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April 4, 2020 • Session II

pril 7, 2018 • Session I


Front Cover 237 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Trail Herd (detail) Oil on canvas 30 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 1936; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $400,000 - 600,000

Opposite 244 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Neolithic Afternoon Oil on canvas 36 x 40 inches Signed lower left and dated 1930 Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000

Back Cover 219 John Clymer 1907-1989 Thundering Hoofs Oil on board 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Titled verso Estimate: $300,000 - 400,000


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SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday• April • April 2017 Saturday 4, 8, 2020

JACK A. MORRIS JR.

MICHAEL FROST

BRAD RICHARDSON

legacy gallery j.n. bartfield morris fine arts Friday,galleries April 7 7178 Street 60 W. 55th Street 79 Baynard Cove Road 10:00am–5:00pm...............................................................................................RegistrationMain & Preview Scottsdale, AZ 85251 New York, NY 10019 ..........................................................................................................Cocktail Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 6:00pm–8:00pm Preview 480.945.1113 212.245.8890 843.247.2217 Saturday, April 8 8:30am–9:30am.................................................................................................Registration & Preview 9:30am ............................................................................................................. First Session: Lots 1–141 11:30am ...............................................................................................................................Lunch Buffet Jason Brooks, Auctioneer 1:00pm ....................................................................................................Second Session: Lots 142–386 Pre-registration at www.scottsdaleartauction.com Online biddingavailable arrangements can be made through

www.scottsdaleartauction.com* *with no additional buyer’s premium

Download our Scottsdale Art Auctions app today!

Hotel reservations at special Scottsdale Art Auction rates are available at: Marriott Suites Hotel Valley Ho Telephone must be Scottsdale Old TownBidding Arrangements 6850 E. Main Street • Scottsdale made no later than 5:00 pm on Thursday, April 2. 7325 East 3rd Avenue • Scottsdale hotelvalleyho.com Subject to availability. (888) 236-2427 toll free Ask for Molly Absentee be (480) 945-1550 localBidding Arrangements must (480) 248-2004 local made no later than 5:00 pm on Friday, April 3. (3 online blocks walking distance) (3 blocks walking Pleasedistance) call (480) 945-0225 or register at www.scottsdaleartauction.com

Auction results will be available online Monday, April 13. www.scottsdaleartauction.com

SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

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7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

480 945-0225

SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION

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SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday• April • April 2017 Saturday 4, 8, 2020

Friday, April 3 10:00am - 5:00pm.............................................................................................Registration & Preview Friday, April 7 6:00pm - 8:00pm..........................................................................................................Cocktail Preview 10:00am–5:00pm...............................................................................................Registration & Preview 6:00pm–8:00pm Saturday, April 4 ..........................................................................................................Cocktail Preview

8:00am - 9:00am...............................................................................................Registration & Preview Saturday, April 8 9:00am. .............................................................................................................First Session: Lots 1-136 8:30am–9:30am.................................................................................................Registration Preview 11:00am - 1:00pm...............................................................................................................Lunch&Buffet 9:30am ............................................................................................................. Session: Lots 1–141 12:30pm.................................................................................................. Second First Session: Lots 137-377 11:30am ...............................................................................................................................Lunch Buffet 1:00pm ....................................................................................................Second Session: Lots 142–386 Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com

Hotel Special reservations at special Scottsdale Art Auction rates discounted hotel rates available: are available at: Make reservations on our website www.scottsdaleartauction.com or call for the Scottsdale Art Auction Corporate Rate. Marriott Suites Scottsdale Old Town Marriot Suites • Scottsdale 7325 East 3rd Avenue Old Town Scottsdale (888) 236-2427 toll free 7325 E. 3rd Ave • Scottsdale (480) 945-1550 local (480) 945-1550 select option 1 Reference Scottsdale Artdistance) Auction (3 blocks walking

Hotel Valley Ho 6850 E. Main Street • Scottsdale Hotel Valley Ho hotelvalleyho.com Scottsdale AskSt.for Molly 6850 E. Main • Scottsdale (480) 248-2004 local (866) 882-4484 toll free Legacydistance) (3Reference blocks walking

Limited Space Available

SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

480 945-0225

SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION

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Terms and Conditions

BUYER’S PREMIUM The purchase price payable by the Purchaser shall be the total of the final bid price PLUS A PREMIUM OF SEVENTEEN PERCENT (17%) on any individual lot in the amount up to and including $500,000; TWELVE PERCENT (12%) on any individual lot on the amount in excess of $500,000. This premium is in addition to any commissions or other charges payable by the consignor. Auction The art illustrated in this catalogue will be offered for sale on April 4, 2020 by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC on premises at 7176 Main Street, Scottsdale, Arizona. Telephone Bidding As a courtesy to clients who are unable to attend the sale, a telephone and order (absentee) bid service will be offered as staff and time allow. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC shall not be responsible for any errors or omissions or failure to execute such bids. Contact Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC at (480) 945-0225 (or register online) early for arrangements as telephone lines will be allocated on a first come basis. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will arrange for telephone lines on lots with a minimum estimate of $5,000 and over. Absentee Bidding and Fax Confidential absentee bid orders for auction items may also be completed and will be executed by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC on behalf of the Purchaser during the auction. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC shall not be responsible for any errors or omissions or failure to execute such intent to purchase orders or auction bids. This catalogue, as may be amended by posted notice or oral salesroom announcement, represents Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s entire agreement with any and all purchasers of the Property listed herein. The following are Procedures, Terms and Conditions on which all such Property listed is offered for sale by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC as agent for various owners or other Consignors: 1. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC reserves the right to withdraw Property at any time before or at the sale and shall have no liability for such withdrawal. 2. All Property will be sold “AS IS”. With respect to each lot of Property, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC does not make any guarantees, warranties or representations, expressed or implied, as to merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, the correctness of the catalogue or the authenticity or description of the Property, its physical condition, size, quality, rarity, importance, medium, provenance, exhibitions, literature or historical relevance. No statement, anywhere, whether oral or written, whether made in the catalogue, an advertisement, a bill of sale, a salesroom posting or announcement, or elsewhere, shall be deemed such a warranty, representation or assumption of liability. In no event shall Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC be responsible for genuineness, authorship, attribution, provenance, period, culture, source, origin or condition of the purchased Property and no verbal statements made regarding the Property either before or after the sale of the Property, or in any bill of sale, invoice or catalogue or advertisement or elsewhere shall be deemed such a guarantee of genuineness, or authenticity. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if within ten (10) calendar days after the purchase of any lot of Property, the Purchaser provides an opinion by a recognized authority on the artist and gives notice in writing to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC that the lot is not authentic, and returns the purchased lot to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, within ten (10) days of its purchase in the same condition as when sold, then Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will refund the full purchase price to the Purchaser. It shall be in the sole discretion of Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC as to whether the opinion provided by the Purchaser is an opinion by a recognized authority on the artist. 3. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC and/or Auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bids. The highest bidder acknowledged by the Auctioneer shall be the Purchaser. In the event of any dispute between bidders, the Auctioneer will have absolute and final discretion to either determine the successful bidder or to re-offer and resell the Property item in dispute. After the sale, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s record of final sale shall be conclusive.

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4. At the fall of the Auctioneer’s hammer, the Purchaser shall (a) be acknowledged by bidder number by the auctioneer, (b) pay the hammer price and a buyer’s premium as outlined above. In addition, Purchaser may be required to sign a confirmation of purchase. All sales are final with no exchanges or returns. 5. Unless exempted by law, the Purchaser will be required to pay any and all state and local tax pertaining to sales (sales tax, transaction privileged, etc...). It is the Purchaser's responsibility to pay any applicable use tax imposed by their state of residence on the total purchase price. In the event that sales tax has not been included in the invoiced amount and it is subsequently determined that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC was required to collect sales tax in connection herewith, Purchaser shall reimburse Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC upon demand for any sales tax (or equivalent) accessed or due as a result of goods or services proveded by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC hereunder, unless Purchaser provides Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC evidence of exemption from such taxes. 6. Terms for all purchases will be cash, check or credit card (VISA/MasterCard/American Express) with settlement and payment due in full the day of the sale unless otherwise arranged. All monies shall be made payable to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC. At the discretion of Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, payment will not be deemed to have been made in full until funds represented by checks have been collected or the authenticity of bank or cashier’s checks has been confirmed. An additional 3% will be charged on all credit card payments. 7. No item of Property may be paid for or removed from Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC during the sale. After the sale has been completed and after the purchase price has been paid in full, Property must be removed from the saleroom at the Purchaser’s expense not later than three business days following the sale. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will, as a service to Purchasers, arrange to have Property packed, insured and shipped, all charges at the expense and entire risk of Purchaser. 8. Some items of Property may be offered subject to a “reserve” or confidential minimum price below which the item will not be sold. In such instances, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC may implement the reserve by bidding through the Auctioneer on behalf of the Consignor. In no event shall the reserve exceed the low estimate in the catalogue. 9. Neither Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, nor Auctioneer, nor Consignor make any representations whatsoever that the Purchaser of a work of art will acquire any reproduction rights thereto. 10. These Conditions of Sale and any other applicable conditions, as well as the Purchaser’s and Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s rights and obligations herein shall be governed by, construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the State of Arizona. If these conditions are not complied with by the Purchaser, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC may, in addition to other remedies available by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the Purchaser liable for the total purchase price stated on the Confirmation of Purchase Invoice, either (a) cancel the sale and retain as liquidated damages any and all payments made by the Purchaser or (b) resell the Property privately or at public auction on three days’ notice to the Purchaser for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs including handling charges, warehousing, the expense of both sales, the commissions, reasonable attorneys’ fees, any and all other charges due and incidental damages. 11. Biding on any item indicates your acceptance of these terms and all other terms announced at the time of sale whether bidding in person, by phone, by Internet, by absentee bid, or through a representative. 12. In most instances, sculpture measurements do not include base. In measurements for two dimensional art, height precedes width and does not include frame. 13. Bidding increments will normally follow the pattern below but may vary at the sole discretion of the Auctioneer. Increment Estimate Increment Estimate 20,000–50,000 ...................... 2,500 Under 2,000............................. 100 2,000–5,000 ............................. 250 50,000–100,000..................... 5,000 5,000–10,000............................ 500 over 100,000 ....................... 10,000 10,000–20,000....................... 1,000


12:30pm Lots 137 - 377

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137 George Catlin 1796-1872 Collection of two lithographs Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Catching the Wild Horse Lithograph 14 x 19 inches

Buffalo Hunt, Chase Lithograph 14 x 19 inches

George Catlin was the first white man to meet and paint American Indians in their world, on their terms. In five separate journeys from his home in New York in the years 1830-36, Catlin traveled west as far as the Oklahoma-Texas border. He painted portraits of Native American men, women, and children, scenes depicting buffalo hunts, ceremonies, and moments in the daily lives of Indians. He saw what was happening to the peoples he visited as they withered and vanished in the face of westward expansion and hoped his prints would broadcast an appreciation of Native American cultures, and lead to peace.

138 R. Brownell McGrew 1916-1994 The Navajo, Tse Gedde Bronze, cast number 6/20 11 inches high Signed Estimate: $2,000 - 3,000

R. Brownell McGrew worked in the film industry before becoming a full time painter and sculptor specializing in Hopi and Navajo subjects. McGrew referred to himself as “an Impressionist in the classical sense,” though his works exhibit a much finer level of detail than his spiritual forebears. McGrew contorts and exaggerates the wrinkles of The Navajo, Tse Gedde’s ancient face into a contour map of his long life. Ironically, the smooth turquoise of his earring is far older than he seems.

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139 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 With Best Wishes for a Happy Trail Ahead Pen & Ink, Watercolor 9 ¼ x 8 inches Signed lower right, titled and dated 1960 Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

140 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Arizona Cowboy Pen & Ink, Watercolor 10 x 8 inches Signed lower left; Titled verso Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

141 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Hasty Loop Oil on board 14 x 12 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 A child acrobat in his native Denmark, Olaf Wieghorst made a smooth transition to successful rodeo rider after his family moved to the United States. He was also a U. S. Cavalryman on the rugged Mexican border and a mounted police officer in New York City. To say that he knew his way around horses is quite an understatement. After moving to California in 1944, Wieghorst translated an interest in art into a career depicting Western life in the saddle, taking special pride in his ability to convey the anatomy of the horse within a wellconstructed scene; he was always on the lookout for the “little natural things” to add to his popular canvases. Among his many friends and the many avid collectors of his work were Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater and President Ronald Reagan.

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142 Carl Oscar Borg 1879-1947 In the Shadow of Casa Grande, N.M. Watercolor 7 ½ x 17 inches Signed lower left/ANA and dated Sept 5 1940 Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000 Provenance: The artist Gifted to William Corcoran by the artist (1940) Robert B. Young Grand Central Art Galleries, NY. University of Southern California, CA. Christie’s. Los Angeles. Oct. 24, 2000. Private Collection. Exhibitions: Out of Sight: From San Diego Collections. Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego. San Diego, CA. Mar.-Apr., 1972. An early art director in Hollywood, Carl Oscar Borg was often paired with silent adventure star Douglas Fairbanks to create a look for Robin Hood, The Three Musketeers, and other classics. Swedish-born, Borg was also a gifted painter who learned his craft from William Wendt and was sponsored by Phoebe Hearst. Settling in Santa Barbara, Borg became fast friends with Edward Borein and the two often traveled together throughout the Southwest, sketching and painting what he called its “wilderness of color and form.”

143 Carl Oscar Borg 1879-1947 Fiesta Walpi Watercolor 14 x 14 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000 Exhibitions: Carl Oscar Borg: An Artist's Journey. May 23 - Sept. 9, 2012. The Wildling Museum, Los Olivos, CA.

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Carl Oscar Borg–Spirit of the West. Santa Barbara Historical Museum. Nov. 15, 2012 Mar 17, 2013.


144 Grace Carpenter Hudson 1865-1937 Mannie's Little Girl Oil on canvas 12 ½ x 10 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Literature:

Searles R. Boynton. The Painter Lady: Grace Carpenter Hudson. Eureka, CA: Interface California Corporation, 1978, p. 167, illustrated. Listed as 251, painted in 1904.

The project that Grace Hudson and her husband undertook when she began to paint portraits of the Pomo and he began to amass their exquisite baskets and other artifacts has become the record of a people who, along with their way of life, were expected to vanish. They did not, and behind their simple beauties, Hudson’s paintings bear witness to their resilient humanity.

145 William A. Walker 1838-1921 Low Country Cabin Oil on board 6 x 12 ¼ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 After serving in the Confederate Army, South Carolina painter William Aiken Walker enjoyed his greatest success with paintings of emancipated African-American sharecroppers during and after Reconstruction. His works have the flavor of nostalgia for the antebellum, plantation South, yet they also serve to document a time, place, and people whose lives often went unrecorded.

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146 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 War Party Gouache 21 x 13 inches Signed lower right and dated 1906 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Denmark native Olaf Seltzer’s parents saw his talent for drawing and enrolled him in a school where he could develop his skills. In 1892, after his father’s untimely death, Seltzer’s mother emigrated to the United States, settling in Great Falls, Montana. Seltzer became a cowboy, then worked as a machinist for the Great Northern Railway. A meeting with artist Charles Russell became a fast friendship, and Russell encouraged and mentored Seltzer as he moved toward a full-time career as a painter.

147 W.H.D. Koerner 1878-1938 Leaving the Old Man Oil on canvas 26 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 1921 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Inscribed verso: “According to his lights– Rose waved a hand to him and blew him a kiss and they cantered off.” Literature:

Kennett Harris. “According to His Lights,” in The Saturday Evening Post. Oct. 1, 1921, p. 3, illustrated.

W.H.D. Koerner began his career doing illustrations for Chicago’s newspapers. After one of the papers went bust, Koerner journeyed to New York to find work and further his studies. His acceptance to Howard Pyle’s school along the Brandywine found him in the company of Pyle’s other great pupils: N.C. Wyeth, Harvey Dunn, and Maxfield Parrish–to name but three. Koerner quickly found work in illustration, but when The Saturday Evening Post asked him, in 1919, to apply his talents to two serialized Westerns, Koerner’s work came to life. He would go on to do many covers and illustrations for the Post and others and would help bridge the gap between illustration and easel painting.

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148 Gilbert Gaul 1855-1919 New Mexican Village Oil on canvas 24 x 18 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $2,500 - 4,500 Gaul, along with Peter Moran, who accompanied him west, must have been just about the first white painters in New Mexico, painting there perhaps as much as a decade prior to Sharp’s first visit in 1893. New Mexican Village has the feel of journalistic realism. If it were a photograph, it wouldn’t be a dramatic composition, a la Edward Curtis, but something more candid, more spontaneous. As an illustrator and ethnological recorder, Gaul captures a range of people, activities, implements, clothing, and architecture in a single image, giving the viewer an impression of a passing moment on a single day.

149 Gilbert Gaul 1855-1919 Mandan Sioux Warrior Oil on canvas 29 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Gilbert Gaul was born six years before the start of the Civil War and died the year after the end of hostilities in World War I. Those conflicts would bookend his career as an important painter of American military and interpreter of Westward expansion. Gaul studied in New York, then went west in 1876; his military and picturesque paintings of that journey soon began to appear in Century and Harper’s. Gaul capitalized on the renewed interest in American history that arose from the Centennial, painting episodes from Civil War battles that were widely reproduced. From 188291, Gaul made many trips west. In 1890, he was one of several artists–including Peter Moran and Julian Scott–who were sent by the Federal Government to illustrate the Census Report. Gaul traveled to reservations in North Dakota where he did one of the last sketches of Sitting Bull before the great chief’s death.

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150 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 Moving Camp Watercolor 6 x 11 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

151 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 Red Horse Oil on board 9 ½ x 9 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

152 Henry Farny 1847-1916 Corn Ceremony Gouache 7 ½ x 10 ¼ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Provenance: George Gund III Trust, CA. Bonhams, Aug. 1, 2017. Lot 137. Private Collection, TX.

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153 Grace Ravlin 1873-1956 Cochiti Corn Dancers Oil on canvas 18 x 22 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

In a letter to her niece, postmarked July 17, 1916, Grace Ravlin describes her visit to the Cochiti pueblo in New Mexico to witness and sketch the traditional Corn Dance: “…The women are mostly in black with red sashes and lots of silver jewelry and beads and a sort of tablet headdress of turquoise green… The men knot a red silk handkerchief across their foreheads and tie it at the back of their heads of heavy black hair, which is done in a tail, like they do up horses’ tails sometimes… They are led by a chap carrying a long pole ornamented quite nattily with hanging skins and feathers and painted and woven ornaments… The women carry bunches of evergreen in their hands…” Ravlin goes on to describe the estufas, or kivas, sacred meeting places for the Pueblo natives. Estufas “are circular buildings of adobe [that] they mount to the roof of [sic] by six or seven steps and then descend [into] by a ladder through a trap door. I made a sketch… of the estufa with bright colored shawls and things against the sky. They used the place as a sort of dressing room [for the Corn Dance].” Excerpted from “Yours always, Grace: Letters of Grace Ravlin, American Artist” by Alta Ann Parkins Morris with Eva Moore. It seems possible, perhaps even likely, that this painting, Cochiti Corn Dancers, was executed after the sketch Ravlin mentions in this letter.

154 Grace Ravlin 1873-1956 Pueblo Afternoon Oil on canvas 23 x 28 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 An elective–an art class–in her Kaneville, Illinois high school set Grace Ravlin’s artistic ambition in motion. She went on to study with William Merritt Chase and the Orientalists in France and served as a Red Cross nurse at the end of World War I. Ravlin met the world on her own terms when doing so was rare for a single woman, painting in France, Holland, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Morocco, Tunisia–and New Mexico. She knew Walter Ufer and many of the Taos Founders and used Ufer’s Chicago studio when he was in Taos. Ravlin’s letters offer a singular window into her life, travels, and career.

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155 John Henry Hill 1839-1922 Overland Ranch, Ruby Valley, Nevada Watercolor 8 ¾ x 15 ¼ inches Signed lower right and dated 1871 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

Hudson Valley native John Henry Hill was a noted landscape artist who specialized in exquisitely detailed watercolors, employing a range of small, dry brushstrokes, to suggest the textures of the terrain. In 1868, Hill went West with Clarence King’s survey expedition, sketching and painting in Idaho, Nevada, and California. On his return to New York, he built a studio on an island in Lake George. A number of his paintings, as well as his diary–which includes a description and sketch of the present work, Overland Ranch, Ruby Valley, Nevada–are on display in the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake, New York.

156 Fremont Ellis 1897-1985 Sunlight Through the Aspen Groves Oil on board 24 x 30 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 You can imagine the brush in Fremont Ellis’s hand pushing paint around, creating sensations of romantic color, dramatic light and sensual texture as opposed to line and shape. The best known of Los Cincos Pintores–Santa Fe’s answer to the Taos Founders–Ellis was virtually self-taught–he had been an optometrist and photographer, occupations that influenced his artistic vision–and had a reputation as a loner among the typically gregarious New Mexico artists. Sunlight Through the Aspen Groves is a tone poem of shadow and light playing through scudding clouds and the crowns of the aspens and darting on the water. This same light hides the trees that are out in the open, at the water’s edge, in a blinding, dazzling obscurity.

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157 Edward Borein 1872-1945 Stagecoach Watercolor 4 ¼ x 6 ¾ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

Edward Borein knew the life of the cowboy and vaquero. Leaving his home near Oakland at an early age, Borein drove cattle throughout the Southwest and Mexico. His mother saw his sketches and enrolled him in art school in San Francisco. But school stifled Borein and he went back to cowboy life, sketching what he experienced. His work began to appear in Eastern periodicals and brought him into the company of Maynard Dixon and Charles Russell–both of them became close friends. Borein settled in Santa Barbara, becoming a fixture in the art scene there and a favorite among the Hollywood set.

158 Edward Borein 1872-1945 Stampede Oil on board 16 x 12 inches Signed lower right and dated 05 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Provenance: Private Collection, TX. In 1905, when Stampede was painted, Edward Borein had just returned from a cattle drive that began at the Bavicora Ranch in Northern Mexico and headed north into New Mexico. On that drive, Borein saw sights that would fuel his imagination for the rest of his life and career. For the first few years after his experience, he would illustrate books and articles and push into oil painting and etching. This work, Stampede, is all about the movement of the herd and the attempts of the mounted vaqueros to maintain control. In a great cloud of sandy dust, the herd swirls from right to left and right again, trapping the vaqueros in the middle of the merry-go-round.

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159 James Bama b. 1926 Old Corral in Winter Oil on board 20 x 24 inches Signed lower left and dated 00; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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160 James Bama b. 1926 Making Horse Medicine Oil on board 20 x 24 inches Signed lower left and dated 92; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

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161 Bill Owen 1942-2013 CO Bar Roundup (Triptych) Oil on canvas Signed lower right/CA and dated 2004 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

Oil on canvas 24 x 20 inches

Oil on canvas 24 x 20 inches

Oil on canvas 24 x 32 inches

Like the Frank McCarthy triptych offered elsewhere in this catalogue, Bill Owen’s CO Bar Roundup is a continuous scene broken up and framed in three paintings. Some cowboys have saddled their horses, others wait to saddle theirs, and the riders in the middle panel are in the act of choosing and saddling theirs. Making each painting into a panel invites the viewer to pay attention not only to the heart of the action but also to the quieter moments at the action’s edges.

162 Bill Anton b. 1957 Winter Palette Oil on board 30 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2015 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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163 Jason Rich b. 1970 In the Morning Light Oil on board 24 x 31 ½ inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2010 verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

164 Mehl Lawson b. 1942 Early Morning Disagreement Bronze, cast number 1/15 44 inches high, 30 inches wide Signed/CA and dated 89 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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165 John Coleman b. 1949 War & Peace Bronze, cast number 4/15 48 inches high, 44 inches wide Signed, titled and dated 2001 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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166 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Buffalo Dance Acrylic 13 x 11 ¾ inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

Ken Riley adapted his skills as an illustrator to easel painting, developing a signature style in Western Art that owes something to classical bas-relief sculpture, Renaissance fresco, and the mural tradition. In the Preface to the book, West of Camelot: The Historical Paintings of Kenneth Riley, art historian Susan Hallsten McGary sums up Riley’s approach: "Riley uses the past as inspiration and then passes through it to personal revelation about the harmony and perfection to be found in the human condition. On the pediments of the Parthenon and on the ceilings and walls of Renaissance churches we find the classical ideal Kenneth Riley portrays…” Riley’s unerring sense of design creates a stillness, an air of myth and legend. He focuses our eyes and accentuates the drama of the moment. Attention to craft that demonstrates the breadth of his artistic and historical education means that Ken Riley is a crucial connection, perhaps the crucial connection, between the early masters of the West, the Golden Age of American Illustration and the contemporary Western Art scene.

167 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 A Captured Mount Acrylic 12 x 18 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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168 John Coleman b. 1949 Pasheepo, Little Stabbing Chief Bronze, cast 9/35 32 inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 2006 Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000 169 John Coleman b. 1949 A Warrior’s Journey Charcoal 21 x 14 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2006 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Award: Silver Medal in Drawing and Other Media. Cowboy Artists of America. 2006

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170 John Coleman b. 1949 Addih Hiddisch-Hidatsa Chief Bronze, cast number 5/9 88 inches high, 40 inches wide Signed, titled and dated 2004 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Award: Kieckefer Award (Best of Show). Cowboy Artists of America. 2005 Exhibitions: Part of the Peter Kiewit Foundation Sculpture Garden on permanent display at the Joslyn Museum, Omaha, NE.

Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, AZ. On permanent display.

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171 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Autumn Acrylic 12 x 9 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 2012 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

172 Charles Fritz b. 1955 Bloods Traveling the Old North Trail Oil on board 7 ž x 16 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $2,800 - 3,800

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173 Z.S. Liang b. 1953 The Captured Flag Oil on canvas 40 x 60 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2019 verso Estimate: $50,000 - 70,000 Over the years I have visited the site of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, which is also known as the Battle of the Greasy Grass to the Lakota and other Pains Indians, eleven times. And on each occasion when I approached the rolling hills of the Little Bighorn on one of my visits, I would get the feeling that the encounter between the U.S. Cavalry and the Plains Indians had just taken place the day before. And as strange as it may seem, I would also be overcome with a sense of sadness and my heart would become heavy thinking of what transpired on that day in June of 1876. After many visits to the site of the battle, I painted “Victory Dance, Little Bighorn, 1876” three years ago. And after my most recent visit, I was once again overcome with emotion and I had strong feelings that the warriors and soldiers who fought that day did not actually perish. Instead, they are standing there invisible and their spirits remain alive. So I decided to paint “The Captured Flag” - which depicts an event that could have happened immediately after the battle ended.

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174 Don Oelze b. 1965 The Interpreter Oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 "During the fur trade era, many trappers would take Indian wives. The relationship was beneficial in several ways. One important blessing was her ability to communicate with various tribes, either verbally or with hand signs. In many cases she would be the go-between and interpreter leading to a successful and safe encounter." - Don Oelze

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175 Bill Anton b. 1957 Packing the Superstitions Oil on board 30 x 50 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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176 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Morning Calm Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 98 Estimate: $65,000 - 85,000

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177 Martin Grelle b. 1954 She Awaits Her Warrior Oil on canvas 40 x 30 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 2018; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $65,000 - 85,000

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178 C. Michael Dudash b. 1952 Nobility Oil on board 30 x 26 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 7/24/19 verso Estimate: $14,000 - 16,000

179 Russell Case b. 1966 Kiva Meeting Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2020 verso Estimate: $6,000 - 8,000

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180 Mark Maggiori b. 1977 Arizona Wonders Oil on board 32 x 34 inches Signed lower right and dated 2019 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 "Arizona Wonders is an ode to the monsoon, a visual testimony to the magic hour that only the Grand Canyon State can offer. As a painter, my love for the colors of an Arizona sunset has no equal. Everytime I travel to paint outdoors, I spend every hour of the sunset staring at the clouds or just at the incredible pinks that emanate from the Mesa. In this painting, I wanted to bring the viewer with me out into the desert, to smell the petrichor, that unique scent produced by rain on the creosote in bushes, so typical to the southwest desert. These two cowboys are headed back to the ranch before dark, leading their horses with confidence so the electricity of the moment wouldn’t spook them. They are the knights of the desert, roaming forever and firing our imagination in the mythical Arizona landscape." - Mark Maggiori

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181 Tom Browning b. 1949 Bustin’ Loose Oil on board 34 x 34 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $18,000 - 28,000

182 Glenn Dean b. 1976 September Morning Oil on canvas 30 x 30 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2020 verso Estimate: $14,000 - 18,000

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183 Gary Lynn Roberts b. 1953 Return of the Scout Oil on canvas 40 x 54 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

184 Jeremy Winborg b. 1979 Songs for My Ancestors Oil on board 40 x 30 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2020 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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185 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Wherever the Wind Might Go Oil on canvas 40 x 60 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 "Each time I set out to make a new painting there is a recognition of my past, an acceptance of my presence, and new goals for the future. Each piece is a springboard to the next, a part of the process of the life of an artist that I have come to love." - Logan Maxwell Hagege

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186 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Study for New Direction Oil on board 18 x 20 inches Initialed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2017 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

187 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Amongst the Sage Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed upper left; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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188 Ed Mell b. 1942 Inner Canyon Flow Oil on board 10 x 18 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2004 verso Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

189 Ed Mell b. 1942 Chihuahua Burro Oil on canvas 12 x 16 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2005 verso Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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190 Ed Mell b. 1942 Across the Desert Oil on canvas 40 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2019 verso Estimate: $28,000 - 38,000

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191 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 All American Oil on canvas 21 x 35 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

“Football embodies everything we love about American exceptionalism. During times of war, it served to ready men for service and lift the morale of the nation.�- Kyle Polzin

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192 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Spirit of the Plains Oil on canvas 19 x 10 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

193 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Puttin’ Up the Spurs Oil on canvas 12 x 19 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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194 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 Attacking the Iron Horse Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right and dated 72; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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195 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 Running Off the Herd (Triptych) Oil on canvas Signed lower right/CA; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

Oil on canvas 30 x 20 inches

Oil on canvas 30 x 50 inches

Oil on canvas 30 x 20 inches

What makes Frank McCarthy’s Running Off the Herd a triptych–three paintings intended to be hung and seen together–is also what makes this an unusual triptych: the background. Most triptychs are religious in nature: three paintings of related, generally sacred subjects by a single artist, hinged and placed as altarpieces. Each panel, traditionally, can stand as a single work, but a triptych is three in one and one in three–you see how this works in a Christian, Trinitarian sense. In Running Off the Herd, however, Frank McCarthy takes the triptych concept to another level, painting the rocky, craggy setting and the light falling on the scene in continuity across all three paintings. But what is happening in McCarthy’s triptych isn’t something you’d see on the altar of an Old World church. What we see in these paintings–in this unified work–is the warriors’ successful return, with fresh horses, to their starkly beautiful, unbroken homeland. Horses were perhaps the scarcest commodity on the Northern Plains. Native Americans depended on them and revered them. The horse raid becomes much more than mere theft; it is an opportunity for the men of the band to demonstrate cunning, audacity bravery–essential leadership traits, and thus, a sacred ritual act. That this raid will be remembered in song and story is signified in the light breaking across Running Off the Herd. Light breaks on the peaks, on the river below, on the warriors’ faces, on their horses, on the tips of their spears, in the very dust they kick up. Light.

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196 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Contenders Acrylic 10 x 11 ½ inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $28,000 - 38,000

197 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Push Comes to Shove Bronze, cast number 23/25 18 ½ inches high, 54 inches wide Signed Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Award: James Earle Fraser Sculpture Award. 2004 Prix de West. Literature:

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Don Hedgpeth & Ed Trumble. The Story of Leanin’ Tree: Art and Enterprise in the American West. Boulder, CO, pp. 302-303, illustrated. The Best of the Best: 2015 Contemporary Wildlife Exhibition and Sale. Woolaroc Museum, Oklahoma. p. 76, illustrated. *A copy of the book will accompany this lot.

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198 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 A Wee Stirring Acrylic 12 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000

199 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Black Timber Bugler Bronze, cast number 2/30 27 inches high, 27 inches wide Signed Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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200 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Alaska Fly By Acrylic 24 x 30 inches Signed lower right; Signed and dated 2003 verso Estimate: $75,000 - 125,000 Literature: The Best of the Best: 2015 Contemporary Wildlife Exhibition and Sale. Woolaroc Museum, Oklahoma. p. 44, illustrated. *A copy of the book will accompany this lot. Bob Kuhn began–as so many artists of his generation did–as an illustrator. His animal imagery graced the covers and pages of Outdoor Life and many other publications, illustrating stories and advertising Remington firearms, sometimes in the same issue. In 1970, Kuhn left illustration for easel painting and quickly became one of the finest interpreters of big game animals. Kuhn balanced a desire for accuracy with a flair for design that transmits the essential cycles of action and stillness, life and death, in the natural world. In Alaska Fly By, gulls on the prowl–for scraps, no doubt–zoom around and past a mother Brown Bear with her frightened but curious cub. To mama, the birds are probably a normal nuisance, but to the cub this is new. Kuhn often saw humor in animals. In his paintings animals learn, play, and miscalculate just as humans do; this, in turn, brings the world of the wilderness closer to our own.

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201 Tucker Smith b. 1940 Morning Fog Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right and signed 99 Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000

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202 William Gollings 1878-1932 Sagebrush Jaunt Oil on board 10 x 7 inches Signed lower right and dated 1923 Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Provenance: G.A. Tomlinson, OH. Circa 1930s. Scottsdale Art Auction. Apr. 2, 2011, lot 227. Private Collection, acquired at the above sale. Christie’s. New York, May 21, 2015. Lot 6. Private Collection, TX. Exhibitions: “Recapturing the Real West: Collections of William I. Koch.” The Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach, Florida. Feb 4-Apr 15, 2012.

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203 Charles Schreyvogel 1861-1912 The Last Drop Cast No 127 Bronze, Signed Chas. Schreyvogel, with Copyright and dated 1903 and inscribed RBW beneath base Cast by Roman Bronze Works, NY. Height: 12 inches Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Literature: Patricia Janis Broder. Bronzes of the American West. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1975, pp. 202-206, illustrated p. 203 (another example). Charles Schreyvogel was never a prolific illustrator, so the national acclaim accorded his contemporaries, Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell came late to him and was short-lived due to his early demise at the age of 51. He did, however, travel widely in the West from his home in Hoboken, sketching and documenting life on U.S. Army posts and Native American reservations. Unlike Remington and Russell, the cowboy was not a typical subject for Schreyvogel. Most of the fewer than 100 major works he had painted when he died were scenes of intense conflict between soldiers and Indians. In 1901, his powerful action scene, My Bunkie, in which a cavalryman rescues a friend who has lost his horse during a scuffle, won top honors at the National Academy of Design. Demand for his work rose. Schreyvogel only did two subjects in bronze, a bust of White Eagle, and this one, The Last Drop, which began its life as a clay model the artist created as a model for a painting. One of the most poignant of all Western scenes, The Last Drop has enjoyed a long life, appearing as a tableau in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, in countless reproductions and imitations, and on film and television.

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204 William Gollings 1878-1932 Doubling Back Oil on canvas 24 x 34 inches Signed, titled and dated 1929 verso

Provenance: The artist Willis Spear, Sheridan, WY. Jessamine Spear Johnson, WY. Phyllis Johnson King, WY. By descent in the family to the present.

Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

Wolf roping is a dangerous sport made even more dangerous when the wolf sees it is cornered or simply decides that enough is enough and fancies a cold dish of revenge in the form of horse– or human–flesh. Many great Western painters, from Russell to Leigh, have painted cowboys tempting fate, pitting their lasso skills against a lobo, but Bill Gollings’ Doubling Back turns the moment into a classic predicament painting, inviting the viewer to wonder what happens next. William “Bill” Gollings found his calling in a mail-order paint set. Born in Idaho, but raised in Michigan and Illinois after the death of his mother, Gollings spent two years at the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago before heading West. An eager student, Gollings absorbed lessons from illustrious friends and visitors like W.H.D. Koerner, Hans Kleiber, and Joseph Sharp. Doubling Back has been in the Spear family since it was painted. Gollings worked occasionally for the Spear O Ranch before becoming a painter full time. He became a friend and often accompanied the family on trail rides to their Spear O Wigwam. There is, in fact, a beautiful photograph of the artist at work, taken by 15-year old Jessamine Spear on one such trip. Willis Spear and his brother, known as Doc, often served as models in Gollings’ paintings.

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205 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 The Grub Line Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower left

Provenance: Biltmore Galleries, CA. (Circa 1938) Leech Family, OH. By descent in the family to: Mongerson Wunderlich Galleries, IL. 1992. Private Collection, acquired from the above.

Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000 Born in Iowa in 1874, Frank Tenney Johnson saw the last of the prairie schooners heading West when he was a boy. The family moved to Milwaukee, and it was there, on a class field trip to the Layton Art Museum, young Frank determined to make a life in art. Johnson studied under Panoramist Richard Lorenz, whose specialty was horses and riders in the enormous circular paintings of biblical and battle scenes that were precursors of cinema. Lorenz, who had traveled and painted in the West, fired Johnson’s imagination with his canvases and tales. But Johnson and his new bride, Vinnie, went to New York first, where he studied and enjoyed success in the burgeoning advertising industry. Johnson’s sketches at the Bronx Zoo earned him a contract with Winchester rifles and these ads, in turn, caught the attention of the editors of Field & Stream, who offered to sponsor a trip to the West, which he would repay with illustrations. Johnson’s art alone couldn’t support him, so he cowboyed in Colorado to earn a living, and saw some of the last “beef roundups” in American history, an experience that would prove invaluable to his art. He would, no doubt, have seen some riders of The Grub Line: panhandling cowboys, knights of the road, if you will, unattached to any outfit, looking to cadge a free meal. Eventually, Johnson settled in Southern California, in the heart of the nascent film industry, where he painted murals in movie theaters, sold his works to the new moguls, and appeared in cowboy silents. Johnson was, and remains, the undisputed master of the Western nocturne. In December, 1939, Frank and Vinnie were visiting their friends, the Callahans. Frank greeted Mrs. Callahan with a kiss. What neither of them knew was that Mrs. Callahan was coming down with spinal meningitis. Within days, she had died. By the end of the year, Frank Tenney Johnson had passed into the story of Western Art.

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206 E.I. Couse 1866-1936 Indian Drinking, Moonlight Oil on board 12 x 16 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000 Provenance: The artist. Dr. S. C. Red, Houston (circa 1929) Kodner Gallery, MO. J. N. Bartfield Galleries, NYC. Private Collection, acquired from the above in 2004.

Our thanks to Virginia Couse Leavitt for her assistance in cataloguing this lot. Born in Michigan and trained in Paris, E. I. Couse was artistically drawn to the romance and realism of rural life as expressed in Barbizon and impressionist painting. On his return from Europe, Couse found an analogous inspiration in Native American culture. Couse painted in the Pacific Northwest, Montana, and in Taos, where, after establishing summer residency in 1902, he would become a permanent fixture and one of the storied Taos Society founders. Couse’s moonlight scenes often graced railroad advertising and calendars; in this way, his romantic imagery percolated throughout the nation, and beyond.

207 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Uncas Oil on board 12 ¼ x 9 ¼ inches Signed upper right and titled; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Exhibitions: Cincinnati Museum. 1900. Listed on page 52 of the 1900 Cincinnati Museum Assoc. Twentieth Annual Report, listing works on loan to the museum. “Exhibition of Fine Arts.” Pan-American Exposition. Buffalo, New York. 1901. Number 613 in the Catalogue. Literature: Julie Schimmel. Bert Geer Phillips and the Taos Art Colony. Albuquerque, NM: Univ. of New Mexico Press. 1994, pp. 144, 153, 269, illustrated on p. 269. The “Exhibition of Fine Arts,” at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, is one of the greatest assemblies of American art in history. Benson, Hassam, Moran, Dewing, Remington, Sharp, Couse, Blumenschein. These are just a handful of the artists represented, each by numbers of works. One of the paintings by Bert Geer Phillips was this one, Uncas, Phillips’s brooding, firelit interpretation of James Fenimore Cooper’s ill-fated young Mohican.

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208 Ernest Blumenschein 1874-1960 Rock of Fire - Morning, Ghost Ranch Oil on canvas 24 x 27 inches Signed lower right

Provenance:

Stendahl Galleries, CA. Biltmore Galleries, AZ. Owings Dewey Fine Art, NM. Private Collection.

Estimate: $250,000 - 350,000 Exhibitions: Grand Central Art Galleries, NY. Feb. 7-19, 1927. Chicago Art Institute, Chicago, IL. Jan. 1928. Denver Art Museum. Spring, 1928. Foundation of Western Art. Los Angeles, CA. 1928. Literature: Peter H. Hassrick and Elizabeth J. Cunningham. In Contemporary Rhythm: The Art of Ernest L. Blumenschein. Norman, OK: Univ. of Oklahoma Press, 2008, p. 185, discussed. In the catalogue that accompanies In Contemporary Rhythm: The Art of Ernest L. Blumenschein, the late Peter Hassrick wrote: “As in the previous several years, Blumenschein painted many of his landscapes in series. Such is the case with Rock of Fire - Morning, Ghost Ranch, part of a set of three works that traveled with his one-man show. The artist and Denver Art Museum’s director, Arnold Rönnebeck, referred to the three works… as painted in the manner of the French Impressionists, at various times of day and under various weather conditions. They illustrate, Rönnebeck concluded, ‘what a penetrating and passionate way this artist seeks to find out about the light of New Mexico and the atmospheric peculiar to this very country.’ The vitality of Blumenschein as a man translated into the freshness and potency of his art.” (pp. 185-187) Ghost Ranch, of course, near Abiquiú, New Mexico, is where Georgia O’Keeffe planted her easel. Blumenschein painted there on numerous occasions, as did many of the artists who resided in or visited New Mexico. Rock of Fire - Morning, Ghost Ranch was part of an exhibition of thirty Blumenscheins that toured the country in 1927-28, making stops in, among other cities, New York, Dayton, Toronto, Chicago, Denver, and Los Angeles. S C O T T S D A L E A RT A U C T I O N

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209 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 A Sioux Chieftain Oil on board 16 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 1934; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000 Provenance: The artist. Mr. and Mrs. Willis J. Hole, acquired from the artist, mid-1930’s. By descent in the family to the present. Private Collection, CA. Private Collection.

Frank Tenney Johnson’s A Sioux Chieftain casts a deep shadow, though not a long one. The moon must be near its zenith in the sky, or just past it. Dressed as if for war, the chief is nevertheless unaccompanied, alone in the night. Johnson’s portrait suggests a lost past; the painting telling a sort of Don Quixote story of a heroic, chivalrous age that will be no more. A Sioux Chieftain is perfect under these stars, on this night, though the night he thinks of may well be another. Mythical nostalgia is a hallmark of Western art. Even more than Russell and Remington, the West Johnson glimpsed was rapidly shrinking and changing. Seeing into the night becomes a metaphor for seeing into an imagined past.

210 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Big Eagle Oil on canvas 11 5 x 8 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Provenance: George R. Hatounia. OK. (Possible.) Mary Shaddock. Tulsa, OK. Edith L. Roarke (her daughter). Indianapolis, IN. Mark Roark (her son). Tucson, AZ. Coeur d’Alene Art Auction. 2005. Lot 155. Private Collection. Exhibitions: Thumb-Box Exhibition. Salmagundi Club, NY.

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211 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 The Close of Day Oil on canvas 19 x 25 inches Signed lower left and dated 1925 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

Provenance: M.A. Southby. (Circa 1925) Paul Masa, MT. Gallery of the Masters, St. Louis, MO. Sydney Shoenberg, Jr. (Circa 1983). Sotheby’s New York. May 22, 2002, Lot 201. Private Collection.

In The Close of Day, Frank Tenney Johnson, master of the Western nocturne, proves that he is no slouch when it comes to sunset, or, as filmmakers say, “magic hour.” In this painting, Johnson’s style is softly impressionistic. The shadow of night–a good alternative title, I think–begins to fill the painting from bottom to top, just now touching the bodies of the Navajo horses. Their horses’ bodies and heads, and they themselves, are illuminated in bright, soft light. Two of the Navajo look back down a darkening canyon, towards a rising full moon. The rider at right looks ahead, into the setting sun. These may well be purely aesthetic gestures. Why not? It is a beautiful time of day. But there is a sense of urgency, especially in the middle rider who leans into and strains to see into the shaded gorge. Time, as it always is, even when noticing its passing as aesthetic appreciation, is of some essence. Where have they been? What is their destination? What are they after? What pursues them? There’s a story here.

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212 Charles M. Russell 1864-1926 Where the Best of Riders Quit Bronze, Signed CM Russell, with skull insignia Roman Bronze Works, N-Y. Height: 14 ½ inches Estimate: $350,000 - 550,000 Provenance: Nancy Russell. 1928. Biltmore Galleries, CA. Joseph E. Otis, IL. 1928. Dewey Galleries, NM. 1985. Private Collection, acquired from the above. Literature: Rick Stewart. Charles M. Russell, Sculptor. Fort Worth, TX: Amon Carter Museum. 1994, pp. 234-239, illustrated. A letter from Nancy Russell to Joseph E. Otis, dated April 13, 1928 accompanies this lot. Born in St. Louis in 1864 just as the Civil War was coming to a close, young Charlie Russell’s hometown was the gateway to the rapidly filling frontier of the American West. Russell saw wagon trains lighting out for the open range, and the stories they sent back enthralled him. At the same time, his mother’s skill at painting flowers planted a seed that would become a vocation. In his teens, Russell convinced his parents to allow him to try his hand at punching cows. He made a real go of it and made lifelong friends among the characters of the Judith Basin in Montana Territory. Soon, he began to try to capture cowboy life in art, in watercolor at first, then in oil and bronze. Russell’s work was published regularly in Harper’s Weekly and was hailed as original, fresh and real even before he married Nancy Cooper in 1896. Nancy took over the business of Russell’s art and proved to be a tough, shrewd agent. Russell’s devotion, to his West, and to what he called “The West that has passed” led to some of Western art’s most celebrated works. The relationship between horse and human, in many ways, defines the American West. The bucking bronco, emblematic of the tension in the West between freedom and restraint, is a leitmotif of American Western Art, one that Charles Russell often explored. A wily, unbroken horse–with a homicidal streak–meets a wily old hand at this game in Where the Best of Riders Quit, a bronze Russell modeled in the early 1920’s. The horse rears backwards to throw the would-be rider off and fall on him. The wise horse breaker senses this, steps off as it rears, but holds on to the cheekpiece, ready to mount again as this horse rises, somewhat worse for wear after its fall. Russell catches the horse just past the vertical and the rider about as far from the horse as he will get without falling himself. Gravity, having been just about defied, is just about to reassert its authority. The horse might think he’s winning, but the cowpuncher is actually in command.

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212 Charles M. Russell 1864-1926 Where the Best of Riders Quit Bronze, Signed CM Russell, with skull insignia Roman Bronze Works, N-Y. Height: 14 ½ inches Estimate: $350,000 - 550,000

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213 Charles M. Russell 1864-1926 The Medicine Man Bronze, Signed CM Russell, with skull insignia Nelli Art Bronze Works L.A. Height: 7 inches Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Provenance: Private Collection, NY (Until 1983). Wunderlich & Company, NY. 1983. Dr. Andrew Somalyo, PA. 1983. Mongerson Wunderlich Galleries, IL. 1993. Private Collection, acquired from the above. Literature: Rick Stewart. Charles M. Russell, Sculptor. Fort Worth, TX: Amon Carter Museum. 1994, pp. 240-244, illustrated.

Nancy Russell left a rich description of The Medicine Man, a Charles Russell bronze taken from a character Russell himself created and called Sleeping Thunder. Russell based The Medicine Man on Blackfoot ceremonies he observed or heard accounts of, and Nancy’s notes are quoted in Charles M. Russell, Sculptor, excerpted here: “He sits on his robe cross-legged, facing the lodge door where the sick person is to be healed… His rawhide tom-tom is decorated with eagle feathers and as he beats a rhythm, he chants his healing song. Across one knee are other symbols of his medicine–an otter skin, a wolf’s skull, and a bear’s claw. The otter is cunning, the wolf is smart and the bear is strong, and Sleeping Thunder is invoking the spirits of these three animals to help him drive away sickness or ‘bad medicine.’ (Stewart, p. 241)

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214 Charles Russell 1864-1926 High, Wide and Handsome Watercolor, Gouache and Pencil 16 x 12 ½ inches Signed lower left, CM Russell with skull insignia and dated 1919 Estimate: $400,000 - 600,000 High, Wide, and Handsome hangs on the wall in the background of a 1920 photograph of Russell taken in his cabin as he sits back and considers an oil in progress, The Salute of the Robe Trade. Of this photo, Brian Dippie has observed that High, Wide, and Handsome floats about his head like a cowboy artist’s muse.”

Provenance: The Artist Nancy Russell Private Collection, WY The Russell: Sale to Benefit the C.M. Russell Museum. Mar. 14-16, 2013. Lot 147 (Also catalogue cover illustration). Private Collection, CA. Literature: “Calgary Stampede to be Greatest Ever Staged; Prince of Wales Will Open It.” Flathead Courier. July 10, 1919, illustrated. J. F. Lewis. ”Montana Can Show Missouri Some Things.” Choteau Montanan. Nov. 18, 1921, illustrated. B. Byron Price. Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonne. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press. 2007, no. CR.PC.114 (online), illustrated. Emily Wilson. “Promoting the Stirring! Startling! Scintillating! 1919 “Victory” Stampede,” in Return to Calgary: Charles M. Russell and the 1919 Victory Stampede. Great Falls: C.M. Russell Museum. 2019, p. 34, illustrated. Exhibitions: “Calgary Stampede.” Calgary, Alberta. August, 1919. “Return to Calgary: Charles M. Russell and the 1919 Victory Stampede.” C.M. Russell Museum. Great Falls, MT. June 7-Sept. 30, 2019.

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215 Charles Russell 1864-1926 Indian with His Winchester Watercolor 18 x 8 inches Sigend lower left, CM Russell with skull insignia Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

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216 Charles Russell 1864-1926 Hello Ford, Where the Blazes Did You Drop From? Gouache 16 x 13 inches Signed lower left, CM Russell with skull insignia and dated 1913 Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Provenance: Coeur d’Alene Art Auction. Jul 25, 2009. Lot 161. Private Collection, TX. Literature: B.M. Bower (B.M. Sinclair). The Uphill Climb. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company. 1913. Frontispiece.

B. Byron Price. Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonne. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press. 2007, no. CR.UNL.215 (online), illustrated.

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217 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Cheyenne (lifetime cast) Cast number 11 (beneath base) Signed twice, once with Copyright and dated 1903 Roman Bronze Works N.Y. Height: 20 inches Estimate: $400,000 - 600,000 Provenance: Private Collection, NY. (As of 1958). Kennedy Galleries, NY. 1958. Bronson Trevor, NY, 1958-1991. Mongerson Wunderlich Galleries, IL. 1991. Private Collection, acquired from the above. Literature:

Michael Edward Shapiro. Cast and Recast: The Sculpture of Frederic Remington. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institute Press, 1981, pp. 73-77, and throughout (other examples). Michael D. Greenbaum. Icons of the West: Frederic Remington’s Sculpture. Ogdensburg, NY: Frederic Remington Art Museum, 1996, pp. 88-93 and throughout (other examples).

Apart from some talent for caricature and drawing, in his youth Frederic Remington had little in the way of aptitude and even less ambition. Roaming, camping, fishing–this was his idea of living. Mine, too. Born in Canton, New York into a military family with a pedigree dating back to the 1600’s, Remington got into Yale but left their College of Art after only three semesters. He bounced from job to job, failed to win the approbation of his fiancee’s father and drifted west into the Kansas Territory, where he got involved in get-rich quick schemes that ranged from sheep to saloons. At last, after winning the hand of his fiancee, Eva Caton, Remington convinced her to go west with him, but on learning that he owned a piece of a saloon, she went home to New York in a huff of outrage. But Remington’s first western folly taught him something: caricatures and sketches could evolve into paintings that people would buy, and so he followed Eva back East, enrolled in the Art Students’ League of New York and soon began selling scenes of Western life to Harper’s magazine and other periodicals hungering for stories and images of the “Wild West.” By the mid 1890’s, Remington was America’s premier illustrator of the American West and one of the architects of the enduring myth of the cowboy. Not content with this, he turned his attention to sculpture and, with the help of Italian immigrants who brought the ancient lost-wax process to the United States, iconic bronzes like The Bronco Buster and The Cheyenne would establish him as one of the nation’s most important sculptors. One of two bronzes by the artist–the other is The Bronco Buster–that flank the desk in the Oval Office, The Cheyenne is a study in speed and power. All the movement is forward as the The Cheyenne brave leans over and into his charging mount. It’s an interesting contrast with The Bronco Buster, which is all vertical and wheeling motion. Taken together, they represent three dimensions in space, and the fourth–time–as Remington strives to apprehend and arrest moments in time and history.

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217 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Cheyenne (lifetime cast) Cast number 11 (beneath base) Signed twice, once with Copyright and dated 1903 Roman Bronze Works N.Y. Height: 20 inches Estimate: $400,000 - 600,000

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218 Henry M. Shrady 1871-1922 Monarch of the Plains Bronze, Signed Henry Merwin Shrady and dated 1899 also signed Theodore B Starr, with Copyright and dated 1899 Height: 13 ½ inches Estimate: $75,000 - 100,000

The prestige that American sculptor Henry Shrady brought to the Roman Bronze Works–the foundry that cast many of his works–was so significant that in 1908 they built a home and studio for the artist in White Plains, New York. Shrady’s home and studio has hosted many other sculptors since and is now the Leo Friedlander Studio, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This is just one remarkable fact about a remarkable American artist. Shrady was born in New York. His father had been one of President Ulysses S. Grant’s doctors when Grant contracted throat cancer. Keep that in mind. After a year at Columbia University, Shrady abandoned a career in the law and joined his brother-in-law (one of the Gould family) in business at a company that made matches. Matches didn’t catch fire but Shrady caught typhoid fever, a disease that left Shrady unfit for tycoondom. But, as he recuperated, Shrady began to draw animals–dogs in pet shops, moose and bison at the zoo. His wife saw his talent and sent some of his doodles, without his knowledge, to the National Academy of Design. To Shrady’s delight, people liked and bought his drawings and paintings. He began to study and then, quickly, to sell his bronzes. In 1901, Shrady received his first monumental commission: the Army Plaza in Brooklyn depicting Washington at Valley Forge. A year later, Shrady and architect Edward Pearce Casey won the commission to create the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Shrady’s father tended Grant; his son memorialized Grant in bronze and stone. Circle closed. For the next two decades, the Grant Memorial occupied all of Shrady’s time and effort. He dove into animal biology and anatomy, taking courses at the American Museum of Natural History and dissecting animals to understand their forms. Tabletop bronzes like Monarch of the Plains were conceived and cast in a few short years, circa 1900 to 1903, and in relatively small numbers. Theodore B. Starr admired Shrady’s work and offered to market it. Roman Bronze Works cast Shrady’s bronzes. They were and are scarce, and highly prized.

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219 John Clymer 1907-1989 Thundering Hoofs Oil on board 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Titled verso Estimate: $300,000 - 400,000


Lot 219A William R. Leigh 1866-1955 Pony Express Oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches Signed lower left and dated 1934 Estimate: $600,000 - 900,000

Additional Information on the Reverse


Lot 219A William R. Leigh 1866-1955 Pony Express Oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches Signed lower left and dated 1934 Estimate: $600,000 - 900,000 Provenance: Private Collection, NY. (prior to 1995) J.N. Bartfield Galleries, NYC. Private Collection, CA. (1995) J.N. Bartfield Galleries, NYC. Private Collection. (2010) Exhibitions: Our Fabulous West: Paintings by William R. Leigh. Grand Central Art Galleries, New York. Apr. 14-May 9, 1953.

Romance of the West: Paintings by William R. Leigh. Washington County Museum of Fine Arts. Hagerstown, MD. Feb. 28-Mar. 31, 1954.

Eight Decades in Review: Paintings by William R. Leigh. Grand Central Art Galleries, New York. Jan. 11-29, 1955.

Literature: June DuBois. W.R. Leigh: The Definitive Illustrated Biography. Kansas City: The Lowell Press. 1977, p. 121. illustrated. Kennedy Quarterly. Kennedy Galleries, NYC., v. XVI, No. 4, June, 1979, Fig. 174, illustrated.

Under a cold swath of the nebulous Milky Way on a frosty night, under stars so bright you can see by them without benefit of the moon, the rider in W. R. Leigh’s 1934 masterwork, Pony Express, does the one thing his horse cannot afford to do–he looks back. And what he sees–a thing the horse already knows–must chill him more than the mercury in the glass: the eyeshine and lean bone shadows of a pack of wolves in pursuit. Speaking of Mercury, it wouldn’t be a bad idea for the rider to invoke that fleet footed messenger of the gods and to wish that his horse’s hooves–and his own boots–would sprout wings. Leigh puts all this in raked perspective. Hoofprints refract, as if mirrored in the Milky Way. Rider and mount quarter away from us, from upper right to lower left, even as two wolves flank them at right and left, attempting to cut them off. But the rider, looking back, unperturbed and determined, is a classic image of stoic, masculine heroism in the Old West. The Pony Express ran a 1,966 mile route over one hundred ninety stations from St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California for a relatively brief period in 1860-61, before the transcontinental telegraph rendered the service redundant. But in that short time, the route and riders acquired legendary status. Riders changed horses every ten miles and rode seventy-five to one hundred miles every day, night and day, winter and summer, through highwaymen, hostiles and tough terrain. An ad at the time is said to have read: “Wanted: Young, skinny wiry fellows not over eighteen. Must be expert riders, willing to risk death daily. Orphans preferred.” Young William Cody, who would go on to fame as Buffalo Bill, wasn’t the only celebrated western figure to move the westbound mail on the Pony Express. William Robinson Leigh, one of the seminal artists of the American West, was an unsparing individualist and a famous contrarian. His artistic talent earned him a ticket to Munich, and he spent twelve years at the academy there, perfecting his craft. Back in New York, the struggling young realist in a New York that had begun to delight in the likes of Cezanne met the grand old artist of the American West, Thomas Moran, who prodded Leigh to light out and seek the “American” in American art. In 1906, newly divorced and dead broke, Leigh accompanied his artist friend Albert Groll on a journey to Arizona and New Mexico. After this, he would make the West– its open spaces, ancient peoples, and brash cowboys–his principal subject. Leigh would quickly come to be regarded in the same breath as Remington and Russell. His place in the pantheon of artists of the American West has been secure ever since.

Saturday • April 4, 2020 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • www.scottsdaleartauction.com • 480 945-0225


219 John Clymer 1907-1989 Thundering Hoofs (detail) Oil on board 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Titled verso

220 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Tejon - My Palomino Oil on board 20 x 16 inches Signed lower left and dated 1936; Signed, titled and dated verso

Estimate: $300,000 - 400,000 Provenance: The artist. Grand Central Art Galleries, NY. Private Collection, 1984. Private Collection, acquired from the above, 1991. Sotheby’s, NY. June 6, 1997 (lot 187). Private Collection, acquired from the above.

Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000

In The Frank Tenney Johnson Book, Harold McCracken wrote, “In early 1935 Frank painted a picture of a beautiful palomino horse named Tejon. The picture was done for a friend who wanted the painting–and Frank wanted the horse. They both considered it a fair exchange. That summer Frank’s nephew Gene Turner, who spent quite a bit of time with the Johnsons in their Champion Place home and was very close to his Uncle Frank, took Tejon to Rim Rock ranch in a horse trailer. Frank enjoyed riding Tejon and frequently used the horse as a model.” (pp. 189-90) McCracken goes on to write that the last painting on Frank Tenney Johnson’s easel was a nocturne featuring Tejon. In this 1936 oil, Johnson shines moonlight on the pretty palomino, keeping the rider–his nephew, perhaps?–in shadow under the wide black brim of his hat. Only a few of the brightest stars and planets can manage even a faint twinkle under so bright a moon as it floods the canyon floor with its reflected rays. The lad looks off to his right, a gesture that to us, from our point of view, looks as heroic as anything one might have seen on a poster for an early John Ford Western.

In 1960, John Clymer left a highly successful career as a commercial artist to try his hand at painting the historical West, a subject that had always fascinated him. He and his wife began to trace what was left of the early Trails–the Oregon, Bozeman, Chisholm, Overland Stage, and Pony Express–as well as the path Lewis and Clark had taken, making close studies of the terrain, dress, manners, horses, dwellings, weapons and lives of the men and women, trappers and Indians of the early frontier days. Back in his studio, Clymer poured his findings onto his canvases, investing them with incredible energy. Thundering Hoofs is about as far from commercial art as you can imagine. Painterly in every way, the wild energy of the life-giving hunt flows through the painting as the herd and hunters emerge from the dust cloud their speed and purpose have made. The hunter on the white horse at left stands high, having just released an arrow into the beast that dominates the picture. Posed in this classical way, Clymer has painted him like a figure from a frieze in Greece or the Near East.

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221 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 February Chinook, Crow Reservation Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right and inscribed “Crow” Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Labeled verso in the artist’s hand: “Valley of the Little Big Horn 1/2 mile from Custer Battlefield, Crow Res’n, Montana.” Provenance: The artist Leroy William James (Roe) Emery, MT. Walter Emery By descent in the family Private Collection (purchased from the above) Chinook, defined: “a warm, dry wind which blows down the east side of the Rocky Mountains at the end of winter.” Spring is in the air, the light, the earth, and in the colors of February Chinook, Crow Reservation. Yes, there may be more snow, drifts of it, but winter is on its heels. The Crow woman carrying firewood stands as erect as possible under her burden. No cold wind blows into her eyes. Ahead, another woman holds the tent flap open for her, and the sense of the picture is of people emerging, of the red of the willow flowing into buds, of snow transforming into life giving water, soaking into earth.

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222 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Strikes His Enemy Pretty Oil on canvas 18 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 1905 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

In 1901, the Crow Agency–at the request of President Theodore Roosevelt, who had admired Sharp’s work–invited the artist to live and paint on the reservation, and built a studio for the him not far from the site of the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Sharp painted hundreds of portraits of Native American survivors of Custer’s fateful engagement and their descendants, as well as canvases depicting encampments, daily life, and ceremonies. Sharp painted Strikes His Enemy Pretty–who was Crow but of Gros Ventre parentage–on numerous occasions between 1900 and 1936. In Teepee Smoke, Forest Fenn writes: “He [Strikes His Enemy Pretty] was a member of the Agency police and a judge for the Indians in the late 1890’s. Sharp said he was ‘…a fine type, a great man and favorite model.’” (p. 139)

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223 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Interior of a Buffalo Hunter’s Teepee Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000

Sharp was an enthusiastic collector of Native American objects: pottery, weapons, and clothing, all of which appear time and again in his paintings. The elk skin in Interior of a Buffalo Hunter’s Teepee, for example, is of particular interest. In Teepee Smoke: A New Look Into the Life and Work of Joseph Henry Sharp, Forest Fenn tells the story of how the artist acquired the skin from Chief Flat Iron, an Oglala Sioux who liked to visit and partake of the Crow Agency’s celebrations: “According to Sharp, Flat Iron was raised with Sitting Bull, had nine wives and seventy-five children, and lived to the age of 107. Sharp became very close to the aging warrior: one of the artist’s prized possessions was a gift from him, a prime elk skin that was ‘the best you could find in two days’ ride in any direction.’ A green dragonfly had been painted on the inside of the skin near a beaded bullet hole. The artist used the skin as a prop in many of his important canvases,” including this one, Interior of a Buffalo Hunter’s Teepee.” The insect and bullet hole appear at left, beside the shield and above the skull. In the work, they are images of contemplation, perhaps paths to a vision or to memory, after a song of prayer accompanied by the drum at rest behind the hunter.

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224 Oscar Berninghaus 1874-1952 Lazy Day Watercolor 10 x 12 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

225 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Taos Indian with His Horse Oil on board 9 ½ x 12 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 Provenance: Sotheby’s. New York. Dec. 2, 1992. Private Collection. Bert Phillips only had to see Taos once–in 1898 on a trip with Ernest Blumenschein–before he decided to pitch his tent there forever. The most vocal enthusiast for founding an art colony in Taos–he was one of the original members of the Taos Society of Artists–Phillips’ artistic vision was perhaps the most romantic of all. He found a poetry in the people and landscape that appears in his paintings as twin aspects of a single, timeless, idyll. A Classical, almost Greek sensibility is on display in Taos Indian with His Horse, and it is as if Phillips has fused the aesthetic of the Attic urn or Hellenistic fresco with the indigenous culture of the Southwestern pueblos.

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226 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Savage Cast number 26 Bronze, Signed Frederic Remington, with Copyright, and dated 1905, Roman Bronze Works N.Y. Height: 10 ¾ inches Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Literature: Michael D. Greenbaum. Icons of the West: Frederic Remington’s Sculpture. Ogdensburg, NY: Frederic Remington Art Museum, 1996, pp. 113-119, 195 and throughout (other examples). Michael Greenbaum writes that The Savage, like its companion bust, The Sergeant, “may have been inspired by a suggestion” (Greenbaum, p. 113) from Roman Bronze Works owner Riccardo Bertelli that the artist create some smaller, more affordable works. In The Savage, Remington works to capture the fierceness of a defiant, unreconstructed Native American warrior, squinting grimly and perhaps chanting into a future he vows to resist.

227 Cyrus Dallin 1861-1944 Signal of Peace Bronze, cast number 11 15 ¾ inches high Signed and dated 1890; Gorman Co Founders Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Provenance: Private Collection, TX. Literature: Rell G. Francis. Cyrus E. Dallin: Let Justice Be Done. Springville, Utah: Springville Museum of Art. 1976, pp. 37-40. Cyrus Dallin was the son of a true covered wagon pioneer. He grew up in Utah and made many friends among the Native Americans there. Dallin’s talent saw him study in Boston and Paris, where he modeled his first Native American sculpture, Signal of Peace, which won honorable mention at the Paris salon and would be the first work in his “Epic of the Indian.” Dallin returned to America and devoted his art to the plight of the American Indian and to incidents in American History. Dallin’s bronzes have a smooth, sinewy simplicity, composing long, strong, dramatic lines to communicate the humanity of Native Americans in life rather than in history.

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228 E. Martin Hennings 1886-1956 Rabbit Hunters Oil on canvas mounted on board 12 x 14 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $70,000 - 100,000

The hills in the background and the clouds that hover over the scene in Ernest Martin Hennings’ Rabbit Hunters seem to be almost alive. Softly undulant hills preside, half in shadow, half in light; waves of sagebrush billow back to the base of the hills. Hennings composes the figures as if we have just happened upon the moment. A successful hunter with his back to us shows off his quarry and tells his mounted partner all about it. Hennings often painted scenes such as this, scenes that let us in on the rhythms of the daily lives of the Taos Pueblo Indians. But the artist takes care not to send us into some distant, mythical past or frozen-in-time Shangri-la. The clothes these men wear and the rifles they use place them squarely in the early 20th century. Hennings compels us to contend with them as contemporaries rather than relics or primitives.

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229 E. Martin Hennings 1886-1956 Amongst the Aspens Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000

Ernest Martin Hennings was born in New Jersey but moved to Chicago with his family when he was a child. When he was 12 or 13, he and a friend visited the Art Institute of Chicago and the germ of art began to stir in the boy. Hennings studied in Chicago, earned a trip to Munich, and became interested in Art Nouveau ideas of design inspired by natural forms–and derived, in part, from Japanese prints–that was known in Germany as jugendstil, or “youth style.” Chicago Mayor and businessman Carter Harrison admired Hennings and offered to send him to Taos to paint (as he had sent Ufer and Higgins). Hennings took him up on his offer and headed to Taos in 1917 where he would ultimately make his home and become one of the early members of the Taos Society of Artists. The jugendstil emphasis on nature, design, and color adapted beautifully to Taos and its environs, and Hennings spent the remainder of his career painting the people of Taos as if they were legendary, as if they were woven into their surroundings, into the forests and mountains and sagebrush. From the sunlit foreground through to the mystery of the forest in Amongst the Aspens, Hennings layers pattern on pattern, color on color. The Indian watering his pony by the stream inhabits a medieval tapestry.

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230 Henry Farny 1847-1916 Indian on Horseback Gouache 7 ½ x 4 ½ inches Signed lower right and dated 1902 Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Provenance: Kennedy Galleries, NYC.

In 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt attended an exhibition of Henry Farny’s works at Cincinnati’s Fall Festival. Roosevelt and Farny were already old friends; they had met on western hunting trips in the 1880’s. As the President strolled through the exhibition–which may well have included Indian on Horseback–he turned to Cincinnati Mayor Julius Fleischmann and said, “I do not often feel envious of a trust magnate. But this is one time, for they have the money to buy beautiful paintings like this.” (Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Sept. 21, 1902) Indian on Horseback has a beautiful late Fall feel, with the last few yellow leaves clinging to the trees. From bottom to top, the painting seems to move through the year, season to season, green to yellow to gray. Look, for instance, at the hue of the man’s shirt, see how Farny matches it to the burnt yellow of the leaves, suggesting, perhaps, an indelible quality, an identity that dwells in the seasons. Born in the contentious Alsace region of France, Henry Farny’s romantic notions of the noble savage were tempered by his encounters with real Indians when he and his family emigrated to America. Exploited and ignored, the Indians Farny met in the West made him rail against the official policy of forced resettlement, barren reservations and inadequate rationing. Farny’s progressive, egalitarian stance towards Native Americans and his sympathies with their plight grate against the general view at the end of the 19th century that the submission of the Indian was sad but inexorable. His depictions of Native Americans as tough, hardy souls who repudiate subjugation are always balanced, as they are here in Indian on Horseback, with a sense of inner strength, harmony, and dignity.

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231 Alfred Jacob Miller 1810-1874 Two Arapaho Watercolor and gouache 9 ½ x 12 ¼ inches Signed lower center Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Provenance: John L. & Ida E. King, MD. (Circa 1900.) Alvin L. & Carrie E. Walton. (By descent.) Private Collection. MD. (By descent.) Two Arapaho is a lovely composition in watercolor and gouache that closely resembles one found in The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and discussed in Marvin C. Ross’s The West of Alfred Jacob Miller. Describing the Walters version, Miller’s notes read, in part, “This scene represents an Arapaho Indian en famille, smoking his pipe and reposing under a blanket suspended from the branches of a tree, to screen them from the sun.” (Ross, p. 73). Set on a hillside overlooking a distant camp, Two Arapaho–though there are, in fact, three, counting the baby on the cradle board in its mother’s arms–captures the kind of languid, tranquil, Arcadian moment seen more often in early paintings of Native Americans than in later works that focus on action and war. Perhaps this is due to the fact that indigenous world Miller saw on his journey West with Scottish aristocrat William Drummond Stewart in 1837 had not yet been penetrated and disrupted by the inexorability of Manifest Destiny. Apart from a scattering of fur traders, the world of the Arapaho belonged to the Arapaho, and they belonged to it. This ease shows in key works like Two Arapaho. Along with George Catlin. Karl Bodmer, and a very few others, Alfred Jacob Miller is one of the most important of the first generation of artists to travel and paint the American West. Born in Baltimore, Miller studied in Paris and Rome in 1832-33, returned home and set up a studio in New Orleans–where he met Drummond–and settled once again in Baltimore after his return from his Westward travels and a visit to his patron in Scotland.

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Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Scottsdale Art Auction is thrilled to offer thirteen paintings and drawings by one of America’s premier painters, Maynard Dixon (1875-1946). Spanning five decades of the artist’s storied career, these thirteen works demonstrate his development as he absorbed and transcended the tumultuous artistic changes and innovations of his times, making them his own as he worked toward his inimitable, mature style. From works of pure illustration, to Art Nouveau and Brandywine inflected drawings and paintings, to paintings that draw on his participation in the mural movement, and, finally, to outstanding examples of his major oils—paintings that allow us to see the American West again and anew through his imaginative gaze—these lots remind us of Maynard Dixon’s essential place at the nexus of American art in the first half of the 20th century. Friendships with artists as diverse as Charles M. Russell and Diego Rivera (among many others) and his marriage to famed Depression photographer Dorothea Lange brought Dixon into the sweep of American history; Dixon’s keen understanding of the currents of modernism both here and in Europe take his work far beyond the realm of Western art.

Scottsdale Art Auction is also proud to be a major sponsor of Maynard Dixon’s American West, the new exhibition on view at Western Spirit: Scottsdale’s Museum of the West, 3830 N. Marshall Way. The exhibition runs through August 2, 2020 and features more than 250 of Dixon’s artworks, including masterpieces like Cloud World, Earth Knower, and Watchers of the Housetops.

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232 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Cowboy Mixed media 13 x 9 ½ inches Initialed lower left and dated 08

233 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Watchers from the Housetops Crayon 5 ¼ x 6 ¾ inches Initialed lower right, dated Sept 1931 and inscribed “Taos”

Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

234 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Canyon Mixed Media 4 ½ x 5 ¾ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Exhibitions: “A Place of Refuge: Maynard Dixon’s Arizona.” Tucson, AZ: Tucson Museum of Art. Oct. 11, 2008 - Feb. 15, 2009. Literature: Donald J. Hagerty. The Life of Maynard Dixon. Layton, UT: Gibbs-Smith. 2010, pp. 119, illustrated.

Thomas Brent Smith and Donald J. Hagerty. A Place of Refuge: Maynard Dixon’s Arizona. Tucson, AZ: Tucson Museum of Art. 2008, p. 93, illustrated.

Mark Sublette. Maynard Dixon’s American West. Tucson, AZ: Just Me Publishing. 2018, p. 167, illustrated.

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235 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Their Notice Gouache 25 ½ x 19 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated 13 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Literature: Eugene Manlove Rhodes. “A Reversion to Type,” in Sunset, The Pacific Monthly. June, 1913, p. 753, illustrated.

Here’s the whole quote from the caption beneath Maynard Dixon’s illustration for “A Reversion to Type:” “No! That’s it: they ignore me. I’m beneath their notice!” So exclaims N. P. Logan, empire-builder and ranch owner to his young protege, John Sayles Watterson, as they watch a herd of cattle being counted by brand and hustled into train cars for market. Logan, despite owning the outfit, is beneath the notice of the men who work for him because he failed to come to the assistance of a cowboy being pulled down a steep draw. He rationalizes his failure by averring that he, and young John Sayles, are bred to be leaders, that should not risk themselves for such “excellent, admirable, and blind savages” as the cowboys who “do the work and take the risks.” But John Sayles, after weeks of riding with these “savages,” finds their skill, courage, and absolute loyalty not only endearing, but worth emulating. Later, when a boxcar full of dynamite begins to slide down a hill into the cowboys, it is Logan’s horse, Katy–once a famous cowpony, now an old, safe mount–who takes off, compels Logan to save the day, and saves Logan’s daughter, who, unbeknownst to Logan, is in the Pullman Car behind the dynamite.

236 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Hello, Stranger Gouache 9 ¾ x 13 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated Jan 95 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Provenance: Bonhams. San Francisco, CA. Oct. 12, 2006. Private Collection. Painted in January, 1895, Hello, Stranger is a very fine early example of Maynard Dixon’s work in illustration, done around the time when he was working for newspapers such as the San Francisco Morning Call. You can see Dixon working on composition and narrativity at this point in his career, watching and emulating the success of other illustrators. In Hello, Stranger, he plays with balance and imbalance to suggest the tension of the moment.

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237 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Trail Herd Oil on canvas 30 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 1936; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $400,000 - 600,000


238 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Nez Perce Cowpuncher Watercolor 20 x 14 inches Signed lower left and dated 1911; Inscribed “Flathead Res. Mont.” verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 Provenance: Private Collection, AK.

237 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Trail Herd (detail) Oil on canvas 30 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 1936; Signed and titled verso

Donald Hagerty writes in his biography, The Life of Maynard Dixon, “Sometime in the late spring of 1909, Dixon received an invitation from Dr. Charles Stuart Moody, a doctor at the Indian Agency in Sand Point, Idaho, who had expressed admiration for his work. Would he like to visit and paint among Plains Indians and participate in a cattle drive…? With Moody as his guide, Dixon fished in Lake Pend Oreille, visited “old timers” and homesteaders in their log cabins, camped with Nez Perce and Kootenai Indians, and then traveled into the plains of Western Montana…” The sights seemed to excite Dixon’s imagination. Hagerty goes on to quote the artist’s own feelings about what he was seeing. The place “‘was not strange–old as the world, yet created only this morning.’” (p.98) Titled and dated verso in Dixon’s hand, with “Flathead Res Mont,” Nez Perce Cowpuncher is a product of this journey. You can see Dixon here, still rooted in Western illustration, but straining against its strictures and literalness with a new concern for larger and more sculpted shapes and for restraining his palette in a deliberate and artistic way. Seeing Native Americans as cowboys must have been a fascinating subject for Dixon; to this day, it is an understudied historical phenomenon.

Estimate: $400,000 - 600,000 Provenance:

Tivoli Gallery, UT (Circa 1974) Private Collection, UT, acquired from the above.

All of it, all of Maynard Dixon’s magnificent Trail Herd rests on the gentle curve of a hill, a hill that curves from left to right and, when you really look at it, curves towards you as well, towards you the viewer, placing the herd, horses, and men in motion, placing the yellow ochre dust, placing the desert itself on the surface of a sphere, a ball, a world. That’s what takes the painting out of the ordinary sequence of events, out of history, out of beginning and ending, out of time. The temporality of it, the painting’s present, what submits to our shared notion of the order of things– the horse’s lifted foreleg; the kicked up dust; the horse’s shadow congruent with the curve of the hill; the cow’s lowered head; the calf looking up, catching the light; the dominant cowboy looking down to his left; the cowboy at far left, behind the passing herd, looking down and to his right; the curve of his hat brim, worked for many hours to make it just right and cast just the right shade on his face; the slant of the dust cloud where it meets the struggling sky–is, ultimately, subordinate to the underlying design, to the ball we all move across, doing what we have to do, going to whatever it is that destiny has in store for us as it, our Earth, spins beneath us, spinning to its own destiny in the spinning universe. Maynard Dixon traveled to Nevada in 1935 to file for divorce from photographer Dorothea Lange. The Depression had made Dixon’s always precarious economic situation even more so, and hard times had only made his generally skeptical view of civilization more jaundiced. Meanwhile, Lange had found the subject that would make her name as an artist in the stark, black and white images that broadcast the dignity of the forgotten men and women. She had also fallen in love with another man. Dixon returned to Nevada in 1936, camping with his sons and an artist friend on their way to the Wind River Country in Wyoming. Dixon did numerous sketches of cattle ranches in the high plains. Back in the studio, he transformed these sketches into singular canvases of cowboy and range life–including Trail Herd–that were exhibited to great acclaim the following year.

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239 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Desert Clouds Mixed Media 9 x 15 inches Signed lower right and dated 1922 Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 In style and subject, and by dint of the 1922 date, Desert Clouds appears to have been painted while Dixon was making an important circuit in Northern Arizona at the invitation of John and Louisa Wetherill. The Wetherills, who ran the trading post at Kayenta, Arizona, in the heart of Navajo Country just south of the Utah border, guided Dixon and Dorothea Lange through this remote area, taking the artist to prehistoric sites, to Monument Valley, and to other trading posts–Red Lake and Kaibito among them. Wetherill’s hospitality was known widely among artists, and Dixon reveled in the sheer scale of the landforms and the sweep of what Don Hagerty calls, “the cloud-swollen skies.” (Hagerty. Life of Maynard Dixon, p. 144)

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240 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Saddle Stock Watercolor 17 x 21 inches Signed lower left and dated 1945; Signed, titled and inscribed “Tucson, Ariz” verso Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000 Proceeds of this sale go to benefit the Thunderbird Foundation

Chiseled and rounded, the horses in Maynard Dixon’s masterful 1945 watercolor, Saddle Stock, might be racing out of a cave painting in France–or sprinting off an Anasazi wall in Arizona. And that’s an interesting way to think about any Dixon–or any work of twodimensional art at all, in fact–to imagine it, in all its style, in three-dimensions, as if you have your Virtual Reality goggles on. Grace runs alongside power in Saddle Stock. The sure economy of an artist who, near the end of his career and life, knows what to include, and what to leave out, an artist who knows exactly what he wants to convey. But what is that? What do you see? Light, dust, the sharp shadows under the brush, a simple sky, varied only by the ratio of water to pigment–the mixture, if you will–that Dixon makes. And the horse and rider: what of them? Imagine the textures–the coats of their animals, the graininess of the sand–and the layers of volumes and space as you move from foreground through the horses and rider to the lip of the draw and the sky beyond. Imagine all of this in motion, substance and shadow. Pretty neat little film running in your mind, isn’t it?

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241 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Winter Landscape Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Provenance:

Frances Graves Gallery. Santa Barbara, CA. Maxwell Galleries. San Francisco, CA. Tivoli Gallery, UT (Circa 1976) Private Collection, UT.

Though he refused to align himself with any of the isms that fall under the umbrella of modernism, Maynard Dixon was acutely aware of the currents in early 20th century art. And in a way, despite his disdain for movements and schools, he seemed to receive and store the shapes that the desert of the American West presented to his eye as geometries not at all unlike those you find in cubism, futurism, and synchronism. In Winter Landscape sweeping draperies of clouds drag across a dominant sky while the shadowed mesa below broods like a slumbering deity over the landscape where ranks of brush and distant rocks almost seem to wait for orders. But a space sandwiched in between, running along flat line of the mesa and under the bottom of the sky offers a window of respite: towering cumulus clouds in sunlit relief suggest that illumination is imminent, that the mesa’s dark mood will soon lift like the disposition of a monarch lifts when a musician strikes up a song and dancers follow in merry measure.

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242 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 West Walls of Zion Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left, dated Aug 1933 and inscribed “Zion Natl. Park”; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Provenance:

Tivoli Gallery, UT (Circa 1976) Private Collection, UT.

Literature: Antiques. March, 1982, p. 653, illustrated. Donna L. Poulton and Vern G. Swanson. Painters of Utah’s Canyons and Deserts. Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith. 2009, p. 141, illustrated.

Wesley M. Burnside. Maynard Dixon: Artist of the West. Provo, UT; Brigham Young U. Press. 1974, p. 176 (listed).

Along with his wife, Dorothea Lange, and their children, Maynard Dixon spent the summer of 1933–from June to October–in southwestern Utah, roaming, painting, and camping in Zion National Park. The fin-shaped rock in the foreground of West Walls of Zion (dated August, 1933) looks an awful lot like Angels Landing, with its well-known–and quite dangerous–hiking trail up the spine. The formation supposedly got its name from a hiker in 1916 who proclaimed “Only an angel could land on it,” so, of course, it’s the most popular hike in the park. Dixon wisely keeps his distance, looking down on it and across to the sandstone wall that looms over it. He also keeps it simple, piling regular and irregular blocks of paint, block on block, and letting light and shadow work their magic. In their simplicity, the place and Dixon’s rendering suggest building blocks left behind by giants or gods.

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243 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Deserted Sheep Range Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left and dated 1935; Signed verso Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000 Literature: Donald J. Hagerty. The Art of Maynard Dixon. Layton, UT: Gibbs-Smith. 2010, pp. 210-11, illustrated. Deserted Sheep Range came to be after Maynard Dixon visited the dry hills around Coalinga, California in 1935 on a state-sponsored fact-finding trip with Dorothea Lange. Dixon “discovered [that] the rural economy had been shattered by the Depression. Small ranchers, destitute and unable to cope, had fled the land… Where once these hills had hosted numerous cattle and sheep ranches, not one survived.” (Hagerty. The Art of Maynard Dixon, p. 211) Still, appalled as the artist was at the scenes unfolding before him, he manages to find a great deal of beauty in the rounded forms, darks and lights, and the narrow, tonal palette he employs in Deserted Sheep Range. Looking at the painting, one thinks of the simplified landscapes of Dixon’s contemporary, Georgia O’Keeffe, though here, in Deserted Sheep Range, subtle pinks, oranges, and lavenders tint the brown land with something like hope. Life–unvanished–slumbers in apparent lifelessness, in the shadows and in the foreground stubble, waiting on the turn of the seasons, the years, the times, waiting on rain to bring back the sheep, waiting on the sheep to bring back the shepherds. A work of social realism that is neither social nor especially realistic, Deserted Sheep Range also anticipates Andrew Wyeth’s portraits without people, with the land here standing in as a self-portrait, an emblem of the artist’s all but hollowed out heart.

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Provenance: The Grindstone Trust John and Toni Bloomberg, UT. Private Collection. Literature:

Wesley M. Burnside. Maynard Dixon: Artist of the West. Provo, UT; Brigham Young U. Press. 1974, pp. 90, (illustrated), 101 (discussed), 172 (listed).

Donald J. Hagerty. The Art of Maynard Dixon. Layton, UT: Gibbs-Smith. 2010, pp. 158, 160, and rear endpapers, illustrated. Mark Sublette. Maynard Dixon’s American West. Tucson, AZ: Just Me Publishing. 2018, p. 218, illustrated. Exhibitions: Museum of Fine Arts. Museum of New Mexico. “The Bloomberg Collection.” Santa Fe, NM. “Mesas, Mountains & Man: The Western Vision of Maynard Dixon.” Medicine Man Gallery: Tucson, AZ: Nov. 6, 1998-Dec. 24, 1998. “Arizona Collects.” Desert Caballeros Western Museum. Wickenburg, AZ: Feb. 7-Apr. 19, 2004.

244 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Neolithic Afternoon Oil on canvas 36 x 40 inches Signed lower left and dated 1930 Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000


244 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Neolithic Afternoon Oil on canvas 36 x 40 inches Signed lower left and dated 1930

245 Walter Ufer 1876-1936 Spring Morning Oil on board 10 ½ x 12 inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $500,000 - 700,000

Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

It is no accident, as I have written elsewhere, that the Dutch word, landschap, refers to a painting or drawing of a scene in nature for a century and a half before entering English as “landscape” and doing dual duty referring to an artwork and the natural scene it represents. To perceive is to make art; we are all always making art. Erich Auerbach, in his masterwork, Mimesis, speaks of the figura, of the idea proposed by early church fathers that the New Testament fulfills the Old, that the Old Testament isn’t fulfilled until the events of the New take place, that each is a separate reality, bound to the other outside of the relentless forward motion of time. Auerbach finds the figura in Dante’s Divine Comedy, seeing that the souls in the Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso are never more themselves, never more human than they are in the afterlife. I think this is true of Maynard Dixon’s perceivings of the landscapes of the American West, that his paintings aren’t just of places, that they fulfill the landscape he paints just as the landscape is never more fulfilled than when we see it in his paintings. Each realizes and figures forth the other. Place and painting; each make the other more real, more alive. Neolithic Afternoon rises out of Dixon’s immediate experience of the Tehachapi wilderness as he wandered and sketched it in the spring of 1930, rising out of his imagined vision–a vision of truth and poetry rather than fact and history–a vision of a simpler, beautiful, remote past rising out of the emotions that swirled around his awareness of the turmoil and pain that the Depression wrought and would continue to wreak. It’s an ultimate vision, one wrought out of his faith, not just in human nature and human spirit but in the spirit of nature– nature’s renewal, adaptation, and persistence. Soft black Gauguin outlines divide rockform from rockform in the mass. They curl around the shapes of the two indigenous women who sit atop them on a dais carved by time. Cezanne colors in proto-Cubist patches create the greens and oranges of lichen–suggesting life’s tenacity, even on bare rock–and indicate the wear of water and wind on this giant jumble of boulders. The jumble itself is shaped like a cairn, a sign of the way, a marker on a difficult path, the kind left by a traveler’s predecessors to this day. The cairn shape is almost human, and the rounded, pelvic y is a womb or eye opening onto the canyon wall and the larger world. The rocks are far more ancient than these ancient people, these early, vanished California peoples, the First Peoples of the Americas. At the base of this canyon, the trickle of water that slouches by is perhaps all that is left of a once mighty torrent, a great primordial river. The women winnow seeds, separating the utile from the inutile. Their nakedness–also referencing Gauguin, and perhaps Matisse–reflects their absolute innocence, a state of nature Dixon often sought out, though never more so than during the Depression, when greed and want showed humankind at its least humane. My eye keeps returning to the hole in the rocks–the cairn, as I see it–and that, in turn, leads me to the sprocket hole in film, when film was film. Dixon’s painting seems to lunge out of and swirls around the hole, just as movies issues out of the one part of a frame of film that no one cares about, the sprocket hole. But that hole, that absence, is what makes the film move, what makes the image on the film move as the sprocket grabs the frame by the hole and pulls it past the illuminated lens. That absence, that hole that you can raise to your eye and see the moving world through, is what gives motion–life–to motion pictures. That hole, that absence, is time–or, perhaps, spacetime– which is what Dixon dips into to give life to his vision in Neolithic Afternoon.

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Walter Ufer’s family came from Germany and settled in Kentucky. Following his father’s trade in engraving, young Walter was apprenticed to a lithography firm. With the strong support of his parents, Ufer completed his in Dresden. While abroad, Ufer met Sharp and Blumenschein, then settled in Chicago where he met Mayor Carter Harrison, who became his first patron. Harrison sent Ufer to Taos, where he found his friends, Sharp and Blumenschein, and his subject–the landscape and Indians of the New Mexico Pueblos. A founding member of the Taos Society of Artists, Ufer’s paintings combine strong composition, elegant impasto work and vibrant light and color. In Spring Morning, diagonals from left (new grass on the hill) and right (a (small creek) narrow and meet at a clump of young green aspens then veer at corresponding angles left and right in lines of white blossomed apple trees. X marks this beautiful place and time while the Taos Mountains rise beyond like a pile of mussel shells. Ufer’s nature secrets her math in a new ancient season.

246 Sydney Laurence 1865-1940 The Mystery of Light Oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 In The Mystery of Light, Alaska’s first master painter, Sydney Laurence, sets an unseen moon in the sky, casting its illumination over a small, warmly lit cabin in a deep northern forest. Deep wheel ruts in the snow indicate, if not a road, a way in and out. But it’s that single star or planet shining just to the right of and above the center of the canvas that lends something more to the scene: a benediction, perhaps, or perhaps a sign that all–for tonight, at any rate–is well.

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247 Oscar Berninghaus 1874-1952 Summer Day, Taos, New Mexico Oil on board 9 d x 13 d inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

Oscar Berninghaus, a St. Louis native, was already known for his expert draftsmanship when the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company commissioned him to do the artwork for a series of advertising lithographs based on scenes from the settlement of West. Because of this commission, the artist’s reputation and interest in painting the American West soared. On his first Western journey, a chance encounter and a broken wagon wheel–so legend has it–led him to Taos. Berninghaus made Taos his home and became one of the founders of the Taos Society of Artists. The light and color there, and the Pueblo way of life, filled his senses. All this is on display in Summer Day, Taos, New Mexico: sun bathes the adobe home, making the blue outlines of its door and window glow, making the meadow and the foothills a palette of greens. Rainclouds shade the mountains, deepening their blues. The woman seems to have stepped from the house to look up and appreciate the moment of this glorious summer’s day.

248 Henry Balink 1882-1963 Burro Oil on board 7 ¾ x 10 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000 In Burro, Henry Balink adds his take to the tradition of paintings of southwestern donkeys, a tradition that begins with Peter Moran in the 1860’s and continues through Clark Hulings to the present day.

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249 William R. Leigh 1866-1955 Wash Day at the First Mesa Oil on board 10 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 1912 Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000 Provenance: Private Collection, TX. William Robinson Leigh was an unsparing individualist and a famous contrarian. After twelve years at the academy in Munich, the struggling young realist painter returned to New York, a city that had begun to delight in the likes of Cezanne. He also met Thomas Moran, who prodded Leigh to head West. In 1906, newly divorced and dead broke–a condition he must have grown used to in his youth–Leigh journeyed to Arizona and New Mexico. After this, he would make the open spaces, brash cowboys, and ancient peoples– especially the Hopi–of the American West his principal subject. First Mesa is the Hopi home of three thousand-year old villages: Walpi, Sichomovi, and Tewa, villages that produced and drew Leigh and many other artists. Leigh would quickly come to be regarded in the same breath as Remington and Russell.

250 Charles Humphriss 1867-1934 Indian on Horseback Bronze, Signed Charles Humphriss Roman Bronze Works, N-Y Height: 26 inches Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Charles H. Humphriss was an important sculptor of Native American subjects. Born in Great Britain, Humphriss emigrated to the United States, where he lived and worked in New York, spired by his trips to the West. In contrast to many of his peers, who preferred fierce Indians in bellicose situations, Humphriss was fascinated by the Indian at peace, enacting ancient rituals whose purpose is to appeal to the spiritual worlds for guidance, for patience, for good fortune.

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251 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 October Morning - Crow Teepees, Montana Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Provenance: Biltmore Galleries, AZ. Private Collection. Though Joseph Sharp painted in every season, transitions—Fall after early snow and Spring just before the last snow melted away—seem to have been favorites. Shadows on bright sun, teepees through last and first leaves, mustardy yellows and old mauves against pale blue skies, figures out on those last and first best days, before Winter sets in or Spring cues up. October Morning - Crow Teepees, Montana balances these key Sharp elements in a peaceful composition as the single figure, up before everyone else, wrapped against the chill, catches the morning air and light before heading back in to the warmth of the teepee.

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252 Adolph Weinman 1870-1952 Chief Black Bird, Ogalala Sioux Bronze, Signed A. Weinman and titled Roman Bronze Works N.Y. Height: 16 inches Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000

Adolph Alexander Weinman emigrated to the United States from Germany with his family when he was ten years old. After studying at Cooper Union and the Art Students’ League of New York, Weinman worked with Augustus Saint-Gaudens. Chief Black Bird, Ogalalla Sioux, is one of the Weinman’s most important works, inspired after he met and sketched the Chief, who was in New York performing with a Wild West Show. Weinman’s elegance and precision can also be found on one of our most beautiful coins, the “Walking Liberty” half dollar.

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253 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Stalking Game Big Horn Montana Oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000 Provenance: Coeur d’Alene Art Auction. Jul 25, 2009. Lot 134. Private Collection, TX.

254 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 The Blizzard Oil on board 10 x 14 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Joseph Sharp was born in Ohio in 1859. The outdoors, art, and Indians absorbed him from an early age. Sharp studied in Cincinnati, Munich, and Paris, but brought his classical training home with the idea of painting Native Americans in the West. Having been the first of the Taos Society to visit New Mexico (in 1893), Sharp made Taos his permanent residence in 1912 but would venture out, back to Montana and the Northern Plains, to California and Hawaii, to Europe, Africa, and Asia on his restless search for people and places to paint.

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255 Thomas Moran 1837-1926 Castle Rock, Santa Barbara, California Oil on canvas 25 x 20 inches Signed lower left and dated 1917, Thumbprint lower right Estimate: $250,000 - 450,000

This work will be included in Stephen L. Good’s and Phyllis Braff’s forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist’s work. Provenance: The artist. Charles Frederickson, OH. Elizabeth Frederickson Lane, OH. By descent in the family to the present. Literature: Thurman Wilkins. Thomas Moran, Artist of the Mountains. Norman, OK: Univ. of Oklahoma Press. 1998, p. 309.

Thomas Moran was born into a family of weavers in Bolton, England in 1837. At seven, after the swift, violent collapse of the hand weaving industry in the face of industrial mills, Moran’s family—artists all—emigrated to the United States. Moran apprenticed with an engraver, saw the works of the English artist J.M.W. Turner, and thought Turner’s light and atmosphere worth emulating here in the vastness and variety of the American landscape. Like Turner, Thomas Moran was a romantic. He loved Longfellow’s Hiawatha and Lord Byron’s poems and dreamed of becoming a solitary wanderer in remote, craggy lands and among the ruins of lost civilizations. In 1870, while working for Scribner’s Monthly, Moran was asked to develop sketches from the first scientific expedition to Yellowstone. Enthralled, Moran secured a spot with Ferdinand V. Hayden’s geological survey, which was scheduled to visit there. Hayden’s report to Congress, accompanied by William Henry Jackson’s photos and Moran’s paintings led to the establishment of Yellowstone as our first national park. By 1917, at 80, Moran, deemed the “Dean of American Painters,” was wintering in Pasadena, California and summering in East Hampton, New York. He was still vigorous: traveling to and painting his beloved Grand Canyon and sending his work to the National Gallery for the National Parks Exhibit. Castle Rocks, in shape even if not in name, drew Moran’s aesthetic eye and imagination, whether they were to be found in Green River, the north of Wales, or Castle Rock, Santa Barbara, California, carved into its axehead form by the ceaseless pounding of Pacific waves. Charles Frederickson was president of American Art Works, a company specializing in tin lithography for breweries and other kinds of firms, best known for the beautiful and collectible Coca-Cola trays they made.

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255 Thomas Moran 1837-1926 Castle Rock, Santa Barbara, California Oil on canvas 25 x 20 inches Signed lower left and dated 1917, Thumbprint lower right Estimate: $250,000 - 450,000

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256 Albert Bierstadt 1803-1902 Cabin Oil on paper laid on canvas and mounted on board 13 x 19 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Provenance: Mary L. Sooy, CA. Maxwell Galleries, CA. 1965. Harry & Diana Hind, acquired from the above, 1967. Gift to the present owner from the above, 1978. Christie’s. New York. May 20, 2010. Lot 117. Private Collection. Coeur d’Alene Art Auction. Jul 29, 2017. Lot 185. Private Collection, TX. Exhibitions: “Albert Bierstadt: An Observer of Air, Light and the Feeling of a Place.” The Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, M.H. de Young Memorial Museum. August 3, 1985-January 6, 1986. In checklist.

257 Albert Bierstadt 1803-1902 Mountainous Landscape Oil on canvas 19 ½ x 14 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

Born in Germany, near Dusseldorf, Albert Bierstadt was brought as a child to the bustling whaling town of New Bedford, Massachusetts. Early artistic prowess led to formal training in Germany–back in Dusseldorf, in fact. Immersion in the aesthetics of Dusseldorf’s High German Romanticism and its counterpart in American Transcendentalism–think Goethe, Beethoven, Wagner, Cooper, Melville–prepares him to transform the American wilderness into art. In 1859, Bierstadt secures a place in the 1859 Lander Expedition to the Rocky Mountains and he finds his subject and quick success once he returns and sets up shop in New York. Out of the surreal majesty of the American Rockies, Bierstadt creates panoramic landscapes combining elements of the beautiful and the sublime that capture the popular imagination. Subsequent trips West add to the artist’s experience and reputation.

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258 Bruno Liljefors 1860-1939 White Rabbit in Winter Oil on canvas 24 ½ x 33 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated 1927 Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

If Rungius and Kuhnert are the spiritual fathers of big game painting, Swedish artist Bruno Liljefors is the father of the painters of smaller creatures, the rabbits and hares, foxes and cats and birds. A slight, sickly child, Liljefors took to rambling in the outdoors as a cure. The great forests of Sweden offered innumerable subjects for his interest in art. Impressionism impressed him in his studies, as did Darwinism as it applied to the animal world. Liljefors sought out the rhythms and harmonies of form and color in his work. In 1929, he summed up his philosophy: “Organic life, especially the animal, is the apex of creation, and movement is the highest expression of natural life.” White Rabbit in Winter is a study in the tonalities of the season, capturing the coziness of the forest in the depth of the cold.

259 Hermann Herzog 1832-1932 Glacier Meadow Oil on canvas 38 x 30 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Like his contemporary, Albert Bierstadt, Herman Herzog’s training at the art academy in Dusseldorf led him to paint sweeping Romantic landscapes with roiling, vertiginous cataracts and storm shrouded peaks. However, Herzog’s conception of Nature always seems to describe a duality, a yin and yang battle–and balance–between darkness and light, between elements that are beautiful and picturesque and others that are sublime and awe-inspiring. Draw a line in your mind from the top left corner of Glacier Meadow to the bottom right. Cows graze in a green pasture in the lower right half of the painting while the glacier, topped with an oncoming storm, dominates the top left.

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260 Ogden Pleissner 1905-1983 Playing a Fish Watercolor 18 x 30 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

If Ogden Pleissner is the most important 20th century interpreter of American field sports and fishing, perhaps it’s because he never consigned himself to that or any genre. Like his spiritual forbear, Winslow Homer, whose Civil War paintings brought him to prominence, Pleissner achieved early success painting scenes from World War II, first in Alaska and then, famously, interpreting D-Day, the liberation of Europe, and the China-Burma-India theater for Life Magazine. Playing a Fish has all the elements of a classic Pleissner salmon fishing scene from the low, graycentered clouds in a blue sky to the guide holding the long net while the steersman keeps the boat in place. The angler, meanwhile, sits in the middle, his attention and theirs offscreen, if you will, on the great, coin bright salmon bending the rod.

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261 John Whorf 1903-1959 Marsh at Sunrise Watercolor 14 ½ x 21 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Massachusetts painter John Whorf spent a great deal of time in the artists’ colony of Provincetown, where he learned to do quick plein air studies with Charles Hawthorne. Despite the lifelong effects of a debilitating childhood injury, Whorf traveled to, studied, and painted in Europe and North Africa. Well represented in Boston and New York, Whorf’s work quickly found a place in museums and major collections. John Singer Sargent, to whom Whorf owes some debt–as you can see in the bold, luminous Marsh at Sunrise–knew and admired the artist’s watercolors.

262 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Protecting the Future Oil on board 15 x 22 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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263 John Fery 1859-1934 Snake River Sunset Oil on canvas 20 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 In the 1890’s, the work of German born and trained John Fery–who was earning his living guiding wealthy patrons on hunting trips to the Northwest while trying to make his way as an artist–came to the attention of Louis W. Hill, president of the Great Northern Railway. Over the next thirty years, Hill would commission Fery to adorn his stations and hotels with over three hundred canvases depicting the dramatic scenery and wildlife along the rail line. Just the sort of scene you might imagine seeing from a train window, if your imagination runs to soft impressionism. Snake River Sunset shows a pair of deer, emerging as they do at day’s end to browse and drink. Evening mist rises and curls over the riverbank to fold them in its protective screen until night falls and hides them from view.

264 Ralph Blakelock 1847-1919 The Indian Encampment Oil on board 13 ½ x 19 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Provenance: Frank Dudensing, Dudensing Galleries, NY. (C. 1920) Mrs. Irene Trunk. Taft Museum of Art, OH. Adelson Galleries, MA. Christies, New York. June 3, 1983. Mary Ran Gallery, OH. Private Collection. If you haven’t read Glyn Vincent’s biography, The Unknown Night: The Genius and Madness of R.A. Blakelock, head to the library, bookstore (if you can find one), or your laptop. The story is riveting and harrowing. Even as Blakelocks were commanding the highest prices ever in American art, the artist himself was in an asylum, where he was kept from his family and preyed upon by people who sought to cash in on his new celebrity. Perhaps the first real visionary in American art, Blakelock is, in some ways, the opposite of an artist: he wants to prevent you from seeing, to restrict sight and compel your imagination to grapple with the mystery of what you cannot discern and complete the vision.

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265 Thomas Hill 1829-1908 The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone Oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Provenance: Mary Ran Gallery, OH. (Circa 1983) Private Collection.

Thomas Hill was born in England but emigrated with his family to Massachusetts when he was 15. Hill began his studies at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts where he fell under the influence of the Hudson River School while adding a plein air slant to his own practice. In 1861, Hill moved to California, where the natural wonders of the West would become his principal subject. A close friend of naturalist and conservationist John Muir, the images Hill created contributed greatly to the American desire to set wild and beautiful places aside for posterity. It seems like late summer, maybe September, in Hill’s painting of The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. The falls are a trickle and the river runs shallow and slow. Like the hunter and his dog, the canyon is readying itself for year’s end.

266 Thomas Hill 1829-1908 Mt Hood Oil on canvas 16 x 24 inches Signed lower right and dated Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Thomas Hill painted Oregon’s Mt. Hood on numerous occasions. In this richly colored, spontaneous canvas, he adds a small camp of indigenous figures, including one mounted man and dog, members perhaps of one of the numerous nations that occupied the area– Multonomah, Chinookan, Klickitat, or Yakima, to name a few.

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267 G. Harvey 1933-2017 The Street Vendor Oil on canvas 24 x 20 inches Signed lower left; Titled verso Estimate: $48,000 - 68,000 Literature: G. Harvey. The Golden Era. Fulshear, TX: Somerset House, 1992, p. 118, illustrated.

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268 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Street Cars Along the Avenue, Austin, TX Oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches Signed lower right and dated 1982; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000


269 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Burro Near Talpa, NM Oil on canvas 16 x 24 inches Signed lower right and dated 1976

268 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Street Cars Along the Avenue, Austin, TX (detail) Oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches Signed lower right and dated 1982; Signed and titled verso

Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000 A son of the Texas Hill Country, Gerald Harvey Jones, known to the art world as G. Harvey, listened to stories his father and grandfather told, stories of ranch life, the frontier, and cattle drives. These stories, springing from the landscape, helped form the images that shaped his career as an artist. Harvey’s subject matter ranged from nostalgic cityscapes to oil derricks, to historical and working cowboy scenes. But the artist’s values, faith, and interest in American history are the true wellspring of his work. Harvey’s influences embraced Impressionism, American artists like Moran and Bierstadt, and the works of 20th century French boulevard painters such as Cortes. Dramatic light playing over areas of greater and lesser detail were Harvey’s stock in trade, and while he rooted his work in realism, his conceptions were the children of his prodigious imagination. From 1875-1940, streetcars—also known as trolleys—ran through the streets of Austin. A few early cars at right, and the gas streetlights put this scene closer to 1910. Here, at the end of horse and buggy days, the trolleys share the wide, rain slicked road we look toward the Texas State Capitol. Lone Star flags adorn the lampposts, points of Texas pride in the big shouldered bustle of the city. Dominating the center of the picture, riding our way, two cowboys with a packhorse seem to have cantered out of the state’s past, making their way boldly but quickly through what might be, for them, a little too much civilization.

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270 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 The Collector, Naples Watercolor 17 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Provenance: Fenn Galleries, NM. Private Collection. Altermann Galleries, June 16, 2007 Private Collection.

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271 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Tesuque Frieze Oil on board 18 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 1974 Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 Exhibitions: Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Okla. City, OK. 1974. Clark Hulings grew up in New Jersey, studied in New York under Bridgman and Reilly at the Art Student’s League, and haunted the Grand Central Art Galleries until they took him on. Golden Age illustrators, like Rockwell and Cornwell, offered a constant wellspring of inspiration and insight into technique, but the time he spent in Spain as a little boy after the death of his mother seems to have imprinted on his imagination. Old cobblestone streets, donkeys and carts, stalls and markets in Mexico, Italy, Spain, and the adobe of the American Southwest became the principal objects of Hulings’s art. As Hulings himself wrote: “If it is nostalgia that induces me to paint markets and donkeys and Spanish landscapes, perhaps it is also nostalgia that moves me to search out rustic places with bygone lifestyles.” (Hulings, A Gallery of Paintings, p. 5)

272 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Konya Carriage Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Provenance: The artist. Grand Central Galleries, NY. Brown L. and Marion H. Whatley, FL. Sotheby’s, New York, Apr 23, 2015. Private Collection.

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273 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Still Life with Antique Chinese Jar Oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 1990 Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000 Provenance: Nedra Matteucci Galleries, NM, 1995. Paul Masa, MT. Private Collection.

274 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Torremolinas, Once Oil on canvas 14 x 21 inches Signed lower left and dated 1998 Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000 Provenance: Nedra Matteucci Galleries, NM, 1998. Paul Masa, MT. Private Collection. Exhibitions: “Timeless Beauty: Pursuing Life’s Textures,” Nedra Matteucci Galleries, NM. 1999. Illustrated in the catalogue, plate 4. Of Torremolinas, Once, Clark Hulings wrote: “I spent seven weeks in this seaside village in southern Spain when there was but one small boardinghouse. This woman is long gone, as is her house–sacrificed to build high-rise condos and luxury hotels. “Her granddaughter no doubt lives inland with an electric washer and dryer and no view of the sea.”

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275 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Washing Clothes in a Canal Oil on board 9 ½ x 8 ¼ inches Signed lower right and dated 1982 Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000 Provenance: Lois Wagner Fine Arts, NY. (1999) J.N. Bartfield Galleries, NYC. (Circa 2000) Private Collection, TX.

276 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Market Day, San Miguel de Allende Oil on canvas 30 x 20 inches Signed lower right and dated 1967 Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Provenance: Grand Central Galleries, NY, 1967. Private Collection. Sotheby’s, NY, Sept. 29, 2010. Private Collection.

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277 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Old Boston Oil on canvas 30 x 36 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $75,000 - 100,000

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278 G. Harvey 1933-2017 A Stroll on the Plaza Oil on canvas 48 x 36 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000 Literature: G. Harvey. The Western Series. Fulshear, TX: Somerset House, 2001, p. 80, illustrated. G. Harvey. The City Series. Fulshear, TX: Somerset House, 2001, p. 80, illustrated.

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279 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Ginny’s Doll Conte Crayon 17 x 14 inches Signed lower right; Titled and dated 1985 verso Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

280 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Pansies Oil on board 8 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 2012 Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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281 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Carnations Oil on canvas 8 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 2004; Signed, titled and dated 2005 verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

282 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Serenity Oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1978 verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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283 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Victoria Twilight Gouache 12 ¼ x 18 ½ inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1975 verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

284 Edouard Cortes 1882-1969 Rue de la Paix-Vendome Oil on canvas 13 x 18 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Provenance: Private Collection, Fayetteville, NC. Heritage Auctions, Dallas, TX. May 15, 2002. Lot 64135. Private Collection, TX. Edouard Cortes was born into an artistic family during what has come to be called the “Belle Epoque”—those final decades of the 19th century when Paris was the cultural capital of the world. Cortes’s nostalgia for the period of his youth permeates his paintings. Untouched by the cataclysms of the 20th century, Cortes’s paintings typically have the quality of dripped candle wax, the accidental beauty of a passing cart as crowds of people stroll along the softly lit boulevards.

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285 Morgan Weistling b. 1964 The Corn Shuckers Oil on canvas 22 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 13; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

286 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Holiday Lights NYC Oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches Signed lower right; Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Literature: G. Harvey. The Western Series. Fulshear, TX: Somerset House, 2001, p. 152, illustrated. G. Harvey. The City Series. Fulshear, TX: Somerset House, 2001, p. 152, illustrated.

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287 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Mountain Jubilee Oil on canvas 34 x 21 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

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288 William Acheff b. 1947 The Children are in the Village Oil on canvas 36 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2004 verso Estimate: $28,000 - 38,000

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289 Tom Lovell 1909-1997 The Helpers Oil on canvas 16 x 24 inches Signed lower left/NAWA dated 1987; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $35,000 - 45,000 Provenance: Altermann Galleries. April 4, 2014. Lot 283. Private Collection. Literature: Don Hedgpeth & Walt Reed. The Art of Tom Lovell: An Invitation to History. New York: William Morrow and Company. pp. 36-38, illustrated. In The Art of Tom Lovell, Hedgpeth and Reed describe The Helpers: “The Mandans were a sedentary people who farmed and hunted along the upper Missouri River on the eastern edge of the Great Plains. Mandan women cultivated corn, squash, and beans in the fertile soil along the riverbanks, and the men made annual expeditions to hunt buffalo. “Early on a cold, winter morning, an old Mandan woman has gathered firewood and loaded it on a travois with the help of her grandchildren. The village is quiet; snow lies deep on the lodge roofs; and most families still sleep, huddled in warm buffalo robes. “The once proud Mandan people would be ravaged by a series of epidemics as a result of contact with white men. In 1837, smallpox killed hundreds, leaving scarcely more than a hundred survivors of the Mandan nation.” (p. 38)

290 Tom Lovell 1909-1997 Homage to the Bison Pastel 6 x 10 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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291 Tom Lovell 1909-1997 Even Trade Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right/NAWA and dated 1976; Signed verso Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000 Provenance: Altermann & Morris Galleries, Nov. 2, 1996. Private Collection. Morris & Whiteside Galleries, Oct. 25, 2002. Private Collection. Tom Lovell was already a successful illustrator for the New York slicks and pulps–Maxwell Grant’s The Shadow springs immediately to mind–when World War II rolled around. Lovell lived in the Metro New York area, not far from Norman Rockwell, Mead Schaeffer, Harold Von Schmidt, and other artists who made their homes a train ride from the Manhattan magazine offices and agencies that hired them. Lovell would spent the war years with John Clymer, illustrating Leatherneck, the publication of the U.S. Marine Corps, and would go on to illustrate numerous stories in magazines prior to finding his calling as an easel painter of scenes out of American history–and especially the history of the American West. Horse for eagle fathers. That’s the Even Trade the pioneer is offering with his two touching forefingers, laid side by side in sign language, one of the many lingua francas of the American frontier. For each, this would seem a good bargain: the medicine of the feathers, its religious significance, against a good horse, always a dear commodity in the early West. Still, the body language of the two men expresses some doubt, some hesitation, some cross cultural trepidation just as the deal is about to be sealed.

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292 Charlie Dye 1906-1972 The Rustler Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Literature: Paul Weaver. Charlie Dye: One Helluva Western Painter. Los Angeles: Petersen Prints. 1981, p. 134, listed. While on a roundup in 1964, Charlie Dye–along with Joe Beeler, John Hampton, and George Phippen–came up with the germ of the idea that would become the Cowboy Artists of America. Of his own art, Dye–with characteristic self-deprecation–observed, “I have always tried to paint what I can remember of a life I led before I became dishonest and studied art. My old man could have forgiven me if I had turned out playing piano in a whorehouse, but artists rated one step below pimps in his book.” Despite his humility, whatever he depicted of cowboy life, Charlie Dye painted it from the point of view of a life lived, not merely as an observer, but as a participant, a wrangler in the thick of the action. In The Rustler, Dye hides a special species of polecat, one he was surely familiar with in his cowboy days, in the shadow of a steep defile, where he is about to brand–or re-brand–a stray with his own mendacious moniker. A few of the herd stand at a distance as the only mute witnesses to the dastardly deed.

293 Gordon Snidow b. 1936 Memories Gouache 20 x 28 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1986 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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294 Gordon Snidow b. 1936 Morning on the 06 Watercolor 5 ¾ x 7 ½ inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1980 Estimate: $2,500 - 4,500

295 Gordon Snidow b. 1936 Headin’ for the Shindig Oil on board 19 x 28 inches Signed lower right and dated 2013 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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296 John Moyers b. 1958 Apache Gouache 36 x 24 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 07; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000 Award: Silver Medal in Water Soluble. Cowboy Artists of America. 2007.

297 John Moyers b. 1958 Hang and Rattle Oil on board 40 x 20 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2010 verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Award: Cowboy Artists of America Kieckhefer Award (Best in Show) 2010

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298 R.S. Riddick b. 1952 Keeper of the Pipe Oil on canvas 24 x 32 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2006 Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

299 Richard Greeves b. 1935 Yankton Sioux Grass Dancers Bronze, cast number 16/30 22 ½ inches high, 25 ½ inches wide Signed and dated 2004 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Literature: Don Hedgpeth & Ed Trumble. The Story of Leanin’ Tree: Art and Enterprise in the American West. Boulder, CO, p. 149, illustrated.

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300 Jim Norton b. 1953 Checking the Trapline Oil on board 20 x 32 inches Signed lower left/CA; Signed verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

301 Jim Norton b. 1953 Guardian of the Springs Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $6,000 - 8,000

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302 Jim Norton b. 1953 The Toll Oil on board 30 x 48 inches Signed lower left/CA; Signed, titled and dated 10/01 verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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303 Roy Andersen 1930-2019 The War Bonnet Robe Oil on canvas 48 x 34 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Roy Andersen studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Art and the Art Center School of Los Angeles. He spent the early part of his career in illustration, working for National Geographic, Time, and Sports Illustrated. He designed stamps for the Postal Service and executed murals for the National Park Service and other public institutions. But the artist’s heart was in the American West and his fascination with Native American history and culture soon became his principal subject. Andersen was inducted into the Cowboy Artists of America in 1989 and won countless awards for dramatic works such as The War Bonnet Robe.

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304 Roy Andersen 1930-2019 Four Legged Gold Oil on canvas 18 x 26 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

305 John Moyers b. 1958 Fleeting Drama-Taos Oil on canvas 30 x 30 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 04; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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306 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Marshall II Bronze, cast number MAII7P 17 inches high Signed and dated 1979 Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000 Literature:

307 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Cowboy’s Meditation Bronze, cast number 26 22 ½ inches high, 21 inches wide Signed/CA Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Literature:

Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. pp. 98-99, 188-189, illustrated (other examples).

Don Hedgpeth & Ed Trumble. The Story of Leanin’ Tree: Art and Enterprise in the American West. Boulder, CO, p. 193, illustrated.

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Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. p. 252, illustrated (other examples).


308 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Flagbearer II Bronze, cast number TFIIP12P 23 inches high Signed and dated 1992; HJS Cody Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

Almost certainly the only figure in American art to claim friendship with Jackson Pollock and John Wayne, the iconoclastic Jackson was born in Chicago and grew up in his mother’s diner near the stockyards where men of the range brought their cattle to market. Jackson went West in his teens, served in the Pacific in World War II, went East to meet Pollock and paint among the Abstract Expressionists, but ultimately rediscovered realism and made the American West his subject.

309 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Sacagawea, The First Working Model for a Monument Bronze, cast number 34 27 inches high Signed, titled and dated 1977; WFS Italy Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 Literature: Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. pp. 140-146, 277-290, illustrated (other examples).

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310 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Study for Plains Motif Oil on board 9 ½ x 9 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Born in Missouri in 1919, Kenneth Riley grew up loving both music and art. But not too many people can play the drums with one hand while painting with the other. Art won out, and Riley soon found himself studying in Kansas City with Thomas Hart Benton, and then in New York with George Bridgman and Harvey Dunn. After serving as a combat artist during the Second World War, Riley hit the illustration trail, producing work for Bantam Books, The Saturday Evening Post, Cosmopolitan, National Geographic, and Life magazine and traveling through Europe, North Africa, and the Far East. But the American West roused Riley’s interest in fine art and he began to paint the Little Bighorn Battlefield, Grand Teton National Park, the Black Hills, the Badlands and in the Southwest. In 1982, Riley became a member of the Cowboy Artists of America, receiving gold medals in 1984, 1988, 1989, 1993, and winning the Prix de West in 1995. Riley never looked back, and we have never looked away. His paintings can be found in important public and private collections, including the White House, the Smithsonian Institution, the Booth Western Art Museum, and the Phoenix Art Museum. Plains Motif is a stunning example of Riley’s ability to make the strong abstraction of indigenous design appear to be part of the inner life of the subject. The horizontal line of blood from the antelope’s eye intersects with the red of the feathered standard, linking the man with the animal while the man’s face sits at their nexus. The painting seems as if it has been created by the mind of the warrior.

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311 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Study for Mandan Gold Acrylic 6 x 5 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

312 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Pause on the Trail Oil on board 10 Âź x 16 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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313 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Following the Trail Acrylic 4 x 7 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

314 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Study for Music to Buy By Acrylic 3 Âź x 6 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

315 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Stolen Ponies Acrylic 3 x 6 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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316 William Acheff b. 1947 Shotgun Chaps Oil on canvas 26 x 20 inches Signed lower left and dated 1998; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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317 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Lament Bronze, cast number 6/8 65 inches high Signed and dated 90 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Allan Houser was the first child born to Geronimo’s people, the Chiricahua Apache, when they were settled in Oklahoma after their release in 1914 from decades of detention in Florida. Their strength and suffering unite in works that combine Modernist forms with traditional Native American elements; Houser’s simplified figures inhabit the plane we live on and a higher, spiritual plane. Life, work and worship are made of the whole cloth of purpose. They are, in his sculptures, strands of the same divinity. Houser’s Lament is an abstraction of grief: everything in the figure elongates and rises in song and prayer while the hands grip the buffalo skull by the horns, willing the physical and spiritual weight of it to defy gravity and death.

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318 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Sioux with Rattle and Fan Bronze, cast number 8/50 16 inches high Signed and dated 94; AHI Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Literature:

Don Hedgpeth & Ed Trumble. The Story of Leanin’ Tree: Art and Enterprise in the American West. Boulder, CO, p. 199, illustrated.

319 Fritz White 1930-2010 In Search of the Snow Goose Bronze, cast number 15/16 29 ¾ inches high Signed/CA Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Literature:

Don Hedgpeth & Ed Trumble. The Story of Leanin’ Tree: Art and Enterprise in the American West. Boulder, CO, p. 364, illustrated.

Award:

Cowboy Artists of America Gold Medal in Sculpture 1985

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320 Martin Grelle b. 1954 The Lost Kettle Oil on canvas 44 x 44 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2005 Estimate: $85,000 - 125,000

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321 Chad Poppleton b. 1976 Eminent Domain Oil on board 24 x 48 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2020 verso Estimate: $11,000 - 15,000

322 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Down the Snake Bronze, cast number 18/22 10 ½ inches high, 33 ½ inches wide Signed/CA Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Literature: Don Hedgpeth & Ed Trumble. The Story of Leanin’ Tree: Art and Enterprise in the American West. Boulder, CO, p. 246, illustrated. S C O T T S D A L E A RT A U C T I O N

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323 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 God’s Country Oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

324 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Free Spirit Bronze, cast number 10/30 21 inches high Signed/CA Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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325 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 A Song for the Heart Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

Joe Beeler grew up on the Oklahoma border, studied in Kansas and Los Angeles and made his living in commercial art before breaking through in 1960 with a one-man exhibition at the Gilcrease. Four years later, Beeler became one of the founding members of the Cowboy Artists of America. Beeler believed that “a really fine or great piece of western art will not only show care in the documentary aspects of the work, but it will also be a fine piece judged primarily on its merits alone.” In A Song for the Heart, Beeler turns his attentions to the end-of-day joys of the vaquero’s hard life. As a woman tends the stew over the cookfire that spreads its glow over the scene, the music the men make recalls the dusty deeds of the day and the storied deeds of the dusty past.

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326 John Moyers b. 1958 Photo $1 Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 07; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000

327 John Moyers b. 1958 Souvenirs of Mexico Gouache 36 x 20 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 05; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000 Award: Cowboy Artists of America Gold Medal in Water Solubles 2005

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328 Fred Fellows b. 1934 Riding Out a Bad Investment Bronze, cast number 14/15 60 inches high, 55 inches wide Signed/CA Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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329 Jay Kemp b. 1966 Mountain Music Acrylic 31 Âź x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $12,000 - 16,000

330 Bonnie Marris b. 1951 By the Den Oil on board 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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331 Ralph Oberg b. 1950 On the Rocks Oil on board 40 x 50 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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332 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 A Look Around Acrylic 8 x 9 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

333 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Deer Fawn Conte Crayon 11 x 15 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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334 Tucker Smith b. 1940 His Territory Oil on canvas 10 x 12 inches Signed lower left and dated 89 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

335 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Seeking Passion and Glory Bronze, cast number 8/35 24 inches high, 24 inches wide Signed Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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336 James Reynolds 1926-2010 No Hurry Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1976 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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337 James Reynolds 1926-2010 Now the Day is Over Oil on canvas 28 x 40 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 Jim Reynolds grew up in California near the Donner Pass, a place with a storied name in the American West. At 13, Reynolds received a calendar with a reproduction of a Frank Tenney Johnson and began to wonder what it would take to be able to paint like that. After a stint in the navy in World War II, he became a commercial illustrator and a Hollywood storyboard and set artist. In 1967, Reynolds moved to Arizona, where his work achieved great acclaim and earned every Western honor. When you really take in a work like Now The Day Is Over, Reynolds seems to descend directly from his hero, Frank Tenney Johnson, demonstrating a similarly intimate focus on the people of the West and their activities depicted with a broad, bold realism.

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338 Herman Hansen 1854-1924 Cruising for New Pastures Watercolor 23 ¼ x 35 ½ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 One of many expatriate European artists to find the allure of the American West irresistible, Herman Hansen came to the States in 1877 and settled in San Francisco in 1882. He spent his summers sketching his way through the Southwest and became fast friends with Borein and Dixon. Hansen, who is known for his wild-eyed horses and high-octane scenes, famously lamented the rapid civilizing of the West, observing as early as 1908 that: “Tucson is killed from my point of view. They have shut down all the gambling houses tight, and not a gun in sight. Why, the place hasn’t the pictorial value of a copper cent any longer.”

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339 Herman Hansen 1854-1924 Cowboy with a Lasso Watercolor 9 ¼ x 10 ¼ inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

340 Herman Hansen 1854-1924 Apache Scouts Trailing Watercolor 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Herman Hansen studied in Germany, England, and Chicago. Though he would, on occasion, paint in oils, transparent watercolor seemed to suit the meticulously drawn compositions and capture the pastel light he favored. A contract creating railroad advertising sent him to the Dakotas and many other points in the West and Southwest. The detail in Apache Scouts Trailing epitomizes Hansen’s work; it is almost hyperrealistic, a kind of reportage that conveys much more than photography at that time could have.

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341 R.S. Riddick b. 1952 Cart Before the Horse Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 1993 verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

342 Ed Mell b. 1942 Rearin’ Back Bronze, cast number 9/30 13 ½ inches high Signed Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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343 Ed Mell b. 1942 Blue Water Lake Powell Oil on canvas 48 x 48 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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221


344 Curt Walters b. 1950 Grand Temples of Zion Oil on canvas 40 x 64 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000

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345 Steve Kestrel b. 1947 Spectre of Ancient Pathways Bronze, cast number 8/10 35 inches high, 26 inches wide Signed and dated 1989 Estimate: $12,000 - 22,000

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346 Jim Reno 1929-2008 Enemy Commache and Apache Bronze, cast number 6/8 25 inches high, 31 inches wide Signed, titled and dated 1990 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Growing up in Indiana’s horse country, Jim Reno developed a strong affinity for race horses and polo ponies that led him to begin to sculpt them. Indeed, his first commissions were portraits of winning mounts. Reno settled in Kerrville, Texas and adapted his art to Western subjects such as the classic action grouping, Enemy Comanche and Apache.

347 Fritz White 1930-2010 Out of the Mystic Past Bronze, cast number 6/15 21 ½ inches high, 51 inches wide Signed/CA Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000 Award: Gold Medal in Sculpture. Cowboy Artists of America. 1983.

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348 R.S. Riddick b. 1952 Hunter’s Alliance Oil on canvas 40 x 34 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2006 Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000

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225


349 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Mirage Bronze, cast number 7/24 27 inches high Signed and dated 2013 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

350 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 A Common Waterbuck Oil on canvas 16 ½ x 21 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Provenance: Mr. William Ruger, CT. Christie’s, New York. Oct. 30, 2002 J.N. Bartfield Galleries, NYC. 2002. Private Collection, UT. Private Collection. Born in Germany in 1865, Wilhelm Kuhnert showed early promise and prowess in the visual arts. While attending the Royal Academy of Arts in Berlin, he learned to paint animals and landscapes en plein air–from life–as the Impressionists in France advocated. Three years later, Germany established the colony of German East Africa, which included Mt. Kilimanjaro, the rich game lands around the Rufiji River and parts of Maasailand. To an ambitious wildlife artist, the call of Africa was strong, and Kuhnert found a way to make the journey. For the next 15 years, Kuhnert would explore, draw, and paint areas of Africa that few Europeans and Americans had seen. Kuhnert’s A Common Waterbuck is anything but. A sensitive portrait of a gorgeous animal, the artist’s ease and economy here suggests this was done from life.

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351 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Rocky Outcrop Acrylic 12 x 20 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000

352 David Shepherd b. 1931 Lion Pair Oil on canvas 9 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 91 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 British artist David Shepherd has spent a lifetime painting and advocating for the great game animals of Africa. He founded what has become a vital African wildlife foundation and was awarded the Order of the British Empire for his efforts. Shepherd began his career painting airplanes and reenactments of World War II air battles, but a trip to Africa–ostensibly to paint planes– became a lifelong challenge to capture elephants, big cats, rhinos, and all of the continent’s creatures, great and small. Shepherd also painted portraits, including Queen Elizabeth’s. In Lion Pair, the female rests watchfully while the maned male looks up from their meal, a freshly killed Cape Buffalo whose horns peek out of the thorns. It’s a moment of repose after what must have been a frenzy of action.

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353 William Alther b. 1959 Reigning Champ Oil on board 38 x 38 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

354 Michael Coleman b. 1946 High Range Bear Oil on board 14 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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355 Kenneth Bunn b. 1938 Cougar on Rock Bronze, cast number 9/10 26 inches high, 37 inches wide Signed Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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229


356 T.D. Kelsey b. 1946 The Heavy Weights (fighting buffalo desc) Bronze, cast number 3/5 14 inches high, 28 inches wide Signed, titled and dated 2011 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

357 Kenneth Bunn b. 1938 Ugly Sister Bronze, cast number 26/35 21 inches high, 25 inches wide Signed and dated 1999 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000 Literature: The Best of the Best: 2015 Contemporary Wildlife Exhibition and Sale. Woolaroc Museum, Oklahoma. p. 14, illustrated. A copy of the book will accompany this lot.

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358 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 Lion Etching, edition number 59/60 13 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $1,200 - 2,200 Literature: Fritz Meyer-Schonbrunn. Wilhelm Kuhnert: Miene Tiere. Berlin: Reimar Hobbing. p. 35, illustrated and listed.

359 Richard Loffler b. 1956 Silent Twitch Bronze, cast number 4/10 39 inches high, 88 inches wide Signed Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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360 James Bama b. 1926 Jack Brown, Cody WY Oil on board 25 x 13 inches Signed lower right and dated 1969 Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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361 James Bama b. 1926 Richard Smith - “Flaming Rainbow”, Part Arapahoe, Part Sioux Indian Oil on board 20 x 15 inches Signed lower right and dated 77; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

362 Henry Balink 1882-1963 Daughters of a Vanishing Race Oil on canvas 24 x 20 inches Signed upper left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Henry Balink’s parents were hostile to the idea of their son becoming an artist, so the boy ran away from home and paid for classes by skating in competition, entering bicycle racing contests and doing stunts in silent movies. Balink finished school, sailed for America, and found work doing drawings of artifacts at the Met. In 1923, Balink settled in Santa Fe. Best remembered for his portraits of Native Americans, Daughters of a Vanishing Race finds the artist in a more expansive, symbolic frame of mind. The two beautiful girls seem to share a haunted, resigned aspect. Their bright shawls shield them from the dark, Rembrandt-like background. Despite their youth and apparent health, their eyes and mood are somber.

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363 William Acheff b. 1947 Grinding Corn Day Oil on canvas 22 x 28 inches Signed lower right and dated 2013; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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364 George Carlson b. 1940 I’m the Drum Bronze, cast number 10/21 37 ½ inches high Signed and dated 1976 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Literature: Don Hedgpeth & Ed Trumble. The Story of Leanin’ Tree: Art and Enterprise in the American West. Boulder, CO, p. 239, illustrated. A prediction I made in the copy for the Leanin’ Tree Auction in 2018—that George Carlson would be one of the artists of our era whose work is remembered and revered in the future—wasn’t, as it turns out, so clever and original. Not only am I not alone in my opinion, you might say I was late to the party. Very late. If one of the measures of good art, art that you suspect might last, is that takes risks, then Carlson’s bronzes and paintings have to be counted as among the riskiest, certainly in the realm of what we call art of the American West. For Carlson, whose visionary work has earned just about every possible award, a work like I’m the Drum embodies his sense that our connection to the natural world and to its beauty is what’s at stake in our hectic, isolated lives. I’m the Drum dates from the years Carlson spent among the Tarahumara in Northern Mexico, an indigenous people who invited Carlson to observe and document their lives, ceremonies, and travails before modernity effaced them. I’m the Drum is a tactile piece. As light bounces off its many facets, the trace evidence of Carlson’s hands, the shimmer suggests the resonance of the notes as they emanate from the drum and drummer.

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365 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Deer Hunter Gouache 13 x 5 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

366 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Early Morning Gouache 10 x 16 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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367 David Mann b. 1948 Song of the Buffalo Oil on canvas 48 x 36 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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368 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Camp in the Valley Oil on board 30 x 60 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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369 Richard Greeves b. 1935 Eagle Chief Bronze, cast number 17/20 25 inches high, 25 inches wide Signed and dated 2000 Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000

370 Henry Farny 1847-1916 Indian Chief Bronze, cast number 4/200 6 inches high, 8 ½ inches wide 1984 Walt Wiggins Santa Fe Bronze Estimate: $600 - 900

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371 Fred Fellows b. 1934 An Honest Days Work Bronze, cast number 43/50 36 inches high, 32 inches wide Signed Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Award: Gold Medal in Sculpture. Cowboy Artists of America. 1995.

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372 Fritz White 1930-2010 Free Bronze, cast number 3/18 10 inches high, 19 inches wide Signed/CA Estimate: $1,000 - 2,000 Award: Gold Medal in Sculpture. Cowboy Artists of America. 1982.

373 Veryl Goodnight b. 1947 Freedom Mare Gathered Bronze, cast number 10/10 16 ½ inches high, 31 inches wide Signed and dated 1990 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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374 Richard Axtell 1929-1997 Finding the Trail Watercolor 20 x 25 inches Signed lower left and dated 87 Estimate: $1,000 - 2,000

375 William Maughan b. 1946 Joseph Walker in the Uintas Oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $1,000 - 2,000

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376 Alfredo Rodriguez b. 1954 Zapata the Revolutionary Oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500

377 Harold Bryant 1894-1950 Time for a Twirley Oil on canvas 28 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $2,000 - 4,000 Nebraska native Harold Bryant studied art in Chicago before enlisting in the armed forces in World War I. After the war, he made sketching trips to Northern Arizona from his ranch in Colorado. Bryant then worked as a commercial artist in Chicago and New York while taking frequent trips West to paint. Time for a Twirley is illustrative in a period, painterly way. You might think of it as Bryant’s take on Frank Tenney Johnson.

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Saturday • April 4, 2020 Index – Alphabetical by Lot number Artist

Lot #

Acheff, William....................................288, 316, 363 Alther, William......................................................353 Andersen, Roy................................................303, 304 Anton, Bill.....................................................162, 175 Axtell, Richard.......................................................374 Balink, Henry...............................................248, 362 Bama, James...................................159, 160, 360, 361 Beeler, Joe......................................322, 323, 324, 325 Berninghaus, Oscar.........................................224, 247 Bierstadt, Albert.............................................256, 257 Blakelock, Ralph....................................................264 Blumenshein, Ernest...............................................208 Borein, Edward...............................................157, 158 Borg, Carl Oscar.............................................142, 143 Browning, Tom......................................................181 Bryant, Harold.......................................................377 Bunn, Kenneth...............................................355, 357

Carlson, George.....................................................364 Carlson, Ken...........................................................262 Case, Russell...........................................................179 Catlin, George........................................................137 Clymer, John...................................................219, BC Coleman, John................................165, 168, 169, 170 Coleman, Michael...........................354, 365, 366, 368 Cortes, Edouard......................................................284 Couse, E.I...............................................................206

Dallin, Cyrus........................................................227 Dean, Glenn...........................................................182 Dixon, Maynard............... FC, IFC,232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244 Dudash, C. Michael................................................178 Dye, Charlie...........................................................292

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Artist

Lot #

Ellis, Fremont.......................................................156 Farny, Henry.........................................152, 230, 370 Fellows, Fred..................................................328, 371 Fery, John...............................................................263 Fritz, Charles..........................................................172

Gaul, Gilbert................................................148, 149 Gollings, William..........................................202, 204 Goodnight, Veryl...................................................373 Greeves, Richard............................................299, 369 Grelle, Martin................................171, 176, 177, 320

Hagege, Logan Maxwell........................185, 186, 187 Hansen, Herman....................................338, 339, 340 Harvey, G...............................267, 268, 277, 278, 286 Hennings, E. Martin.......................................228, 229 Herzog, Herman.....................................................259 Hill, John Henry....................................................155 Hill, Thomas..................................................265, 266 Houser, Allan.................................................317, 318 Hudson, Grace Carpenter.......................................144 Hulings, Clark...............269, 270, 271,272, 273, 274, 275, 276 Humphriss, Charles................................................250

Jackson, Harry...............................306, 307, 308, 309 Johnson, Frank Tenney...........205, 209, 210, 211, 220

Kelsey, T.D...........................................................356 Kemp, Jay..............................................................329 Kestrel, Steve.........................................................345 Koerner, W.H.D.....................................................147 Kuhn, Bob.....................196, 198, 200, 332, 333, 351 Kuhnert, Wilhelm..........................................350, 358


Saturday • April 4, 2020 Index – Alphabetical by Lot number Artist

Lot #

Laurence, Sydney...................................................246 Lawson, Mehl.........................................................164 Leigh, William R...................................................249 Liang, Z.S...............................................................173 Liljefors, Bruno.......................................................258 Loffler, Richard......................................................359 Lovell, Tom............................................289, 290, 291

Maggiori, Mark....................................................180 Mann, David..........................................................367 Marris, Bonnie........................................................330 Maughan, William.................................................375 McCarthy, Frank.............................................194, 195 McGrew, R. Brownell.............................................138 Mell, Ed.................................188, 189, 190, 342, 343 Miller, Alfred Jacob................................................231 Moran, Thomas......................................................255 Moyers, John..........................296, 297, 305, 326, 327

Norton, Jim..........................................300, 301, 302 Oberg, Ralph........................................................331 Oelze, Don.............................................................174 Owen, Bill..............................................................161

Phillips, Bert G.............................................207, 225 Pleissner, Ogden.....................................................260 Polzin, Kyle...................................191, 192, 193, 287 Poppleton, Chad.....................................................321

Artist

Lot #

Rich, Jason.............................................................163 Riddick, R.S...........................................298, 341, 348 Riley, Kenneth......................166, 167, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315 Roberts, Gary Lynn................................................183 Rodriguez, Alfredo.................................................376 Russell, Charles.......................212, 213, 214,215, 216

Schmid, Richard....................279, 280, 281, 282, 283 Schreyvogel, Charles...............................................203 Seltzer, Olaf C........................................146, 150, 151 Sharp, Joseph H..............221, 222, 223, 251, 253, 254 Shepherd, David.....................................................352 Shinabarger, Tim............................197, 199, 335, 349 Shrady, Henry.........................................................218 Smith, Tucker.................................................201, 334 Snidow, Gordon......................................293, 294, 295

Ufer, Walter..........................................................245 Walker, William A..............................................145 Walters, Curt.........................................................344 Weinman, Adolph..................................................252 Weistling, Morgan.................................................285 White, Fritz...........................................319, 347, 372 Whorf, John...........................................................261 Wieghorst, Olaf......................................139, 140, 141 Winborg, Jeremy....................................................184

Ravlin, Grace................................................153, 154 Remington, Frederic.......................................217, 226 Reno, Jim...............................................................346 Reynolds, James.............................................336, 337

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Saturday • April 4, 2020 Absentee Bid Form Fax to (480) 423-4071 or Email info@scottsdaleauction.com As a courtesy to Absentee Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will execute your bid if you are unable to be present at the auction. Please complete this form and forward it to a member of our staff. A disinterested party will bid on your behalf, not necessarily to your maximum bid, but to the next bid above what is offered, provided that your bid is in excess of the reserve, if any. In the event of identical bids, the first bid received will take precedence. Mailed or faxed bids should be confirmed by email at info@scottsdaleartauction.com Absentee Bidder Information: Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Email _______________________________________________________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ By checking this box I certify that I am not a resident of the State of Arizona Credit Card Information: Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Billing zip code: ________________________________ An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Please bid on my behalf for the following Lots up to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC Terms and Conditions of Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 78 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Signature __________________________________________________Date __________________________________________________

Lot #

Maximum Bid

Description

(Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Absentee bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Friday, April 3, 2020. Please fax your completed Absentee Bid Form to (480) 423-4071 or email info@scottsdaleartauction.com. SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

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Saturday • April 4, 2020 Telephone Bid Form Fax to (480) 423-4071 or Email info@scottsdaleauction.com As a courtesy to Telephone Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will arrange for telephone lines on Lots with a minimum estimate of $5,000 and over. For lots under $5,000, please use our Absentee Bid Form. Please complete this form and forward it to a member of our staff. Bidders are encouraged to make arrangements early as telephone lines will be allocated on a first come basis. Mailed or faxed bids should be confirmed by email at info@scottsdaleartauction.com Telephone Bidder Information: Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Email _______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________Alternate Phone __________________________________ By checking this box I certify that I am not a resident of the State of Arizona

Credit Card Information: Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Billing zip code: ________________________________ An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Please bid on my behalf for the following Lots up to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC Terms and Conditions of Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 78 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Signature __________________________________________________Date __________________________________________________

Lot #

Maximum Bid

Description

(Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Telephone bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Thursday, April 2, 2020. Please fax your completed Telephone Bid Form to (480) 423-4071 or email info@scottsdaleartauction.com. SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION • 7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

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Writer: James Balestrieri Photography: Rob Kaufman Hilton Head Island, SC (843) 290-8883 www.kaufmanphotography.com Design & Production Cindy & Paula Moser Phoenix, AZ (843) 441-3686 www.xmsdesigns.com Printing: O'Neil Printing Phoenix, AZ (602) 258-7789 www.oneilprint.com


Profile for Scottsdale Art Auction

Scottsdale Art Auction Session 2 Catalogue  

Scottsdale Art Auction will be auctioning off over 350 Western, Wildlife, and Sporting Arts on April 4, 2020.

Scottsdale Art Auction Session 2 Catalogue  

Scottsdale Art Auction will be auctioning off over 350 Western, Wildlife, and Sporting Arts on April 4, 2020.