foundation of his career in illustration, creating pieces for magazines, advertising and book covers. His work in Hollywood—including posters for Lawrence of Arabia, The Guns of Navarone, The Sound of Music, Dr. Zhivago, Cleopatra and a 1968 re-release of Gone With the Wind—would become classic images of the era. In 1967, he risked life and limb by volunteering to go to Vietnam, where he saw firsthand the cruelty, and also the heroism, of the war as a civilian combat artist. A decade later, he was essentially at the top of his field when he followed fellow illustrators and friends, including John Clymer and Ken Riley, to the West, where he could tell his own stories on his own terms. Terpning was immediately drawn to the Plains People, whose plight with their disappearing lands and lifeways was one of immense importance to the painter. His compositions were masterful, even from the very beginning, but so was his storytelling and the special care he put into faces and expressions. “Howard avoids romanticizing the Indians of the past,” painter Harley Brown writes in Terpning: Tribute to the Plains People. “His work conveys fierce bravery, beauty and strength but also careworn, even defeated expressions, and, although rarely, a touch of humor and skepticism. These paintings contain every facet of human expression. When in full flight through paint, they glide like an eagle to the highest peak.” These qualities are on full display in Hunting, which shows a Blackfoot hunter scanning the snowy landscape for a target that has so far eluded him. His figure shows equal parts determination and quiet resolve as he steadies his weapon against a makeshift bipod. The work is a spiritual successor to Terpning’s great masterpiece The Long Shot, which also focuses on hunters, unseen prey and a powerful Sharps rifle. “This Blackfoot hunter has been patiently searching the landscape with his monocular scope in hopes of seeing a deer or an elk or any other game that would provide meat for his people,” Terpning says of Hunting. “He is holding a Sharps ‘Buffalo’ rifle that fired a .50-caliber center-fire cartridge.”

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231 Howard Terpning b. 1927 Head Study Oil on board 12 x 9 inches Signed lower right and dated 2011; Inscribed “To our dear friends Carol and Harley with much love and affection Marlies and Howard. 10/22/11 This is just a small thank you for all of the beautiful and expressive words you wrote for the text of my book. An Artist Writing about an Artist and you were the one that accomplished that. Bravo!” verso Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000

232 Howard Terpning b. 1927 Face of Many Winters Charcoal 20 x 16 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1984; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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233 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 The Bone Whistle Acrylic 16 x 12 inches Signed lower left; Dated July 8, 1980 - Clear Sky Ranch verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

234 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Visit of Lewis and Clark (Study) Acrylic 6 ¼ x 5 ½ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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235 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Blood Brothers Oil on canvas 40 x 44 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $60,000 - 80,000 Created in 1994 for the Cowboy Artists of American annual exhibition, Kenneth Riley’s Blood Brothers shows one of the artist’s famous interior scenes filled with warm, inviting color and moody light and shadow. Throughout the 1980s and into the 1990s, the Missouriborn artist’s works were showing hints of more modern design and inventive compositions that offered complex arrangements of figures and abstracted forms in the background. By 1994, his modernist approach was in full force. Riley, who had trained under Harvey Dunn and Thomas Hart Benton, was a sought-after illustrator in New York before heading to Arizona, first to Tombstone in 1971, and then later to Tucson in 1973. Years later, he would reacquaint with other transplants from back east, including Howard Terpning and Bob Kuhn, and they would form the Tucson 7 with Duane Bryers, Harley Brown, Don Crowley and Tom Hill. “There’s not one of us who wouldn’t sell his soul for Ken’s magic sense of color and design,” Bryers would write in The Tucson 7, the catalog for a 1997 group show at the Tucson Museum of Art. In the same catalog, Riley comments on his trajectory into Western art: “Illustrators are uniquely qualified to paint the history of the West. Their basic training is to take subject matter that no longer exists and give it authenticity—to use their imaginations and empathy to transfer history into a context that becomes very believable.”

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236 W.H.D. Koerner 1878-1938 Rocks Leave No Tracks Oil on canvas 34 x 30 ¼ inches Signed lower left and dated 1934 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 It was tough in the West, and you can certainly see it in the work of W.H.D. Koerner, who painted broad-shouldered figures with square jaws, men who could hold their own in the sizzling heat of the desert. Koerner was all storyteller, too. His characters were outlaws and lawmen, homesteaders and Indian warriors, white-hatted cowboys and big-game hunters, and here, in the case of Rocks Leave No Tracks, a seasoned tracker making his way up unhospitable terrain. He painted action, drama and grit, but Koerner also had a soft spot for women and children, and painted them with important roles to play in the deserts and prairies. Wilhelm Heinrich Dethlef Koerner was born in Germany, but came to America as a young child. His career resembled those of many illustrators of the 20th century: small paying jobs led to a formal education at the Art Students League, which then led to better illustration jobs, including assignments that focused on the West. Where Koerner’s story differs is with the company he kept, including a who’s who of Golden Age illustrators: N.C. Wyeth, Maxfield Parrish, Harvey Dunn, Frank Schoonover, Norman Rockwell and Howard Pyle, who was a teacher and mentor. After Pyle died in 1911, Koerner very quickly came to be one of the top illustrators in the country. He worked on books, magazines, advertisements and numerous covers for The Saturday Evening Post, Ladies Home Journal, McClure’s and others. After 1922, it’s estimated Koerner had done 600 pictures for newspapers, dozens of books and more than 2,500 works for magazines. His work was seen far and wide, and there is no doubt it influenced Western art and inspired a new generation of artists to paint the American West.

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237 John Clymer 1907-1989 Wild Horses Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000


A homage to George Catlin and Karl Bodmer, two of the earliest—and finest—artists of the American West, John Coleman’s Explorer Artists Series is itself an exploration, in bronze, in three dimensions, of the unparalleled portraits of Native American chiefs, braves and medicine men painted by Catlin and Bodmer in the 1830s. Faithful to the two-dimensional originals, Coleman fleshes these Indians out in all their splendor, inviting us to look at the portraits anew and to look behind and around them, to the individuals who posed for them, people who might otherwise have been lost to history, people whose cultures, in some cases, were. Complete sets of the Explorer Artists Series can be found in the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska; the Booth Museum in Cartersville, Georgia; and in important private collections around the nation. Monumental versions of individual works have been purchased by the Phoenix Art Museum as well as other prominent institutions.

238 John Coleman b. 1949 Wunnestow, The White Buffalo Bronze, cast number 24/35 30 inches high Signed/CA and dated 2010 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

237 John Clymer 1907-1989 Wild Horses (detail) Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000 As a successful illustrator in New York, John Clymer occasionally lamented the high circulation of the publications that employed him, including the ubiquitous The Saturday Evening Post. “They went everywhere in the country, and because I picked and painted actual places, there would be several hundred people who lived nearby who’d scrutinize every detail to try to find something wrong,” he says in Walter Reed’s book John Clymer: An Artist’s Rendezvous with the Frontier West. So when Clymer left illustration in the 1960s, he teamed with his wife to do some of the historic research that went into his works. One of their first trips was a journey west along the Oregon Trail. They stopped at Chimney Rock, at rutted wagon paths, long-abandoned camp sites and even overgrown pioneer graves. John would drive and Doris, his wife, would read in the seat next to him about the West, its people and history. They were instantly hooked. It was this attention to history and detail that would drive the rest of his career. The Washington-born artist studied under N.C. Wyeth, Harvey Dunn, Frank Schoonover and other greats at the Wilmington Academy of Art in Delaware. Illustration soon followed, including work for Good Housekeeping, Blue Book and other publications. During the outbreak of World War II, he joined the Marines with Tom Lovell—their military serial numbers were one number apart—and they both were assigned to Leatherneck magazine in Washington, D.C. After the war came more than 80 covers for the The Saturday Evening Post. When he left illustration and moved to Wyoming, Clymer would turn that tall Post cover format on its side and create vibrantly detailed, cinematically composed Western works, including this work of wild horses breaking free toward the magnificence of the Tetons in the distance. Once again history was Clymer’s guide. “I think it is an accumulation of all these experiences, the research and the old stories, the trips on the old trails to the actual places, the visits to history museums, large and small, that make it possible to do pictures that are real and believable and have the feeling of the place and the time,” he said in the Reed book. “I have always tried in both wildlife paintings and historical paintings to take the viewer to an actual place and make him feel he was really there.”

239 John Coleman b. 1949 Hisoosanchees, Little Spaniard Bronze, cast number 24/35 29 ½ inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 2008 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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240 John Coleman b. 1949 Pitatapiu, Bowlance Warrior Bronze, cast number 26/35 37 inches high Signed/CA and dated 2007 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

241 John Coleman b. 1949 Mato-Tope, Four Bears Bronze, cast number 6/35 34 inches high Signed, titled and dated 2005 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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242 Ed Mell b. 1942 Nature’s Stature Oil on canvas 42 x 42 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000 “This painting was an idea that I carried around for some time. The color and composition required two developmental studies before it all came together. My approach was to deal with the power of nature between land and animal, but in a quite unthreatening American Western way. The contrast of the cool blue horse in the foreground against the warm background formations lend to the relaxed strength of the subject.” - Ed Mell

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243 Ed Mell b. 1942 Storms Forms Oil on canvas 22 x 28 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

244 Ed Mell b. 1942 Crimson Spikes Oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2004 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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245 Howard Post b. 1948 Ranch at Rocky Ridge Oil on canvas 36 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

246 G. Russell Case b. 1966 Canyon de Chelly Oil on board 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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247 Glenn Dean b. 1976 Sage Brothers Oil on canvas 36 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 “Inspired by the landscape in Wyoming, Sage Brothers is about two friends who have been riding and working together among the sagebrush. ‘Sage’ also alludes to the wisdom gained by their extensive time spent in nature. I wanted to make an impactful design by using a minimal approach, with the main center(s) of interest clearly stated against a large field of muted color from the late evening sky. By setting the horizon line low in the composition, I wanted to allow visual room for the full moon to rise in the night sky, which perhaps helps illustrate a glimpse of the gentle and quiet spirit of nature.” - Glenn Dean

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248 Mark Maggiori b. 1977 The Sarapes Oil on canvas 29 x 36 inches Signed lower left and inscribed "Taos" Estimate: $28,000 - 38,000 Taos has for centuries been a commerce center within the West. When the Spanish colonists settled in New Mexico, they brought churro sheep and the European treadle loom, replacing cotton for wool as the fiber of choice in the Southwest. During the late 17th Century the highly industrious Navajo were learning to weave from their Zuni neighbors, and quickly amassed vast flocks of sheep from raids along the settlements in Northern New Mexico. The Navajo would within a century master and surpass their neighbors in the production of fine woolen textiles, meanwhile encroaching Spanish settlements would appear alongside their Pueblo neighbors, bringing their blanket weaving techniques, along with far more sophisticated and spectacular efforts from weaving centers further south in central Mexico. The Southwest was changing and everybody wanted woven wool wearing blankets. Meanwhile in Taos, the indigenous Pueblo people didn’t need to pursue the arduous discipline of weaving because their neighbors, the Spanish excelled, producing a surplus, and the Navajo to the West were establishing themselves as makers of the finest, most desirable blankets in the region. Taos people customarily wore either Navajo or Hispanic Rio Grande blankets, striving for the finest, most beautiful examples that their station in life would afford. Mark Maggiori’s sweeping Taos landscape with a backdrop of Lucero Peak, just north of the Pueblo features two Taos men at days end, proudly clad in a classic Rio Grande Indigo stripe blanket and a Navajo “Moki” sarape, typical of those woven for trade and commonly worn by residents of the Taos Valley. Both types were the fashion of the 1870-1880 period in Taos before the arrival of commercial trade blankets a generation or two later.

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249 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Washakie Bronze, cast number WAP7P 36 inches high Signed and dated 1981 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 In the mid-20th century, many representational artists grumbled at the prevalence of abstract expressionism, but for Harry Jackson modern art was where he found his voice as an artist. After a combat injury in the Pacific during World War II, Jackson set out to meet abstract expressionist Jackson Pollock. They eventually met in 1948, and Pollock gave the younger artist guidance early in his career. But by the 1960s, Jackson was living in Wyoming and fully committed to Western art. He would go on to create several iconic works: the 10-by-21-foot painting The Range Burial, a painting and bronze titled Stampede, and his famous polychrome bronze of John Wayne that appeared on the cover of a 1969 issue of Time magazine.

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250 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Kiss the Sky Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2014 verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

251 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Strength and Solitude Oil on board 12 x 16 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2014 verso Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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252 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Gathering Oil on canvas 40 x 60 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $85,000 - 135,000


252 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Gathering (detail) Oil on canvas 40 x 60 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $85,000 - 135,000 A union of two-dimensional shapes with three-dimensional forms—abstracted land and clouds with realistic figures rendered in fine detail—that’s the heart of Logan Maxwell Hagege’s modernist vision of the American West. The California painter started with beach scenes, with loose brushwork and the immediacy of plein air, but once he found the Southwest, particularly the Vermilion Cliff region, he shifted his attention to the desert and its denizens. Gathering, completed in 2013 for Trailside Galleries’ 50th anniversary celebration, bears many of the hallmarks of his work: the pillowy clouds ballooning from the horizon, finely painted Navajo weavings that seem to call out to the natural patterns and textures of the desert, and Native American figures standing firm against the intensity of the sunlight.

253 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 The Sentinel Oil on canvas 40 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2011-2013 verso

“This piece was inspired by the light found in the deserts of the American Southwest,” Hagege wrote in the 2013 catalog for the group show. “The late afternoon is one of my favorite times to paint. The color of the sunlight turns into a golden hue and affects everything in its path. I was also attracted to this scene by the pattern of the blankets and other patterns in this picture. Trying to put just the right amount of information in the painting without overdoing it is a big undertaking. This piece challenged me on many levels, which is what I hope for with each painting.”

Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

“Logan Maxwell Hagege has come to define a new era in the Southwestern American genre and is showing us a new way of looking at old tropes,” writes painter Billy Schenck in the forward of Desert Survey: Logan Maxwell Hagege. “He is giving us a more modern language to describe ‘The West.’ He isn’t recording anything factual, historical or real in time; he is portraying something more ethereal. His interpretation of the West is a deeply thought-out and methodical journey, which appears to be very personal and introspective. Logan has achieved in his paintings an essence of something that lives and breathes in our Southwestern deserts.”

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254 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Mesa Rodeo Oil on canvas mounted on board 30 x 30 inches Signed upper right; Signed, titled and dated 2015 verso Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000 Literature: Desert Survey: Logan Maxwell Hagege, Maxwell Alexander Gallery, Los Angeles, CA, 2019: p. 56. Exhibitions: Scottsdale Museum of the West

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255 Z.S. Liang b. 1953 Waiting for the Right Moment Oil on canvas 36 x 56 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000

“For hundreds of years, the Native American tribes living in the northern regions of the United States - with its many lakes and streams - built and used birch bark canoes as the primary means of transporting their personal belongings and also for hunting wildlife. On this bright sunny morning, a young Ojibwe hunter spots several elk just as he was preparing to step into his newly built canoe.” - Z.S. Liang

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256 Z.S. Liang b. 1953 Head Man of the Blood Tribe Oil on canvas 48 x 34 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2019 verso Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000

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257 Tom Browning b. 1949 Drawin’ a Pair Oil on canvas 30 x 34 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $17,000 - 23,000 “On a ranch I used to frequent, there were some pretty nice hiding places where a few of the horses would hang out so they wouldn’t be pestered. Up this one particular draw, a pair of shy ones got flushed out and inspired this painting.” - Tom Browning

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258 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 The Chase Oil on canvas 17½ x 22½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 “The idea for The Chase came to me while I was working up a sketch of a lone rider on horseback with his pistol at the ready. I figured the drawing would make a clever backdrop to the old saddle bags and Colt revolver, and perhaps give some insight into the painting. In the end, I thought I’d let the viewer decide if the guy in the sketch is doing the chasing, or making for a fast getaway.” - Kyle Polzin

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259 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Trailblazer Oil on canvas 44 x 34 ½ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $60,000 - 80,000

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260 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Lone Scout Oil on canvas 34 x 35 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000

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261 E. Martin Hennings 1886-1956 Riders in Taos Valley Oil on board 14 x 12 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000 Born in New Jersey, raised in Chicago, E. Martin Hennings made his initial entry into art at the Art Institute of Chicago, and later at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, Germany, under the teaching of Franz Von Stuck. On the outbreak of World War I, Hennings returned to the United States as an illustrator and muralist. He first ventured to Taos, New Mexico, in 1917 and was elected a member of the Taos Society of Artists in 1924, just two years before the society disbanded. He was the second youngest member of the group, and greatly respected by the other members, who praised his figures and attention to color.

262 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Taos Mountain: September Landscape 1942 Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 It was Bert Geer Phillips, along with Ernest Blumenschein, who was among the first artists to recognize the creative potential in Taos, New Mexico. In 1911, Phillips wrote: “Nothing could be more natural than that a distinctive American art idea should develop on a soil so richly imbued with romance, history and scenic beauty as is to be found in the far famed beautiful Taos Valley and the poetic Indian Village of the Taos Pueblos. Here, Father Time laid his hand on an ancient civilization and bade it pause with all its picturesqueness, poetry and romance until the men, who could translate its beauty and charm and forever record for future generations, arrived upon the scene.”

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263 Edgar Payne 1883-1947 Burning the Hogan Oil on canvas 28 x 34 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000


264 Edgar Payne 1883-1947 Canyon de Chelly Oil on board 11 ¾ x 13 ¼ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $18,000 - 22,000

263 Edgar Payne 1883-1947 Burning the Hogan Oil on canvas 28 x 34 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 Literature: Edgar Payne: The Scenic Journey, Scott A. Shields, and Patricia Trenton, Pomegranate Communications Inc., Portland, Oregon, 2007, p. 206, illustrated. Burning the Hogan, created for the Leon McSparron family at the Thunderbird Ranch near Canyon de Chelly, is featured prominently in Edgar Payne: The Scenic Journey. “…Payne offered an unusual narrative component. A gentle reminder of a perceived passing culture, the oil portrays three riders looking back over their shoulders at a twilight horizon. A column of smoke rises from the base of a rock escarpment as a Hogan burns in the distance,” Peter Hassrick writes in one of the book’s essays. “The Navajo had a custom that when a man died in his Hogan, he would be cremated there by his family and friends. For Payne, this was no rhetorical gesture; it was heartfelt reverie that deserved what was, for him, a rare narrative portrayal.”

265 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 An Old Garden in Taos Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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266 Birger Sandzén 1871-1954 Poplars in Moonlight Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000 Poplars in Moonlight, like so many paintings by Birger Sandzén, sparkles in the light. He painted with an impasto technique, so his short and controlled brushstrokes seem to catch the light and levitate over the canvas—bouquets of color sprouting from the terrestrial plane. The artist, known for painting around the Rocky Mountains, contributed much to the West, including impressionism, postimpressionism and pointillism, which he learned from Georges Seurat, whose A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte typically gathers a crowd at the Art Institute of Chicago. He also studied with Anders Zorn, the Swedish painter so many of the cowboy artists envied and emulated. Sandzén found himself in America after leaving Sweden in 1894. His destination was small-town America: Lindsborg, Kansas, which had a population of barely 1,000 people at the turn of the last century. He had taken an assignment to teach at Bethany College, a job he would keep for six decades. Outings around Kansas—including to California, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and through the Rocky Mountains—were a revelation to the teacher and artist. Emory Lindquist, in her book Birger Sandzén, documents his response to the West: “Here the air is so thin that the colors here are purples and greens and yellows with everything bright with this clear ringing atmosphere of the West. When I started to paint here I had to pitch everything in a higher key.”

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267 Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902 Sunset - Demarest NJ Oil on board 4 ¾ x 7 inches Inscribed “AB Demarest” verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Albert Bierstadt never lived in Demarest, New Jersey, though he would have certainly recognized the views of the Hudson River from its shores when he painted Sunset - Demarest NJ, a tiny gem of a painting measuring just 33 inches square. Beginning in 1865, the artist lived in a sprawling home just 15 miles north and across the river in Irvington-on-Hudson, New York. The mansion took more than a year to build, but when it was a completed it held a formidable position on the horizon, with its towering gothic architecture, multiple turrets and an imposing parapet that gave the structure a castle-like quality. It was designed by architect Jacob Wrey Mould, who contributed to Central Park, and before it was ever complete Bierstadt would name the home Malkasten, a German word for paintbox. Inside was a massive studio with cavernous ceilings and a curtain that separated a more formal viewing area with the main painting space. Bierstadt painted the grounds of his forested estate, as well as gorgeous views of the surrounding area, but works of Hudson River are somewhat less common—ironic considering Bierstadt is known as a Hudson River School painter. In the early morning hours of November 10, 1882, Malkasten caught fire and was quickly returned to the earth. Today the site is empty and overgrown, but signs of Bierstadt’s great castle are still there in the New York soil. And views of the Hudson River, some very similar to Sunset - Demarest NJ, can still be found amid the trees.

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268 Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902 Starr King Mountain Oil on paper mounted on board 14 x 19 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $300,000 - 500,000 Provenance: Zaplin Lampert Gallery, NM JN Bartfield Galleries, NY 1989 Private collection, MA 1989


269 Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902 Cabin in South Sierra California Oil on paper mounted on board 11 ½ x 12 inches Inscribed lower right and dated 20, Aug, 72 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Provenance: Private collection MA Barry King Newport, RI 1974 Private collection Fairfield, CT 2020 Private collection Palm Beach, FL Literature: Antiques Magazine, 1974. 268 Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902 Starr King Mountain (detail) Oil on paper mounted on board 14 x 19 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $300,000 - 500,000

The exact date noted on Cabin in South Sierra California—“20, Aug, 72”—offers pinpoint accuracy as to where Albert Bierstadt was and what he was up to in the wilds of the West. In May of 1872, the artist had returned to Yosemite and the High Sierras where he would explore canyons and vistas around the increasingly popular park. On August 14 he joined naturalist Clarence King near Mount Whitney. An August 17 mention in the newspaper the Inyo Independent indicated the artist was in the South Sierra. He later returned to San Francisco briefly, and it is entirely likely he completed Cabin in South Sierra California on his journey, or just prior to taking it.

(To be included in the forthcoming Catalog Raisonne by Melissa Webster Speidel) In 1853, Albert Bierstadt returned to Düsseldorf, Germany, the city of his birth, a city that he had previously left at the age of 2 when his parents immigrated to Massachusetts. When he returned at the age of 23, he found Düsseldorf to be a bustling arts city, teeming with young and optimistic painters. He would become fast friends with artists Thomas Worthington Whittredge and Sanford Robinson Gifford and study under Emanuel Leutze, who had completed the iconic Washington Crossing the Delaware just two years earlier. While he was there he hiked through the German countryside, explored Italy and stood atop the Swiss Alps. One way this story ends is with Bierstadt, standing atop Europe’s most famous peaks and gazing into the horizon, suddenly realizing his place in the world, staying in Germany and becoming a great European painter. But his path diverged, as did history. Instead Bierstadt returned to New Bedford, Massachusetts, and quickly got to work in the great American experiment. By 1859, his fate was sealed when he joined Colonel Frederick West Lander’s expedition to chart an upper trail to Oregon. The trip was such a success—“I never felt better in my life,” he wrote—that upon its completion he set up a New York studio and immediately began planning a return to the West. The Civil War would make a small interruption, but another expedition would begin in 1863, this time with writer Fitz Hugh Ludlow. It was on this journey he would first lay eyes upon Yosemite. Ludlow would later write: “Never were words so beggared for an abridged translation of any Scripture of Nature. We stood on the verge of a precipice more than three thousand feet in height—a sheer granite wall, whose terrible perpendicular distance baffled all visual computation.” The trip would propel Bierstadt through much of his career.

270 Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902 Deer in the White Mountains Oil on paper mounted on board 14 x 19 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

The expedition would also inspire Starr King Mountain. Though the work is not dated, it is certainly linked to the 1866 work Mount Starr King, Yosemite, a marvelous and large work that is now in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Though there are differences in the two works—namely the two figures and a horse standing at the river’s bank near the tall twig of a tree in the museum piece—the paintings are nearly identical in their immense treatment of their natural subjects. Peter Hassrick, the late Western scholar who wrote about Bierstadt in his final major project, Albert Bierstadt: Witness to a Changing West, spoke to that ambitious quality of the painter’s works: “In an outpouring of immense panoramic canvases, Bierstadt expressed the epic scale of the West by combining his precise observations of the land with exaggerated, fantastical peaks dissolving into misty clouds, merging the corporeal with the celestial.”

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Provenance: Private collection, TX A copy of a 1972 letter from Gordon Hendricks accompanies this lot

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271 Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902 Swiss Mountain Scene with Cows Oil on board 7 x 9 ½ inches Signed with monogram lower right; Inscribed “Young Frau” verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

272 Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902 Western Sketch Oil on board 10 x 16 inches Signed verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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273 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Westward Bound Oil on canvas 14 x 22 inches Signed lower right and dated 08; Titled verso Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Created during a pivotal period in the career of the artist, Maynard Dixon’s 1908 oil Westward Bound showed the promise of what is to come from the still-rising modernist, who at this time was in New York City making a splash in the world of illustration. Just two years prior he was nearly killed in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and, even though he lost artwork in the devastation, he regrouped, created some covers for Sunset magazine, moved east, met Charles M. Russell and rose through the ranks of New York artists. Dixon would have many hot streaks in his career, and Westward Bound arrived during one of them.

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274 William Gollings 1878-1932 Two Riders Oil on board 11 x 17 inches Signed lower left and dated 04 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Literature: Elling William “Bill” Gollings: A Cowboy Artist, William T. Ward and Gary L. Temple, Patgonia Publishing Company, Argentina, p. 17, illustrated

275 Oscar Berninghaus 1874-1952 Indians on Plain Oil on board 12 x 16 ¼ inches Signed lower left and dated ‘51 Estimate: $20,000 - 40,000

With relatively few exceptions, Oscar E. Berninghaus painted the expanding vastness of the Southwest, from sage-strewn foregrounds to horizon-cradled hills deep in the background. And in many instances, as is the case here with Indians on Plain, he painted the sky looming large and limitless over his subjects. “No painter of the West has so caught and fixed its moods,” one critic wrote, as quoted in Gordon E. Sanders’ book Oscar E. Berninghaus: Taos, New Mexico. “The brilliant sky with the drift of lazy clouds, the misty mass of distant granite peaks, the rounded nearer hills, the shadows of purple, lavender and amethyst, the misty blues of the timbered hillside, these are not superficial things. They are the heart of the West. Also they reveal the heart of Berninghaus. A man could live with a Berninghaus painting as he could live with the mountains.” Born and raised in St. Louis, Berninghaus took his first trip out West on the dime of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, which had hired the artist to create works for East Coast advertisements. At one point on this fateful 1899 journey he was strapped to the top of a train car so he could sketch unobstructed views passing in front of him. One of the stops was in Taos, New Mexico. “I stayed here but a week, became infected with the Taos germ and promised myself a longer stay the following year,” he wrote in 1950. He later met Bert Geer Phillips, and by 1915 he and five other now-legendary artists would start the Taos Society of Artists. Berninghaus had considerable success in the group, and after it disbanded in 1927. He created Indians on Plain in 1951, one year before his death.

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276 Oscar Berninghaus 1874-1952 Forgotten Oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Literature: The Legendary Artists of Taos, Mary Carroll Nelson, Billboard Publications, New York, 1980: p. 38, illustrated. Taos: A Painter’s Dream, Patricia Janis Broder. Boston, MA: Little, Brown & Co. 1982, p. 132, illustrated. Oscar E. Berninghaus painted several really wonderful twilight and nocturne works showing hitching posts and horses. This lovely example is featured in Mary Carroll Nelson’s 1980 book The Legendary Artists of Taos and is printed near an excerpt from a 1950 letter, in which the artist describes his first impression of Taos, New Mexico: “…a barren plaza with hitching rail around it, covered wagons of home seekers, cow and Indian ponies hitched to it. A few merchants and too many saloons made up the business section; there were comparatively few Anglos, some of these had mining interests, some were health seekers, and some perhaps fugitives from justice, as Taos might well be a good hide-out place at the time. I found one artist, with whom I soon became acquainted. It was Bert Phillips.”

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277 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Indian Scout in Moonlight Watercolor 25 x 16 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated 1922 Estimate: $55,000 - 85,000

Frank Tenney Johnson and nocturnes are almost as synonymous in Western art as Charlie Russell and buffalo skulls. The illustratorturned-artist was able to, with just a delicate mixture of paint—mostly blues, greens and grays—bring out a solemn reverence in the desert’s darkness. Other artists around this time were exploring the nocturne, including William R. Leigh and Frederic Remington, but Johnson was able to elevate the genre with just the sheer power of the moonlight. Indian Scout in Moonlight shows the subtlety of the color and muted quality of the light. The effect is even more mesmerizing on the white coat of the horse, which shines delicately out of the night. “It’s almost too easy to attribute the prevalence of nocturnes in Frank Tenney Johnson’s art to the recognition that by his time the sun had definitively set on the mythic days of the Old West…” writes Joan Carpenter Troccoli in Painters and the American West. “However, when it comes to Johnson’s…nocturnes, the interpretive path of least resistance happens to be the right one. Like Charles M. Russell’s nearnocturnes of the 1910s and 1920s, in which a twilight palette underscores the artist’s regret at the demise of cowboys as well as Indians, Johnson’s night scenes are unabashedly focused on either the past or on those few places where its ways survived into his lifetime.” In 1904, during a trip to New Mexico, Johnson observed a remnant of the past that had survived when he witnessed Navajos traveling by moonlight. “[The Navajos] do a lot of their traveling across the desert at night, to avoid the intense desert heat during the daytime,” he wrote in a letter documented in The Frank Tenney Johnson Book: A Master Painter of the Old West. “…Seeing these people in the moonlight or even the magic light of just the stars has impressed me very deeply.”

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Provenance: Artist, Carrol R. Thorn, Jr, through descent, Private Collection Literature: Elling William “Bill” Gollings: A Cowboy Artist, William T. Ward and Gary L. Temple, Patagonia Publishing Company, Argentina 2007, p. 121, illustrated. Exhibition: Bradford Brinton Memorial & Museum (Brinton Museum), Big Horn Museum, 1999. In 1922, the year Cheyenne Winter Camp was created, William Gollings was working a punishing schedule in his studio that seemed to point to his dogged determination and persistence. At that time he was living in a shack in Sheridan, Wyoming, and nearby was another shack that served as his studio. His frantic pace eventually led to a December 1922 entry in his personal diary: “Moved bed in studio last week.” It’s possible he was staying busy to keep his mind off the failure of his marriage, which had begun to unravel earlier that summer when he asked his wife of three years for a separation. Maude Scriven was in California by that time, and Gollings was alone in Sheridan, which is reflected in much of his great work of the period, including images of lone wolves, moody cowboy nocturnes and images of single riders in desolate landscapes. Also in this period were dozens of works showing figures from behind—admiring the land or turning their back on it, that was for viewers to decide. There were vibrant and sunny scenes as well, but it was these quiet works of stillness and haunting solitude, many of them at night or in the snow, that marked a noted departure for the painter. There was fragility in these works, a sensitivity to the land and its people, and it added another dimension to this rough-and-tumble cowboy. Born in Idaho in 1878, Gollings grew up in Michigan and later in Chicago and Albany, New York. As an adult, he would take on odd jobs, including a bell hop at the Chicago World’s Fair, in a drafting room making blueprints, on various farms and, later, in mining camps where work included sheepherding and cowpunching, to which he took an immediate liking. There was a brief detour through Deadwood, South Dakota, before Gollings ended up near Belle Fourche, where he was captivated by the land. “All this country was worth living in; there were antelope in abundance on the prairie and deer in the hills besides wolves and coyotes aplenty,” Gollings writes in his brief autobiography, which was republished in Elling William “Bill” Gollings: A Cowboy Artist. “It all seemed a paradise to me. The whole country seemed to belong to the big cow outfits alone; there were very few sheep and horses and the grass waved over all this land.” In 1903 the cowboy would order a set of oil paints from Montgomery Ward and begin painting the cow camps, the rugged cattle trails and local Native American tribes. As his work progressed and he moved to Wyoming, he came and went from cowboying freely, and it was that authentic spirit that endeared him to his contemporaries, including Joseph Henry Sharp, Frederic Remington, Charles M. Russell and Hans Kleiber, who mentored Gollings for a period and showed him how to create etchings. “Many years of his life were spent in the saddle and the scenes he paints are those upon which his eyes gazed many, many times,” the Sheridan Post printed in 1918. “Sheridan is proud of its cowboy artist but his fame is not confined to Sheridan nor yet to Wyoming for in the centers of the east his fame is as great as it is at home and there are many competent critics who claim and prove the claim, that he is at least the peer of the great Remington.” By the 1920s, Gollings was alone in his cabin and heavy hearted, but he was creating some of the best work of his career, and even he seemed to know that. “A work for the rest of my life is ahead of me,” he wrote in his 1923 autobiography, “with only one thing that would ever take me from it; to be younger and have the country open and unsettled as it was when I first made riding my profession.”

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278 William Gollings 1878-1932 Cheyenne Winter Camp Oil on canvas 24 x 18 inches Signed lower right and dated 1922 Estimate: $300,000 - 500,000

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279 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Corn Husking Oil on board 9 x 11 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1933 verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

280 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Guardians of the Night Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left and inscribed Taos NM Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

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281 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Carving the Tribal Emblem Oil on board 12 x 9 ¼ inches Signed lower left; Titled verso Estimate: $16,000 - 24,000 Born in New York, Phillips studied briefly in England and then in Paris, where he met Ernest L. Blumenschein and Joseph Henry Sharp, who first planted the seed about the wonders of Taos, New Mexico. Years later, on the trip out West, Phillips and Blumenschein were described as tenderfoots and had bad luck with their horses. At one point bandits entered their camp and attempted a robbery, though there was nothing of value to steal. And then of course, on September 3, 1898, a broken wagon wheel would waylay their journey in Taos. Phillips, the dreamer and the romantic of those early Taos artists, was immediately smitten by the land and people. He lived in Taos for much of the rest of his life.

282 Laverne Nelson Black 1887-1938 Chief Red Cloud Oil on canvas mounted on board 30 x 24 ¾ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 Provenance: Bob Lovett, Marietta, Georgia Dallas Fine Art Museum, Dallas, Texas Literature: The Great American West, James D. Horan, Crown Pubishers, 1959: p. 93, illustrated. Many of Laverne Nelson Black’s most famous works are large scenes with dozens of figures spread out in complex arrangements and color bursting from the clothing and the trees. Though Chief Red Cloud only has one figure, the complexity of the portrait’s design—with the variety and arrangement of shapes in the headdress and regalia, as well as the vibrant color in each element—shows the power of artist’s brush regardless of the number of subjects. Red Cloud was a great Oglala Lakota leader, and Black captures the wisdom and quiet resolve in his face.

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283 William Gollings 1878-1932 Scouts Oil on canvas 10 x 14 8 inches Signed lower right and dated 1921; Signed verso Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

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284 William Gollings 1878-1932 Wolf in Starlight Oil on board 10 x 7 8 inches Signed lower right and dated 1922 Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Literature: Elling William “Bill” Gollings: A Cowboy Artist, William T. Ward and Gary L. Temple, Patagonia Publishing Company, Argentina 2007, p. 126, illustrated.

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285 Henry Farny 1847-1916 Corn Ceremony Gouache 7 ½ x 10 ¼ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Literature: The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, “My Adventures in Zuni,” by Frank H. Cushing, May 1883, Volume XXVI: 46. Henry Farny’s Corn Ceremony, sometimes called A Zuni Burial, describes a Zuni funeral, during which the body of the dead is washed, “thus renouncing all claim to him forever and returning his being to the sun,” and later buried in a blanket.

286 Leon Gaspard 1882-1964 Portrait of Noula Karavas, Toas 1957 Pastel 16 x 13 inches Signed lower right, dated 1957 and inscribed “To Noula from Leon Gaspard” Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Provenance: Nedra Mattucci Gallery, Santa Fe, NM In 1922, brothers John and James Karavas, and James’ wife Noula, leased the restaurant in the Columbian Hotel in Taos, New Mexico. Soon they bought the hotel outright, and rebranded it with the name: Hotel La Fonda de Taos, which is likely where Gaspard came to meet the subject of Portrait of Noula Karavas, Toas 1957. The coffee shop there is named after Noula.

287 Leon Gaspard 1882-1964 Winter Visitors – Vitebsk Oil on board 16 x 10 ½ inches Inscribed lower right “Vitebsk” and dated; Estate stamp of Leon Gaspard verso Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000 Provenance: Arrowsmith-Fenn Galleries, Santa Fe, NM Nedra Mattucci Galleries Santa Fe, NM Winter Visitors – Vitebsk was created during a major turning point in the life of Leon Gaspard. Painted in 1907 while the artist was studying in Paris. The Russian region of Vitebsk, where Gaspard was born, had seen unfathomable violence just a year prior. It’s easy to picture Gaspard thinking of home and of a more peaceful time during the painting of this work.

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288 Leon Gaspard 1882-1964 Korzak Girl Oil on board 16 ¾ x 13 ¼ inches Signed lower left, dated 1936 and inscribed “Pamir”; Inscribed “A mon ami A. B. Church/ un ami de MacMorris/Leon Gaspard/3 Aout 1950” verso Estimate: $70,000 - 90,000

Provenance: 1936 Presented by the artist to Arthur B. Church Jr., Colorado Springs, Colorado. 1985 to Prominent collector Denver, Colorado Private collection, TX. This gem of a portrait by Leon Gaspard was presented by the artist to A.B. Church, a broadcasting pioneer in radio and television, in 1950. Church interviewed Gaspard in his Taos home, where the artist regaled his guest with stories about his career and travels, including an epic adventure in 1921. It was likely in the second half of that journey, in the tribal regions of the Himalayas, where Gaspard would be inspired to paint Korzak Girl, which has also used the title A Girl of the Pamir Mountains, Korzak Girl. Gaspard was smitten with Taos when he first saw it in 1915, but he would not paint it exclusively the way many of the other Taos Art Colony painters were around this same period. In fact, he would leave Taos fairly quickly, in 1921, for a globe-trotting journey that took him west to the coast and then by boat to Japan. From there he went into China, Mongolia, Siberia and south into Tibet and the Himalayas, where the painter likely encountered the subject of Korzak Girl. Though Gaspard didn’t keep a journal, the late Forrest Fenn, in his book Leon Gaspard: The Call of Distant Place, estimates Gaspard and his guide, Nagumba, traveled 2,400 miles over two years and four months. “The men were scorched by the sun and scoured by the driven snow,” Fenn wrote. “They listened to the soft, muffled tread of their horses in tall grasses, the clop of hooves on dry, cracked earth, quieted again by the endless expanses of snow. They heard the bottomless silence of the empty landscape and the pounding thunder of the Hunghutzes bearing down upon them. They woke to dewladen grasses in the summer and a world glittering with hoarfrost in the spring and fall. Gaspard would have admired the dawn’s first rays of pink and the evening sky’s violet, colors he used frequently. The colors and the memories would soon find their way to his canvases.”

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“We wish to thank Joan Carpenter Troccoli for her assistance cataloguing these important Catlin works. Troccoli is the author of two important books on Catlin, George Catlin: American Indian Portraits and First Artist of the West: George Catlin Paintings and Watercolors from the Collection of Gilcrease Museum. She is also a former director and curator at the Gilcrease Museum and the founding director and senior scholar at the Petrie Institute of Western American Art at the Denver Art Museum.” - Scottsdale Art Auction During numerous trips throughout the 1830s, artist and explorer George Catlin documented more than 50 Indigenous tribes, many of which had little prior contact with European visitors. The portraits Catlin would create, a great number featuring proud and dignified warriors in full regalia, are some of the earliest and most important images of Native Americans ever created. The figure at the left, the Osage warrior Tál-Lee, was likely first painted by Catlin at Fort Gibson in presentday Oklahoma in 1834, according to the Smithsonian, which owns an oil version of the figure. “Amongst the many brave and distinguished warriors of the tribe, one of the most noted and respected is Tal-lee, painted at full length, with his lance in his hand—his shield on his arm, and his bow and quiver slung upon his back,” Catlin wrote in 1841 about the oil version. “In this portrait, there is a fair specimen of the Osage figure and dress, as well as of the facial outline, and shape and character of the head, and mode of dressing and ornamenting it with helmet-crest, and the eagle’s quill.” The warrior at right is Wáh-pa-ko-lás-kuk, Bear’s Track, who was likely first painted in a Sac and Fox village in 1835. “I have visited forty-eight different tribes, the greater part of which I found speaking different languages, and containing in all 400,000 souls,” Catlin wrote in 1841. “I have brought home safe, and in good order, 310 portraits in oil, all painted in their native dress, and in their own wigwams … as well as a very extensive and curious collection of their costumes, and all their other manufactures, from the size of a wigwam down to the size of a quill or a rattle.” This rare pairing of Catlin watercolors—both passed down through five generations and both in original frames by George F. Of, a friend of Alfred Stieglitz and an exclusive framer of his work for 15 years—bear a direct resemblance to a portfolio containing 16 of 20 Catlin watercolors in the Gilcrease Museum collection in Tulsa, Oklahoma, which are also from the 1836 period.

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289 George Catlin 1796-1872 Collection of two paintings Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

Tál-Lee Watercolor on paper 10 ½ x 8 ¼ inches Dated lower right 1836

Wa'h-pa-ko-ia's-kuk [Bear's Track] Watercolor on paper 10 x 7 ½ inches Signed lower right and dated 1836

Provenance: Edith & Henry J. Wyatt, vice president of Crum & Forster Insurance and the Wyatt Company, New York City, ca. 1900 Henry C. Wyatt, Connecticut William Wyatt, Florida Henry J. Wyatt, Florida By Descent

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290 Edward Borein 1872-1945 Flat Top Riders Watercolor 7 ½ x 10 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

In 1890, Edward Borein, then a young cowboy in Southern California, hung up his spurs and enrolled briefly at the San Francisco Art Association School. The school did not have the intended effect on the young cowpoke, and within a month he left and later returned to cowboying in 1894. But the artist in him was still struggling to get out. It was amid cattle drives and round-ups that Borein would jot down quick sketches and studies that would get passed around and shared among friends and colleagues. He would eventually sell two works to the publisher of the magazine The Land of Sunshine for $15. In 1901 he took a meandering painting trip from California to Canada and back again with Maynard Dixon. By 1903, Borein was finally committed to his destiny within Western art. Known for his works on paper, the artist was largely self-taught but always drew on his ranching experience for his rough-and-tumble views of the West. He was also admired by many of his peers, including Dixon and James Swinnerton, both from Borein’s brief stint at art school, and later with actor Will Rogers and Charles M. Russell, who would stay with Borein when he would travel to California.

291 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 Indian on Horseback Watercolor 8 ¼ x 6 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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292 Charles Russell 1864-1926 The Battle at Belly River Oil on canvas 18 ¼ x 22 ½ inches Signed lower left, dated 1905 and skull Estimate: $250,000 - 350,000

Provenance: Gerald Peters, Gallery, Santa Fe, NM Private collection, WY Literature: Charles M. Russell: A Catalog Raisonné, Byron P. Price, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, 2007; p. 44, illustrated full page color.


292 Charles Russell 1864-1926 The Battle at Belly River (detail) Oil on canvas 18 ¼ x 22 ½ inches Signed lower left, dated 1905 and skull

293 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Indian Portrait Oil on board 9 ¼ x 7 inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $250,000 - 350,000

Estimate: $16,000 - 20,000

In the fall of 1870, two warring factions of First Nations warriors engaged in a battle so fierce and so violent it would be the last of its kind on Canadian soil, and it pushed the two parties to broker peace within a year. Fought over adjacent territories that extended from the United States up into Canada, the battle was waged between the Blackfoot Confederacy—an alliance of Blackfoot (Siksika), the Bloods (Kainai), the northern Piegan (Piikani/ Pikuni), the southern Peigan (Blackfeet)—and the Iron Confederacy, which was made up of Plains Cree, Assiniboine (Stone Sioux), Salteaux (Plains Ojibwa) and Stoney (Nakoda). On October 25, 1870, a Cree war party fell upon a camp of Blackfoot near the Canadian city of Lethbridge, Alberta. Thinking the camp was vulnerable due to a recent smallpox outbreak, the Cree fighters attacked without realizing larger Blackfoot groups were nearby and ready to fight. As the battle expanded to more than 1,000 fighters, the Blackfoot pushed their attackers back, eventually forcing the Cree to retreat across what was then called Belly River. Witnesses to the battle say the river ran red as the fleeing Cree were picked off from the river’s banks. Naturally, the battle and its violent end—some estimates suggest as many as 400 died in the fighting— were part of the lore of the area and likely fascinated people on both sides of the border. Charles M. Russell certainly heard tales of the skirmish when he lived with Blood Indians in Canada starting in 1888. The Battle at Belly River came much later, in 1905, and it speaks to the frantic chaos and kinetic mayhem of warfare. Fighters topple over each other, bodies are strewn all over the battlefield, guns and arrows seem to point every direction and some of the figures are rendered in a loose detail that conveys motion and even propulsion as riders are launched off their horses into the maelstrom. The work is a unique piece for Russell, who more frequently focused on smaller groups of people; The Battle at Belly River shows dozens, possibly a hundred or more, figures in the fray. In some ways, Russell’s oil painting seems to be a response to Edgar S. Paxson’s masterpiece Custer’s Last Stand, which was painted six years earlier in 1899. The two artists had likely met in the 1880s, possibly as late as 1891, and were two of the great Montana artists working at the time. They were also friends.

294 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Montana Oil on board 6 x 8 inches Signed lower left; Titled and initialed verso

But where Paxson’s work relied on the gritty realism and the meticulous details of Custer and his men’s final moments, Russell adheres to a more expressionistic approach in Belly River as the painting’s figures swirl together, creating a turbulent tableau of warfare rendered as if to maximize the carnage while also showing the hypnotic drama of battle. Consider just the varying levels of detail in The Battle at Belly River: figures in the foreground can be seen wearing earrings, multi-colored war paint and beaded pouches, and then as each layer drops back behind it the figures seem to get looser, until they are almost abstractions in the dust, and then finally as pictograms emerging from the past. There is no heroism in Russell’s work, just echoes of it amid the violence and frenzy.

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Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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295 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Strikes His Enemy Pretty Oil on canvas 18 ¼ x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 1905; Titled verso Estimate: $65,000 - 95,000 In 1901, the Crow Agency–at the request of President Theodore Roosevelt, who had admired Sharp’s work–invited the artist to live and paint on the reservation, and built a studio for the him not far from the site of the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Sharp painted hundreds of portraits of Native American survivors of Custer’s fateful engagement and their descendants, as well as canvases depicting encampments, daily life, and ceremonies. Sharp painted Strikes His Enemy Pretty–who was Crow but of Gros Ventre parentage–on numerous occasions between 1900 and 1936. In Teepee Smoke, Forest Fenn writes: “He [Strikes His Enemy Pretty] was a member of the Agency police and a judge for the Indians in the late 1890’s. Sharp said he was ‘…a fine type, a great man and favorite model.’” (p. 139)

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296 Edgar S. Paxson 1852-1919 Trappers Gouache 19 ¼ x 13 ½ inches Signed lower right and dated 1905 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Exhibitions: Scottsdale Museum of the West If there is a middle ground between Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell, it may be in the work of Edgar S. Paxson, whose illustrative, storytelling-based artwork of the Western frontier sprung from his own experiences beginning in 1870s Montana. Paxson, who was later friends with Russell, fell in love with the drama of the West, particularly stories of trappers and early pioneers, Native Americans and the Battle of Little Big Horn, of which his work is well known.

297 William H. Dunton 1878-1936 Evening Meal - The Hunter’s Supper Oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 Dunton often painted what he experienced, so it should come as no surprise that hunting, fishing and other outdoor pursuits were common themes for the painter. Much was learned on these subjects from his grandfather, though certainly some was gleaned from his father, who appears in Dunton’s first known work, William Henry Dunton, a fishing scene that was completed in 1896 when the artist was just 18 years old. While exploring the outdoors and fishing held a certain fondness for the artist, it was hunting that would appear most frequently in his work. In 1936, it was noted by New Mexico writer Loraine Carr that Dunton “…was an artist-hunter with the legs, the heart and the wind to track down his game in order to paint it.” Deer and elk maintained a strong presence in his work, but nothing quite held a candle to his bear paintings, of which there were many. Another subject was the hunter himself, as is the case in Evening Meal – The Hunter’s Supper, a loosely painted image of a figure sinking into the tangle of darkness that is nature at night. The only thing seemingly keeping the hunter from falling into the void is a glowing campfire that lights up his face and his striking blue eyes. Dunton was known to kill his game for paintings and, weather permitting, he would even freeze his specimens in the poses he desired. But it was also the thrill of the hunt, and the outdoor setting of the hunt, that captivated him. Though he never stopped hunting, it was this lifestyle that caused reflection in him later in his life. “Years ago I hunted much and killed a lot,” he told Carr in the 1930s. “But, even in youth, it was not the killing of the game but, rather, the life and environment in which I lived in order to hunt, which satisfied my chief desire. The fascination of out-witting a wild animal at its own game—the satisfaction in making a good shot—a clean, painless kill—yes; but, as I grow older, the shooting of big game grows less to my liking.”

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298 William H. Dunton 1878-1936 Gold of Autumn Oil on board 10 ½ x 8 ½ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 In 1913, more than 1,200 American and European paintings were displayed at New York City’s 69th Regiment Armory. The Armory Show would be an instant and unequivocal sensation, though it would split many critics, show visitors and artists. “While some conservative artists were equally disdainful, there were others who responded more moderately,” writes Julie Schimmel in The Art and Life of W. Herbert Dunton, 1878-1936. “This was true of a number who painted in essentially representational styles, while attempting to remain abreast of contemporary art movements. Dunton’s development away from realistic detail and naturalistic effects toward a style that emphasized, without abandoning the subject, the language of art—color, life and form—suggests that he was one of these artists.” Schimmel goes on to theorize that Dunton was wholeheartedly endorsing a modernist approach within his own studio, and classic works like Sunset in the Foothills, Rio Grande Canyon and these tightly composed forest scenes with fall color were Dunton’s way of affirming his exploration into more contemporary movements. “An artistic production is not a literal translation of nature,” Dunton says in Schimmel’s book. “If it were there would be no sense in painting or paintings—because nature would be always superior to our humble product. Art—in painting as in music—is one’s individual interpretation of what they see in nature.”

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299 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Mary Tailfeather - Blackfoot Oil on canvas 15 x 10 inches Signed upper left and dated 1902, Titled upper right Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000

300 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Autumn Flowers, Weeds, Grasses and Seed Pods Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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301 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Hunting Son and Eagle Star Oil on canvas 22 x 26 ¾ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000 Provenance: John C. Eulich Collection of Western Art Private Collection, New Mexico Private Collection, Texas Private Collection The subjects of Hunting Son and Eagle Star would appear in many works by Joseph Henry Sharp, one of the earliest painters to discover the creative opportunities available in Taos, New Mexico. Hunting Son (Chúyah), who also used the name John Gomez, can be seen on the left with bluish ribbons wrapped around his hair. Hunting Son was introduced to the artist by his father, and frequent Sharp model, Soaring Eagle. The figure on the right is Eagle Star, who also went by Juan Concha. Taos was a bustling art town, and there were no shortages of artists to work for in the early part of the 20th century, but Native American models would enjoy working with Sharp and return to him frequently. “Many of the Indians loved Sharp dearly, almost always preferring to pose for him rather than the other artists, and they were greatly amused by his habits,” Forrest Fenn writes in Teepee Smoke: A New Look Into the Life and Work of Joseph Henry Sharp. “When working on a painting, Sharp would dab some paint on the canvas, then dance or hop backwards six or eight feet to view the result. The Indians who often gathered in the studio thought this was very funny and would laugh and mimic him behind his back. Their actions weren’t disrespectful, though; they were instead a sign of acceptance and regard for the artist.”

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Three Montana Cowboys, painted in 1906 during William Herbert “Buck” Dunton’s pre-Taos illustration heyday, shows subjects that were certainly influenced by his trips to Montana, the first being in 1896. “[Dunton] pays tribute to Remington’s ‘action’ paintings and sculpture, namely his painting Dash for the Timber and his sculpture Coming Through the Rye,” notes Dunton scholar Michael Grauer, “[Three Montana Cowboys] may very well be Dunton’s direct homage to this Remington masterpiece.” The painting was last on the market at J.N. Bartfield in New York. The gallery notes the title: “Though the painting is titled Three Montana Cowboys, in fact there is a fourth, as a single ghostly rider, a kind of doppelganger to the figure at left, emerging from the dusty background at far left. And so this painting becomes Dunton’s contribution to a trope—four horsemen riding hell bent for leather, to town, to make trouble, to face trouble,” the gallery writes. “Why four? Four gives the sense of the four cardinal points of the compass: north, south, west, east. It recalls the four anchors on the clock: 12, 3, 6, 9. Four sides make a square, a solid fortress of shape. In other words, the four horseman come from everywhere and everywhen. They are unassailable, inexorable, a life force pursued perhaps by civilization.” When looking at old photos of the Taos Society of Artists, it is never hard to find Dunton in a crowd. The tall, skinny fellow with the 10-gallon hat stood out within the influential group—the cowboy among the scholars. Born in Maine in 1878, Dunton experienced nature through his grandfather, who took him on hunting and fishing expeditions that conditioned the young lad to the ways of the wilderness. He blazed his own trails forward, an attribute that figured prominently into his art career as a self-taught artist. By 16 years old he was selling drawings and paintings to magazines. He did eventually take art classes in Boston and New York before expanding his illustration career with Harper’s Weekly, Collier’s and illustrating Zane Grey stories, including Riders of the Purple Sage. It was an effort to find new and exciting subject matter for his illustration work that drove Dunton into the West, including an 1896 trip to Montana in which the artist tried his hand at cattle wrangling. “I tried awfully hard to be a cowboy. Though I had lots of experience I made a sorry one, in spite of the fact that in youth I loved it and the life,” Dunton told American Magazine of Art. “Why! Even to this day I couldn’t rope a sick chicken with his legs hobbled. I reckon I was cut out for something other than a puncher.” In fact, he was cut out to be something else, which was quickly evident as his illustration soared within the publishing world and the West once again called to him. After a dangerous trip to war-torn Mexico in 1910, Dunton finally laid eyes on Taos, New Mexico, in 1912, and eventually moved there two years later. It was in Taos in 1915 that he co-founded the Taos Society of Artists with Eanger Irving Couse, Joseph Henry Sharp, Oscar E. Berninghaus, Bert Geer Phillips and Ernest L. Blumenschein, who originally suggested to Dunton that he would be happier in the West. And by all accounts, Blumenschein was right. “Buck Dunton became a familiar figure on the village streets,” writes Mary Carroll Nelson in her 1980 book The Legendary Artists of Taos. “Tall and lanky, he was dressed strictly as a cowboy. There was the Stetson hat (the Stetson Company sent him a new one every year with his name gold-stamped on the sweatband), a scarf tied around the neck, long narrow trousers and boots. There is every reason to believe Dunton loved the slow easy ways of Taos, but he brought a Yankee pace with him. He is remembered as a person who never sauntered. He always dashed along the streets to the Taos Post Office where everyone met socially then (and still does). There was an urgency in him to catch a quality of Western life that was passing. Protective game laws already prevented him from further big-game hunting. The romantic untamed West was quickly coming under domination.” This passing of the West was a common theme in much of Dunton’s work. “The West has passed—more’s the pity,” he told writer F. Warner Robinson. “In another 25 years the old-time Westerner will have gone, too—gone with the buffalo and the antelope. I’m going to hand down to posterity a bit of the unadulterated real thing.”

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302 William H. Dunton 1878-1936 Three Montana Cowboys Oil on canvas 25 ½ x 19 inches Signed lower right, dated 06 and inscribed “Montana” Estimate: $175,000 - 225,000 Provenance: JN Bartfield Galleries, NY Private Collection, CO

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303 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Mounting a Wild One Lithograph 25 x 18 ½ inches Signed lower left

304 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 A Running Bucker Lithograph 25 x 19 ½ inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $2,000 - 3,000

Estimate: $2,000 - 3,000

Literature:

Literature: Davis & Sanford Co., New York, 1895, b/w lithograph.

Harper’s Monthly, March 1894, “A Rodeo at Los Ojos,” Frederic Remington, halftone illustration: p. 521, illustrated. Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne, Volume II, Peter H. Hassrick and Melissa J. Webster, University of Washington Press, 1996: p. 490, illustrated.

This work originally appeared in the March 1894 issue of Harper’s Monthly, in an article titled “A Rodeo at Los Ojos,” written by Frederic Remington himself and based on a trip to Mexico in February and March of 1893. The article includes several famous Remington works, and starts with a line that could easily be mistaken for Ernest Hemingway: “The sun beat down on the dry grass, and the ‘punchers’ were squatting about in groups in front of the straggling log and adobe buildings which constituted the outlying ranch of Los Ojos.”

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Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne, Volume II, Peter H. Hassrick and Melissa J. Webster, University of Washington Press, 1996: p. 556, illustrated.

Originally published as a pair with Sun Fisher, A Running Bucker can be found in two versions: one with the cowboy facing left and the other a reverse image with the cowboy facing right. The rightfacing version is the 1895 lithograph from Davis & Sanford Co. The left-facing version, seen here, was reproduced in Drawings from 1897. The catalogue raisonne suggests the left-facing image was reversed by Davis & Sanford to make a better pairing with Sun Fisher.


305 Charles Schreyvogel 1861-1912 A Close Call Oil on canvas 25 ¼ x 34 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $750,000 - 1,250,000


305 Charles Schreyvogel 1861-1912 A Close Call (detail) Oil on canvas 25 ¼ x 34 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $750,000 - 1,250,000

Provenance: Christie’s auction, New York City, May 25, 1989 Merton Shapiro, Pennsylvania J.N. Bartfield Gallery, New York City Private Collection, Colorado Private Collection, Wyoming Literature: The Life and Art of Charles Schreyvogel: Painter-Historian of the Indian-Fighting Army of the American West, James D. Horan, Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, 1969: p. 55, illustrated.

306 Nicolai Fechin 1881-1955 Man with Crooked Nose Charcoal 17 x 13 inches Signed lower right

307 Nicolai Fechin 1881-1955 Indian Girl with Bangs Charcoal 17 ½ x 13 ½ inches Initialed lower center

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

308 Nicolai Fechin 1881-1955 Old Indian Woman Charcoal 15 ½ x 11 ½ inches Signed lower left

309 Nicolai Fechin 1881-1955 Balinese Girl Charcoal 13 x 16 inches Signed lower right and inscribed

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Where other artists would let a viewer breathe or take pause, Charles Schreyvogel was relentless in his pursuit of drama. His paintings bore down on a viewer with intensity, the thrilling action and highstakes storytelling spilling from the paint surface. He also had a way of implicating his audience in the events as figures aimed their rifles and revolvers at the viewers themselves, an effect that made the danger more realistic and palpable. Much was made at the time about Edwin S. Porter’s 1903 silent film The Great Train Robbery, which ends with a cowboy pointing his gun at the audience and firing. Schreyvogel must have been amused at this spectacle—he had done it in paint at least several times prior to 1903, including in an early masterpiece, My Bunkie, in 1899. In A Close Call, Schreyvogel lets the viewers off the hook—the guns are aimed into the picture—but the violence and threat of death is no less real for the scout and two Native American riders, who share a horse as they weave through the dust and haze of the prairie. The presence of guns, and their placement within the composition, was carefully arranged by the New Jersey-based artist. “Often pointed directly at the viewer or placed in striking angles and directions, the guns in [Schreyvogel’s] paintings do more than reconstruct the legendary history of conquest that Theodore Roosevelt famously called ‘the winning of the West.’ Schreyvogel deployed the gun as a powerful visual device to dramatize that history in new ways while advertising his own skills as an artist knowledgeable about military weapons and marksmanship,” Alan C. Braddock writes in his essay Shooting the Beholder: Charles Schreyvogel and the Spectacle of Gun Vision. “As an organizing motif and focal point, the gun also helped Schreyvogel make his realism unusually eye-catching to modern audiences. In a marketplace of imagery increasingly saturated with and transformed by popular photographs, films, illustrations, and advertising, Schreyvogel shrewdly adapted his traditional medium of easel painting to new conditions of pictorial production and spectatorship.” Schreyvogel, who was fluent in Dakota Sioux and dined with Teddy Roosevelt, had a sensational presence within American culture in the early 1900s. The artist drew quick comparisons to Frederic Remington, and the two were later embroiled in a very public feud that played out on the front pages of newspapers. Remington had accused Schreyvogel of inaccuracies in his magnificent Custer’s Demand, which was drawing crowds at New York City’s Knoedler Gallery. Though Schreyvogel never said a coarse word about the artist and illustrator, the newspapers kept the dispute smoldering until George Armstrong Custer’s widow and a soldier who served with Custer came to Schreyvogel’s defense and confirmed the painting’s accuracy. Like Remington, Schreyvogel’s presence on the American art scene would be epic, but also short lived—he would die at the age 51 in 1912. Fewer than 100 major works were completed in his studio.

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Nicolai Fechin was born in Russia, the son of a woodworker who taught his son early about drawing and sculpting. After his art education, and the agony of World War I, Fechin came to the United State in 1923 and soon settled in Taos, New Mexico, where his work would flourish. Today, the Taos Art Museum is located within the Fechin House. The museum notes, “Fechin is one of the most important portrait painters of the 20th century. In addition to his portraits, his paintings of Native Americans and of the New Mexico desert landscape are considered among his best works…The brilliance of his painting style and the bold imagery one encounters in his drawings is undeniably arresting. His exuberant use of line and color to define form creates an immediate impression of energy and purpose.”

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310 Donald Teague 1897-1991 Long Shadow Oil on board 23 ¼ x 35 ¼ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Described as one of the country’s most accomplished watercolorists, Donald Teague began, like many Western artists, as an illustrator on the East Coast, where he did work for the The Saturday Evening Post and Collier’s, among other publications. After a move west in 1958, Teague rose to prominence with his remarkable compositions, brilliant technique and ability to convey detail and texture. The classically taught painter, who studied at the Art Students League under George Bridgman, Dean Cornwell and Frank DuMond, Teague joined the Cowboy Artists of America in 1969 and was a member throughout the rest of his career.

311 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Back Street in Las Vegas Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 1968; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

Before moving to Texas as a teenager, Melvin Warren lived in Arizona and New Mexico. The three uniquely different states all have various roles within his work, from large sombreros on the occasional rider to images of the great New Mexican Pueblos. That Southwestern flavor can be seen here as he paints slightly contemporary brick and adobe buildings within a classic street scene, creating a pleasing view of the stillness and solitude of Las Vegas, New Mexico.

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312 Frank Hoffman 1888-1958 Fish Tales Oil on board 18 ½ x 25 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $18,000 - 22,000

After arriving in Taos, New Mexico, in 1920, Hoffman became fast friends with Leon Gaspard, who offered the newcomer encouragement. Hoffman later settled on a horse ranch he called Hobby Horse Rancho, not far from Gaspard’s own home. It was here Hoffman kept dozens of animals, including many horses, and where he fulfilled commissions for Cream of Wheat, General Electric, the Cuban Tobacco Company and works for writers Zane Grey and Jack London. He also produced a great number of pieces for Brown & Bigelow, the leading calendar company of that time, as well as his easel work. Paintings in which he showed a particular interest were sporting scenes, including bear and moose hunts, scenes with hunting dogs and, as in the case with Fish Tales, adventurous fishing paintings.

313 Frank Hoffman 1888-1958 The Pointer Oil on board 15 x ½ x 16 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000 Like so many Western artists before him, Frank Hoffman’s life did not intersect much with the West until suddenly there he was in Taos, on his own ranch and surrounded by animals. After being found to have poor eyesight, he was rejected for military service, which sent him West to find his destiny. He worked for a brief period in Glacier National Park, but by 1920, he was in Taos, New Mexico, and smitten by the color of nature and the quality of the light. His easel work was noteworthy for its rich color, action-packed thrills and his nuanced depictions of wildlife, horses and hunting dogs.

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314 Ogden Pleissner 1905-1983 Quail Country Watercolor 18 x 28 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 A quintessential Ogden M. Pleissner work—magnificent scenery, game hunters at the ready, hunting dogs plotting their path through the brush and the faintest whispers of the modern world—Quail Country shows why the painter is one of the great sporting artists in American art. The Brooklyn-born Pleissner was very much a city boy, though his childhood was filled with adventures into the wild, including in Wyoming where he was exposed to the Tetons and the abundance of nature that surrounded them. He studied at the Art Students League, and later illustrated the D-Day invasion for Life magazine. Early in his career he switched to watercolor after being drawn to the lightness of its application and translucent color possibilities. It was around this time he also started to turn more toward the sporting scenes that would make him famous. Fly fishing, hunting, canoeing and exploring field and stream—these were the subjects Pleissner focused on in his work and as hobbies in his private life. His sporting scenes have been prominently featured in two recent exhibitions: Wild Spaces, Open Seasons: Hunting and Fishing in American Art and Lying in Wait: Sporting Art by Ogden M. Pleissner at the Gibbes Museum of Art. “The men and women who spent their winters in the [South Carolina] Lowcountry relished the same moments that Pleissner celebrated in his paintings: ducks alighting from a marsh at sunrise, the chill of a crisp fall morning, trained dogs catching a scent, the moment of steady aim just before pulling the trigger,” writes Daniel Vivian, history professor University of Kentucky, for the Gibbes exhibition. “For upper-class Americans of the era, hunting meant more than recreation. It proved self-worth, discipline, and physical and mental strength. It challenged people living lives of comfort and convenience to test themselves under conditions that had changed little over time. Tradition, unspoiled nature, and the human drive to assert dominance over wild animals combined to create invigorating experiences requiring skill, stamina, and nerve.”

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315 Ogden Pleissner 1905-1983 Riverman Cascapedia 1975 Watercolor 8 ½ x 14 ¾ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

316 Brett Smith b. 1958 Here’s to Tight Lines Watercolor 21 x 29 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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317 Robert Abbett 1926-2015 The Pointer Oil on board 9 x 12 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1985 verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Robert Abbett was born in Indiana, but like many young artists in the 1950s he was drawn to New York City, where he would have a long successful career as an illustrator. He moved to Connecticut in the 1970s and began to explore his easel work, including sporting and hunting images. His most iconic subject matter was unquestionably bird dogs, which he painted into magnificent wilderness scenes bursting with natural detail. The artist wintered in Scottsdale, Arizona, so he also painted the Southwest and images of Native Americans.

318 Luke Frazier b. 1970 Evening Magic Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2021 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000 “Fine bird dogs are such a joy to be around - I treasure the memories of the hunt, the evening colors as the day winds down, watching the dogs excitement and fortitude as they work; sometimes they are psychotically driven by the scent of birds, the moment they get so close, everything shuts down and they freeze – chaos then “wham” nobody move! It is a tense moment, a joyful moment, and I love it, they’ve earned it, and painting it is what I was meant to do.” - Luke Frazier

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319 Henry Shrady 1871-1922 Monarch of the Plains Bronze 13 ½ inches high, 15 ½ inches wide Signed and dated 1899; Theodore B Star Estimate: $85,000 - 125,000 After first studying law at Columbia University, and later working for a company that made matches, Henry Shrady turned to sculpting wildlife and Native Americans of the American West. The son of a surgeon, Shrady was one of the earliest and finest sculptors working with these subjects, and he was also one of the first artists to use the lost-wax casting process. He created two iconic monuments: Washington crossing the Delaware River at the Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, New York, and the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial in Washington, D.C., as well as others. He was urged into art by Theodore B. Starr, who cast much of his work, including this rare and magnificent tabletop cast of Monarch of the Plains.

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320 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Old Men of the Ram River Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $175,000 - 225,000 Literature: Carl Rungius: Painter of the Western Wilderness, Jon Whyte & E. J. Hart, Salem House, Salem, NH, 1985: Forward p. 2, illustrated. In Carl Rungius’ long career he cultivated many friendships with names that might ring familiar, including Teddy Roosevelt and Frederic Remington, who once wrote the wildlife artist to tell him, “…as soon as I get settled I mean to own a Rungius.” Another name comes up frequently: wildlife conservationist William T. Hornaday, who was then the director of the New York Zoological Society. On at least several occasions, Hornaday had disclosed to Rungius his disapproval of the artist’s modernist approach, even going as far to call him an “out-and-out impressionist” in a letter mentioned in Donald Crouch’s Carl Rungius: The Complete Prints: A Catalog Raisonne. Rungius, for his part, pushed past Hornaday’s criticisms and gave them little thought. Still, this “Rungius as a modernist” line of thinking is easy to visualize in a work like Old Men of the Ram River, which is bursting with contemporary design—from the hard-edged ridgelines and the switchback-like composition of the mountains to the abstracted rock forms in the foreground and the juxtaposition of rounded horns in a painting full of diagonal lines. Block forms and modernism aside, this is still a painting about big horn sheep, to which Rungius devotes ample attention and consideration. These subjects come from the Ram River in the Alberta Rocky Mountains, where the artist spent a great deal of time hunting and observing, and also taking note of the unique horn size. “In Wilcox Pass and at the head of the Ram River, stalking sheep was something very different; there they knew all about hunters. While the Brazeau sheep had horns of a type with a wide curl, the rule at the Ram River was a very short curl,” Rungius relates in William J. Schaldach’s book Carl Rungius: Big Game Hunter. “A friend…who went with me to the Ram River on two occasions shot a ram with 16-year rings, but only 36-inch curl—a typical head for that section. But there are always exceptions to rules.”

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321 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Out of the Canyon Drypoint etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right

322 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Challenged Drypoint etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

323 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Dall Sheep Drypoint etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right

324 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Alaskan Wilderness Drypoint etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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325 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Grizzly Bear Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000


326 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Singing Meadows Oil on canvas 9 x 11 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

325 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Grizzly Bear (detail) Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 Exhibitions: Scottsdale Museum of the West With relatively few exceptions, Carl Rungius spent much of his adult life alternating between the warmer seasons in the West—in the Rockies, Alberta, Banff and the Yukon—and the winter months in the east. His trips, which were marked by long periods “out of doors” by way of covered wagon or pack mules, would inspire some of his greatest work, including bighorn sheep, elk and moose. But other popular subjects were bears, which Rungius painted with great affection and respect. This piece shows the artist’s more developed painting style, with his impressionistic brushstrokes creating the rock-strewn landscape high above the treeline. The bear is rendered more realistically, but with subtle touches, including those lighter-colored guard hairs on the bear’s neck and back, that show a master wildlife artist at work. He refers to this shimmer on the bear’s coat as “silvertip,” and comments frequently in his writing about the magnificent coats of grizzly and black bears. Rungius first experienced the American wilderness in 1894, when a Brooklyn doctor by the name of Clemens Fulda invited his Berlin-based nephew to America to go on a hunting trip. Uncle Fulda didn’t realize it at the time, but he had, at that very moment, changed the course of wildlife art in the United States forever. His nephew, a 25-year-old Rungius, would arrive in America elated at the journey in front of him—of particular interest was the magnificent moose, the ultimate hunting trophy. In Maine, the pair of hunters would pull trout from the streams with ease and each would shoot a whitetail deer, but the moose eluded them. The uncle, disappointed in the failure to nab one of the great creatures, invited Rungius to stay through until warmer weather permitted a return to the Maine wilderness. “During the winter I tried to put on canvas what I had seen, but with little success. The material was new to me and I needed more experience,” Rungius says in William J. Schaldach’s book Carl Rungius: Big Game Hunter. Another moose trip in the spring of 1895 never materialized, but by then Rungius was already making plans for his first trip west, which occurred later that year and went as far as Wyoming. When he returned to Germany in 1896, he brought with him bird specimens and insects, as well as a stack of drawings from his trip. His return was futile, and he immediately missed his adventures in the American West. By 1897, he would leave Europe for good.

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327 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Lake Louise Oil on board 9 x 12 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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328 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Moose in Landscape Oil on canvas 16 ¼ x 24 8 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $75,000 - 100,000

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329 David Shepherd 1931-2017 Cheetah Oil on canvas 10 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated ‘03 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

330 David Shepherd 1931-2017 Tiger Oil on canvas 9 x 16 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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331 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 Zebras Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $70,000 - 100,000 Though he was known for his lions, and was even given the nickname of “Lion,” Wilhelm Kuhnert painted major works featuring a variety of African wildlife, including tigers, giraffes, cape buffalo and zebras, seen here in Zebras. The painting shows the artist at the pinnacle of his career, using light and texture to play against the African foliage and the zebras that are meandering through. The artist was born in Germany, studied art at the Royal Academy of Arts in Berlin and was captivated early by wildlife as he traveled around Europe, India and, starting in 1891, Africa, where he would produce the bulk of his work. In 1901 he illustrated Animal Life on Earth, written by zoologist Johann Wilhelm Haacke, which further cemented his status as a noteworthy painter of wildlife subjects. Yearly safaris to Africa—to hunt and get field studies—helped keep his studio busy and his subjects fresh. He produced a large body of work in his lifetime, though many were lost during World War II.

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332 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 Antelope by a River Oil on canvas 13 ½ x 28 ¼ inches Signed lower right and dated 1913 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

333 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Bull Elephant Bronze, cast number 18/30 19 inches high Signed Estimate: $2,500 - 3,500

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334 William R. Leigh 1866-1955 Frontiers of Enchantment - Zebras Pen & Ink 8 x 13 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

335 William R. Leigh 1866-1955 Frontiers of Enchantment - Giraffes Pen & Ink 10 x 14 inches Signed lower right

336 William R. Leigh 1866-1955 Lion Pen & Ink 6 x 5 ½ inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500

337 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 Crouching Lion & Lioness Graphite 11 x 18 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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338 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Mare Protects Her Colt Oil on board 16 ¼ x 21 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000 Literature:

St. Nicholas Magazine, “Some Stories About ‘The California Lion,’” E. P. Roe, September 1888, wood engraving, p. 816. Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne, Volume I, Peter H. Hassrick and Melissa J. Webster, University of Washington Press, 1996, p. 150.

Originally published in the September 1888 edition of the St. Nicholas Magazine, Frederic Remington’s oil work The Mare Defends Her Colt paints a vivid picture of a mother’s love in the wilds of California. A wood engraving of the work appeared within an article titled “Some Stories About ‘The California Lion’” by E. P. Poe, who wrote: “A very interesting scene in which a lion figured, was related to me by a gentleman who was on a hunting expedition with two or three friends in the range beyond the Santa Inez mountains. Late one afternoon, they were sitting on a crag, overlooking a grassy valley which was already in shadow. Almost beneath them a mare was grazing, with her foal gamboling about her. While the hunters were watching the graceful little creature’s antics, it gave a startled whinny and sped toward its mother, and then it was seen that a mountain lion was in pursuit. The mare at once offered battle, showing surprising agility and courage. She always kept between the foal and the lion. Whenever the lion sought to spring upon the colt, she would interpose herself with incredible swiftness, whirl around and let fly both heels. As usual with horses out at pasturage the mare was unshod, but more than once was heard the thud of her hoofs against the tawny side of the lion. In her unhesitating devotion to her young, she made a fine, inspiring picture. Her neck was arched, her action courageous; and whenever she struck out with her feet, the force of the blows was tremendous. How the contest would have ended is hard to say, for the hunters, after watching the strange scene a few moments, hastened down the mountain side in hope of having a shot at the marauder, but on the approach of these new foes, the great cat at once made off, defying all pursuit among the steep cliffs.”

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339 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 On the Way to the Platte Ink Wash 16 x 12 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000 Literature: Century Magazine, November 1890, wood engraving, illustration: 115. Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne, Volume I, Peter H. Hassrick and Melissa J. Webster, University of Washington Press, 1996; p. 150, illustrated. Appearing in a Century Magazine article titled “The First Emigrant Train to California,” by John Bidwell (“Pioneer of ’41”), Frederic Remington’s On the Way to the Platte accompanies an amusing story about a hunter who returned to the wagon train without his mule, gun or clothes, and saying “thousands” of Indians were going to attack. Eventually a small Cheyenne war party rode right up to the wagons, but their intentions were peaceful. “…Signs were made to understand that the Indians did not intend to hurt the man or to take his mule or gun, but that he was so excited when he saw them that they had to disarm him to keep him from shooting them; they did not know what had become of his pistol or clothes…”

340 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Halt by the Roadside OR The Story of a Thousand Ink Wash 12 x 29 inches Signed lower right

Literature:

The Cosmopolitan, “The Story of a Thousand,” Albion W. Tourgée, January 1895, halftone illustration: p. 355.

Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne, Volume II, Peter H. Hassrick and Melissa J. Webster, University of Washington Press, 1996: p. 531 #1915.

Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

The Frederic Reminton catalog raisonne lists this painting of resting soldiers near the work The Cavalry Came Up On Their Jaded Horse, both of which were created for a January 1895 issue of The Cosmopolitan. The works were likely submitted to the publisher in the fall of 1894, and afterward they appeared in a serialized story titled “The Story of a Thousand” by Albion W. Tourgée, the renowned abolitionist who chronicled Union campaigns in Tennessee, Kentucky and Georgia. S C O T T S D A L E A R T AU C T I O N

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341 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Lancer Private Watercolor 13 ½ x 7 ½ inches Signed lower right

342 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Prussian Dragoon Officer Watercolor 20 x 11 inches Signed lower left and titled

Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

Literature: Harper’s Weekly, May 20, 1893, halftone illustration: 481.

Literature: Harper’s Weekly, May 20, 1893, halftone illustration: 479.

Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne, Volume I, Peter H. Hassrick and Melissa J. Webster, University of Washington Press, 1996; p. 451, illustrated.

Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne, Volume I, Peter H. Hassrick and Melissa J. Webster, University of Washington Press, 1996; p. 452, illustrated.

Prussian Dragoon Officer and Lancer Private are listed just six images apart in the Frederic Remington catalogue raisonne. Both works on paper were created for the May 20, 1893, issue of Harper’s Weekly, of which Remington was a frequent contributor. A great number of works finished around this time show how Harper’s was using his work to illustrate stories: paintings include dozens of soldiers, formal inspections by commanding officers, standing portraits of high-ranking officers with sabers and numerous riders on horseback carrying various flags.

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343 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 A Typical Trooper Watercolor 17 x 10 inches Signed lower left, dated 90 and inscribed “No.3” Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000

Literature:

Century Magazine, July 1891, wood engraving, illustration: 368.

Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne, Volume I, Peter H. Hassrick and Melissa J. Webster, University of Washington Press, 1996: pg 357 #1159.

This magnificent trooper, with his formal pose and lean silhouette, appears toward the end of an 1891 Century Magazine article titled “General Miles’s Indian Campaigns.” The unsigned article concludes with the capture of Geronimo and his Apache fighters, which involved a number of small skirmishes. “Though the contests of forces so small may not merit the name of battle,” the author notes, “yet in no battle have the participants incurred greater risks or evinced a higher degree of heroism.”

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344 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 The Guardian Oil on board 30 x 28 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

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345 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Scouts Acrylic 4 ¾ x 4 ½ inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

346 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Mandan Warrior Acrylic 4 a x 3 ½ inches Signed lower right

347 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Evening Flute Song Acrylic 4 ¾ x 4 inches Signed lower left/CA

Estimate: $3,500 - 5,000

Estimate: $3,500 - 5,000

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348 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Letter from St. Louis (study) Acrylic 4 x 7 ½ inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $3,500 - 5,000

349 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 The New Land Oil on board 22 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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350 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Chief Joseph Oil on board 7 ½ x 6 inches Signed lower left and dated 48 Estimate: $7,000 - 9,000

351 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Sunset Warrior Acrylic 4 x 4 ½ inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $3,500 - 5,000

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352 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 El Palmar #3 Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $14,000 - 18,000 Literature: This painting will be included in the forthcoming Clark Hulings Catalogue Raisonné, No. O945.

353 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Stone Bridge Oil on canvas 8 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 1987 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Literature: This painting will be included in the forthcoming Clark Hulings Catalogue Raisonné, No. O944.

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354 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Old Lady in Black – Valencia Oil on board 32 x 46 inches Signed lower center and dated 1969 Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000 Literature: This painting will be included in the forthcoming Clark Hulings Catalogue Raisonne’, No. O148.

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355 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Blonde Girl – Sicily Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right and dated 1970 Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000 Literature: This painting will be included in the forthcoming Clark Hulings Catalogue Raisonne’, No. O943. Although he never thought of himself as a Western artist, Clark Hulings’ reach within the genre is profound and lasting. His works, many of which speak to the light and life of the West, offered views that showed the abundance of nature, and also the systems at play within a village, a town square or even just a street corner, where the local vendors would load up their goods on burro-driven carts. His paintings have gorgeous detail in the rock and texture, but also in the flowers, fruit and laundry that fill his village scenes. Hulings was once told not to paint laundry, or burros, but he took great pleasure in painting those subjects anyway and found an audience that appreciated his humble slices of small-town life. Born in Florida, but raised in New Jersey, Hulings hopped all around the country, including to Louisiana, New York and in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he eventually settled for good. The initial pull to the Southwest was a job opportunity on the Manhattan Project in nearby Los Alamos, New Mexico, but poor health prevented the young physicist from taking the job. Recuperating in the Southwest, Hulings returned to art, which he had explored as a teenager. Serious painting began soon after as he took instruction from artist Sigismund de Ivanowski, and later, at the Art Students League, with George Bridgman and Frank Reilly. He began as a portraitist, and then transitioned into an illustrator in New York doing paperback book covers in the 1950s. By the 1960s, inspired by his trips to Europe—particularly France, Italy and Spain—Hulings turned to fine art and never looked back. In 1973 he was the first recipient of the coveted museum purchase prize at the inaugural Prix de West. The award ensured his piece, Grand Canyon, Kaibab Trail, would remain in the collection at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Center, which would also host a major exhibition for the artist in 1976. Other major shows, as well as numerous books of his art, would soon follow. And though he never painted cowboys, his work reverberated in the West due to his technical ability as a painter and his careful observation of people and places.

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356 Norman Rockwell 1894-1978 The Marriage Counselor Oil on cellophane laid over photograph 9 x 11 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

This preliminary study for Norman Rockwell’s unpublished 1963 illustration The Marriage Counselor reveals a great deal of the illustrator’s process. “During the planning of this painting,” writes Joyce K. Schiller, curator at the Norman Rockwell Museum, “Rockwell’s photographer made at least 70 photographic studies of the set-ups for it using: different men models; different women models; a man in a light-colored suit and hat; a man in a dark-colored suit and hat; the wife with her chin not down; and with her chin tucked down in a different position.” The final painting does have some differences—notably, a different pattern on the woman’s dress—but this preliminary work shows how close he was to the completed work.

357 Giuseppe Pino 1939-2010 Vanessa Oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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358 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Trolley Stop Oil on canvas 16 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

359 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Landmark of Freedom Oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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360 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Waitin’ on Shorty Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

As warm light beckons the riders in from the cold, G. Harvey’s Waitin on Shorty reminds viewers of the simple pleasures of the West. His images are meant to evoke a feeling of nostalgia. “We find in his paintings a tranquility—a time when we did not lock the doors to our houses, and strong, willing hands helped us up when we fell,” Randy Best writes in The Golden Era: The American Dream. “G. Harvey paints the spirit of America, from its western hills and prairies to the commerce of its great cities. His paintings give depth and dimension to scenes that move across, into and out of his living canvases.”

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361 Edouard Cortès 1882-1969 Gare de I’Est Oil on canvas 19 x 21 ¾ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

In the 1600s, in an effort to make Paris safer for its residents, Louis XIV authorized the placement of thousands of lanterns, oil lamps and lampposts throughout Paris, which would eventually birth the nickname the City of Light. Many painters have captured the lights of Paris, but few as effortlessly and succinctly as French painter Edouard Cortès, whose Parisian street scenes have become the blueprints for the entire genre. Once established as a professional artist, right around the start of the 20th century, Cortès painted Paris’ people, monuments and streets for more than 60 years.

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362 Edouard Cortès 1882-1969 Grand Boulevard Porte Saint-Denis in Winter Oil on canvas 13 x 18 ¾ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $16,000 - 22,000

363 Eugene Galien-Laloue 1854-1941 Collection of two paintings Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

Le Grands Boulevard Oil on canvas 9 x 14 inches Signed lower left

Le Boulevard Voltaire Oil on canvas 9 x 13 ¾ inches Signed lower left

A mystery-box of an artist, Eugene Galien-LaLoue was born in Paris in December of 1854. At least, that’s the story that’s been told. Galien-LaLoue was prone to hijinks with his career, including at least three pseudonyms—J. Lievin, E. Galiany and L. Dupuy—with the possibility of even more that have yet to be discovered. The aliases have been explained with two possible scenarios: first, Galien-LaLoue was extremely private, and second, he was showing work at competing galleries in France. This fascinating and perplexing artist lived a mysterious and, at times, odd life: he served in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 under a fake name, he married three sisters back to back (starting with the youngest and ending with the oldest) and went through periods of his life as a recluse. Known for popularizing the Belle Époque paintings of Parisian street scenes, Galien-LaLoue would inspire new generations of street painters, everyone from Édouard Cortès to G. Harvey.

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364 David Leffel b. 1931 Green, Gold and Madder Oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 87 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

365 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Sunseekers Oil on board 12 x 24 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled, dated 2012 and inscribed “painted with my friend Al Mengert” verso Estimate: $22,000 - 32,000

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366 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Richard’s Flight Oil on canvas 19 x 25 inches Signed lower left and dated 2010; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000 Literature: The Artist, The Practical Magazine for Artists for Artists, October 2011, Cover and p. 13, illustrated. (Magazine included with lot).

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367 William Acheff b. 1947 Straight Arrows Oil on canvas 30 x 22 inches Signed lower right and dated 2007; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $28,000 - 38,000

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368 William Acheff b. 1947 Design Maker Oil on canvas 25 x 20 inches Signed lower right and dated 1999 Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

369 Richard Greeves b. 1935 Kickapoos Bronze, cast number 10/30 37 inches high Signed and dated 2003 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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370 Charles Fritz b. 1955 The Sundial of Unrecorded Time Oil on canvas 30 x 36 inches Signed lower right and dated 15 Estimate: $14,000 - 18,000

371 Jim Norton b. 1953 Waiting for the Signal Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left/CA; Signed, titled and dated 09 verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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372 Bill Owen 1942-2013 A CO Bar Cowboy Oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1978 Estimate: $18,000 - 28,000

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373 Charlie Dye 1906-1972 Mustangs, Mules and Men Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

Charlie Dye was one of the four founders of the Cowboy Artists of America in 1965. After discussing plans for the group at the Oak Creek Tavern in Sedona, Arizona, the artists met in Dye’s studio to formulate bylaws. He was the oldest member of the group and a mentor figure to the younger artists, including Joe Beeler and John Hampton. Born in Colorado, Dye worked as a cowboy in the West until he was 21 years old, after which he studied under Harvey Dunn and became an illustrator, contributing works to Argosy, Outdoor Life and The Saturday Evening Post.

374 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Medicine Whip’s Coup Oil on canvas 24 x 48 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 In the late 1950s, Joe Beeler sought out the artist Joe De Yong—first, because he admired his work, but also because De Yong had been friends with Charlie Russell. Their meeting, and later friendship, helped affirm for Beeler the direction his work needed to go in. “Through De Yong, Joe Beeler had tapped into the cowboy artist tradition that began with Charlie Russell, and in doing so he had become the tradition’s legitimate heir,” writes Don Hedgpeth in Joe Beeler: Life of a Cowboy Artist. “The spiritual succession from Russell to De Yong to Beeler is a continuum that would become the very heart and soul of Western art, now and forever.” That continuum is abundantly clear in Medicine Whip’s Coup, a thrilling action scene that shows Beeler’s appreciation of Russell, but also his own growth as an artist.

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375 Arnold Friberg 1913-2010 A Glimpse of Geronimo Oil on canvas 32 x 44 inches Signed lower left; Signed and dated 1977 verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000 Exhibitions: Scottsdale Museum of the West Born in Winnetka, Illinois, but raised in Phoenix just several years after Arizona was granted statehood, Arnold Friberg started working as a cartoonist at the ripe age of 8, and later worked as a sign painter’s apprentice in high school. In 1931 he borrowed $500 to study at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and later with famed artist and illustrator Harvey Dunn in New York City. During World War II, Friberg was drafted into the Army as an artist with the rank of captain, but he chose to serve in the infantry as an enlisted soldier in Europe and the Pacific. Humble beginnings eventually led Friberg’s artwork to be some of the most viewed, most reproduced images in North America. When he died in 2010, The New York Times ran a 700-word obituary acknowledging his legacy and his contributions to American art. Some of the artist-illustrator’s earliest works were a series of commissions starting in 1937 with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police that would last 35 years, a number of important and widely reproduced images of Mormon figures for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints and, famously, The Prayer at Valley Forge showing George Washington kneeling in solemn meditation next to his horse. He was also selected by director Cecil B. DeMille to paint 15 historical works based on DeMille’s 1956 film The Ten Commandments. The paintings were sent around the world and seen by millions. In many of these works, as well as his Western easel paintings, there were several recurring themes: intense color, strong and imposing central figures, and magnificent horses rendered with an exact eye. “To me, the picturing of horses is next to worship,” Friberg said. “I am awed by how a hock joint is put together. I marvel, not only at the anatomy of animals, but also at the anatomy of trees, the whole thing, the design and engineering of it.”

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376 Z.S. Liang b. 1953 A Prized Trophy from a Blue Coat’s Encounter Oil on canvas 38 x 25 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2018 verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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377 John Coleman b. 1949 1804, The Newcomers Bronze, cast number 12/20 34 inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 2012 Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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378 Bill Owen 1942-2013 His String of Horses Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2003 Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Bill Owen was just 31 years old when the Cowboy Artists of America made him a member in 1973. Owen, the Arizona-born sculptor and painter—the son of a cowboy father and an artist mother—would go on to spend four full decades with the group and see it through a long period of growth and revitalization. The enigmatic and assertive artist lost the use of his right eye in 1989 during a rodeo practice. Though his sculpting career was over, Owen’s easel work continued unhindered. His paintings, including work of cowboys and cattle in important collections around the country, marked a defining period of Western art.

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379 Bill Owen 1942-2013 Range Branding Oil on canvas 30 x 44 inches Signed lower right and dated 2011; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 “Rough country ranches are run differently because it’s impossible to gather all the cattle during round up. Therefore the cowboys carry a running iron behind the cantle of their saddle so that when they come across any cattle that were missed and are unbranded, they can build a small fire and brand when and where they are caught. The event I depicted here took place on a ranch near Ucca Arizona. The cowboy doing the branding is Clay Tyree and the other cowboy is Shawn Grose” - Bill Owen

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380 Ray Sexton 1959-1996 Moose at Vermillion Lakes Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $3,500 - 5,000

381 Richard Loffler b. 1956 Rolling Thunder Bronze, cast number 1/15 19 inches high Signed and titled Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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382 Chad Poppleton b. 1976 Market Fresh Oil on canvas 28 x 40 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2015 verso Estimate: $10,000 - 14,000

383 George Northrup b. 1940 Elk Bronze, cast number 18/24 16 inches high, 29 inches wide Signed and inscribed “Jackson Hole” Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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384 Kenneth Bunn b. 1938 Tribute to the Gray Wolf Bronze, cast number 4/6 45 inches high, 52 inches wide Signed and dated 2014 Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000

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385 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Bear Grass & Blossoms Bronze, cast number 1/12 58 inches high Signed and dated 2015 Estimate: $35,000 - 45,000

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386 Steve Burgess b. 1960 An Icy Stare Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 20,000

387 John Schoenherr 1935-2010 Two’s Company Oil on canvas 20 x 48 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $3,000 - 6,000

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388 Arthur B. Frost 1851-1928 Set of 12 chromolithographs, 1895 13 ¾ x 20 inches each Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

These dozen prints by the great sporting artist Arthur B. Frost come from the 1895 portfolio titled The Shooting Pictures. The portfolio was meticulously designed, but over the years many sets were separated and framed, with paper wrappers often discarded. A set of 12 is quite rare, and even rarer is a set with the paper wrappers and the original text pages by Charles D. Lanier, all of which accompany this lot. The chromolithograph prints, originally published by Scribner’s, includes some of Frost’s most iconic subjects, including hunting dogs, duck decoys, and quail and pheasant hunting. The prints were a natural fit for Frost, who apprenticed with engravers and lithographers when he was 15 years old in Philadelphia. He later took night classes with Thomas Eakins at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. His initial trips west were with Scribner’s and Harper’s, which had hired him to illustrate for their publications. With his illustration career advancing rapidly, he moved to New Jersey to be closer to New York, and then spent eight years in Paris, before finally settling in California. His work was shown at both the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago and the 1900 Paris Exposition. Frost was also colorblind, which never interfered with his work, especially his early black-and-white paintings. In addition to painting these classic hunting and camping scenes, Frost was an avid sportsman and would routinely take adventures out into nature.

389 George Browne 1918-1958 Pintail Going Out Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches George Browne estate stamp verso Estimate: $2,500 - 3,500

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390 Kyle Sims b. 1980 A Bird’s Eye View Oil on canvas 42 x 22 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2014 verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

391 Daniel Smith b. 1954 Mountain Lion in the Mist Acrylic 22 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 94 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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392 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Seeking Passion and Glory Bronze, cast number 16/35 24 inches high Signed Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

393 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Bear Grass and Blossoms Bronze, cast number 10/35 15 ¾ inches high Signed Estimate: $2,500 - 3,500

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394 Clyde Aspevig b. 1951 Autumn Foothills, Glacier Park, Montana Oil on board 26 x 36 inches Signed lower left; Titled and dated 12/03 verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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395 Jay Moore b. 1964 Indian Summer, Frying Pan River Oil on canvas 54 x 72 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled dated 2007 verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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396 Glenn Dean b. 1976 Mighty Zion Oil on canvas 48 x 60 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

397 Brian Grimm b. 1968 Heart of Home Oil on board 24 x 32 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2021 verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 “This painting is a celebration of the big spread. It is of land and cattle that so many, especially Texans like myself, enjoy. It is an appreciation for an easy evening at home.” - Brian Grimm

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398 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Father Kino Graphite 18 x 14 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000 Olaf Wieghorst’s graphite drawing Father Kino shows the famous Jesuit missionary and explorer, who first arrived in North America sometime around 1680 as part of a mission for the Holy Roman Empire. Father Kino, born Eusebio Francisco Kino, traveled extensively throughout what is now northern Mexico and Southern Arizona. In addition to setting up missions throughout the region, Kino also worked with numerous Indigenous tribes, including the Tohono O’Odham. Arizona honors Father Kino with a statue in the National Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.

399 Warren Rollins 1861-1962 Plains Burial Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000 Born in Carson City, Nevada, and raised in California, Warren Rollins is one of the few early Southwestern artists who was actually from the West. Early adventures took him to Montana, where he painted Calamity Jane, and then to Arizona, where he painted Native Americans, including the Hopi, Zuni and Navajo people. He eventually landed in Santa Fe and Taos, the hot spots in New Mexico in the early 1900s. He was friends with Eanger Irving Couse, Gerald Cassidy, Sheldon Parsons and other artists of the era. In 1906, he was the first artist to have a formal art exhibition in Santa Fe’s historic Palace of Governors. He died in Winslow, Arizona, at the age of 100. The tree or scaffold burial, shown here Plains Burial, was common practice for Native American men of the region.

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400 Gary Niblett b. 1943 Rage of the Dog Soldiers Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2002; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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401 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Set of two lithographs Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000 Literature: Peggy and Harold Samuels. Remington: The Complete Prints. New York: Crown Publishers, 1990, p.70, illustrated. These are two of the original portfolio of eight lithographs, A Bunch of Buckskins, by Frederic Remington published by R. H. Russell in 1901.

Army Packer 20 x 15 inches

Calvary Officer 20 x 15 inches

402 Edward Borein 1872-1945 Set of four drawings Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Thrown 4 ½ x 3 inches

Afternoon Stage 7 ¾ x 12 ¾ inches

Cowboys 7 ½ x 10 inches

Bucking Studies 9 ½ x 7 ½ inches

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Saturday • April 10, 2021 • Session II Index – Alphabetical by Lot number Artist

Lot #

Abbett, Robert.....................................................317 Acheff, William......................................198, 367, 368 Adams, Charles Partridge.......................................180 Anton, Bill.............................................................190 Aspevig, Clyde.......................................................394

Beeler, Joe.....................................................177, 374 Berninghaus, Oscar.........................................275, 276 Bierstadt, Albert.....IFC, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272 Black, Laverne Nelson............................181, 182, 282 Borein, Edward...............................................290, 402 Borg, Carl Oscar.............................................164, 165 Browne, George......................................................389 Browning, Tom......................................................257 Bunn, Kenneth.......................................................384 Burgess, Steve.........................................................386

Carlson, Ken.........................................................197 Case, G. Russell......................................................246 Catlin, George........................................................289 Clymer, John..........................................................237 Coleman, John...............211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 238, 239, 240, 241, 377 Coleman, Michael...........................................203, 333 Cortès, Edouard..............................................361, 362

Dean, Glenn.................................................247, 396 Dixon, Maynard.....................................................273 Dudash, C. Michael........................................223, 225 Dunton, William H...............................297, 298, 302 Dye, Charlie...........................................................373

Farny, Henry.........................................................285 Fechin, Nicolai...............................306, 307, 308, 309 Fleck, Joseph..........................................................167 244

S C O T T S D A L E A R T AU C T I O N

Artist

Lot #

Frazier, Luke...........................................202, 205, 318 Friberg, Arnold......................................................375 Fritz, Charles..........................................................370 Frost, Arthur B.......................................................388

Galien-LaLoue, Eugene.........................................363 Gaspard, Leon.........................................286, 287, 288 Gollings, William................... FC, 274, 278, 283, 284 Greeves, Richard....................................................369 Grelle, Martin................................................228, 229 Griffing, Robert.............................168, 220, 221, 222 Grimm, Brian.........................................................397

Hagege, Logan Maxwell........250, 251, 252, 253, 254 Harvey, G...............................................358, 359, 360 Hauser, John...........................................................179 Hennings, E. Martin...............................................261 Hoffman, Frank..............................................312, 313 Houser, Allan.........................................................173 Hulings, Clark...............................352, 353, 354, 355

Jackson, Harry.......................................170, 171, 249 Johnson, Frank Tenney...........................................277

Koerner, W.H.D...................................................236 Kuhn, Bob.....................................................207, 208 Kuhnert, Wilhelm..................................331, 332, 337 Leffel, David..........................................................364 Leigh, William R...........................183, 334, 335, 336 Liang, Z.S...............................................255, 256, 376 Loffler, Richard..............................................206, 381 Lougheed, Robert...................................................184 Lovell, Tom....................................................169, 178


Saturday • April 10, 2021 • Session II Index – Alphabetical by Lot number Artist

Lot #

Maggiori, Mark....................................................248 McCarthy, Frank.............................................176, 192 McGrew, R. Brownell.............................................172 Mell, Ed.................................................242, 243, 244 Monroe, Lanford.....................................................174 Moore, Jay..............................................................395 Moyers, John..........................................................227

Niblett, Gary........................................................400 Northrup, George...................................................383 Norton, Jim...................................................189, 371

Oelze, Don....................................................217, 218 Owen, Bill..............................................372, 378, 379 Paxson, Edgar S.....................................................296

Artist

Lot #

Rungius, Carl................320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328 Russell, Charles......................................................292 Ryan, Tom..............................................................187

Sandzén, Birger.....................................................266 Schmid, Richard.....................199, 209, 210, 365, 366 Schoenherr, John.....................................................387 Schreyvogel, Charles........................................305, BC Seltzer, Olaf C........................................................291 Sexton, Ray............................................................380 Sharp, Joseph H......265, 293, 294, 295, 299, 300, 301 Shepherd, David.............................................329, 330 Shinabarger, Tim....................200, 201, 385, 392, 393 Shrady, Henry.........................................................319 Sims, Kyle..............................................................390 Smith, Brett...........................................................316 Smith, Daniel.........................................................391 Snidow, Gordon......................................................188

Payne, Edgar..................................................263, 264 Phillips, Bert G..............................262, 279, 280, 281 Pino, Giuseppe.......................................................357 Pleissner, Ogden.............................................314, 315 Polzin, Kyle...................................219, 258, 259, 260 Poppleton, Chad.............................................204, 382 Post, Howard.........................................................245 Pummill, Robert....................................................193

Teague, Donald.....................................................310

Remington, Frederic.....303, 304, 338, 339, 340, 341

Warren, Melvin......................................................311 Wieghorst, Olaf......................186, 194, 195, 196, 398

342, 343, 401 Reynolds, James.....................................................185 Riddick, R.S...........................................................226 Riley, Kenneth..............233, 234, 235, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351 Roberts, Gary Lynn................................................224 Rockwell, Norman.................................................356 Rollins, Warren..............................................166, 399

Terpning, Howard..................................230, 231, 232 Thomas, Richard....................................................191

Walker, William A..............................................175

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Saturday • April 10, 2021 • Session II Absentee Bid Form Fax to (480) 423-4071 or Email info@scottsdaleauction.com As a courtesy to Absentee Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will execute your bid if you are unable to be present at the auction. Please complete this form and forward it to a member of our staff. A disinterested party will bid on your behalf, not necessarily to your maximum bid, but to the next bid above what is offered, provided that your bid is in excess of the reserve, if any. In the event of identical bids, the first bid received will take precedence. Mailed or faxed bids should be confirmed by email at info@scottsdaleartauction.com Absentee Bidder Information: Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Email _______________________________________________________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ By checking this box I certify that I am not a resident of the State of Arizona Credit Card Information: Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Billing zip code: ________________________________ An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Please bid on my behalf for the following Lots up to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC Terms and Conditions of Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 88 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Signature __________________________________________________Date __________________________________________________

Lot #

Maximum Bid

Description

(Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Absentee bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Wednesday, April 7, 2021. Please fax your completed Absentee Bid Form to (480) 423-4071 or email info@scottsdaleartauction.com. SCOTTSDALE • 7176 7176 MAIN ARIZONA85251 85251 ••480 SCOTTSDALE ART ART AUCTION AUCTION • MAINSTREET STREET •• SCOTTSDALE SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 480945-0225 945-0225

www.scottsdaleartauction.com www.scottsdaleartauction.com

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Saturday • April 10, 2021 • Session II Telephone Bid Form Fax to (480) 423-4071 or Email info@scottsdaleauction.com As a courtesy to Telephone Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will arrange for telephone lines on Lots with a minimum estimate of $5,000 and over. For lots under $5,000, please use our Absentee Bid Form. Please complete this form and forward it to a member of our staff. Bidders are encouraged to make arrangements early as telephone lines will be allocated on a first come basis. Mailed or faxed bids should be confirmed by email at info@scottsdaleartauction.com Telephone Bidder Information: Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Email _______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________Alternate Phone __________________________________ By checking this box I certify that I am not a resident of the State of Arizona

Credit Card Information: Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Billing zip code: ________________________________ An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Please bid on my behalf for the following Lots up to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC Terms and Conditions of Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 88 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Signature __________________________________________________Date __________________________________________________

Lot #

Maximum Bid

Description

(Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Telephone bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Thursday, April 8, 2021. Please fax your completed Telephone Bid Form to (480) 423-4071 or email info@scottsdaleartauction.com. SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

www.scottsdaleartauction.com

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Notes

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Writer: Michael Clawson Photography: Rob Kaufman Hilton Head Island, SC (843) 290-8883 www.kaufmanphotography.com Design & Production Cindy & Paula Moser Phoenix, AZ (843) 441-3686 www.xmsdesigns.com Printing: O’Neil Printing Phoenix, AZ (602) 258-7789 www.oneilprint.com


SCOTTSDALE ART A U CTION 7176 main street • scottsdale arizona 85251 • www.scottsdaleartauction.com • 480 945-0225

Profile for Scottsdale Art Auction

Scottsdale Art Auction Session 2  

Scottsdale Art Auction April 9th and 10th, 2021. Auctioning over 400 works of Western, Wildlife, and Sporting Art.

Scottsdale Art Auction Session 2  

Scottsdale Art Auction April 9th and 10th, 2021. Auctioning over 400 works of Western, Wildlife, and Sporting Art.

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