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April 6, 2019 • Session II

April 8, 2017 • Session II


Front Cover 229 Thomas Moran 1837-1926 Castle Rock, Green River, WY Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right and dated 1907; Initialed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $3,500,000 - 4,500,000

Opposite 226 Albert Bierstadt 1803-1902 Sunset - Salt Lake Oil on board 5 s x 8 d inches Initialed lower right Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000

Back Cover 236 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Smoke of a .45 Oil on canvas 45 x 45 inches Signed lower left/NA and dated 1937 Estimate: $600,000 - 900,000


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SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday• April • April 2017 Saturday 6, 8, 2019

MICHAEL Friday,FROST April 7

JACK A. MORRIS JR.

BRAD RICHARDSON

j.n. bartfield galleries morris fine arts legacy&gallery 10:00am–5:00pm...............................................................................................Registration Preview

Jackson Hole • Scottsdale

6:00pm–8:00pm ..........................................................................................................Cocktail Preview

60 W. 55th Street 79 Baynard Cove Road 7178 Main Street New York, NY 10019 Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 Scottsdale, AZ 85251 Saturday, April 8 212.245.8890 843.247.2217 480.945.1113&| Preview 307.733.2353 8:30am–9:30am.................................................................................................Registration 9:30am ............................................................................................................. First Session: Lots 1–141 11:30am ...............................................................................................................................Lunch Buffet 1:00pm ....................................................................................................Second Session: Lots 142–386 Jason Brooks, Auctioneer Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com Online bidding arrangements can be made through

www.scottsdaleartauction.com* *with no additional buyer’s premium

Hotel reservations at special Scottsdale Art Auction rates are Arrangements available at: must be Telephone Bidding

made no later than 5:00 pm on Thursday, April 4. Subject to availability. Marriott Suites Hotel Valley Ho Absentee Bidding Arrangements must be Scottsdale Old Town 6850 E. Main Street • Scottsdale made no later than 5:00 pm on Friday, April 5. 7325 East 3rd Avenue • Scottsdale hotelvalleyho.com Pleasetoll callfree (480) 945-0225 or register online (888) 236-2427 Ask for Molly at www.scottsdaleartauction.com (480) 945-1550 local (480) 248-2004 local (3 blocks walking distance)

(3 blocks walking distance)

Auction results will be available online Monday, April 15. www.scottsdaleartauction.com

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7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

480 945-0225

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SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION Saturday• April • April 2017 Saturday 6, 8, 2019

Friday, April 57 Friday, April 10:00am - 5:00pm.............................................................................................Registration & Preview 10:00am–5:00pm...............................................................................................Registration & Preview 6:00pm - 8:00pm..........................................................................................................Cocktail Preview 6:00pm–8:00pm ..........................................................................................................Cocktail Preview Saturday, April 6 Saturday, April 8 8:30am - 9:30am...............................................................................................Registration & Preview 8:30am–9:30am.................................................................................................Registration & 1-119 Preview 9:30am. .............................................................................................................First Session: Lots 9:30am- ............................................................................................................. First Session: Lots 1–141 11:00am 2:00pm...............................................................................................................Lunch Buffet 11:30am ...............................................................................................................................Lunch Buffet 1:00pm.................................................................................................... Second Session: Lots 120-346 1:00pm ....................................................................................................Second Session: Lots 142–386 Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com Pre-registration available at www.scottsdaleartauction.com

Hotel reservations at special Scottsdale Art Auction rates are available at:available: Special discounted hotel rates Make reservations on our website www.scottsdaleartauction.com or call (877) 214-6722 for the Scottsdale Art Auction Corporate Rate. Marriott Suites Hotel Valley Ho Scottsdale Old Town 6850 E. Main Street • Scottsdale 7325 East 3rd Avenue • Scottsdale hotelvalleyho.com (888) 236-2427 for Molly Hilton Scottsdale Resorttoll & free Villas DoubleTreeAsk Resort by Hilton (480)Scottsdale 945-1550 local North Paradise Valley - Scottsdale (480) 248-2004 local (3 blocks walking distance) 6333 N. Scottsdale Rd • Scottsdale (877) 214-6722 toll free

SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

(3 blocks walking distance) 5401 N. Scottsdale Rd • Scottsdale (877) 214-6722 toll free

7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

480 945-0225

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Terms and Conditions

BUYER’S PREMIUM The purchase price payable by the Purchaser shall be the total of the final bid price PLUS A PREMIUM OF SEVENTEEN PERCENT (17%) on any individual lot in the amount up to and including $500,000; TWELVE PERCENT (12%) on any individual lot on the amount in excess of $500,000. This premium is in addition to any commissions or other charges payable by the consignor.

Auction The art illustrated in this catalogue will be offered for sale on April 6, 2019 by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC on premises at 7176 Main Street, Scottsdale, Arizona. All Purchasers irrespective of any previous activity or sale by Scottsdale Art Auction are required to complete the applicable Registration or Bidder form in advance of sale agreeing to Terms and Conditions. Telephone Bidding As a courtesy to clients who are unable to attend the sale, a telephone and order (absentee) bid service will be offered as staff and time allow. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC shall not be responsible for any errors or omissions or failure to execute such bids. Contact Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC at (480) 945-0225 (or register online) early for arrangements as telephone lines will be allocated on a first come basis. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will arrange for telephone lines on lots with a minimum estimate of $5,000 and over. Absentee Bidding and Fax Confidential absentee bid orders for auction items may also be completed and will be executed by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC on behalf of the Purchaser during the auction. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC shall not be responsible for any errors or omissions or failure to execute such intent to purchase orders or auction bids. This catalogue, as may be amended by posted notice or oral salesroom announcement, represents Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s entire agreement with any and all purchasers of the Property listed herein. The following are Procedures, Terms and Conditions on which all such Property listed is offered for sale by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC as agent for various owners or other Consignors: 1. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC reserves the right to withdraw Property at any time before or at the sale and shall have no liability for such withdrawal. 2. All Property will be sold “AS IS”. With respect to each lot of Property, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC does not make any guarantees, warranties or representations, expressed or implied, as to merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, the correctness of the catalogue or the authenticity or description of the Property, its physical condition, size, quality, rarity, importance, medium, provenance, exhibitions, literature or historical relevance. No statement, anywhere, whether oral or written, whether made in the catalogue, an advertisement, a bill of sale, a salesroom posting or announcement, or elsewhere, shall be deemed such a warranty, representation or assumption of liability. In no event shall Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC be responsible for genuineness, authorship, attribution, provenance, period, culture, source, origin or condition of the purchased Property and no verbal statements made regarding the Property either before or after the sale of the Property, or in any bill of sale, invoice or catalogue or advertisement or elsewhere shall be deemed such a guarantee of genuineness, or authenticity. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if within ten (10) calendar days after the purchase of any lot of Property, the Purchaser provides an opinion by a recognized authority on the artist and gives notice in writing to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC that the lot is not authentic, and returns the purchased lot to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, within ten (10) days of its purchase in the same condition as when sold, then Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will refund the full purchase price to the Purchaser. It shall be in the sole discretion of Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC as to whether the opinion provided by the Purchaser is an opinion by a recognized authority on the artist. 3. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC and/or Auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bids. The highest bidder acknowledged by the Auctioneer shall be the Purchaser. In the event of any dispute between bidders, the Auctioneer will have absolute and final discretion to either determine 4

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the successful bidder or to re-offer and resell the Property item in dispute. After the sale, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s record of final sale shall be conclusive. 4. At the fall of the Auctioneer’s hammer, the Purchaser shall (a) be acknowledged by bidder number by the auctioneer, (b) pay the hammer price and a buyer’s premium as outlined above. In addition, Purchaser may be required to sign a confirmation of purchase. All sales are final with no exchanges or returns. 5. Unless exempted by law, the Purchaser will be required to pay any and all state and local tax pertaining to sales (sales tax, transaction privileged, etc...). It is the Purchaser's responsibility to pay any applicable use tax imposed by their state of residence on the total purchase price. In the event that sales tax has not been included in the invoiced amount and it is subsequently determined that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC was required to collect sales tax in connection herewith, Purchaser shall reimburse Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC upon demand for any sales tax (or equivalent) assessed or due as a result of goods or services provided by Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC hereunder, unless Purchaser provides Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC evidence of exemption from such taxes. 6. Terms for all purchases will be cash, check or credit card (VISA/MasterCard/American Express) with settlement and payment due in full the day of the sale unless otherwise arranged. All monies shall be made payable to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC. At the discretion of Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, payment will not be deemed to have been made in full until funds represented by checks have been collected or the authenticity of bank or cashier’s checks has been confirmed. An additional 3% will be charged on all credit card payments. 7. No item of Property may be paid for or removed from Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC during the sale. After the sale has been completed and after the purchase price has been paid in full, Property must be removed from the saleroom at the Purchaser’s expense not later than three business days following the sale. Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will, as a service to Purchasers, arrange to have Property packed, insured and shipped, all charges at the expense and entire risk of Purchaser. 8. Some items of Property may be offered subject to a “reserve” or confidential minimum price below which the item will not be sold. In such instances, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC may implement the reserve by bidding through the Auctioneer on behalf of the Consignor. In no event shall the reserve exceed the low estimate in the catalogue. 9. Neither Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC, nor Auctioneer, nor Consignor make any representations whatsoever that the Purchaser of a work of art will acquire any reproduction rights thereto. 10. These Conditions of Sale and any other applicable conditions, as well as the Purchaser’s and Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC’s rights and obligations herein shall be governed by, construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the State of Arizona. If these conditions are not complied with by the Purchaser, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC may, in addition to other remedies available by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the Purchaser liable for the total purchase price stated on the Confirmation of Purchase Invoice, either (a) cancel the sale and retain as liquidated damages any and all payments made by the Purchaser or (b) resell the Property privately or at public auction on three days’ notice to the Purchaser for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs including handling charges, warehousing, the expense of both sales, the commissions, reasonable attorneys’ fees, any and all other charges due and incidental damages. 11. Biding on any item indicates your acceptance of these terms and all other terms announced at the time of sale whether bidding in person, by phone, by Internet, by absentee bid, or through a representative. 12. In most instances, sculpture measurements do not include base. In measurements for two dimensional art, height precedes width and does not include frame. 13. Bidding increments will normally follow the pattern below but may vary at the sole discretion of the Auctioneer. Estimate Increment Under 2,000............................. 100 2,000–5,000 ............................. 250 5,000–10,000............................ 500 10,000–20,000....................... 1,000

Estimate Increment 20,000–50,000 ...................... 2,500 50,000–100,000..................... 5,000 over 100,000 ........................ 10,000


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120 Tom Lovell 1909-1997 The Scalp Lock Charcoal 9 ¼ x 7 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated 1993

121 Tom Lovell 1909-1997 Two Indians Charcoal 10 x 8 inches Signed lower left

Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500

Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500

122 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Mother and Child Gouache 19 ½ x 11 inches Signed lower left and dated 1902 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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123 Leon Gaspard 1882-1964 Pair of Horses Oil on board 5 x 7 inches Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

124 John Clymer 1907-1989 Study for The Catch Graphite 9 ½ x 7 ½ inches Signed lower right/CA

125 Tom Lovell 1909-1997 Paul Revere Illustration Mixed Media 12 x 9 inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Tom Lovell was already a successful illustrator for the New York slicks and pulps–Maxwell Grant’s The Shadow springs immediately to mind–when World War II rolled around. Lovell lived in New Rochelle, New York, and Westport, Connecticut, not far from Norman Rockwell, Mead Schaeffer, Harold Von Schmidt, and other artists who made their homes a train ride from the Manhattan magazine offices and agencies that hired them. Lovell would spend the war years with John Clymer, illustrating Leatherneck, the publication of the U.S. Marine Corps, and go on to illustrate numerous stories in magazines prior to switching to easel painting full time.

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126 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 Mountain Landscape Oil on board 12 x 15 ž inches Signed lower right Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500 Provenance: Chester Marron, PA.

127 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 Wilderness Pond Oil on board 12 x 16 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500 Provenance: Chester Marron, PA.

128 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 Canadian Landscape Oil on board 5 ž x 9 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $600 - 1,200

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129 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 Study for A Break at Dawn Watercolor 6 x 9 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500 Provenance: Chester Marron, PA. Literature: Larry Len Peterson. Philip R. Goodwin: America’s Sporting and Wildlife Artist. Hayden, ID: CDA Art Auction, 2001. pp. 184, 255, illustrated.

130 Frank Schoonover 1877-1972 We Had Some Difficulty Descending the Mountain Oil on canvas 36 x 18 inches Signed lower right and dated 27; Titled and dated Aug. 1927 verso Estimate: $8,000 - 10,000 Label verso including the caption and describing the placement of this painting in “Red Crow’s Brother.” Provenance: E. W. Latendorf, New York, NY. Chester Marron, PA. Exhibitions: “The Brandywine Heritage: An American Tradition.” Society of the Four Arts. Palm Beach, FL. Mar. 21 Apr. 19, 1981.“Artists of the Brandywine Valley, 1850-1993.”Union League of Philadelphia. Apr. 1993. Literature: Frank Schoonover. The Edge of the Wilderness: A Portrait of the Canadian North. Secaucus, NJ: Derbibooks, Inc. 1974, p. 150, illustrated.

John R. Schoonover et al. Frank E. Schoonover Catalogue Raisonné. New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2009, p. 490, illustrated.

James Willard Schultz. “Red Crow’s Brother,” in The American Boy. Nov. 1927, p. 23, illustrated.

James Willard Schultz. Red Crow’s Brother. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Mifflin Co. 1927, illustrated.

One of the great American illustrators of the Brandywine School, Frank Schoonover was probably the most successful of Howard Pyle’s students, apart from N.C. Wyeth. Schoonover is best remembered for western and sporting scenes, but he was also adept at capturing key moments in adventure stories and historical romances. James Willard Schultz lived in Arizona and Montana, married into the Blackfeet nation–the Blackfeet named him Apikuni–and settled in what is now Glacier National Park. He wrote many books and tales of life about the American West and was an explorer and archaeologist. Schoonover and Schultz often teamed up as author and artist as seen here in “Red Crow’s Brother,” the second of Schultz’s books featuring “Rising Wolf,” or Hugh Monroe, an early fur trader with the Hudson Bay Company. Schultz met Monroe when Monroe was an old man and set down his stories of crossing into what is now Montana, living among the Piegans, exploring the Glacier Park area, and doing battle with the Snake Indians. S C O T T S D A L E A RT A U C T I O N

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131 Louis Akin 1868-1913 Mount Akin Oil on board 12 x 16 inches Signed lower left and dated 1909 Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000 Literature:

Bruce Babbitt. Color and Light: The Southwest Canvases of Louis Akin. Flagstaff, AZ: Northland Press. 1973, p. 53, illustrated.

Louis Akin’s career began with a break in New York. The Santa Fe Railroad offered him passage to Arizona in return for paintings of the Hopi. Akin not only painted the Hopi, he was initiated into their secret society. Mount Akin (named for the occasion by the artist) was painted on a hunting trip in 1909 to the wilderness north of the Fraser River, BC.

132 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Goats Etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000 Provenance: Morton Quantrell, Bronxville, NY.

133 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Silvertip Etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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134 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Cliff Dwellers Etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000 Provenance: Harlow, McDonald & Co., NY.

135 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Dall Sheep Etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

136 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 The Stranger Etching 8 x 11 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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137 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 A Bunch of Buckskins 20 x 15 inches each Estimate: $20,000 - 40,000 A portfolio of eight lithographs by Frederic Remington published by R. H. Russell in 1901. This set is framed and includes the original portfolio and Owen Wister’s introductory text. Literature:

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Peggy and Harold Samuels. Remington: The Complete Prints. New York: Crown Publishers, 1990, p. 70, illustrated.


138 Frank Hoffman 1888-1958 Curious Herd Oil on canvas 32 x 44 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000 Provenance: Leonard Clayton Gallery, NYC. Private Collection, NY.

In Curious Herd, Frank Hoffman seems to be channeling some of the great horse painters: Bonheur and Delacroix. There is something of El Greco in the contrasts in the sky, in the languid shading of the horses, and in their tight grouping in a shallow picture plane. The sweetness of the foal and of the horse laying her head on the back of the protective herd leader–the white horse shielding the others–is all Hoffman. I imagine him on the other side of a fence, painting these horses, who come closer and closer, curiouser and curiouser.

139 Edward Curtis 1868-1952 Old Well of Acoma Orotone 11 x 14 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000 Literature: Ralph W. Andrews. Curtis’ Western Indians. New York: Bonanza Books. 1952, p. 71, illustrated. Florence Curtis Graybill. Edward Sheriff Curtis: Visions of a Vanishing Race. New York: Thomas Crowell. 1976, p. 249, illustrated. Edward Curtis, the “Shadow Catcher,” spent the summer of 1900 on the Blackfoot Reservation in Montana where his monumental project, a complete photographic record entitled The North American Indian–that would come to twenty volumes–was born. Curtis believed his work would capture the vanishing Native American races in the twilight of their tragic grandeur.

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140 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 Blackfeet Traverse Oil on board 12 x 16 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

141 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 When a Lever Action Carbine Lowered the Odds Oil on board 24 x 34 inches Signed lower left and dated 74; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 This painting might be called, When the Fellow Riding Shotgun is Riding Lever Action. In truth, his accuracy–in considerable doubt sitting in a wagon flying over and down a rock-strewn incline–is all that stands between getting through and getting dead. One brave is down–see the beautifully painted empty horse at right–and another is falling, but the driver is seeing his life pass before his eyes right about now. The painting is trademark McCarthy with its scumbled Arizona rocks, high key lighting, and sharp shadows, but the point of view here is unusual: as if from another rock, looking down, across, and tilted diagonally, allowing us to take the action in its entirety.

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142 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 Crossing on the Clark Fork Oil on canvas 26 x 40 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $35,000 - 45,000 Crossing on the Clark Fork gives Frank McCarthy a chance to show his skills at composing a tight group of mounted native warriors who express their individuality in every way, weapons to shields to adornments. Each seems intent on making his mark in the destiny they ride towards. Frank McCarthy began his career in art working elbow to elbow with many great painters during illustration’s Golden Age. They painted and brawled together in the 50’s and 60’s, living the Bohemian life in what was called “The Bullpen,” a building in Midtown Manhattan that was, in reality, a hive of artists who lived from assignment to assignment as the “Mad Men” of the day dreamed up campaigns for pulp novels, cigarettes, lingerie and Oldsmobile. McCarthy illustrated books and magazine stories and did posters for Hollywood–James Bond films in particular. In 1974, McCarthy shed his journeyman artist role and moved to Arizona, where he set up his easel and created some of the finest action scenes that ever leapt out of the Old West.

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143 Paul Calle 1928-2010 Old Woman of the Canyon Graphite 40 x 30 inches Signed lower right and dated 1975 Estimate: $6,000 - 8,000 Paul Calle was known for his amazing pencil work, but the depth he achieved in Old Woman of the Canyon is nothing short of incredible. The way the work recedes from the textures of the blanket and the woman’s skin, to the door and logs of the Hogan, the thorn brake at left, and the canyon entrance, links the elements of this world, human and natural, and makes the negative space infinite. Calle was the principal staff artist for NASA during the Mercury and Apollo eras, but he also loved American history, especially the early days of the Old West.

144 Paul Calle 1928-2010 They Call Me Joshua Graphite 13 ½ x 15 inches Signed lower left; Signed verso Estimate: $2,000 - 3,000

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145 Don Oelze b. 1965 Friend or Foe Oil on canvas 32 x 48 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $12,000 - 16,000

146 Glenn Dean b. 1976 The Gleaming Oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $12,000 - 15,000

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147 John Coleman b. 1949 Addih Hiddisch, Hidatsa Chief Bronze, cast number 4/35 35 inches high Signed/CA and dated 04 Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

148 John Coleman b. 1949 Wahktageli, Big Soldier Bronze, cast number 21/35 34 inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 2009 Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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149 C. Michael Dudash b. 1952 Always on Guard Oil on canvas 48 x 38 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $22,000 - 28,000

When studying the history of the native people in America’s southwest region, I am truly amazed at their ability to survive and thrive in this difficult and rugged terrain. Both opportunities and danger were always near and far, and the need to be keenly aware of their surroundings at all times often determined whether they would live or die. This band of brothers is in such a state of mind as they travel a well worn trail, eyes alert with guns at the ready. We don’t know if they are looking for fresh game, or possibly aware of a reported human danger – either way, it serves them well to be always on guard.

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150 John Coleman b. 1949 Two Ravens Bronze, cast number 13/20 26 inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 2014 Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

151 John Coleman b. 1949 Sun Priest Charcoal 18 x 12 inches Signed lower right/CA, titled and dated 13 Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

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152 John Coleman b. 1949 Mystic Smoke and Sacred Arrows Bronze, cast number 22/35 23 inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 2010 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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153 James Reynolds 1926-2010 The Old Way Oil on board 30 x 48 inches Signed lower right and dated 1984; Signed, titled and dated 2-1-84 verso Estimate: $35,000 - 50,000

Hitching horses to an old-fashioned chuck wagon, this outfit is taking The Old Way to a roundup. By the time Jim Reynolds would have painted this picture, the wagons would almost certainly have been trucks and jeeps. As serene as this composed scene is, Reynolds injects a great deal of excitement into the myriad impressionist brushstrokes–bright blues, pinks, yellows, greens–that make up the prairie grasses. Why, Monet would be pretty happy with this. The shadow that falls over the lower half of the cowboy hitching up the horse only serves to heighten the light on his back and hat, and on the flanks of the chestnut beside him. Light on the ridge in the distance provides an illuminated backdrop.

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154 Maynard Dixon 1875-1946 Bronco Busting Gouache 12 ½ x 10 inches Initialed lower left and dated 1945 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 By 1940, Maynard Dixon was living in Tucson. His asthma and emphysema were worsening and the air in Southern Arizona acted as a tonic. He still traveled, on occasion with his wife Edith, through Arizona and Southern Utah, in search of interesting subject matter. Dixon’s late style is spare; the Deco softness and shadings of the 1930‘s have given way to compositions of positive and negative shapes that carve areas of light and shadow. Because Dixon executed Bronco Busting, a gouache en grisaille from 1945, in shades of white, gray, and black, and because we see the moment in perfect profile, the work has the beautiful economy of a bas-relief frieze that suspends and freezes time on the balance point between man and horse, between busting the bronco and being busted by the bronco.

155 T.D. Kelsey b. 1946 Line Dance Bronze, cast number 6/7 27 inches high, 32 inches wide Signed, titled and dated 2007 Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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156 James Reynolds 1926-2010 Ropin’ One Out Oil on board 20 x 40 inches Signed lower right and dated 1984 Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

157 Gordon Snidow b. 1936 Counting His Money Gouache 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1981 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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158 Tim Cox b. 1957 Where Riches Lie Oil on board 16 x 12 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 08 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

159 Tim Cox b. 1957 Waiting for Dad Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower left and dated 91 Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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160 Mark Maggiori b. 1977 Electric Desert Oil on board 35 x 40 inches Signed lower right and dated 2018 Estimate: $20,000 - 25,000

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161 Chris Owen b. 1967 Lots of Leather Oil on canvas 33 x 49 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 40,000

162 Bill Anton b. 1957 Time and Tide Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower left Signed, titled and dated 2012 verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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163 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Music of Manhattan Oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000

After the heavy snowfall–you can tell that by the clearing sky–but before the slush, the Music of Manhattan is in the rhythms of the horses’ hooves, the streetcars’ bells, the lights of lanterns, lights burning in the regular columns of windows, the light in the air, and, most of all, in the people–the hack drivers and theatergoers and evening strollers, crossing and crisscrossing on their various and merry ways. Harvey’s nostalgic view of the world embraces “Old New York”, the great city in simpler times.

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164 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Old Dallas, Main Street Oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2008 verso Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

Oftener than not in G. Harvey, the city scenes are scenes of old New York, sometimes Boston. But here, in Old Dallas, Main Street, Harvey finds a gentle nostalgia in Dallas’s cable car era. Mist rising from the warmer, wet pavement makes the light diffuse and romantic. Gaslight and electric light shine side by side, just as a horse drawn hack waits for a fare even as the streetcars ring their bells in passing. The two women in their long skirts cross, seemingly with an eye to this slower mode of transportation, but perhaps it’s the brightly lit shop—a flower shop?—behind the hack that has caught their eye.

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165 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Vendors & Shoppers Oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1995 verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Literature: G. Harvey. The City Series. Somerset House, 2001, p.31, illustrated.

166 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Spring Market NYC Oil on board 12 x 9 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Literature: G. Harvey. The City Series. Somerset House, 2001, p.110, illustrated.

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167 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Beginning of a Boomtown Oil on canvas 30 x 48 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000


167 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Beginning of a Boomtown (detail) Oil on canvas 30 x 48 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 Provenance: Bill and Wylodean Saxon Estate, Dallas, TX Heritage Auctions, Nov. 16, 2015. Private Collection. 168 Z.S. Liang b. 1953 Water Lily Oil on canvas 32 x 52 inches Signed lower right

In Beginning of a Boomtown, G. Harvey unites two worlds one rain-slicked dirt road under one sky and bathes them in a fiery, incandescent light. Ranchers vs. oilmen, cowboys vs. wildcatters, the old world vs. the new, working the land vs. wresting wealth from beneath the land—Harvey gives us the collision where the one horsepower horse meets the internal combustion engine and steel derricks rise to challenge the heavens.

Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000

There may be others, but the only other painting–apart from Z.S. Liang’s Water Lily–that I know of that features a Native American reaching for a water lily is George de Forest Brush’s 1887 masterpiece, The Indian and the Lily. If you want to see that one in person, you’ll have to take a trip to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, where it hangs alongside hosts of wonderful paintings. As in Brush’s masterwork, Liang wants to give us a private, quiet moment, one that, perhaps, we aren’t meant to see. Liang’s own words tell the story: "In this painting, I am trying to show the tender-human side of a young warrior/hunter as he peacefully floats among the Water Lilies, in his canoe, admiring and gently reaching out to touch a flowering lily. In composing this scene, I was mindful of the fact that all human beings–past and present–have always been drawn and moved by the simple beauty of Mother Nature.”

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169 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Offerings on the Wind Oil on canvas 48 x 60 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2019 Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000

Of Offerings on the Wind, artist Martin Grelle writes: "It was commonplace for Native Peoples of the Northern Plains to make offerings of various kinds. One of the most common was an offering of tobacco. In the painting, a small group of Apsaalooke warriors have stopped on a rise overlooking lands they consider to be their homeland, and are making an offering of tobacco—being carried on the wind to the Creator. This is a practice still done today, and I have had the opportunity to make offerings like this in some very special places.” In this painting, Grelle lets us “see” the wind. It’s in the horses’ manes and tails, in the fluttering feathers that adorn a spear, in the edges of clouds, white against gray, as they scud over the distant peaks. The spiritual gesture is as clear and sacred as this place is chosen and hallowed.

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170 Martin Grelle b. 1954 A Hunter’s Tale Oil on canvas 18 x 28 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2001; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

171 Martin Grelle b. 1954 A Daughter of Tradition Oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 2018 Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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172 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Pride of the Plains Oil on canvas 32 x 36 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 2008 verso Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000

In full regalia, a Plains warrior stands proud in Martin Grelle’s magnificent full-length portrait, Pride of the Plains. His pose beside his pony, holding the reins loosely, looking off to his left is decidedly heroic. The light–it seems like morning light–is soft, as is the lightly clouded sky. Perhaps it seems like morning because the camp itself is quiet. With no one else up and about, the warrior seems as if he is heading out alone, on a quest, perhaps, or to take his turn scouting the area, or to meet a band of warriors and take his place among them.

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173 Morgan Weistling b. 1964 The Quilting Bee, 19th Century Americana Oil on canvas 44 x 64 inches Signed lower right and dated 2007 Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000 Exhibitions: Autry Museum’s Masters of the American West exhibition, 2007. (Winner of the Patrons’ Choice Award and Artists’ Choice Award.)

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174 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 Breaking Through the Storm Oil on canvas 40 x 60 inches Signed upper left; Signed, titled and dated 2014 verso Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000

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175 Logan Maxwell Hagege b. 1980 On the Mesa Oil on canvas 30 x 30 inches Signed upper left; Signed, titled and dated 2013 verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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176 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Strength and Honor Oil on canvas 28 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Literature: Western Art Collector magazine. January, 2011. Cover illustration.

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177 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 A Warrior’s Legacy Oil on canvas 34 x 34 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $45,000 - 65,000 The shield sings the songs of past battles, of victories great and small. The song ends, and silence succeeds sound. But the ledger book, in a pictorial language of its own, sets those deeds down with a kind of permanence we can appreciate. Ledger paintings are, in a way, on the right kind of paper, a second entry in double-entry bookkeeping, telling stories we think we know from a point of view—the indigenous point of view—that we don’t often have access to. Kyle Polzin echoes this: "The heroic accounts of a Cheyenne warrior fill the pages of an old ledger book. Surrounded, are the personal belongings that live on to tell his story."

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178 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 1851 Oil on canvas 11 x 20 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

179 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Boots Oil on canvas 24 ½ x 19 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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180 Kyle Polzin b. 1974 Hydrangeas and Gerbers Oil on canvas 14 x 20 inches Signed lower right and dated 1996; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $10,000 - 20,000

181 Jeremy Lipking b. 1975 Kerrie Oil on canvas 30 x 26 inches Signed upper right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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182 Richard Schmid b. 1934 The White Begonias Oil on canvas 12 x 20 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1990 verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

183 Richard Schmid b. 1934 Nanaimo Farm House Oil on board 12 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 1996; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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184 John Coleman b. 1949 Pachtuwa-Chta, Arikara Warrior Bronze, cast number 21/35 36 inches high Signed, titled and dated 2010 Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

185 John Coleman b. 1949 Pitatapiu, Bowlance Warrior Bronze, cast number 29/35 41 inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 2007 Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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186 William Acheff b. 1947 The Chiefs Will Decide Oil on canvas 40 x 30 inches Signed lower right and dated 2005; Signed, titled and dated 2004/05 verso Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

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187 William Acheff b. 1947 Pueblo Chanter Oil on canvas 13 x 10 inches Signed lower right and dated 2005 Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

188 William Acheff b. 1947 Light Thunder Oil on canvas 26 x 20 inches Signed lower right and dated 1996; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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189 William Acheff b. 1947 Baby Blue Oil on canvas 8 x 6 inches Signed lower left and dated 2003 Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

190 Joe Beeler 1931-2006 Voices in the Wind Bronze, cast number 2/35 30 ½ inches high Signed/CA Estimate: $6,000 - 8,000

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191 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Hands that Speak Oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches Signed lower right/CA; Signed, titled and dated 96 verso Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Plains Indian Sign Language, also known as Plains Sign Talk, was actually a complex of languages unrelated to any spoken language, with variant forms and dialects ranging from Mexico to Canada. Sign Talk became a “lingua franca” between peoples whose spoken languages would have been unintelligible to one another and was also used by mountain men in the Fur Trade era. Martin Grelle sets Hands that Speak by the bank of a river, a natural boundary, or border, perhaps. The traveler, at left, is stopped by two armed scouts who guard the trail that winds along this river in the midst of some forbidding peaks. At this point, the “conversation” seems to be going well. This might be late fall, or a January thaw, or even the first signs of spring. It’s an opportunity to be on the move, but the conditions also indicate that the potential for an unwelcome surprise is high.

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192 Jim Norton b. 1953 The Coup Stick Oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000

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193 Theodore Van Soelen 1890-1964 Bull Session Mixed Media 16 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

Theodore Van Soelen was born in Minnesota and studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and in Europe just before World War I. Venturing west for his health, Van Soelen crisscrossed New Mexico absorbing the culture of cattlemen and Native Americans. Ranch life was one of Van Soelen’s favorite themes, and Bull Session combines ease of composition and an almost monochromatic palette to address the timeless scene of cowboys and coffee. What’s new and interesting here is the rolling gas stove and kitchen that has replaced the traditional campfire.

194 George Phippen 1915-1966 Easy Drivin’ Oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

With little formal education and no training in art at all apart from three months with Henry Balink in Santa Fe after World War II, George Phippen still somehow managed to parlay his intimate knowledge of how the West looked and felt into a contract to illustrate catalogues for Brown and Bigelow. Illustration was Phippen’s way in and soon he was making a living painting and sculpting the American West. Phippen, the first President of the Cowboy Artists of America, once said, “The art game, which includes illustrating, fine art, and cartooning is considered about the toughest business there is. I compare it with music, writing, and acting. They are mighty hard to get into but no job holds the freedom the arts do once you make the grade.”

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195 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Remnants of the Herd Oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1974 Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000


196 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Texas Longhorn Bronze, cast number 21/60 10 inches high Signed/CA, titled and dated 1974 Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500 Provenance: L.D. Brinkman Collection, TX. By descent in the family to the present. Literature: L. D. Brinkman. Honoring the Western Tradition: The L.D. “Brink” Brinkman Collection. Kerrville, TX: L. D. Brinkman Foundation. 2003, p. 168, illustrated. A copy of the book will accompany this lot. Warren modeled this bronze after “Commander,” a prized longhorn given to him by President Lyndon Johnson.

195 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Remnants of the Herd (detail) Oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1974 Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Provenance: L.D. Brinkman Collection, TX. By descent in the family to the present. Literature: L.D. Brinkman. Honoring the Western Tradition: The L.D. “Brink” Brinkman Collection. Kerrville, TX: L.D. Brinkman Foundation. 2003, p. 165, illustrated. A copy of the book will accompany this lot. Melvin Warren painted the longhorn at center, the one looking out at you in a sort of laconic way, after “Commander,” an animal given to him by President Lyndon Johnson, who was an avid collector and close friend of the artist. In Remnants of the Herd, cowboys in the painting’s present amble past the backdrop of an ancient pueblo. These longhorns are remnants not only of a great herd but a great species. Like the old man and the older adobe, they seem to be constants with earth, sky, and sun. While the cowboy at right keeps his eye on the cattle, his partner at right seems to notice some of the affinities in the passing scene.

197 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Recruiting the Guide Acrylic 3 ½ x 6 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $3,500 - 5,000

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198 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 The Red Pipe Acrylic 20 x 16 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 40,000

Born in Missouri in 1919, Kenneth Riley grew up loving both music and art. Not too many people can play the drums with one hand while painting with the other. Art won out, and Riley soon found himself studying in Kansas City with Thomas Hart Benton, and then in New York with George Bridgman and Harvey Dunn. After serving as a combat artist during the Second World War, Riley hit the illustration trail, producing work for Bantam Books, The Saturday Evening Post, Cosmopolitan, National Geographic, and Life magazines and traveling through Europe, North Africa, and the Far East. The American West roused Riley’s interest in fine art and he began to paint the Little Bighorn Battlefield, Grand Teton National Park, the Black Hills, the Badlands and in the Southwest. In 1982, Riley became a member of the Cowboy Artists of America, receiving gold medals in 1984, 1988, 1989, 1993, and winning the Prix de West in 1995. Riley never looked back, and we have never looked away. His paintings can be found in important public and private collections, including the White House, the Smithsonian Institution, the Booth Western Art Museum, and the Phoenix Art Museum. The Red Pipe transcends portraiture, locating the figure inside the strength of the design elements–the beadwork, fringe, and the deer or antelope painted on the hide that serves as backdrop. The red line connecting the animal’s eye, heart, and spine seems to run through the Indian’s headband and the color showers down through the triangles and lines of beads before coming to rest in the catlinite pipe.

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199 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Study for Coming to the Trade-Fort Union, 1833 Acrylic 4 ¼ x 3 ¾ inches Signed lower right Graphite Drawing 2 8 x 2 inches Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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200 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Study for Winter Solstice Acrylic 5 ¼ x 4 ¾ inches Signed lower left

201 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Study for Artist-Explorer in Mandan Lodge Acrylic 4 ½ x 3 ¾ inches Signed lower right

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

Estimate: $3,500 - 5,000

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202 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 In the Stronghold Oil on board 36 x 22 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

When Kenneth Riley paints with a muted, limited palette, it means something. It isn’t that he wants you to ignore the walls of dusty rose and lavender that all but vanish into the background–they are the “stronghold” of the title after all, aren’t they? Or are they? Consider the triangle made by the two Indians and the horse. The triangle. Strongest of shapes. One of the basic shapes, not only in the composition of paintings, but in nature and in the universe. Consider the vertices of this triangle. The warrior, standing with spear, shield, and quirt (which is itself a trio, if not a triangle). The pony grazing at his right, relaxed but ready, and the medicine man squatting at his left. The strength of humanity, the strength of Nature, the strength of spirit. Perhaps there are two “strongholds” here.

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203 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Smoke Signal Bronze, cast number 4/15 56 inches high, 34 inches wide Signed and dated 93 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Exhibitions: 1993 National Cowboy and Western Heritage Prix de West. Winner of the Grand Purchase Prize. More realistic than many of his bronzes, Allan Houser’s Smoke Signal employs a combination of patinas to achieve its overall effect. Verdigris greens alternate with shades of evenly toned bronze to shape the young man’s body and garb, as well as the robe or blanket he uses to make smoke, the smoke itself, the fire, and the earth he stands on. The viewer’s eye moves around the work’s smooth Art Deco chiseling. Communicating with smoke was no easy task. The young man looks up, watching to see that his transmission is proper, and that it will be properly received at the other end. This, of course, is a metaphor for all artistic endeavor–the difficulty of mastering a medium, sending creations out into the world and wondering, hoping they will be well received.

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204 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Apache Warrior Bronze, cast number 3/8 31 inches high, 53 inches wide Signed and dated 82 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Literature: Barbara H. Perlman. Allan Houser (Ha-O-Zous.) Boston: David R. Godine. 1987, pp. 140, 170, 222, 227, illustrated p. 131.

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205 Kenneth Riley 1919-2015 Wings for the Spirit Oil on canvas 50 x 38 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Provenance: Leanin’ Tree Museum. Boulder, CO. Literature: Don Hedgpeth & Ed Trumble. The Story of Leanin’ Tree: Art and Enterprise in the American West. Boulder, CO, p. 205, illustrated. Exhibitions: “A Passion for the West: Mehl Lawson and Ken Riley.” Cowboy Artists of America Museum. Kerrville, TX. July 16-Sept. 30, 1997. A fallen warrior, spear at his side, shield shielding his face, lies at an acute angle at the bottom of Ken Riley’s Wings for the Spirit. He is the occasion for the painting, but not its subject. Above, an eagle spirit holds his hands out to the warrior’s spirit, spirit meeting spirit, to bear it to the moon (or is it the sun?) where a totemic eagle holds sway. Interestingly, the blue square that dominates the top right of the picture, with the luminous disc and flying eagle, when you see it beside the four birches at left, and the pale pastel orange between them, the whole almost looks like the flag of an Indian nation. The spirit bearer is, of course, a Native American version of the Norse shield maiden, a Valkyrie who takes the warrior’s soul to Valhalla.

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206 Roy Andersen b. 1930 The Winter Move Oil on canvas 30 x 50 inches Signed lower left/CA, Initialed lower right Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 The drama in Roy Andersen’s The Winter Move is in the sky. It’s a lowering sky, a lumbering beast, heavy with snow. The band moves with their laden horses, towards us, quartering from upper left to lower right. They will pass us in a cinematic way. Andersen plants the camera, as it were, waist high, to accentuate the weight and importance of the move. At the moment, looking up at that pendulous sky, this move seems like a good move. Roy Andersen studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Art and the Art Center School of Los Angeles. He spent the early part of his career in illustration, working for National Geographic, Time, and Sports Illustrated. He has done designs for the Postal Service and executed murals for, among others, the National Park Service. Andersen was inducted into the Cowboy Artists of America in 1989 and has won numerous awards for his work.

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207 Howard Terpning b. 1927 Head Study Oil on board 12 x 9 inches Signed lower right and dated 2011; Signed, titled and dated 10-22-11 verso Estimate: $55,000 - 85,000 Provenance: The Artist Harley Brown Private Collection, Texas

Inscription verso: “To our dear friends Carol and Harley with much love and affection. Marlies and Howard Terpning” “Harley, This is just a small thank you for all of the beautiful and expressive words you wrote for the text of my book [Terpning: Tribute to the Plains People]. An artist writing about an artist–a first and you were the one who accomplished that! Bravo! H.T.”

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208 Howard Terpning b. 1927 The Next Generation Oil on canvas 32 x 26 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 2003; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $250,000 - 350,000

The most celebrated contemporary artist of the American West, Howard Terpning was born in Oak Park, Illinois and studied at the Chicago Academy and the American Academy of Art. He became a commercial artist in Chicago and New York, where his film posters, including the one for The Sound of Music, have become part of American film culture. When Winchester Arms hired him, Terpning returned to his first love: Native Americans and the West. He threw himself into history and culture, of the Plains Indians in particular. In 1975, he gave up his lucrative career in commercial art and headed West, settling in Tucson. Terpning would quickly become a renowned painter in the grand Western tradition, combining superb draftsmanship, authenticity as regards the material cultures of indigenous peoples, and a storyteller’s gift.

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209 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 Canyon Traffic Watercolor 13 ½ x 18 ž inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

210 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 At Sundown Watercolor 14 x 21 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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211 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 The Council Oil on canvas 26 x 48 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $300,000 - 500,000


212 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 Lone Horseman Watercolor 14 x 20 inches Signed lower left on mat and titled Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

211 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 The Council (detail) Oil on canvas 26 x 48 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $300,000 - 500,000 Provenance: The Artist Private Collection Sotheby’s, New York, March 13, 2002 (Lot 76) Private Collection We’re in the audience in The Council, just behind the first ring, sitting at the foot of the natural podium where a chief holds the floor. Their attention, and ours, is rapt. Even the young brave right in front of us, looking to his right, is listening and thinking. Some of the chiefs stand. In this they echo the teepees at left that also seem to be ranked to lean in and pay attention. Delano’s composition is strictly triangular; the orator stands only slightly right of center. Because he limits his palette, our eyes bounce from strong red to strong red, from blue to blue, and skip from the black of feathers to black heads of hair. Delano unites the composition just as the speaker unites his hearers. Whatever the subject: war, migration, or some other stress on the people, Delano’s painting suggests persuasive unanimity. Gerard Curtis Delano filled the loneliness of his childhood with fishing, hiking, and drawing. No one in his family or at school thought much of his interest in art, but Delano persisted, making his way through art schools in New Bedford and New York, where he embarked on a career in commercial art. The American West fascinated Delano and some of his earliest drawings had been of Indians. He visited the West in the 1920’s, found a measure of success, then returned to the East Coast to study with N. C. Wyeth and Harvey Dunn before heading west for good. Settling in Colorado, he made his fame painting Native Americans–the Navajo in particular–and the history of the Old West. Softly lit masses and a warm palette animate Delano’s paintings.

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213 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 The Goatherd Oil on board 10 x 18 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and inscribed “Kremmling Colo” verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Delano’s goatherder may not know it, but he is part of an unbroken line of herders in the American West. From the goats and sheep watched over by the Navajo, to the longhorns watched over by the cowboys of the Panhandle, to the ponies watched over by the Sioux and the vaqueros of California, herding, in many ways, defines the history of the American West. With the sun on his back making his robes and the rocks he sits beside glow, the herd boy not only watches his flock, he also watches the enormous gliding eagle, a beautiful bird of prey that might take advantage of a wayward kid.

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214 William Gollings 1878-1932 Crow Camp Oil on canvas 10 x 14 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000

On first glance, there’s a Christmas card beauty to Bill Gollings’s Crow Camp. The shaggy pony in his long winter coat waits patiently in the winter blast while the Indian at right makes his way to the shelter of the near teepee. The pony is in the lee of the wind, back to a thicket. Gollings deftly paints a snowstorm with impasto whites, swirls and streaks, and lets small peeks of canvas stand in for the texture of the teepee and the falling snow. The camp is a temporary home in a harsh season.

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215 William Gollings 1878-1932 Almost Home Oil on canvas 20 x 15 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Almost Home starts with the twilight, a warm sky you might see in the finest Russell oils, via the careful washes of Maxfield Parrish, who taught them to Russell in New York. Jade green shading to egg yolk yellow, just past sunset. The patchwork hills are a comforting quilt; periwinkle sage lines the path home and shows the way. In a fun twist, the pack horse, who would normally follow the lead rider, is out ahead, eager to get to the feed bag and a clean stall. The ranch itself is almost certainly one of those Gollings knew well near his home in Sheridan, Wyoming. A quiet, lovely, beckoning image, Almost Home betokens a hot meal, conversation, and a feather pillow‌ Like many Western artists, Bill Gollings found his calling in a mail-order paint set. Born in Idaho but raised in Michigan and Illinois after the death of his mother, Gollings spent two years at the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago before heading West. An eager student, Gollings absorbed lessons from illustrious friends and visitors like Frank Stick, Hans Kleiber, and Joseph Sharp.

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216 Oscar Berninghaus 1874-1952 Taos Indian Family Oil on board 9 x 11 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000 Oscar Berninghaus, a St. Louis native, was already known for his expert draftsmanship when the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company commissioned him to do the artwork for series of advertising lithographs based on scenes from the settlement of the West. Because of this commission, the artist’s reputation and interest in painting the American West soared. On his first Western journey, a chance encounter and a broken wagon wheel–so legend has it–led him to Taos. Berninghaus made Taos his home and became one of the founders of the Taos Society of Artists. The light and color there, and the Pueblo way of life, filled his senses. There’s a buttery, plein air feel in Taos Indian Family, as if some sort of aesthetic wind is blowing the paint around.

217 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Riders in the Valley Oil on canvas 14 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Cool heat washes over the landscape in Bert Phillips’s Riders in the Valley. Lavenders, light greens, and light blues dominate the composition, while Phillips, characteristically, dresses his chief in a flowing red robe. A tonal palette and the movement of the paint in the disparate parts of the work mark this as an ideas painting, one born in the imagination and set down quickly, before it vanishes. Bert Phillips only had to see Taos once, in 1898 on a trip with Ernest Blumenschein–before he decided to pitch his tent there forever. The most vocal enthusiast for founding an art colony in Taos, Phillips became one of the original members of the Taos Society of Artists. Of all the Taos artists, Phillips was the most unrepentant romantic, seeing the poetry in the people and landscape as twin aspects of a single, timeless idyll. He selected the subjects of his works for their beauty and ability to convey the romance of the area as he saw it through his vision.

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218 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 A Serious Warning Ink Wash 19 x 28 ¾ inches Signed lower right and inscribed “To my friend Frank Millett” Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

Provenance: The Artist Frank Millett (until 1912) Kennedy Galleries, NY. (1976) Gerald Peters Gallery. (1978) Coeur d’Alene Art Auction. Reno, NV. (1998) J.N. Bartfield Galleries, NYC. Private Collection, FL. (Since 1998)

Literature: J.G.A. Creighton. “The Northwest Mounted Police of Canada,” in Scribner’s Magazine. Vol. XIV, No. 4, October, 1893, p. 405, illustrated.

Kennedy Quarterly. New York: Kennedy Galleries. Vol. XV, Number One. June, 1976, p. 17, illustrated.

Peter H. Hassrick & Melissa J. Webster. Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne of Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings. Cody, WY: Buffalo Bill Historical Center, 1996. Vol. II, no. 1691, p. 478, illustrated.

J.G.A. Creighton’s article, “The Northwest Mounted Police of Canada,” which appeared in the October, 1893 issue of Scribner’s Magazine outlines the history of this celebrated force noted for their scarlet jackets, their fearlessness, and their sense of fair play and equitable justice. At first, writes Creighton, the Mounties numbered only 300, and policed an area “as large as France and Germany.” They took on “whiskey traders,” established “friendly relations with the Indians,” resolved native conflicts “over encroachments upon each other’s hunting-grounds,” escorted dignitaries, patrolled the border with the United States, all on sometimes lengthy patrols from rough posts and outposts. Remington gave A Serious Warning as a gift to his friend, polymath Frank Millett. Millett served under his father, a surgeon, as a surgeon’s assistant during the Civil War, studied art at Harvard and in Belgium, and was a decorated foreign correspondent in the Russo-Turkish war of 1877-78. One of the first trustees of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, he also acted as decorations manager for the Columbian Exposition of 1893. Millett wrote stories, translated Tolstoy, traveled widely, and painted everything from portraits to murals. On April 10, 1912, on his way back to New York from Italy, where he had been working with the American Academy in Rome, Millett boarded the Titanic on her ill-fated voyage and perished in the catastrophe.

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219 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 At the Mouth of Rapid Creek–General Carr Receiving the Report of a Scout Ink Wash & Gouache 19 ½ x 27 ½ inches Signed lower right and inscribed “From sketch 6th cab. Camp Rapid Creek. Dec 23-1890” Estimate: $75,000 - 125,000 Provenance: Boatmen’s National Bank of St. Louis. Exhibitions: “Impressionism Reflected: American Art, 1890-1920.” The St. Louis Art Museum. St. Louis, MO. May 6 - June 27, 1982. Literature: Frederic Remington, “The Galloping Sixth,” in Harper’s Weekly, Jan. 16, 1892, p. 64, illustrated.

Harold McCracken. The Frederic Remington Book. Garden City: Doubleday & Co. 1966, p. 242, illustrated.

Peter H. Hassrick & Melissa J. Webster. Frederic Remington: A Catalogue Raisonne of Paintings,Watercolors and Drawings. Cody, WY: Buffalo Bill Historical Center, 1996. Vol. I, no. 1202, p. 368, illustrated. Rapid Creek was a stone’s throw from Wounded Knee, and the 6th Cavalry, depicted here, wasn’t camped far from the 7th, which means that Remington was almost on the spot at the Wounded Knee Massacre, which took place on December 28th, 1890, just five days after he did this painting. Army records show that General Carr and the 6th did engage a party of Sioux seeking revenge for Wounded Knee on January 1st, 1891, and that they drove the Indians away. What renewed the conflict between Native Americans and whites was the Ghost Dance, a ritual of purification that came as a vision to a Northern Paiute prophet named Wovoka, during a solar eclipse in 1889. The dance was supposed to halt the advance of the whites and bring about a new era of harmony and plenty. Peace was Wovoka’s theme, but the Ghost Dance spread from tribe to tribe and others interpreted it as a call to arms. Ghost Shirts, said to be capable of repelling bullets, began to circulate. Spiritual purity and martial invincibility (In one of history’s strange congruences, these would be the very foundations of the Boxer Rebellion in China in 1900, where U.S. forces would protect foreign legations in Peking and Tientsin.) Bureau of Indian Affairs agents, frightened by the Ghost Dance, appealed for military assistance in November 1890, and a scuffle that ensued when the 7th Cavalry demanded that the Lakota lay down their weapons and a young, deaf warrior resisted led to the massacre. Remington painted the Ghost Dance while he was at Rapid Creek and there is even a brief, early film of it, but the article he wrote to accompany At the Mouth of Rapid Creek–which was not published until 1892–makes no mention of the conflict. Instead, Remington says that his time with General Carr destroyed his romantic illusions about cavalry life, and that General Carr only cared about “bacon and forage,” and that he had disabused the artist of his notions of gallantry, telling the artist, “Sir, the most important things about a cavalry regiment are the stomachs of the men and horses.” S C O T T S D A L E A RT A U C T I O N

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220 Charles Russell 1864-1926 Pony Dance Watercolor 10 x 14 ¾ inches Signed lower left, with skull and dated 1902 Estimate: $250,000 - 350,000 Literature: B. Byron Price. Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonne. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press. 2007, no.CR.NE.241 (online), illustrated.

Rick Stewart. Charles M. Russell. Watercolors: 1887-1926. Fort Worth, TX: Amon Carter Museum. 2015, pp. 218-219, illustrated.

Though Charlie Russell would continue to learn and grow as a watercolorist throughout his life, by 1900 or so his work in the medium was assured and mature. In Charles M. Russell: Watercolors: 1887-1926, Rick Stewart writes that William Macbeth of the Macbeth Galleries in New York City wrote to Russell in 1902, asking if he had any available watercolors. “Either Russell had a few watercolors on hand,” Stewart says, “or Nancy put him to work, for within a short time she wrote Macbeth to say that four watercolors were on the way… At least one of the watercolors she mentioned is known today by that same title: Pony Dance,” in which the “central warrior, wearing an animal-fur hat and holding his rifle high in the air, rears his horse in dramatic fashion and appears to let out a fierce war call. Both rider and horse are covered with painted designs that indicate strong medicine in battle.” (p. 218) Russell imparts a great deal of spirit into Pony Dance. Grouping the central warriors gives the impression of a single energetic mass on the verge of exploding into combat. You focus at center on the warrior mounted on the rearing white horse, then move to the bracketing warriors in the dust at left and right, and then take in the partially obscured riders. Horses’ legs and heads seem to be in an electric jumble with the warriors’ heads, arms, and weapons but it’s a jumble united by purpose.

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221 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Beneath the Western Moon Oil on board 20 x 16 inches Signed lower right and dated 1934; Signed, titled and dated August 1934 verso Estimate: $150,000 - 200,000

Inscribed verso: “Beneath the Western Moon painted expressly for Gertrude DuBois August 1934 Frank Tenney Johnson Rim Rock Ranch, Wapiti, Wyoming” Provenance: The Artist Gertrude DuBois. (1934) John Howard Fine Arts, MT (1998) J. N. Bartfield Galleries, NY (1998) Private Collection (1998) By descent in the family to the present. Cowboy and packhorse picking their way through moonlit rocks is a Frank Tenney Johnson staple. Painted on the Rim Rock Ranch in Wapiti, Wyoming in 1934, when the artist had achieved his mature style, Beneath the Western Moon exemplifies Johnson’s deft combination of realism and impressionism. Heightening some details while leaving others less distinct allows Johnson to move the viewer’s eye from cloud to man, man to horse, rocks to sage. Because one of Johnson’s techniques is to light the foreground, is it any wonder that so many of Johnson’s nocturnes feature white horses? White horses let moonlight and shadows sculpt the beast in high relief without having to sacrifice the perception that all this is taking place in darkness.

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222 Laverne Nelson Black 1887-1938 Indians and Saddle Ponies Oil on canvas 8 x 10 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000

Friends in the Kickapoo tribe on a nearby reservation in southwestern Wisconsin introduced Laverne Nelson Black to Native American culture. Black graduated from the Chicago Academy of Art and became a newspaper illustrator, but in his spare time he traveled and painted the West, especially Taos, then the center of Western art. Black would relocate to Taos for his health; in Taos he would develop a personal style employing broad strokes laid down with a palette knife. In Indians and Saddle Ponies, Black packs in nearly a dozen figures, as many horses–and one mule, at left–in a plaza framed by an adobe structure. What look to be the Taos Mountain peaks sit in the clouds above the scene. The action swirls around the white mare and brown foal, whose stillness anchors the foreground.

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223 Nicolai Fechin 1881-1955 Taos Pueblo House Oil on canvas 19 x 31 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000


223 Nicolai Fechin 1881-1955 Taos Pueblo House (detail) Oil on canvas 19 x 31 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 224 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 The Bow and Arrow Makers Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed lower left

Provenance: Gerald Peters Gallery, NM. Private Collection. Literature: Harold McCracken. Nicolai Fechin. New York: Hammer Galleries. 1961, catalogue, no. 55, illustrated.

Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000

Nicolai Fechin’s palette knife makes the shadows that make the heat of the day in Taos Pueblo House. As a woman holds her child’s hand in the shade of the scaffolding at left, a man sitting on the second story scaffolding at right grinds meal in a metate and the domed clay oven, or horno, is tended below. Fechin creates the adobe walls and road with layers of earth tones and highlights of white that give the work a warmth and feel for the layers of history. The blue green mountains behind the pueblo enfold the scene. This is a place apart, distinct, special. Nicolai Fechin was born in Russia’s rugged Tartar forest in 1881 where his father was a noted woodcarver and maker of icons. At 13, Fechin began his training at the Art School of Kazan, studied in St. Petersburg, and ultimately earned a six-year scholarship to the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh. Fechin began to work with a palette knife and experiment with color application in a broadly impressionistic way. His paintings soon came to the attention of prominent American institutions and collectors; these connections helped him elude the hardest of the many hardships of the Bolshevik Revolution after he returned to the new Soviet Union. In 1923, Fechin and his wife left the U.S.S.R. and moved to New York. When Fechin developed tuberculosis, a doctor suggested he move to the Southwest for his health. One of Fechin’s friends, the artist John Young-Hunter, mentioned Taos. Fechin took his advice and found the countryside not only healthful but reminiscent of the woods and mountains of his youth.

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Provenance: Gerald Peters Gallery, NM. O’Meara Gallery, NM. Coletta Ray McMillan, Houston, TX. (circa 1983) Private Collection. Literature: Forrest Fenn. Teepee Smoke: A New Look Into the Life and Work of Joseph Henry Sharp. Santa Fe: One Horse Land & Cattle. 2007, p. 314, listed. The first of the Taos Society artists to visit the area in 1893, Joseph Sharp is considered the father of The Founders. But Sharp, trained in Cincinnati, Munich, and Paris, had painted Plains Indians in Wyoming and Montana before settling in Taos. President Theodore Roosevelt even had a studio built for Sharp near the site of the Battle of the Little Big Horn. While there, Sharp painted over 200 portraits of Native Americans who had participated in that fateful engagement. Sharp made a permanent move to Taos in 1912. In The Bow and Arrow Makers, Sharp, who loved to paint the practical and creative arts of Native Americans, scatters pots, fetishes, drum, and beadwork around the fireplace corner of his studio. One model strings a bow, while the other, seated at his feet, watches. In Sharp, watching, learning, and passing skills and wisdom from generation to generation is a frequent subject.

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225 E. Martin Hennings 1886-1956 Across the Valley Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 40,000 A beautiful place made more lyrical than it is in real life, this describes Ernest Martin Hennings’s Across the Valley. Below, the village of Valdez is tucked in alongside the Rio Hondo. We’re looking up toward what is now the Taos Ski Valley. To the right, the granite rock, known as “El Salto,” rises in front of Lucero Peak. From the shadowed rim at right, Victor Higgins often painted–this is the point of view of Winter Funeral, for example. Under his eye and brush, Hennings makes this is a place of stripes and round folded masses, pinks and yellows and greens, with shadows in purple and all of it under a heavy gray sky. Dark, light, then dark again, the valley seems to thrive under a soft benediction. Two figures walk up a road carved out of the clay of the mountainside, a road that winds like life itself. Ernest Martin Hennings was born in New Jersey but moved to Chicago with his family when he was a child. When he was 12 or 13, he and a friend visited the Art Institute of Chicago and the germ of art began to stir in the boy. Hennings studied in Chicago, earned a trip to Munich, and became interested in Art Nouveau ideas of design inspired by natural forms–and derived, in part, from Japanese prints–that was known in Germany as jugendstil, or “youth style.” One of the Taos Founders, Hennings’s paintings typically layer pattern on pattern, color against color in the manner of medieval tapestry. In them, the Taos Indians are the shuttle, moving through the warp, as if their movement creates the tapestry he weaves. Of the first generation of Taos artists, Hennings (and Bert Phillips) seemed to want his art to be above and outside of his times, outside of time itself. Perhaps, after the horrific cataclysm of World War I, there was a need for this, and room for it.

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226 Albert Bierstadt 1803-1902 Sunset, Salt Lake Oil on board 5 s x 8 d inches Initialed lower right Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000 Sunset, Salt Lake will be included in Melissa Speidel’s forthcoming catalogue raisonne of Albert Bierstadt’s works. A letter from Melissa Speidel will accompany this lot. Provenance: Nicholas Martin Matthews, Baltimore, MD. Private Collection, Virginia. (circa 1920) Born in Germany, near Dusseldorf, Albert Bierstadt was brought as a child to the bustling whaling town of New Bedford, Massachusetts. Early artistic prowess led to formal training in Germany–back in Dusseldorf, in fact. Immersion in the aesthetics of Dusseldorf’s High German Romanticism and its counterpart in American Transcendentalism–think Goethe, Beethoven, Wagner, Cooper, Melville– prepared him to transform the American West and wilderness into art. Success came quickly to Bierstadt after he set up his studio in New York. From the surreal–yet very real–majesty of the American Rockies, Bierstadt created panoramic landscapes combining elements of the beautiful and the sublime that captured the popular imagination. Inspired to travel to the West after hearing a lecture by Bayard Taylor, a famed writer and traveler of the day, Bierstadt manages to secure a place in the 1859 Lander Expedition to the Rocky Mountains. The splash Bierstadt’s paintings make on his return to New York acts as respite from the terrible rupture of the Civil War and he is soon on his way West again, this time with Fitz Hugh Ludlow, a rising literary star, who sends back dispatches to popular periodicals. Bierstadt and Ludlow become bitter foes. Ludlow sinks into opium addiction. His career falters. His marriage ends. Bierstadt falls in love with and marries Ludlow’s ex-wife, Rosalie. Nevertheless, in 1870, Ludlow manages to complete an important book chronicling their adventures–The Heart of A Continent. One of the places they visited in 1863 was Brigham Young’s Salt Lake City. Ludlow’s descriptions of the Great Salt lake in his book align with Bierstadt’s luminous painting, Sunset, Salt Lake. As you read the following excerpts, imagine the writer and the artist, having floated in the saline lake, having hiked and explored, having examined rocks and caves, flora and fauna, racing now, each in his respective medium, to capture the fleeting light, colors, and contours of the scene. “Nothing on the palette of Nature is lovelier,” Ludlow begins, “more incapable of rendition by mere words, than the rose-pink hue of the mountains… hues which in full daylight are as positive ruby, coral, garnet, and carnelian,–at sunset and in twilight as positive amethyst, jacinth, topaz, and opal… “Never had Nature a greater surprise for us. The view was one of the most charming which could be imagined. Its elements of sublimity were many, but beauty was its most impressive characteristic… On our left and western side, as we faced the sea, the lateral ranges of the Oquirrh decreased in height until they melted into vapory streaks of pale turquoise on the far horizon, their northward terminations forming bold headlands, or long, low, promontories, with dreamy bays setting back into the indentations of the coast between them.” (Ludlow, pp. 381-382.) As Melissa Speidel writes in the letter that will accompany this work, "Some of Bierstadt’s most exquisite works are his small oil paintings and Sunset-Salt Lake is a prime example of this genre.”

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226 Albert Bierstadt 1803-1902 Sunset, Salt Lake Oil on board 5 s x 8 d inches Initialed lower right Estimate: $150,000 - 250,000


227 Albert Bierstadt 1803-1902 Hunter’s Camp Oil on canvas 18 x 29 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000 Hunter’s Camp will be included in Melissa Speidel’s forthcoming catalogue raisonne of Albert Bierstadt’s works. A letter from Melissa Speidel will accompany this lot. In 1889, Albert Bierstadt made a tour of the Canadian Rockies, Oregon, Washington, and the Northwest and Alaskan Coasts. While there he saw trainloads of buffalo bones, vast wildfires, and massive glaciers. On a tour of Loring Bay, Alaska, the steamer he was traveling on–the Ancon–ran aground. Bierstadt and the other passengers had to stay on shore for several days, living in Native huts and salmon canneries, until another steamer reached them. Bierstadt used his time to sketch and paint, though, as Melissa Speidel writes, “Not many of Bierstadt’s oil studies from his time in Alaska have been located, and there are few finished oils. Scenes such as Hunter’s Camp give us a welcome view of the artist’s Alaskan experience.” The makeshift shelters of sailcloth and broken spars suggest that Hunter’s Camp, painted in New York on his return, may have been inspired by similar encampments he saw during his predicament.

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228 Albert Bierstadt 1803-1902 Western Landscape Oil on canvas 18 x 26 inches Estimate: $100,000 - 150,000 Provenance: Private Collection, Fort Myers, FL. (circa 1920) Western Landscape will be included in Melissa Speidel’s forthcoming catalogue raisonne of Albert Bierstadt’s works. A letter from Melissa Speidel will accompany this lot. Like two old men leaning away from the wind, the trees at right, one stripped, the other all but–red pines, perhaps–call to mind Albert Bierstadt’s Hudson River School roots and affinities, where Cole, Durand, and others, had thought of trees as people, individuals with histories, stories they tell through their weathered twists and curves. Though it’s impossible to say for sure, Western Landscape has the feel of Bierstadt’s paintings of the Canadian Rockies. Wherever this is, snowmelt might torrent down this mountain, but the prevailing winds, as the two trees tell it, swirl back around and up the valley. The tales they would tell, these two old friends, are of storms bearing down like giants and of sunning themselves in spring light.

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229 Thomas Moran 1837-1926 Castle Rock, Green River, WY In a Wonderland they lie, Dreaming as the days go by, Dreaming as the summers die: Ever drifting down the stream– Lingering in the golden gleam– Life, what is it but a dream? Lewis Carroll, Alice Through the Looking-Glass, 1871

It has always seemed to me that there is an unspoken connection between Thomas Moran’s great landscapes of the American West and the Wonderland that Alice finds down the March Hare’s hole and through the looking glass. Though Moran’s West is a place and Alice’s Wonderland is a dream, somehow they intersect, somehow they interweave. Turn the catalogue upside down. Go ahead. Look at Thomas Moran’s Castle Rock, Green River, WY through the Lewis Carroll looking glass. You could almost put your hand through the image, and if you did, the rest of you might follow, but let your mind’s eye do the work, let it pass through the evanescent of image. By showing us that even the reflection of this place is seductive, Moran illuminates the special nature of the place itself. This world and its mirror image are magical realms. If you look away, it might not be there when you look back, Moran seems to say. Now turn the catalogue right side up. Magically, you’re still somewhere else, in another realm, a natural wonder that becomes, via Thomas Moran’s inner vision of the outward world, a vanished kingdom. Yes, these rocks, these cliffs, too, shall pass, as all things pass, into the past, into time, into other realms and elsewheres. But the painting remains, as a sign and symbol of a vision–Thomas Moran’s vision. Thomas Moran wove the landscape of the West–canyon depths, mountain peaks, the many-hued layers of the bluffs–into the American imagination. Woven of his imagination, Moran’s magnificent oil Castle Rock, Green River, WY weaves a spell of its own, leaving an afterimage that displaces the physical, topographical Green River in our minds. Yet this most American of artists was English–at least at first–as English as Lewis Carroll. Moran was a weaver’s son born in Bolton, England in 1837. At the age of seven, after the swift and violent collapse of the hand weaving industry in the face of industrial textile mills, Moran’s family emigrated to the United States. Moran apprenticed with an engraver, saw the works of the English artist J.M.W. Turner, and thought Turner’s light and atmosphere worth emulating here in the vastness and variety of the American landscape. Like Turner, Thomas Moran was a romantic. He loved Longfellow’s Hiawatha and Lord Byron’s poems, lost himself in their remote, craggy lands, ruins of lost civilizations, and brooding solitary wanderers. In the fall of 1870, while working for Scribner’s Monthly, Moran was asked to work up some crude sketches from the first scientific expedition to a place called Yellowstone. Excited by descriptions of the place, Moran secured a spot with the geological survey headed to Yellowstone and led by Ferdinand V. Hayden. Hayden’s report to Congress, William Henry Jackson’s photos, and Moran’s paintings, which would also be reproduced magnificently in stone lithographs by Louis Prang, would lead to the establishment of Yellowstone as our first national park. Moran’s last stop on that train in 1870 was a boom town beside the tracks, a place called Green River, Wyoming. Moran stepped off. The fantastic forms and colors of the rocks met his eye and fired his imagination. He would return to them again and again throughout his long career. For Thomas Moran, who would turn 70 in 1907, time was on the march. He was already the “Grand Old Man” of American art with a white beard as long as the list of accolades he’d received. His wife, two of his brothers, and his only son had recently passed away. Art was changing. Modernism and the new, urban century were rising together. Moran responded to grief and the changing world by throwing himself into his work. He traveled with his daughter and painted throughout the West, as well as returning to Great Britain, the country of his birth, to paint in the mountains of Wales. 1907 found him back in the West, plying brush and pen. Thinking back to the painting, in light of Moran’s romantic leanings, thinking of Moran and Carroll, of Green River and Wonderland, where does Castle Rock, Green River, WY belong? Are these the ruins of an empire as Turner, Byron, and Longfellow might have described them. No. They’re the ruins of a geological era. The great age of the Earth surely came to Moran as he contemplated the great bluffs–this basin was once a vast body of water teeming with life long vanished. The traces of its past are not the broken keeps of castles and columns of temples but the nature-made towers of a vanished epoch. The Indians cross the mirroring river single file. They are a trace of the past, a vision from another age, another world, another Wonderland, crossing into ours for a moment. Postscript: if you happen to be in the White House, just outside the Lincoln Bedroom, where countless guests of Presidents have slept, you’ll see a Green River Moran, a pure landscape without figures, similar in size and quality to Castle Rock, Green River, WY.

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229 Thomas Moran 1837-1926 Castle Rock, Green River, WY Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right and dated 1907; Initialed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $3,500,000 - 4,500,000

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230 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 Bronco Buster Bronze, cast No 236 22 ¾ inches high Signed with copyright; Roman Bronze Works N-Y

229 Thomas Moran 1837-1926 Castle Rock, Green River, WY (detail) Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right and dated 1907; Initialed, titled and dated verso

Estimate: $75,000 - 125,000 Provenance: J.N. Bartfield Galleries, NY. Private Collection, CO.

Estimate: $3,500,000 - 4,500,000

Literature: Michael Edward Shapiro. Cast and Recast: The Sculpture of Frederic Remington. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institute Press, 1981, pp. 37-69, 95, and throughout (other examples).

Provenance: Newhouse Galleries, New York, 1937 J.B. Saunders, Houston, Texas, 1975 Philbrook Art Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma National Cowboy Hall of Fame and Western Heritage Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma William C. Foxley, California J. N. Bartfield Galleries, New York Private collection, Colorado Private collection, Texas The Russell: Sale to Benefit the CM Russell Museum, 2016 Private collection

By 1893, Frederic Remington was beginning to worry that the era of the cowboy and the free range was vanishing fast. Seeking what was left of the cowboy way of life, he traveled to the Southwest and crossed over into Mexico, where he lighted on “Patron Jack’s” enormous San Jose de Bavicora ranch, situated in rugged Apache country some 200 miles northwest of Chihuahua. Already America’s foremost illustrator of life in the West, Remington was searching for something that was slipping away, something he found south of the border, something that would take him back in time. Bavicora would point the way from pen and ink, watercolor, and oil paint, to wax and bronze and led to his best known, and perhaps greatest work–Bronco Buster. Remington had written: “[The cowboy] was a combination of the Kentucky or Tennessee man with the Spanish.” He would find this combination in “Patron Jack” Follamsbee (Jack Gilbert). Jack had been born into a Kentucky racehorse family, but, in a spirit of adventure, he wrested Bavicora from the Mexican wilderness and earned the loyalty of his vaqueros and foremen through sheer audacity. On his return to his home in New Rochelle, New York, a friend came to visit Remington in his studio. Observing the ease with which Remington moved figures around in the picture plane, the friend, a playwright, advised him that since he worked in three dimensions in his paintings, he should give sculpture a try. Remington went to work, creating Bronco Buster in sculptor’s wax. What remained was to find a foundry to cast the piece. The problem, according to Remington’s sculptor friends, was that the piece was so top heavy it would not stand. Remington rejected this criticism and sought out the Henry Bonnard Works, and then, later, the Roman Bronze Works run by the dashing Riccardo Bertelli. These European artisans had brought techniques to America that dated back to the Greeks, techniques lost and rediscovered in Renaissance Italy that would allow a work like Bronco Buster to be cast in bronze and stand freely. Think about this: every image, every piece of footage of the Oval Office in the White House features Theodore Roosevelt’s Bronco Buster. Remington’s image of the rider trying to master the bucking bronc is undoubtedly the single most recognizable artistic conception of the American West.

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Michael D. Greenbaum. Icons of the West: Frederic Remington’s Sculpture. Ogdensburg, NY: Frederic Remington Art Museum, 1996, pp. 51-65, 178 and throughout (other examples).

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231 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Rattlesnake Bronze, cast No 35 23 inches high Signed; Roman Bronze Works N.Y. Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 Provenance: William Foxley, CA Private Collection, AZ.

Literature: Michael D. Greenbaum. Icons of the West: Frederic Remington’s Sculpture. Ogdensburg, NY: Frederic Remington Art Museum, 1996, pp. 123-128, 195 and following, and throughout (other examples). In the March 18, 1905 issue of Collier’s, in his article “Frederic Remington–Sculptor,” author James Barnes describes visits to the celebrated artist in his studio and at the Roman Bronze Works, where Remington often spent his days, eating his brown bag lunch and working on his models. Barnes notes Remington’s delight as he works and molds the wax snake that would ultimately become the troublemaker in The Rattlesnake: “For instance, something was said about the position of the rattlesnake in a wax model of his frightened pony. Mr. Remington decided to change it; the string of wax that represented the snake was bent and curved and again replaced; this time the effect seemed more pleasing. ‘Great fun,’ said he, ‘isn’t it? Just see what can be done with it–isn’t it wonderful!’” It is fun–and scary. Remington composes the bronze to swirl up, around, and away from the snake, all at once. Everything is in motion in this “wrong time-wrong place” masterpiece as the snake–a tiny thing, really, by contrast––lets the horse and man know that treading on him is not an option. Like H.G. Wells’s War of the Worlds–published in 1898, so we’re in the same ballpark–capital N Nature v. capital C Culture is at work here thematically as well. Just as germs defeat the invading Martians in their massive tripods in Wells’s masterpiece, in The Rattlesnake, men stride around like Goliaths, thinking themselves masters of the wilderness, only to meet their match when they and their steeds meet Nature’s Davids.

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232 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Sergeant Bronze, cast number 29 10 a inches high Signed; Roman Bronze Works

233 Frederic Remington 1861-1909 The Savage Bronze, cast number 7 10 ¾ inches high Signed and dated 1905; Roman Bronze Works

Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

Literature: Michael D. Greenbaum. Icons of the West: Frederic Remington’s Sculpture. Ogdensburg, NY: Frederic Remington Art Museum, 1996, pp. 113-119, 195 and throughout (other examples). Michael Greenbaum writes that The Sergeant and The Savage “may have been inspired by a suggestion” (Greenbaum, p.113) from Roman Bronze Works owner Riccardo Bertelli that the artist create some smaller, more affordable works. The Sergeant, with his lined face and floppy, battered hat, depicts the head of a Rough Rider, one of the men in Theodore Roosevelt’s “San Juan Hill” unit in the SpanishAmerican War, while The Savage strives to capture the fierceness of a defiant, unreconstructed Native American warrior, squinting grimly into a future he vows to resist.

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234 Albert Bierstadt 1803-1902 Clouds Over the Mountains Oil on canvas 13 x 17 ¼ inches Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

Small brown horses graze in the long green grass in the distance, in the sunlight between the shadows the trees and clouds make and the treeline beyond this meadow. Mountains, rounded in volume by the striations of the rocks, meet at the cleft between them and the clouds have the weight of rain, not imminent rain, but rain nonetheless. The scene is lush and expansive; the horses, all but invisible, indicate the impressive scale of the scene.

235 Asher Durand 1796-1886 Mountain Pasture Oil on canvas 14 ¾ x 14 ½ inches Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

American landscape painting, as it first took shape in the Hudson River School, might be said to begin with Asher Durand. Durand worked for his father, a silversmith, showed an aptitude for engraving, studied the artform, and struck out on his own. His engraving of Turnbull’s Declaration of Independence found him hailed as the young nation’s finest engraver. Durand’s friend and sketching partner, Thomas Cole, encouraged him to take up the brush. Together, the two artists rambled the Catskills, sketching and painting, and Durand saw the wisdom of the switch when his paintings began to sell. Durand “viewed nature reverentially, as the visible manifestation of Deity, and the artist as its humble instrument.” (Zellman, ed. 300 Years of American Art, p. 117) Mountain Pasture balances wilderness in the trees, rocks, and distant hills with the pastoral setting where the cows graze. The horses seem to partake of both worlds.

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236 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Smoke of a .45 Oil on canvas 45 x 45 inches Signed lower left/NA and dated 1937 Estimate: $600,000 - 900,000

Provenance: Exchange Bank & Trust Company, Dallas, TX. Merton Shapiro, CA. J. N. Bartfield Galleries, NYC, 1999. Private Collection. Literature: Harold McCracken. Frank Tenney Johnson: Western Paintings. Privately Printed, 1971, p. 10, illustrated. Harold McCracken. The Frank Tenney Johnson Book: A Master Painter of the Old West. Garden City: Doubleday & Company. 1974, p. 48 (following), illustrated. Measuring forty-five by forty-five inches–form following subject or subject suggesting form–Frank Tenney Johnson’s 1937 masterwork, Smoke of a .45, is a cinematic classic, canvas kin to a head-on, headlong action shot straight out of Stagecoach or The Searchers, the kind you’d have seen in bijou movie theaters across the country then. You would have heard the screams as mount and man seemed to ride right over the audience. And that’s who we are–we viewers of this painting–an audience, engaging the rider in this nick of time moment as he seems to be veering to his left. In truth, the rider doesn’t notice us. He’s busy, with his eye on what–or who?–he’s chasing and firing at. It’s a story for you to finish. Is he a lawman after a renegade, a robber, a rustler? Is he himself an outlaw out to settle a score? Is he a cowboy trying to turn the herd from danger? You write it. You film it in your mind. …But when we look beyond the action of the scene–the painterly quality and careful composition of the painting is immediately striking. The high thunderhead behind the rider evokes the idea of thunder that echoes in the pounding of the horse’s hooves and in the puffs of dust that trail behind. This cloud does double duty, casting shadows that provide a brooding backdrop for the otherwise sunlit scene. Johnson builds the background with easy, broad brushstrokes; the horse glistens with sweat and races with a wide, wild eye. This may well be the denouement of a long, True Grit chase with a trail that has led from the far side of that far off peak at right. Born in Iowa in 1874, Frank Tenney Johnson saw the last of the prairie schooners heading West. After the death of Frank’s mother, the family moved to Milwaukee. There, on a class field trip to the Layton Art Museum, young Frank determined to make a life in art. Johnson studied under Panoramist Richard Lorenz, whose enormous circular paintings of biblical and battle scenes were precursors of cinema. Lorenz, who had traveled and painted in the West, fired Johnson’s imagination with his canvases and tales. Johnson and his new bride, Vinnie, went to New York first, where he studied and enjoyed success in the burgeoning advertising industry. Johnson’s sketches at the Bronx Zoo earned him a contract with Winchester rifles. His ads, in turn, caught the attention of the editors of Field & Stream, who offered to sponsor a trip to the West which he would repay with illustrations. Johnson’s art alone couldn’t support him, so he cowboyed in Colorado to earn a living, and saw some of the last “beef roundups” in American history, an experience that would prove invaluable to his art. Eventually, he and Vinnie settled in Southern California, in the very heart of the nascent movie business, where he painted murals in movie theaters, sold his works to the new moguls, and starred in more than one early silent cowboy picture. In December 1939, Frank and Vinnie were visiting their friends, the Callahans. Frank greeted Mrs. Callahan with a kiss. What neither of them knew was that Mrs. Callahan was coming down with spinal meningitis. Within days, she had died. By the end of the year, Frank Tenney Johnson had passed into the story of the Art of the American West.

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236 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Smoke of a .45 Oil on canvas 45 x 45 inches Signed lower left/NA and dated 1937 Estimate: $600,000 - 900,000

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237 Frank Tenney Johnson 1874-1939 Voiceless Solitude Oil on canvas 24 x 18 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Provenance: Stendahl Galleries, CA.

The Navajo rider in Voiceless Solitude moves through Johnson’s bold, bravura, canyon. The circular canyon walls act as an amphitheater and magnifying glass. Moonlight becomes a spotlight. Even a whisper here would sound and resound. The canyon might be voiceless, and the solitude might seem absolute, but something–a moving shadow, perhaps, or a loose pebble rolling down the scree–has attracted the rider’s attention. Listening into the voicelessness, suddenly attentive, the rider, occupying a diagonal band of light–there are four bands, alternating light and shadow, if you look – he looks left, sits erect, filling the moment with palpable tension.

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238 Bert G. Phillips 1868-1956 Guardians of the Night Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000 Provenance: Private collection, Cyprus. Coeur d’Alene Auction. July 26, 1997. Private Collection. Christie’s, New York. Nov. 19, 2014. Private Collection. Exhibitions: “Home on the Range: American Western Art from a Cincinnati Collection.” Taft Museum of Art. Cincinnati, OH. June 17-Aug. 21, 1994. Catalogue, p. 54. Literature: Julie Schimmel & Robert White. Bert Geer Phillips and the Taos Art Colony. Albuquerque, New Mexico: Univ. of New Mexico Press. 1994, p. 231.

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239 John Clymer 1907-1989 Pursuit Oil on canvas 15 x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1983 Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000 Provenance: L.D. Brinkman Collection, TX. By descent in the family to the present. Literature: L.D. Brinkman. Honoring the Western Tradition: The L.D. “Brink” Brinkman Collection. Kerrville, TX: L.D. Brinkman Foundation. 2003, p. 105, illustrated. A copy of the book will accompany this lot. Pursuit tells the story of the start of a buffalo hunt as five Indians employ the element of surprise racing up and over an embankment to try to catch an animal or two unaware. Cliffs in the background and the edge of a precipice at lower right bracket the action and heighten the sense of urgency in the painting. The nearest buffalo’s eye is wide and white with fear. Meat for the tribe versus freedom for the beast. That’s what hangs in the balance. John Clymer’s journey from commercial artist to America’s chronicler of the Fur Trade and Mountain Man Era is itself a tale of exploration and adventure. In 1960, Clymer abandoned a successful career and decided that he would try his hand at painting the historical West, a subject that fascinated him. He and his wife began to trace what was left of the early Trails–the Oregon, Bozeman, Chisholm, Overland Stage, Pony Express–as well as the path Lewis and Clark had taken, making close studies of the terrain, dress, manners, horses, dwellings, weapons and lives of the men and women, trappers and Indians of the early frontier days. Back in his studio, Clymer poured his findings onto his canvases, investing them with incredible energy.

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240 Henry Shrady 1871-1922 Elk Buffalo Bronze 22 ½ inches high Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 Inscribed “HM Shrady 1900” and “Copyright 1900 Theodore B. Starr” on the base; also inscribed “Roman Bronze Works NY” underneath base.


240 Henry Shrady 1871-1922 Elk Buffalo Bronze 22 ½ inches high Estimate: $200,000 - 300,000 Provenance: Private collection, MA. (circa 1950) Eldred’s Auctions, MA. Private Collection. Inscribed “HM Shrady 1900” and “Copyright 1900 Theodore B. Starr” on the base; also inscribed “Roman Bronze Works NY” underneath base. A copy of Frederic Remington’s letter to Shrady will accompany this lot. Exhibitions: “The West in Bronze.” The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Dec. 18, 2013-Apr. 13, 2014. Denver Art Museum: May 11, 2014-aug. 31, 2014. (Another example. Catalogue no. 72, p. 36, 70 illustrated. Literature:

Patricia Janis Broder. Bronzes of the American West. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1975, pp. 241-244, illustrated p. 242 (another example).

The prestige that American sculptor Henry Shrady brought to the Roman Bronze Works—the foundry that cast many of his works—was so significant that in 1908 the foundry built a home and studio for the artist in White Plains, New York. Shrady’s home and studio has hosted other sculptors since and is now the Leo Friedlander Studio, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. But this is just one remarkable fact about a remarkable American artist. Shrady was born in New York. His father had been one of President Ulysses S. Grant’s doctors when Grant contracted throat cancer. Keep that in mind. After a year at Columbia University, Shrady abandoned a career in the law and joined his brother-in-law (one of the Gould family) in business at a company that made matches. Matches didn’t catch fire. Shrady, however, caught typhoid fever. The disease left Shrady unfit for tycoondom, but the young man, as he recuperated, began to draw animals: dogs in pet shop windows; moose and bison at the zoo. His wife saw talent and sent some of his doodles, without his knowledge, to the National Academy of Design. To Shrady’s delight, people liked and bought his drawings and paintings, and he began to study sculpture. In 1901, Shrady received his first monumental commission, an equestrian piece for the Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn depicting Washington at Valley Forge. A year later, Shrady and Edward Pearce Casey, an architect, won a $250,000 commission—the largest Federal sculptural commission authorized by Congress to that date— to create the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Shrady’s father tended Grant; his son memorialized Grant in bronze and stone. Circle closed. For the next two decades, the Grant Memorial occupied all of Shrady’s time and effort. He dove into animal biology and anatomy, taking courses at the American Museum of Natural History and dissecting animals to understand their forms. Shrady’s tabletop cavalry groupings and Western animals were conceived in a few short years, circa 1900 to 1903. New York jeweler and retailer Theodore B. Starr admired Shrady’s work and offered to market his bronzes. Roman Bronze Works cast them and they were, and still are, highly prized. Frederic Remington himself purchased an example of Elk Buffalo in 1908 after seeing one at the Roman Bronze Works and, in a letter to Shrady, heaped praise on the bronze: “It’s by and large the best buffalo I ever saw modeled and it has become one of the things that I had to own—if you hadn’t have modeled it I should probably have stolen one from Bertelli’s sometime and been sent up for life.” That bronze remained in Remington’s personal collection and can now be seen at the Frederic Remington Museum in Ogdensburg, New York. Perhaps what Remington saw in Shrady’s Elk Buffalo is that where other sculptors might strive to create the most perfect specimen, Shrady’s bronzes subordinate the majesty of the species to the personality of the individual animal, going beyond the buffaloness of the buffalo or the horseness of the horse. Counterintuitive though it may seem, this is what gives rise to the heightened sense of grace, power, and beauty you see in Elk Buffalo. Rough, shaggy textures, smooth areas of hide, the lids on eyes, the shapes of nostrils—in Shrady’s work, these details, and the attention he gives to them, act as windows into the soul of the wilderness and the breathtaking wonder of nature in the American West. Monumental versions of this bronze were cast and displayed at the 1901 Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York.

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241 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 In Dakota Territory Acrylic 24 x 36 inches Signed lower left Signed and dated 2003 verso Estimate: $75,000 - 125,000

Bob Kuhn’s In Dakota Territory emerges as a celebratory work, one that finds the American bison–depleted to near extinction at the turn of the 20th century–restored and healthy. At first, you might get the impression that Kuhn is painting a historical work, recalling 19th century buffalo hunts. Then, after a second, you see that this is no hunted animal. This is a resting bison rousing himself to his hooves after a roll in the dust. Its herd mates graze unperturbed; the one on the left has paused to consider his supine friend just down the slope. The grass is plentiful, a few birds are on the wing above, and the sky is a reticulated hazy blue over yellow.

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242 Bob Kuhn 1920-2007 Fallen Giant Acrylic 12 x 15 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $18,000 - 28,000 Literature: Tom Davis. Patrons Without Peer: The McCloy Collection. Dallas: Collector’s Covey. 2009, p. 149, illustrated. Bob Kuhn began, as so many artists of his generation did, as an illustrator, his animal imagery gracing the covers and pages of Outdoor Life, Winchester ads, and countless others. In 1970, Kuhn left illustration for fine art and turned his attention exclusively to easel painting and quickly became one of the finest interpreters of big game animals. Kuhn balanced a desire for accuracy with a flair for design that transmits the essential cycles of action and stillness, of life and death, in the natural world. A home and shelter for life of all sorts– including the carpet of green moss–the massive tree in Fallen Giant also serves as a makeshift bridge and viewing perch for the scanning vulpine that stands atop it, looking back in some unspecified hesitation. The dark, dense, moist mystery of the deep woods engulfs the picture; the tree is a drawbridge open to a fairytale world.

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243 Edgar Payne 1883-1947 Snowy Mountain Scene Oil on canvas 18 x 20 inches Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000 Provenance: The Artist A. N. Slavick, Los Angeles, CA (gift) Sydney M. Irmas, Sr., Los Angeles, CA. Irmas Family. Sotheby’s, New York. Mar. 31, 2004. Private Collection. At 14, Edgar Payne knew that he wanted to be an artist. When his father disapproved, he left home, working his way to Chicago as a house, sign, and theatrical scene painter. He did receive some training in Chicago and he did enjoy some success there, but an enthralling visit to California’s Pacific coastline and the Sierra Nevada Mountains in 1909 set him on a course that would become a career. Three years later, Payne and his wife Elsie would settle in Laguna Beach and California landscapes would provide subjects for a lifetime of paintings in an easy, loose realism that suits the craggy heights in Snowy Mountain Scene.

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244 Birger Sandzen 1871-1954 Moonlit Poplars Oil on canvas 16 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000 Birger Sandzen studied in his native Sweden with the highly regarded Anders Zorn before heading to France to continue his studies in George Seurat’s studio. There, Sandzen absorbed the techniques of the Impressionists and Postimpressionists, especially those regarding color and paint application. Inspired by a book about the struggles of Swedish immigrants in Lindsborg, Kansas, Sandzen emigrated to the United States in 1894. He settled in Lindsborg, and became a professor of art at Bethany College. Sandzen traveled throughout the West, painting deeply textured landscapes reminiscent of woodcuts–a medium at which he was a master–with a rough hand-hewn quality. Moonlit Poplars is shot through with Seurat’s pointillism, points of color placed side by side that the viewer’s eye blends and breaks so that the colors shimmer with light.

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245 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 A Distant Acquaintance Oil on canvas 28 x 19 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

Provenance: Chester Marron, PA. (Since 1962.) Exhibitions: “Brandywine Heritage.” Brandywine River Museum. Chadd’s Ford, PA. May 30 - Sept. 1, 1975.“

Artists of the Brandywine Heritage.” Brandywine River Museum. Jan. 1978 - Apr. 1978.

“The Brandywine Heritage: An American Tradition.” Society of the Four Arts. Palm Beach, FL. Mar. 21 - Apr. 19, 1981.

Brandywine River Museum. Dec. 1988 - July 1989.

Literature: Outing. December, 1905, p. 363, illustrated. Sporting Classics. 2004, p. 216, illustrated. One of Howard Pyle’s celebrated students, Philip Goodwin made his early career illustrating classic works like Theodore Roosevelt’s African Game Trails and Jack London’s Call of the Wild. Goodwin–a New York native–spent summers in the West, camping, hunting, fishing, and gathering material for his inimitable oils depicting the romance of sport. Along the way, he became close friends with Charles Russell and Carl Rungius. Goodwin’s influence on the American idea of outdoor sports is so great that many sportsmen, when they dream of ideal voyages in the woods, imagine scenes straight out of Goodwin’s canvases. His images, including A Distant Acquaintance, made their way into the American unconscious through periodicals, advertising, and calendars. A Distant Acquaintance is one of the artist’s distinctive “predicament pictures,” albeit with a more humorous–and odiferous–slant, than the more typical bear ransacking camp scenes.

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246 Ogden Pleissner 1905-1983 Morning on the Marsh Watercolor 17 x 27 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000

I love the feel of procession that Pleissner paints in Morning on the Marsh: the procession of the boats along the marsh edge, the procession of the birds in the morning sky, even the bobbing march of the decoys on the water. All of this, set off against the procession of the breaking dawn, balances the beauty of the moment against the urgency of the waterfowl flights and their human pursuers in a kind of ritual autumn ballet, a pageant enacted year after year. Ogden Pleissner himself descends in direct aesthetic procession from Winslow Homer, A. B. Frost, and Frank Benson, American masters of the sporting scene. Pleissner is arguably the most important 20th century interpreter of American field sports and fishing, perhaps because he considered himself first and foremost a painter of landscapes. Pleissner’s sportsmen are always in and of the scene and season and his works–perhaps because of this–have achieved a permanent place in the pantheon.

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247 Thomas Blinks 1860-1912 Hunting Dog Oil on canvas 14 x 18 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

248 Fred Machetanz 1908-2002 Which Way! Oil on board 16 x 20 inches Signed lower left and dated 1966; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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249 Robert Abbett 1926-2015 Pointer in the Pines Oil on board 9 x 12 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000 Robert Abbett began his career in commercial art, providing illustrations for paperbacks, film posters and advertisements but left the hum of New York for rural Connecticut in 1970. Abbett embarked on what became a tremendous career painting fly fishing and bird hunting scenes. Pointer in the Pines contrasts the rough darks of the tree bark with the smooth white coat of the pointer, but the way the light hits the dog inks him with the yellow brown ground cover and the bleached logs.

250 Percival Rousseau 1859-1937 On Point Oil on canvas 22 x 15 inches Signed lower left and dated 1910 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 Orphaned in his native Louisiana during the Civil War, rescued by a slave, raised in Kentucky, cowboy on the Chisholm Trail, hunter of mountain lions with a pack of hounds–life prepared Percival Rousseau to be a painter. As Turner Reuter writes in his encyclopedic work, Animal and Sporting Artists in America, after marrying–in Paris while he studied at the Academie Julian–one of Rousseau’s paintings, of the goddess “Diana with two wolfhounds… met with critical acclaim.” Rousseau had found his subject. Back in America, he would spend the remainder of his career painting canine portraits and hunting scenes for wealthy patrons on the East Coast and in the South. In On Point, Rousseau captures the dog in all of the stillness, patience, and nobility of its breed.

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251 Frank W. Benson 1862-1951 Morning Flight Watercolor 13 x 19 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $35,000 - 55,000

An expansive watercolor en grisaille, Morning Flight describes a pause before the decoys are set, when the hunter stands to appreciate the ducks winging in. Benson’s monochromatic watercolors always remind me of Asian ink paintings; he manages to get such a delicate range of grayscale tones into the picture, articulating form, light, movement, and depth with nothing more than black, white, and the apparently infinite range between them. Frank Benson’s interest in art took him to Paris, where he studied at the famous Academie Julian amid the fervor of the Impressionist movement. On his return to the States, he rose to fame as a painter of sunlit portraits. Along with Childe Hassam, Benson became part of an influential group of American Impressionists known as The Ten. In 1900, he began to summer in Maine where, recalling youthful rambles in the woods and marshes near his home in Salem, Massachusetts, he began to paint sporting watercolors and oils and to embark on a series of masterful etchings.

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253 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Seeking Passion & Glory Bronze, cast number 23/35 24 inches high, 24 inches wide Signed

252 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Set of 43 Etchings Estimate: $150,000 - 200,000

Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

1: Alaskan Moose, 10 x 8 inches (above), 1945 2: Ivan, 8 x 11 inches, 1931 3: Siesta, 8 x 11 inches, 1931 4: Mule Deer, 8 x 11 inches, 1928 5: Out of the Canyon, 8 x 11 inches, 1937 6: Morning Mist, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 7: Alarmed, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 8: Rams, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 9: An Old Fighter, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 10: The Answer from the Baron, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 11: The Traveler, 8 x 11 inches, 1931 12: Among the Crags, 8 x 11 inches, 1935 13: Mates, 8 x 11 inches, 1932 14: Dall Sheep, 8 x 11 inches, 1928 15: Friends Again, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 16: An Old Prospector, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 17: The Stranger, 8 x 11 inches, 1926 18: Old Baldface, 8 x 11 inches, 1935 19: Stampede, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 20: Mountain Caribou, 8 x 11 inches, 1937 21: Challenged, 8 x 11 inches, 1927

22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30: 31: 32: 33: 34: 35: 36: 37: 38: 39: 40: 41: 42: 43:

Near Long Lake, 8 x 11 inches, 1926 Alaskan Wilderness, 8 x 11 inches, 1928 Silvertip, 8 x 11 inches, 1926 A Woodland Stag, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1926 Antelope, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1926 The Family, 8 x 11 inches, 1937 The Challenge, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 Coming to the Call, 8 x 11 inches, 1937 Above Timberline, 8 x 11 inches, 1931 On the Skyline, 8 x 11 inches, 1937 Face to Face, 8 x 11 inches, 1931 Browsing, 8 x 11 inches, 1938 White Flag, 8 x 11 inches, 1928 Osborne’s Caribou, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 Cliff Dwellers, 8 x 11 inches, 1928 The Rivals, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 The Wanderer, 8 x 11 inches, 1935 Lord of the Canyon, 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches, 1925 Three Old Gentlemen, 8 x 11 inches, 1928 Goats, 8 x 11 inches, 1926 Old Bull, 11 x 9 inches, 1926 Young Bull, 11 x 9 inches, 1926

254 Tim Shinabarger b. 1966 Sik Sik Shell Game Bronze, cast number 25/30 23 inches high, 21 inches wide Signed

In 1925 Carl Rungius created 12 etchings and drypoints. Over the following 20 years he completed 34 additional etchings and drypoints ending with Alaskan Moose in 1945. The complete set is documented in Carl Rungius: The Complete Prints, A Catalogue Raisonne, Donald E. Crouch, Mountain Press Publishing Co., Missoula, MT, 1989, 203 pages.

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Estimate: $14,000 - 24,000

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255 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Heavy Snow Winter Sun Oil on board 18 x 27 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

256 Ken Carlson b. 1937 Still Life with White Winged Dove Oil on board 13 x 10 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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257 Grace Ravlin 1873-1956 Ceremonial Dance Oil on canvas 18 x 22 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 A high school elective in her native Kaneville, Illinois set Grace Ravlin’s artistic ambition in motion. She went on to study with William Merritt Chase and the Orientalists in France and served as a Red Cross nurse at the end of World War I. Ravlin met the world on her own terms when doing so was rare for a single woman, painting in France, Holland, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Morocco, Tunisia–and New Mexico. Letters that survive indicate that she visited New Mexico as early as 1916. Ravlin loved the rituals of the pueblos, and Ceremonial Dance has the feel of a painting done on location with quick, musical strokes capturing the circular movement of the dance and the attentive buzz of the onlooking crowd.

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258 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Jewish Ghetto Courtyard Oil on canvas 20 x 40 inches Signed lower left and dated 1976 Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Literature: Clark Hulings. Hulings: A Collection of Oil Paintings by Clark Hulings. Kansas City: The Lowell Press. 1976, Plate 16, illustrated. Of Jewish Ghetto Courtyard, Hulings wrote: “Whenever I see anything old being destroyed, I am sorry because things usually have a beauty of craftsmanship which is rapidly disappearing in our mechanized lives. But as I saw the tile from this patio being stacked prior to stripping and demolishing the compound, I had mixed emotions. Although I regret the passing of an age more artistic than our own, I do not mourn the end of a life that this courtyard represents. Here in Seville, as in other cities of Europe in past centuries, the Jews were forced to live in special areas and were subjected to cruel discrimination.�


259 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 The Ringing Bell (Nuestra Señora de la Salud) Oil on canvas 30 x 25 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000

Provenance: The artist. Grand Central Art Galleries, NY. (1965) Private Collection, Toronto, Canada By descent in the family to the present. The Ringing Bell (Nuestra Señora de la Salud)is a seminal painting in Clark Hulings’ career and oeuvre. On page 82 of Hulings: A Collection of Oil Paintings, the artist discusses the evolution of his long relationship with the Grand Central Art Galleries. Even as a boy, Hulings’ father had taken him to Grand Central to see the art. As a student and young painter, Hulings always hoped the great New York gallery would take him on. After a trip to Mexico, Hulings steeled his nerve and took his sketches to show to Grand Central’s director. The director advised him not to paint burros and hanging laundry, because “women don’t like burros and don’t want laundry hanging in their living rooms.” The director went on, “Only Catholics buy pictures of cathedrals…” and topped it off with, “Don’t paint Mexico.” Hulings then says, “A few weeks later, I delivered a painting,” that “showed a cathedral, a Mexican burro, and a whole clothesline full of Mexican laundry. While the director was patiently explaining to me once more why I shouldn’t be choosing these subjects, a customer of the gallery who had been hovering in the background asked if she could buy the painting.” The Ringing Bell (Nuestra Señora de la Salud), #0737 in the Hulings catalogue raisonné, demonstrates not only Hulings’ extraordinary skill, but also his dogged persistence as he pursued his personal vision, painting “what interests and inspires me and not to paint just what the prevailing wisdom maintains will sell.”

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260 Clark Hulings 1922-2011 Aix en Provence Flower Market Oil on canvas 27 x 44 inches Signed lower left and dated 1985 Estimate: $125,000 - 200,000

Clark Hulings grew up in New Jersey, studied in New York under Frank Reilly at the Art Student’s League, and haunted the Grand Central Art Galleries. Golden Age illustrators like Rockwell and Cornwell offered a constant wellspring of inspiration and insight into technique, but the time he spent in Spain as a little boy after the death of his mother seems to have imprinted on his imagination. The old cobblestone streets, stalls, and markets in Mexico, Italy, Spain, France, and elsewhere became Hulings’s principal subjects. Hulings spent the summer of 1984 with his family in Aix en Provence. Hulings was working on a book but, as his daughter, Elizabeth, says, “how could he not also paint this fantastic city?” Aix en Provence Flower Market depicts the Place de l’Hotel de Ville, where a flower market still sprouts weekly in front of City Hall. Hulings sought Everyman everywhere he went, and you can see his love of humanity and feel for its manifest and manifold beauties arrayed, like flowers, all round this beautiful fountain in this beautiful old town square.

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261 Robert Lougheed 1910-1982 Wine, Whiskey and Cold, Cold Beer Watercolor 20 x 40 inches Signed lower left/CA; Signed, titled and dated 1975 verso Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Exhibitions: Cowboy Artists of America, 1975. (Silver Medal)

262 Robert Lougheed 1910-1982 Ten Minutes to Sundown Oil on board 23 x 39 inches Signed lower left Signed and titled verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

As a child, Robert Lougheed loved to sketch. While pursuing a career as a newspaper illustrator, a meeting with John Clymer, a meeting that turned into a lifelong friendship, saw Lougheed head to New York, where he became part of illustration’s “Golden Age.” Lougheed moved to Westport, Connecticut, an artists’ magnet then, and began to concentrate on easel painting. Above all other subjects, he loved the American and Canadian west. His philosophy was simple: work from nature–and when all else fails, draw a horse.

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263 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Homeward Bound Oil on board 48 x 82 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1975 Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000


264 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Adobe at Santa Clara Oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1977 Estimate: $20,000 - 25,000

Melvin Warren seemed to favor the contrast of older and newer, the ancient and the modern, the tradition of the cowboy superimposed on the heritage of indigenous peoples, and vice versa. This contrast isn’t stated in Adobe at Santa Clara, it’s implied in the stillness of the pueblo and the cowboys in motion, saddling up or giving their horses a break. There are layers of history here–even the cowboys may be remnants of an earlier time–Warren’s painting seems to say.

263 Melvin Warren 1920-1995 Homeward Bound (detail) Oil on board 48 x 82 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1975 Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000 Provenance: L.D. Brinkman Collection, TX. By descent in the family to the present. Literature: L.D. Brinkman. Honoring the Western Tradition: The L.D. “Brink” Brinkman Collection. Kerrville, TX: L.D. Brinkman Foundation. 2003, p. 166, illustrated. A copy of the book will accompany this lot. Under a moon so bright it almost carves the shapes and figures out of the canvas, Homeward Bound describes the end of a very special gathering. Melvin Warren draws on the Western art trope of four riders in sync, moving together powerfully. These four riders just happen to be the four founders of the Cowboy Artists of America: John Hampton, Joe Beeler, Charlie Dye, and George Phippen. As they depart, they chat easily and amiably, satisfied with the first fruits of their conversations and looking forward to their future collaboration, even as the lit up house continues to look inviting.

265 Robert Lougheed 1910-1982 At the Arroyo Hondo Cutoff Watercolor 20 x 30 inches Signed lower left

A true child of the West who grew up on ranches in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, Melvin Warren was a commercial artist by day and a Western artist by night until the time when his easel art outsold illustration. Warren became a member of the Cowboy Artists of America in 1968 and won just about every award they offer, some more than once. Melvin Warren’s Wests—the Old and the New—are textured, earth-toned worlds.

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266 James Reynolds 1926-2010 Coming to Town Oil on canvas 28 x 40 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000

Coming to Town finds Jim Reynolds in a classic cowboy mood. Consider Remington’s bronze, Coming Through the Rye. Consider the great paintings of this subject by Borein, Russell, Hansen, and many others. It’s a motif, a challenge to every Western artist: cowboys on the loose, tearing away from the lonely rigors of ranch life and racing to town to burn through their wages. Reynolds makes his mark on the motif–even the paint seems to want to fly off the canvas. Jim Reynolds grew up in California near the Donner Pass–a place that arouses a hunger for history (No one ever gets this joke. Maybe it’s in poor taste? Ok, I’ll stop now.) At 13, Reynolds received a calendar with a reproduction of a Frank Tenney Johnson and began to wonder what it would take to be able to paint like that. After a stint in the navy in World War II he studied art, became a commercial illustrator, and enjoyed great success as a storyboard and set artist in Hollywood. In 1967, Reynolds moved to Arizona, where he earned every Western honor. When you really take in his work, Reynolds seems to descend directly from his hero, Frank Tenney Johnson, balancing loosely drawn landscape elements with tighter figures and animals.

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267 C. Michael Dudash b. 1952 Mister, a Full House and a Colt Beats a Four of a Kind Every Time Oil on board 32 x 48 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2-2-15 verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

Mister, a Full House and a Colt Beats Four of a Kind Every Time kind of sums up the predicament in Michael Dudash’s light-hearted–as long as you’re not the fellow in the tall beaver–look at one of the central motifs in the lore of the Old West: the card game in the saloon. Everybody’s on tenterhooks, the dance hall girls, the other patrons, the bartenders–even the stuffed bobcat and the women in the clever paintings behind the bar–wondering how the other shoe will drop. The lantern provides just enough illumination to draw the viewer’s eye, like a moth to a flame, to the glint on the six-gun barrel.

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268 Martin Grelle b. 1954 Brother to the Wolf Oil on canvas 36 x 24 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 99 Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

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269 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 Lone Star “Well, Good-bye, She Said Wearily” Oil on canvas 27 x 18 inches Signed lower right and dated 1907 Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

Provenance: Chester Marron, PA. (Since 1957) Exhibitions: “Brandywine West.” Brandywine River Museum. Ford, PA. Jan 18 - May 18, 1975.

“The Art of American Illustration.” Brandywine River Museum. Chadd’s Ford, PA. Sept. 11 - Nov. 21, 1976.

“Artists of the Brandywine Heritage.” Brandywine River Museum. Jan. 1978 - Apr. 1978.

Literature: Eugene P. Lyle, Jr. The Lone Star. New York: Doubleday, Page & Company. 1907, p. 246 ff., illustrated. Lone Star is an old-fashioned historical romance set against the backdrop of the Alamo and the battle for the independence of Texas from Mexico––Sam Houston versus Santa Ana. Bowie, Crockett, Austin, Travis: you know the names. Goodwin’s painting illustrates a quiet moment just after the victory at the Battle of Goliad on October 9, 1835. In this painting, the novel’s narrator and hero, Harry Ripley, has a private moment to say farewell to the girl he loves, Nan Buckalew, a tough, beautiful pioneer from Nagacdoches. During the battle, Nan had been trapped in a priest’s house and Harry, along with Nan’s father and a few others, had fought to save her only to find that Harry’s rival, the foppish but brave Englishman, Gritton, had beaten him to it. But Harry’s tongue is tied, the door is soon shut against him by an exasperated Nan, and Harry’s brother, Phil, who had arranged the tryst, merely whistles and calls Harry “one plum’ idiot.”

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270 Philip R. Goodwin 1882-1935 Men of Mettle Oil on canvas 24 x 33 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $60,000 - 90,000 Provenance: Rolph-Clark-Stone, Ltd, Toronto, until 1969. Private Collection, Canada, 1969. Waddington’s, June 20, 2016. Private Collection. Literature: Larry Len Peterson. Philip R. Goodwin: America’s and Wildlife Artist. Hayden, ID: CDA Art Auction, 2001. pp. 201, 250, illustrated.

Waukon Lumber Company Calendar, 1932.

As the Depression settled in during the early 1930’s, artists all over America suffered, Philip Goodwin among them. After the horrors of World War I, as Larry Len Peterson writes, “the nation took an isolationist and anti-firearms turn”. Goodwin’s bread and butter, sporting arms advertising, dried up. Brown & Bigelow, Goodwin’s calendar art agents, asked him for other subjects: fishing, camera hunting, wildlife, and logging. Logging featured cooperative labor, an important aspect of President Roosevelt’s recovery acts; Men of Mettle, with its group of lumberjacks working together, is precisely the sort of thing Brown & Bigelow, and the nation, desired.

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271 Lanford Monroe 1950-2000 Moose in Mist Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000 Influenced by her father and mother, artists C. E. and Betty Monroe as well as her parents’ neighbors–none other than John Clymer and Bob Kuhn–Lanford Monroe sought out the boundaries of American realism, finding a romantic balance between the seen, unseen and half-seen in the natural world. In Moose in Mist, Monroe tucks the moose pair into the fingers of morning fog rising from the still water’s edge. A sense of near silence, of reflections, put the viewer in a reflective mood. If you looked at this painting every morning, you would wonder and look forward to whatever the new day might bring.

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272 Frank Hoffman 1888-1958 Wolves and Caribou Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

Frank Hoffman’s job as art director for the Chicago American–where he illustrated a wide variety of sporting and arts events–prepared him for his first trip West in 1916. After meeting one of his heroes–Leon Gaspard–in Taos, Hoffman stayed on, bought a small ranch two miles from town, and raised animals he would use as subjects for his paintings. Perhaps the most important Taos-based illustrator, Hoffman did work for The Saturday Evening Post and other notable periodicals and produced calendar art and advertising for The Great Northern Railway and Brown & Bigelow.

273 Frank Hoffman 1888-1958 King of the Hill Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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274 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 On the Predatory Oil on board 17 x 32 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $60,000 - 80,000 Born in Germany in 1865, Wilhelm Kuhnert showed early promise and prowess. While attending the Royal Academy of Arts in Berlin, he learned to paint animals and landscapes en plein air–from life–as the Impressionists in France advocated. Three years later, Germany established the colony of German East Africa, which included Mt. Kilimanjaro, the rich game lands around the Rufiji River and parts of Maasailand. To an ambitious wildlife artist, the call of Africa was strong, and Kuhnert found a way to make the journey. For 15 years, at the head of long trains of bearers, Kuhnert would explore areas of Africa that few Europeans had ever seen, drawing and painting wildlife and people. Kuhnert’s nickname was “Lion” because of his skill at capturing the essence of the king of beasts. On the Predatory shows a mated pair in the fullness of their snarling felinity. The setting sun and the presence of some prey animal they’ve senses has roused them to action, and to hunt.

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275 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 Lounging Lions (drawing for On the Predatory lot 273) Graphite 10 x 18 ½ inches Signed lower right and dated 9/11/17 Estimate: $2,000 - 4,000

276 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 Lion Oil on board 8 ½ x 13 ¾ inches Signed upper right Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

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277 Michael Coleman b. 1946 A Big Ol’ Bull and Askaris Oil on canvas mounted on board 30 x 46 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

278 John Seerey-Lester b. 1946 Elephants Oil on canvas 24 x 35 inches Signed lower right and dated 81 Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000

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279 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 Kafferbüffel am Tümpel (Cape Buffalo in the Marsh) Oil on canvas 39 ½ x 72 ¼ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $125,000 - 175,000 Provenance: Christies, London. 2013 Private Collection. Wilhelm Kuhnert liked to paint the African Cape Buffalo. In contrast to his big cats and sleek horned and hoofed mammals of the plains, the challenge of the Cape is to acknowledge the animal’s sheer bulk and apparent docility while conveying the creature’s muscular enormity and famously short temper. In this work Kafferbüffel am Tümpel (Cape Buffalo in the Marsh), Kuhnert hides this massive beast at the edge of a muddy gulley. Egrets and the little yellow flowers at the buffalo’s feet suggest, humorously, a kind of Ferdinand-like disposition. But the Cape Buffalo, one of Africa’s “Big Five,” is also one of the continent’s most dangerous game animals.

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280 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Alarmed Etching & drypoint 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $2,000 - 3,000

281 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Morning Rust Etching & drypoint 6 ¼ x 8 ½ inches Signed lower right Estimate: $1,500 - 2,500

282 Carl Rungius 1869-1959 Carl Rungius, Big Game Painter, by William Schaldach. One of 160 signed copies with an original drypoint etching by Rungius. With photos and Set of 4 Carl Rungius Commemorative Medallions issued by the National Wildlife Museum of Art.

Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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283 Kenneth Bunn b. 1938 Tribute to the Gray Wolf Bronze, cast number 3/12 24 inches high, 29 inches wide Signed and dated 2015 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

284 Robert Bateman b. 1930 Leopard Acrylic 15 x 20 inches Signed lower right and dated 1977 Estimate: $9,000 - 12,000 One of the 20th century’s premier wildlife painters, Canadian Robert Bateman’s twin interests in art and the natural world began at an early age. He had been studying painting and traveling the world for some years while teaching high school when, in 1964, he saw an exhibition of Andrew Wyeth’s work in Buffalo. Inspired by the experience, Bateman began to paint wildlife in a realistic manner with dramatic narrative inflections. Bateman has illustrated and written numerous books and won just about every award in his field. The leopard in this painting, at rest in a tree, communicates the sensitivity of his species, even in his alertness, echoing Bateman’s keen interest in conservation and ecological balance.

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285 Wilhelm Kuhnert 1865-1926 Reclining Tiger Watercolor 6 ž x 13 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

286 Arthur Wardle 1864-1949 Lion Cubs Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $25,000 - 45,000 Arthur Wardle, one of Great Britain’s most admired and reproduced painters of animals, was born in London in 1860. At 16 one of his paintings was exhibited at the Royal Academy and his career was born. Wardle is perhaps best known for his big cats and sporting dogs, as well as his pre-Raphaelite paintings of characters from folklore and fairy tales. Lion Cubs is filled with feisty personality as this trio, hidden in the long grass by their mother, already begin to copy their elders. Two stare intently, hunting in their minds, while the third attempts a snarling roar that no doubt comes out as a meow.

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287 David Shepherd b. 1931 Lion Oil on canvas 9 x 16 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

288 David Shepherd b. 1931 Leopard Oil on canvas 9 x 16 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

British artist David Shepherd has spent a lifetime painting and advocating for the great game animals of Africa. He founded what has become a vital African wildlife foundation and was awarded the Order of the British Empire for his efforts. Shepherd began his career painting airplanes and recreations of World War II air battles, but a trip to Africa–ostensibly to paint planes– became a lifelong challenge to capture elephants, big cats, rhinos, and all creatures great and small. Shepherd also painted portraits, including Queen Elizabeth’s and, at some point, switched his mechanistic art amours from planes to trains.

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289 Fritz Scholder 1937-2005 Deformed Buffalo Dancer Oil on canvas 80 x 68 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 1972 verso Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 One of the most important American artists of the latter half of the 20th century, Fritz Scholder took his Native American heritage, held it up to the light of art, twisted and distorted and painted it, and made the world look anew. The dark imagery of skulls and skins has its origins in modernist practice–the minotaurs of Andre Masson and Pablo Picasso come to mind–but it is also rooted in Scholder’s interest in conveying the difficulties of contemporary Native American life and in the struggle to reconcile modernity with traditional practice. Against a sandy, earthen background, suggesting skin or hide, the half man, half buffalo figure–with only half of one arm–in Deformed Buffalo Dancer struggles to dance. The same history of conquest that has marginalized the dance has damaged the bond between the dancer and Nature and, in turn, has deformed the dancer. Scholder paints his deformity as a physical manifestation of his marginalized condition.

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290 George Carlson b. 1940 Devil Chaser Bronze, cast number 19/25 16 inches high Signed and dated 1980 Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

291 George Carlson b. 1940 The Winnowers Bronze, cast number 7/14 25 inches high, 21 inches wide Signed and dated 1988 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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292 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Behind Schedule Oil on canvas 34 x 48 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $40,000 - 60,000 Provenance: Fenn Galleries, NM. Biltmore Galleries, CA. J.N. Bartfield Galleries, NY. Private Collection. Behind Schedule finds Olaf Wieghorst in an action mood. Though most of his paintings have a timelessness about them–that is, they could be cowboys of yesterday or today–this painting describes a moment in the mythical, heroic Old West, as a stagecoach races across the dust, flying to or fleeing from, trying to make time, make tracks. Wieghorst leaves the narrative up to us. We fill it with details to the story, the before and after, the scene–if you think of this as a film–leading up to this moment, and the subsequent scene, the outcome, the answer to, “Did they make it?”

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293 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Superstition Creek Oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches Signed lower left/NAWA and dated 76; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 A child acrobat in his native Denmark, Olaf Wieghorst made a smooth transition to successful rodeo rider after his family moved to the United States. He was also a U. S. Cavalryman on the rugged Mexican border and a mounted police officer in New York City. To say that he knew his way around horses is quite an understatement. After moving to California in 1944, Wieghorst translated an interest in art into a career depicting Western life in the saddle, taking special pride in his ability to convey the anatomy of the horse within a well-constructed scene; he was always on the lookout for the “little natural things� to add to his popular canvases. Among his many friends and the many avid collectors of his work were Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater and President Ronald Reagan. Wieghorst lived near the Superstitions, loved their beauty and lore, and often painted there.

294 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Crow Indian Oil on board 14 x 12 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

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295 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Mountain Ponies Oil on board 14 x 12 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 1980 verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000

296 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Tails to the Wind Oil on canvas 24 x 20 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $18,000 - 24,000

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297 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Fast Throw Watercolor 14 ½ x 12 ž inches Signed lower left Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

298 Bill Nebeker b. 1942 The Eyes of Texas Bronze, cast number 18/30 30 inches high Signed/CA and dated 2011 Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

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299 George Carlson b. 1940 Searching the Wind Bronze, cast number AP/24 19 inches high, 24 inches wide Signed and dated 1997 Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000

300 Ed Mell b. 1942 Sonoran Cattle Oil on canvas 19 x 25 ž inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2006 verso Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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301 Nick Eggenhofer 1897-1985 Lewis and Clark on the Yellowstone with Sacagawea Watercolor 15 x 25 inches Signed lower right

Tales of Buffalo Bill entranced young Nick Eggenhofer in his boyhood home in Bavaria. When he emigrated to the United States, he quickly found a market for his art in the Western pulps and his career was launched. Lewis and Clark on the Yellowstone with Sacagawea shows Nick Eggenhofer in a pastel, epic mood as opposed to his more typical dry brush, oil, and watercolor scenes that take the viewer inside the Western action. This is a moment of looking off at the trail ahead and, one hopes, at the sheer wonder of the vista.

Estimate: $6,000 - 8,000

302 Olaf C. Seltzer 1877-1957 Medicine Man Oil on board 12 x 9 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $14,000 - 18,000 Provenance: Christie’s, New York, Sept. 27, 1996. Private Collection. Jackson Hole Art Auction, Sept. 16, 2016. Denmark native Olaf Seltzer’s parents saw his talent for drawing and enrolled him in a school where he could develop his skills. In 1892, after his father’s untimely death, Seltzer’s mother emigrated to the United States, settling in Great Falls, Montana. Seltzer became a cowboy, then worked as a machinist for the Great Northern Railway. A meeting with artist Charles Russell became a fast friendship, and Russell encouraged and mentored Seltzer as he moved toward a full-time career as a painter.

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303 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 The Pistol Charge Oil on canvas 24 x 40 inches Signed lower right/CA and dated 1985; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $30,000 - 50,000

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304 Frank McCarthy 1924-2002 Theirs by Right of Might Oil on canvas 18 x 40 inches Signed lower left/CA and dated 1983; Signed, titled and dated verso Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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305 Jim Norton b. 1953 Land of the Good Beaver Oil on canvas 30 x 46 inches Signed lower left/CA Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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306 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Golden Encampment Oil on board 40 x 60 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $25,000 - 35,000

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307 Porfirio Salinas 1910-1973 Bluebonnet Spring Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000 Provenance: The Artist Dr. John Manning Venable, San Antonio, TX. (circa 1940) By descent in the family to the present. Sometimes the provenance, impeccable as it might be (and in this case is), doesn’t tell the whole tale. Here’s the story: Dr. Venable treated a patient in his San Antonio office, but that patient, a fine artist (you’re ahead of me, I know) who just hadn’t quite hit his stride, didn’t have the money to pay him, so he, Porfirio Salinas, offered a painting as barter for the doctor’s services. Dr. Venable accepted and would give the painting–this painting, Bluebonnet Spring–to his daughter as a wedding gift. The rest is, as they say, history, leading to this moment in this auction, offering this pristine Salinas.

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308 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Spring Blanket Oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000 Literature: G. Harvey. The City Series. Somerset House, 2001, p.11, illustrated.

A son of the Texas Hill Country, Gerald Harvey Jones, known to eternity as G. Harvey, listened to stories his father and grandfather told, stories of ranch life, the frontier, and cattle drives and these, springing from the landscape, were the formative images that led to his career as an artist. G. Harvey’s subject matter ranged from nostalgic cityscapes to oil derricks, to historical and working cowboy scenes. But the artist’s values, faith, and interest in American history are the true wellspring of his art. Harvey’s influences embraced Impressionism, American artists like Moran and Bierstadt, and the works of 20th century French boulevard painters such as Cortes. Dramatic light playing over areas of greater and lesser detail were Harvey’s stock in trade, and while he rooted his work in realism, his conceptions were the children of his prodigious imagination.

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309 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Holder of the Pipe Bronze, cast number 8/10 23 inches high Signed and dated 89 Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

310 Allan Houser 1914-1994 First Gift Bronze, cast number 3/20 18 inches high Signed and dated 94 Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000

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311 Allan Houser 1914-1994 As Long as the Waters Flow Bronze, cast number 6/8 60 inches high, 24 inches wide Signed and dated 88 Estimate: $50,000 - 75,000

Allan Houser was the first child born in Oklahoma to Geronimo’s Chiricahua Apache after their release in 1914 from decades of detention in Florida, and the strength and dignity of his ancestors and their travails flow through his sculptures. Combining Modernist abstraction with traditional Native American elements, Houser’s simplified figures inhabit both the plane we all live on and a spiritual plane. Life, work and worship are made of the whole cloth of purpose; they are inseparable aspects of divinity.

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312 Dave McGary 1958-2013 The Last Stand Hill Bronze, cast number 18/20 34 inches high, 53 inches wide Signed and dated 2004 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

As a teenager, Wyoming native Dave McGary was one of four students chosen to travel to Italy to study anatomy and the ancient art of bronze-making. McGary eventually settled in New Mexico, where he would win many awards for his meticulously crafted, highly detailed bronzes of Native Americans. In addition, McGary executed numerous public commissions, including the larger-than-life sculpture of Chief Washakie that stands in the U.S. Capitol and the heroic Battle of Two Hearts on the University of Wyoming campus. The level of detail McGary achieves in bronze is unmatched, and his subtle polychromes are unmistakable.

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313 Dave McGary 1958-2013 Touch the Clouds Bronze, cast number 8/30 33 inches high Signed and dated 1995 Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000 The heroic, 18-foot tall version of Dave McGary’s majestic bronze, Touch the Clouds, that once stood outside the Houston Astrodome, has, since 2015, made its home on the University of Oklahoma campus. Touch the Clouds is McGary’s vision of a famous Lakota Minneconjou chief, cousin to Crazy Horse and brother to Spotted Elk and Roman Nose. After the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Touch the Clouds played a delicate game, doing all he could to keep his people together, his culture alive, and prevent further hostilities with government troops. Touch the Clouds was an imposing figure, perhaps 7 feet tall. In 1898, he was present at the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, where Frank A. Rinehart, famous photographer of Native Americans, took his picture. As McGary sees him, Touch the Clouds is tall and resplendent, extending his arms as if he about to make a cape of a buffalo robe and enfold himself in his deeds and the history of his people.

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314 David Mann b. 1948 Among the Cottonwoods Oil on canvas 48 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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315 Gary Lynn Roberts b. 1953 Proceeding with Caution Oil on canvas 36 x 50 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $20,000 - 25,000

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316 Glenna Goodacre b. 1939 Buffalo Dancers Bronze, cast number 3/10 36 inches high, 34 inches wide Signed, titled and dated 2010 Estimate: $12,000 - 16,000

317 George Hallmark b. 1949 Life’s Little Pleasures Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000

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318 Michael Lynch b. 1950 Spring Evening Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

319 Curt Walters b. 1950 The Great Redwall Cavern Oil on canvas 28 x 36 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000

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320 Jules Bernard Dahlager 1884-1952 Mount McKinley, Alaska Oil on canvas 24 x 32 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

When you’re a painter in Alaska and Sydney Laurence and Eustace Ziegler tell you, you should spend more time painting, you paint. Which is precisely what Jules Dahlager did, becoming one of the “Alaska Four,” with Laurence, Ziegler, and Ted Lambert. Dahlager favored the palette knife, as you can see in the swashbuckling strokes that he used to paint Mount McKinley, Alaska.

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321 George Browne 1918-1958 Mt McKinley from the East Hills Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right; Titled and dated June 1947 verso Estimate: $4,000 - 6,000 Inscribed verso: “Mt. McKinley from the East Hills/ above Wonder Lake. Painted at 2:30 A.M./June, 1947./ For Billie & Louis Corbley.”

Provenance: Coeur d’Alene Art Auction, 2008. Reno, NV.

Literature: John T. Ordeman and Michael M. Schreiber. George & Belmore Browne: Artists of the North American Wilderness. Toronto: Warwick Publishing. 2004, p. 127, listed. George Browne’s untimely death in a tragic hunting accident at the age of 40 remains one of the great “what ifs” in American Sporting Art. One wonders, looking at his masterful paintings of just how much more proficient he would, or could, have become. The son of a very fine painter and famed explorer–Belmore Browne–George trained in woodcraft and painting at his father’s side. Browne painted Mt. McKinley from the East Hills while serving as expedition artist with a party that ascended the summit of the mountain in the summer of 1947.

322 Belmore Browne 1880-1954 Valley of the Kicking Horse Oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000 Provenance: Coeur d’Alene Art Auction, 2007. Reno, NV. Belmore Browne studied in New York and Paris but really made his name as both a painter and explorer in the Rocky Mountains. Between 1902 and 1912, Browne accompanied three American Museum of Natural History expeditions to the summit of Alaska’s Mount McKinley. Browne wrote a book about his exploits and later, painted diorama backgrounds for museums. His realism is soft, hearkening back to his impressionistic training and suggestive of work done in the field.

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323 Steve Burgess b. 1960 Family Outing Oil on board 24 x 48 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 20,000

324 William Alther b. 1959 Out for a Stroll Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower left; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $6,000 - 8,000

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325 Stefan Savides b. 1950 Air Force One Bronze, cast number 14/16 62 inches high, 56 inches wide Signed and dated 2012 Estimate: $14,000 - 24,000

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326 Luke Frazier b. 1970 Buck Fever Oil on board 20 x 24 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2012 verso Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

327 Luke Frazier b. 1970 Texas Quail Hunter Oil on board 18 x 24 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2015 verso Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

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328 Luke Frazier b. 1970 Spoilin’ for a Fight Oil on board 24 x 36 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2004 verso Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

329 Michael Coleman b. 1946 Goats Near the Crest Oil on board 30 x 20 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $6,000 - 9,000

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330 Michael Coleman b. 1946 McKinley Oil on board 30 x 48 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $20,000 - 30,000

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331 G. Harvey 1933-2017 Test of Champions Oil on canvas 24 x 42 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 1991 verso Estimate: $80,000 - 120,000 Literature: Randy Best & Susan McGarry. G. Harvey. The Golden Era. Houston: Somerset House, 1993, pp. 68-69, illustrated. Exhibitions: “The All-American Horse Paintings of G. Harvey. “ National Museum of Natural History. Smithsonian Institute. Washington, D.C. Dec. 6, 1991-Sept. 7, 1992. In a rare foray into the world of horse racing, Test of Champions finds Texas master G. Harvey adapting his talent for depicting men on horseback to a world quite different from that of the cowboy. Harvey creates interest with the colors of the stables and a near head-on point of view that makes it look as if a spectrum or rainbow is flying out of the dust toward the viewer. From this vantage, the front five are neck and neck while a dark horse makes a move on the outside.

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332 Howard Post b. 1948 Waiting Oil on canvas 42 x 62 inches Signed lower left Estimate: $10,000 - 15,000

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333 Oleg Stavrowsky b. 1927 Just Leaving Oil on canvas 48 x 50 inches Signed lower right Signed and titled verso Estimate: $10,000 - 20,000

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334 Chad Poppleton b. 1976 Halfway to the Headwaters Oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches Signed lower right/CA Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000 Newly elected to the Cowboy Artists of America, Chad Poppleton has made his name in wildlife art, painting North American big game animals with an eye for anatomy and a flair for bold, colorful depiction. Halfway to the Headwaters demonstrates Poppleton’s ability to adapt the talents he has displayed in wildlife art to traditional Western subjects. Despite the bright light of day–shadowed only by the last of the snow on the distant mountains–and the greens and blues of the water, brush, and trees, the mood here is introspective. The two riders seem absorbed in and by the landscape, absorbed in their thoughts, given over to the rhythm of the ride.

228

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335 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Safe and Sound Bronze, cast number SAS40 19 ½ inches high Signed and dated 1982 Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000 Just about the only American artist who could plausibly claim friendship with Jackson Pollock and John Wayne, Harry Jackson was born in Chicago and grew up in his mother’s diner near the stockyards where cattle came to market from the ranches in the West. Jackson felt the pull of the range and went West in his teens, then served in the Pacific in World War II, then went on East to meet Pollock and paint among the Abstract Expressionists. Jackson’s interest in the story of the Old West pushed him toward figurative, realistic bronzes that were filled with the clashing energies of Western expansion and Indigenous resistance.

336 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 The Trapper Bronze, cast number 15P 21 inches high Signed and dated 1970 Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Literature: Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. pp. 222-225, illustrated (other examples).

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337 Jason Rich b. 1970 Cow Country Overlook Oil on board 48 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Signed, titled and dated 2006 verso Estimate: $12,000 - 18,000

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338 Jason Rich b. 1970 Before the Setting Sun Oil on canvas mounted on board 36 x 48 inches Signed lower left; Signed, titled and dated 2004 verso Estimate: $14,000 - 18,000

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339 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Iroquois Guide Bronze, cast number 37 20 inches high Signed, titled and dated 1967 Estimate: $2,000 - 4,000 Literature: Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. pp. 218-219, illustrated (other examples).

340 Allan Houser 1914-1994 Grandmother’s Relief Bronze, cast number 8/15 21 x 20 inches Signed lower right and dated 85 Estimate: $7,000 - 10,000

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341 Harry Jackson 1924-2011 Sacajawea with Packhorse Bronze, cast number SPHP13P 27 inches high Signed and dated 1992 Estimate: $15,000 - 20,000 Literature: Donald Goddard and Larry Pointer. Harry Jackson. New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1981. pp. 132-34, 138, 376-77, illustrated (other examples).

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342 Gerard Curtis Delano 1890-1972 Navajo Shepherdess Watercolor 15 x 18 inches Estimate: $5,000 - 7,000

343 Ray Swanson 1937-2004 Navajo Stories Oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches Signed lower right; Signed and titled verso Estimate: $8,000 - 12,000 Ray Swanson was born in rural South Dakota and educated in a one-room schoolhouse. After his father passed away, the family moved to California where Swanson studied drafting and aeronautical engineering and became a civil engineer. When he inherited a box of paints from his grandfather, Swanson began to paint farm subjects as a hobby. The budding artist fell for the Native Americans of Arizona: the Navajo, Hopi, Zuni, and Apache, and saw that their way of life would make an excellent subject for a professional painter. Telling, retelling, and listening, passing the time, passing wisdom down, or just spinning a yarn, the two elders sitting in the shade in Navajo Stories are participating in a time-honored tradition.

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344 Joseph H. Sharp 1859-1953 Medicine Man Oil on board 18 x 11 inches Signed lower right Estimate: $15,000 - 25,000

345 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Red Striped Blanket Oil on board 10 x 8 inches Signed lower left

346 Olaf Wieghorst 1899-1988 Waiting Pen & Ink and watercolor 10 x 8 inches Signed lower left

Estimate: $5,000 - 8,000

Estimate: $3,000 - 5,000

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Saturday • April 6, 2019 Index – Alphabetical by Lot number Artist

Lot #

Abbett, Robert.....................................................249 Acheff, William..............................186, 187, 188, 189 Akin, Louis.............................................................131 Alther, William......................................................324 Andersen, Roy........................................................206 Anton, Bill.............................................................162 Bateman, Robert...................................................284 Beeler, Joe..............................................................190 Benson, Frank W....................................................251 Berninghaus, Oscar.................................................216 Bierstadt, Albert.....................IFC, 226, 227, 228, 234 Black, Laverne Nelson............................................222 Blinks, Thomas......................................................247 Browne, Belmore....................................................322 Browne, George......................................................321 Bunn, Kenneth.......................................................283 Burgess, Steve.........................................................323

Calle, Paul....................................................143, 144 Carlson, George......................................290, 291, 299 Carlson, Ken...................................................255, 256 Clymer, John..................................................124, 239 Coleman, John........147, 148, 150, 151, 152, 184, 185 Coleman, Michael...........................277, 306, 329, 330 Cox, Tim........................................................158, 159 Curtis, Edward.......................................................139

Dahlager, Jules Bernard........................................320 Dean, Glenn...........................................................146 Delano, Gerard Curtis...... 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 342 Dixon, Maynard.....................................................154 Dudash, C. Michael........................................149, 267 Durand, Asher........................................................235

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Artist

Lot #

Eggenhofer, Nick..................................................301 Fechin, Nicolai......................................................223 Frazier, Luke...........................................326, 327, 328

Gaspard, Leon.......................................................123 Gollings, William..........................................214, 215 Goodacre, Glenna...................................................316 Goodwin, Philip R................126, 127, 128, 129, 245, 269, 270 Grelle, Martin................169, 170, 171, 172, 191, 268 Hagege, Logan Maxwell................................174, 175 Hallmark, George...................................................317 Harvey, G...............163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 308, 331 Hennings, E. Martin...............................................225 Hoffman, Frank......................................138, 272, 273 Houser, Allan.................203, 204, 309, 310, 311, 340 Hulings, Clark.......................................258, 259, 260

Jackson, Harry...............................335, 336, 339, 341 Johnson, Frank Tenney............122, 221, 236, 237, BC

Kelsey, T.D...........................................................155 Kuhn, Bob.....................................................241, 242 Kuhnert, Wilhelm..................274, 275, 276, 279, 285

Liang, Z.S.............................................................168 Lipking, Jeremy.....................................................181 Lougheed, Robert...................................261, 262, 265 Lovell, Tom............................................120, 121, 125 Lynch, Michael.......................................................318


Saturday • April 6, 2019 Index – Alphabetical by Lot number Artist

Lot #

Machetanz, Fred...................................................248 Maggiori, Mark......................................................160 Mann, David..........................................................314 McCarthy, Frank.....................140, 141, 142, 303, 304 McGary, Dave.................................................312, 313 Mell, Ed.................................................................300 Monroe, Lanford.....................................................271 Moran, Thomas............................................... FC, 229

Nebeker, Bill........................................................298 Norton, Jim...................................................192, 305

Oelze, Don............................................................145 Owen, Chris...........................................................161

Payne, Edgar.........................................................243 Phillips, Bert G..............................................217, 238 Phippen, George.....................................................194 Pleissner, Ogden.....................................................246 Polzin, Kyle...........................176, 177, 178, 179, 180 Poppleton, Chad.....................................................334 Post, Howard.........................................................332

Ravlin, Grace........................................................257 Remington, Frederic..............137, 218, 219, 230, 231, 232, 233 Reynolds, James.....................................153, 156, 266 Rich, Jason.....................................................337, 338 Riley, Kenneth.......197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 205 Roberts, Gary Lynn................................................315 Rousseau, Percival..................................................250 Rungius, Carl.................132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 252 280, 281, 282 Russell, Charles......................................................220

Artist

Lot #

Salinas, Porfirio.....................................................307 Sandzen, Birger......................................................244 Savides, Stefan........................................................325 Schmid, Richard.............................................182, 183 Scholder, Fritz........................................................289 Schoonover, Frank...................................................130 Seerey-Lester, John.................................................278 Seltzer, Olaf C........................................................302 Sharp, Joseph H..............................................224, 344 Shepherd, David.............................................287, 288 Shinabarger, Tim............................................253, 254 Shrady, Henry.........................................................240 Snidow, Gordon......................................................157 Stavrowsky, Oleg....................................................333 Swanson, Ray.........................................................343 Terpning, Howard........................................207, 208 Van Soelen, Theodore...........................................193 Walters, Curt.......................................................319 Wardle, Arthur.......................................................286 Warren, Melvin..............................195, 196, 263, 264 Weistling, Morgan.................................................173 Wieghorst, Olaf.....................292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 345, 346

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Saturday • April 6, 2019 Absentee Bid Form Fax to (480) 423-4071 As a courtesy to Absentee Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will execute your bid if you are unable to be present at the auction. Please complete this form and forward it to a member of our staff. A disinterested party will bid on your behalf, not necessarily to your maximum bid, but to the next bid above what is offered, provided that your bid is in excess of the reserve, if any. In the event of identical bids, the first bid received will take precedence. Mailed or faxed bids should be confirmed by email at info@scottsdaleartauction.com Absentee Bidder Information: Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Email _______________________________________________________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ By checking this box I certify that I am not a resident of the State of Arizona Credit Card Information: Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Billing zip code: ________________________________ An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Please bid on my behalf for the following Lots up to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC Terms and Conditions of Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 74 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Signature __________________________________________________Date __________________________________________________

Lot #

Description

Maximum Bid

(Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Absentee bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Friday, April 5, 2019. Please fax your completed Absentee Bid Form to (480) 423-4071 or email info@scottsdaleartauction.com. SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

23868

SSCOTTSDALE C O T T S D ART A L EAUCTION A RT A U C T I O N

7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 www.scottsdaleartauction.com

480 945-0225


Saturday • April 6, 2019 Telephone Bid Form Fax to (480) 423-4071 As a courtesy to Telephone Bidders, Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC will arrange for telephone lines on Lots with a minimum estimate of $5,000 and over. For lots under $5,000, please use our Absentee Bid Form. Please complete this form and forward it to a member of our staff. Bidders are encouraged to make arrangements early as telephone lines will be allocated on a first come basis. Mailed or faxed bids should be confirmed by email at info@scottsdaleartauction.com Telephone Bidder Information: Name _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________State __________Zip _________________ Email _______________________________________Fax _____________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________Alternate Phone __________________________________ By checking this box I certify that I am not a resident of the State of Arizona

Credit Card Information: Card Number___________________________________________________Expiration Date _________________ The above listed credit card is to guarantee the bids placed. Billing zip code: ________________________________ An invoice will be provided after the auction and the opportunity to change the card or payment method. Please bid on my behalf for the following Lots up to the bid stated. I have made arrangements with my bank for verification of funds. I understand that my bids are subject to Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC Terms and Conditions of Sale, as stated in this catalogue on page 74 and that Scottsdale Art Auction, LLC cannot guarantee the execution of an absentee bid, but will make all reasonable efforts. I also understand that my bid, if successful, will be subject to the standard Buyer’s Premium, as stated in the Terms and Conditions, and any applicable taxes. Signature __________________________________________________Date __________________________________________________

Lot #

Description

Maximum Bid

(Does not include Buyer’s Premium)

Telephone bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm, Thursday, April 4, 2019. Please fax your completed Telephone Bid Form to (480) 423-4071 or email info@scottsdaleartauction.com. SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION •

7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 www.scottsdaleartauction.com S C O T T S D A L E A RT A U C T I O N

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Writer: James Balestrieri Photography: Rob Kaufman Hilton Head Island, SC (843) 290-8883 www.kaufmanphotography.com Design & Production Cindy & Paula Moser Phoenix, AZ (843) 441-3686 www.xmsdesigns.com Printing: Prisma Graphic Phoenix, AZ (602) 243-5777 www.prismagraphic.com


Profile for Scottsdale Art Auction

2019 Scottsdale Art Auction Session 2  

Auctioning off 350 works of Western, Wildlife and Sporting Art on April 6, 2019.

2019 Scottsdale Art Auction Session 2  

Auctioning off 350 works of Western, Wildlife and Sporting Art on April 6, 2019.