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Preparing Students to Succeed in a Rapidly Changing World


THE

SEVEN

HILLS SCHOOL

Development Office 513.728.2400 email: alumni.news@7hills.org Fax: 513.728.2439

7hills.org

02 04 14 30 51 Front cover photo: Senior Hadiya Harrigan with Chinese language teacher Yu-Chun Lin Above photo: Freshman Chase Gardner (wearing #3 jersey) and eighth grader Neil Keyser

Spring 2014

Seven Hills Magazine is a publication of The Seven Hills School.

Contents True Grit By Head of School Christopher Garten Transformational, Innovative Curriculum By Karla Dejean School News Alumni News and Class Notes Upcoming Alumni Events

Christopher Garten Head of School

Nancy McCormick Bassett ’83 Director of Alumni Engagement

Karla Dejean Writer & Photographer

Margo Kirstein Director of Development

Chris Hedges Editor, Director of Marketing & Communications

Carol Brueggemeyer Graphic Designer Kathy Deubell Photo Editing


Thank you 2 0 1 3 - 2 0 1 4

A N N U A L

G I V I N G

The Seven Hills Development Office gratefully acknowledges and thanks the more than 200 volunteers who dedicate their time and effort to ensure that The Seven Hills School continues to thrive and is able to provide the rich learning experiences that distinguish a Seven Hills education. &

H E L P I N G

H A N D S

V O L U N T E E R S

Joey Adams

Peter Cha

Linda Ford

Elida Kamine ’99

Sybil Behrens Mullin ’83

Sandra Small

Charles Allen

Christine Cho

Rachel Foster

Lair Kennedy

Meg Nelson

Edie A. Smitson

Louise Knauft Allen H’54

Lalitha Chunduri

Renee Frankel

Nancy Keyser

Mary Nordlund

Andy Spooner

Janet Allen-Reid ’76

Terry Clayton

Toby Franklin

Tara Kilcoyne

Lisa Lee & Mike Nordlund

Melinda Freedman Staveley L’55

Janet Allgaier

Liz Coley

Jane Garvey C’74

Peter E. Koenig

Eric O’Driscoll

Jen Stein

Jan Anderson

Mike Collette

Jim Garvey

Ashley Kohnen

Margaret Parlin O’Malley H’57

Sarah Steinman

Libby Andrews

Marilyn Collins

Barbara Gasser

Helen Kovach

Susan & Dennis Okin

Robin Strong

Dulany Anning ’86

Brittany Conner

Ingrid Handl & Walter Geiger

Libby Landen Krone ’77

Libby Warrington Ott ’78

Mary Reis Sullivan C’59

Sydney Anning

Tucker Jones Coombe ’79

Raji Ghosh

Kirsten S. Kulkarni

Jeff Pasquale

Zoe Teets ’07

Beth Archibald

Susan Tietig Covatta C’59

Ben Glassman ’93

Susan Steman Laffoon H’57

Mala Patel

Jerry Seybolt Theron H’54

Jo Arnold

Eric Dauer

Margot Good

Jane Slemmer Larsen H’56

Yvonne Phillips

Lessa Trindle

Humaira Aslam & Tahir Sajjad

Marge Davis C’65

B (Wiley ’75) & Abe Gordon

Margaret Avril Lawson ’75

Alex & Andrew Quinn

Brooke Tucker

Ramagopal Avutu

Elizabeth DeBlasio

Drew Gores ’72

Lisa Lehner

Lela Ransohoff

Heather Zaring Vecellio ’92

Steve Baggott

Kim Dedeker

Wendy Gradison H’71

Peter Levin

Susan Rauh

Kathy Oechler Whitbeck H’67

Gay Seybolt Bain H’51

Ron DeLyons

Anne & Tate Greenwald

Sally Leyman

Jess Reid ’08

Russell White

Lynette Barresi

Andrew DeWitt ’89

Brooke Guigui

Sylvia Lotspeich Greene L’55

Sue Richmond

Kay Whyburn

Jack Binkley

Ann Dinan

Rachel Gustin ’93

Carolyn Huwe Ludwig H’56

Sarah Rooch Roberts C’67

Judy Wiesemann

Rose Bitsoff

Sharon Dizenhuz

Ed Hatfield

Jackie Mack

Lynette Rosati Shim

Jim Wiesmann

Steve Black L’60

Jeannie Zimmerman Donaldson H’60

Muff Hays ’79

Debbie Marquardt

Lynn Schweitzer Rush H’68

Sue Elliott Wilkening C’60

Ann Bartlett Blemker C’65

Priscilla Dunn

Louise Atkins Head H’56

Mike Marrero

Sunny Bowman Saelinger C’61

Marsha Williams ’77

Lucille & Dutro Blocksom

Anne Scherz Durket H’72

Patti Heldman

Gretchen McCormick

Marielle Samaha-Kabbouche

Andy Wilson

Susan A. Bolton

Colleen Dwight

Debbie Hill

Robert C. McCoy

Jennifer & Jim Saporito

Lisa Collins Winick ’85

Peter Briggs

Tara Eaton

Grace Allen Hill ’80

Veronica McCreary-Hall

Quina Schmidlapp C’53

Beth Withers

Jay Brinker

Meredith Edwards ’98

Ben Jacks

Les Bennett McNeill C’61

Anita Schneider

Joan Wolfram

Bobbee Brooks

Gretchen Eifrig

Judy Jackson

Erin McNew

Pamela Schueler

Susan Newkirk Wright H’63

Barbara Brown

Sandy Hauck Elliott C’49

Candice & John Jandes

Robbie Michelman

Nancy Seltz

Sharon Yosafat

Bruce Brown

Jane Ellis

Rose Johnson

Maureen Miller

Katie SenGupta

Mary Beth Young

Cathy Smale Caldemeyer H’72

Merry Ewing ’76

Cecilia & Thomas Johnston

Melissa Morelli

Jim Shanahan

Janet Ziegler

Karen Bidlingmeyer Callard ’80

Phyllis Ewing

Jane Johnston

Velma Morelli

Beth Shaw

Linda Callard

Mary Lou Fink

Linda F. Jones

MarySlade Morrison ’85

Anne Shepherd

Bret Caller

Kitty Blair Fischer H’68

Charla Jones Allen

Lilamae Mueller

Mary Jo & Bill Simpson

Scott Carroll ’85

Ginny Fisher

Jacky Kalubi

Harrison Mullin

Beth Sims

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IF OUR STUDENTS ARE TO DEVELOP THE EMOTIONAL RESILIENCE THAT IS SO CRITICAL TO THEIR FUTURE SUCCESS AND HAPPINESS, THEY MUST BE ALLOWED TO FAIL, AND THEY MUST BE TAUGHT, EXPLICITLY TAUGHT, BOTH AT SCHOOL AND AT HOME, HOW TO TURN THEIR FAILURES INTO RENEWED AND PURPOSEFUL EFFORT.

by Head of School Christopher P. Garten

T R U E G R I T: F O R G I N G R E S I L I E N C E I N TO M O R R O W ’ S L E A D E R S April’s Atlantic Monthly features an article by Hanna Rosin provocatively titled, “Hey, Parents, Leave Those Kids Alone.” Rosin asserts that over the last three decades, our obsession with safety has led to overprotective parenting, “stripping (children) of independence, risk-taking, and discovery.”

imaginative experiences that are “the most important for the children … when they are left alone and can take full responsibility for their actions, and the consequences of their decisions.” Rosin’s article echoes some of the themes of a recent book by education writer Paul

Rosin views this shift in parenting styles through the unique lens of playground

Tough entitled How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and The Hidden Power

architecture. After a rash of lawsuits in the 1970s, consumer products advocates

of Character. Decrying what he calls the “cognitive hypothesis,” Tough challenges

developed handbooks for the nation’s playgrounds which “include specific

both parents and schools that put too much emphasis on academic preparation,

prescriptions for the exact heights, slopes, and other angles of nearly every piece

especially regarding very young children. Tough argues that “what matters most in a

of equipment.” This led to the development of standardized play areas devoid of

child’s development … is not how much information we can stuff into her brain in

opportunities for children to “explore on their own.”

the first few years. What matters, instead, is whether we are able to help her develop

British geographer Roger Hart conducted a decade-long study of the play patterns of young children in the mid-1970s, when children “spent immense amounts of time

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a very different set of qualities, a list that includes persistence, self-control, curiosity, conscientiousness, grit, and self-confidence.”

on their own, creating imaginary landscapes their parents sometimes knew nothing

Tough places special emphasis on the cultivation of “grit” in young people, a quality

about.” When Hart returned 30 years later to study the children of those he had

he defines as “passionate commitment” and “unswerving dedication” to a singular

followed in the 1970s, he found “an alien world” of children who were “used to having

cause. Tough challenges us, as parents and as schools, to cultivate these character traits

their lives organized by their parents.” Citing Norwegian researcher Ellen Sandseter,

more intentionally. “Psychologists and neuroscientists have learned a lot in the

Rosin asserts that our impulse to hover over our children has deprived them of the

past few decades about where these skills come from and how they are developed,”


...our obsession with safety has led to overprotective parenting, “stripping (children) of independence, risk-taking, and discovery.” - Atlantic Monthly writer Hanna Rosin

Tough writes, “and what they’ve discovered can be summed up in a sentence:

At Seven Hills, we have long placed a great deal of emphasis on cultivating character

Character is created by encountering and overcoming failure.”

and commitment in our students. Our mission and values statements highlight such qualities as “responsibility” and “perseverance” and, as the article that follows will

In his book, Tough chronicles the efforts made by the Knowledge is Power Program

attest, our Seven Hills Method calls for learning activities that emphasize not just the

(KIPP) and by New York’s Riverdale Country School to teach emotional resilience.

“acquisition of knowledge” but for “inquiry, discovery, and the application of skills to

According to Riverdale’s Head of School Dominic Randolph, “The idea of building

meaningful problem solving.” We seek to design academic, athletic, artistic, and extra-

grit and building self-control is that you get that through failure, and in most highly

curricular activities that “teach students to make choices, to manage their time, to think

academic environments in the United States, no one fails anything.” He also quotes

critically and creatively, and, above all, to take responsibility for their own learning.”

a Riverdale Lower School learning specialist who said, “Our kids don’t put up with a lot of suffering. They don’t have a threshold for it. They’re protected against it

That being said, as a school community, we are by no means immune from the larger

quite a bit.”

societal forces that Rosin and Tough describe. In some recent faculty conversations it’s been noted that we are certainly seeing signs of the same phenomenon, a generation

Like Rosin, Tough describes the central paradox of contemporary parenting. He

of young people who, to some at least, seem less independent, less resilient, less willing

explained, “We have an acute, almost biological impulse to provide for our children,

to struggle and persevere than their peers just a decade ago. This is a challenge that, as

to give them everything they want and need, to protect them from dangers and

a faculty, we are working very hard to address. It is, as both Rosin and Tough suggest,

discomforts both large and small. And yet we all know — on some level, at least —

a complex issue, with no one clear root cause or solution, but much of the research

that what kids need more than anything is a little hardship: some challenge, some

they cite leads to the same conclusion. If our students are to develop the emotional

deprivation that they can overcome, even if just to prove to themselves that they can.

resilience that is so critical to their future success and happiness, they must be allowed

As a parent, you struggle with these thorny questions every day, and if you make the

to fail, and they must be taught, explicitly taught, both at school and at home, how to

right call even half the time, you’re lucky.”

turn their failures into renewed and purposeful effort. 5


Transformational, Transformational, Innovative Curriculum: Preparing Students to Succeed in a Rapidly Changing World – By Karla Dejean In a recent spring faculty address, Head of School Chris Garten thanked teachers for bringing to fruition another strong year of purpose in the lives of students. He reviewed the School’s Strategic Plan and applauded teachers for “ My point is not, ‘Can you memorize Emerson,’” continuously assessing their she said. “It is, ‘Can you think about why these students’ curricular ideas actually matter in the 21st century?’” needs. In the Seven - Upper School English teacher Marielle Newton Hills learning environment, teachers tailor lesson plans that respond to their students’ challenges and strengths on an ongoing, daily basis. They take smart risks to expose students to new levels of understanding, and they encourage students to not only understand but also thrive in a variety of learning environments. By definition, innovative curriculum inspires, shakes up, and morphs to meet a goal. The Seven Hills community believes in the purpose of the 2013 Strategic Plan, the product of a Board-appointed steering committee and task forces of more than 200 teachers, 6

administrators, and parents who gathered pertinent data over a period of three months. Their findings were coherent, vivid recommendations that are realized daily in our School’s learning environments. The Plan addresses the changing needs of 21st century learners entering a global community, and further applies those findings to our current curriculum.

Lessons They’ll Never Forget

Tucker Robinson was apprehensive about studying transcendentalism and reading segments of Henry David Thoreau’s Walden for five days – at first. Then the 16-year-old Seven Hills junior started Upper School English teacher Marielle Newton’s project.

When Marielle composed this lesson two years ago, her teaching goal was less about infusing a love and appreciation for classic literature and more about focusing on what wouldn’t happen five, 10, or 20 years from now: her students wouldn’t forget Walden. As Tucker and dozens of other juniors waded through their week sans some usual comforts while reading Walden’s “Economy” or “Spring” segments, they also were downloading a permanent connection to Thoreau. In Walden, Thoreau recounts, very painstakingly, two years of simple, solitary living in the woods. Marielle drove home the point by asking her students to give up a form of technology and any number of creature comforts they thought they couldn’t live without. Tucker and his classmates concluded the project successfully, each doing with less for five days, and logging their thoughts while reading Walden. For Tucker, it was PlayStation and junk food. Others boldly nixed cell phones and Facebook. For some, five days was a lifetime. Regardless of how well they fared, each student’s


Innovative Curriculum PREPARI NG

glimpse into the writer’s two years in the woods became real and relevant.

what was going on in the book. I wasn’t just reading about some man sitting in a log cabin.”

“The first couple of years I taught this unit I felt like it stayed in the 19th century,” said Marielle. “My point is not, ‘Can you memorize Emerson,’” she said. “It is, ‘Can you think about why these ideas actually matter in the 21st century?’”

Engaged Learning

Student Srishti Kapur, who pointedly said she does not particularly care for reading the classics, said she connected with Thoreau for five days – five days when she was most vulnerable to understanding the purpose of his literature because she was experiencing it firsthand. “The project gave me a purpose to give something up,” said Srishti. “The journal helped because as you were reading it, you felt parallel to

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Familiarity and close proximity breed engaged learning. It is one of the reasons why it is difficult for students to forget material that means something to them on a personal level, said Middle School math teacher Theresa Keller. Anyone learning a new concept needs a salient point from which they can begin to piece together the process. With math it’s no different, said Theresa. And flat, distant word problems rarely grab the interest of students who may struggle with some math concepts. For Keller the answer was simple. “I just started thinking about my dream backyard and I kept thinking about how much mulch I had to buy and what materials I would need,” said Teresa. “I figured the students would have fun thinking about designing my yard too.” Theresa launched her project with great reception from her students. “The time has come for me to landscape my yard!” the assignment stated at the top of the page. “I want my yard to have a small pond, a rose garden, a meditation area, and an herb garden. My children also want

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a turf football field and a sand box.” Her worksheet was set in first person and very conversational. After Theresa explained to the eager group of 12-year-olds that, no, she wasn’t really installing a turf field in her backyard, she knew they were engaged in the project. Before long, she had students using pi to solve a number of problems in the form of statements like, “I want to put rocks around the pond, so find the circumference of the pond,” or “The meditation area needs a foam mat, so that I don’t have to sit on the itchy grass. Find the area of the meditation region.” continued. . . 7


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Transformational, Innovative Curriculum (continued) The students weren’t so much fixed on solving standard word problems, as much as they were on ensuring “Mrs. Keller’s dream backyard” was supplied with all the appropriate furnishings she required. Head of Middle School Bill Waskowitz said Middle School must incorporate a unique learning environment in order to connect with students in their adolescent years. “Middle School teachers must be able to combine the essential skills of academic literacy (e.g. reflection, critical thinking and reading, communication, comparison, and analysis) with content and topics that are of true interest and relevance to this particular age group,” said Bill. “As a Middle School, we firmly believe that it is our responsibility to make sure that the instruction and development of these types of skills are front and center in all classrooms. Whether it is a natural disaster, political revolution, current pop-star sensation, or a moral dilemma, our 8

teachers draw on the real world to create real learning that empowers our students for success, both now and in the years to come.” A similar project for which Theresa is known around Middle School is her “A Month in the Life” checkbook balancing exercise. The worksheet asks 10 questions that pertain to the students’ fictional checkbook balances of $150.35. One of the questions might be, “On Feb. 25 you and your friends spend the afternoon at Kenwood Towne Center. You grab a hot chocolate and bagel at Panera. Your bill is $3.75 and you tip the cashier 20 percent. Deduct this transaction from your account.” After running through a wallet-draining gauntlet of trips to Panera, Macy’s one-day sale, buying tickets to see Wicked, and going to Perfect North slopes, Theresa asks her students to calculate their “end-of-the-month” balance plus 4.25 percent interest from the bank. “It’s the difference between my asking them to complete 25 tedious problems of multiplying fractions or asking them to tell me how much paint and trim they need to redesign the look of their bedrooms.

“When students take on projects that are relevant, you don’t even have to sell the concept,” said Theresa. “They immediately understand the intent of the lesson and engage fully in the learning process.”

Finding the Solutions Within

Environmental Science teacher Linda Ford keeps a pair of muddy hiking boots in her classroom. For Linda, they are just as essential as any given lesson plan. She never knows when the learning will send her and her students stomping through briars, scooping up clumps of viscous mud, or dipping nets into turbid waters. Linda’s goal is to impart knowledge of the importance of maintaining the biodiversity present in the Ohio River. Once students cast their own net just once into the River, they


Innovative Curriculum learned more than any wiki, lecture, or textbook could have taught them. They saw firsthand the richness of fauna at stake in cases of water contamination. “The students pulled up 15 to 20 different species among 80 to 100 fish in just one net casting,” said Linda. “What that opens up to the students is that this is a healthy enough habitat to support this many different species of fish in such a small area. From this the students learn we have to be careful we are not the abusers of the watershed. We live in this watershed. Why should we not protect it?”

Taking that lesson a step further, Linda asked her environmental science students to research and select parts for a role play in which characters from the government, for-profit, nonprofit,

private, and public sectors worked through a land development situation with environmental implications. Students at the Doherty Campus found their way through a real-life environmental conundrum. When Unit II students complained about the environmental implications of constantly using plastic eating utensils in the lunchroom, Doherty Unit II teacher Sarah Roberts saw a project. “I suggested to my math class that we do some investigating into silverware,” said Sarah. “First we canvassed the Doherty Campus community to see if they wanted to use silverware and if they thought plasticware was bad for the environment.” Sarah’s students came away with strong data that students at the Doherty Campus would prefer silverware. The Unit II students then researched prices for silverware, determined the days they would need certain pieces of silverware, and assembled a “silverware squad” of students who would be in charge of

collecting it before the trays are emptied. Once students built a strong case for bringing silverware to the cafeteria, they presented their findings to Seven Hills Director of Finance and Operations Robert Horne, who approved their proposal and offered to purchase the silverware. While innovation infuses energy into the heart of an effort, that effort also can be an established practice that has proven successful over the years. Head of Doherty Patti Guethlein said Seven Hills’ buddy system instills a confidence within younger students that lays the groundwork for student-led initiatives such as the silverware project. Each year, all classes participate in the Buddy Class program. Older and younger classes are paired and they meet frequently throughout the year.

PARENTS CREDIT SEVEN HILLS FOR NURTURING E N V I R O N M E N T, CURRICULAR INNOVATION

“With the new curriculum and more hands-on learning skills and knowledge base, I can definitively tell you that what students are learning in eighth and ninth grade is what was being taught in medical school – at least decades ago.” – Dr. Gregory

Rouan, parent of senior Connor and junior Mollie, and University of Cincinnati Faculty in Internal Medicine While they are playing with ramps and paper dolls, pre-kindergarten students are learning about the physics of slope and velocity in their weekly Tuesday science classes. In Lower School, students give as many as 20 presentations by springtime. By sixth grade, Middle School students have converted currency from dozens of countries, studied honeybees’ important link to the environment, facilitated structured discussions in literature circles, participated in a number of sports, and reevaluated animal feed supply practices based on independent calculations. In Upper School, students branch out to help the community via community service clubs, compete on the state level in math and science competitions, participate in high-level academic competitions, such as mock trial, and shine in a number of athletic events. The projects and lessons that take place throughout a student’s career at Seven Hills are part of a purposeful network of learning experiences that allow each student to better assimilate knowledge at the next level.

continued. . .

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Transformational, Innovative Curriculum (continued) “They develop a strong bond,” said Patti. “The older students take great pride in their role, mentoring and teaching their younger buddies … these experiences make the transition from one grade to another more comfortable. A first grader who buddies with a pre-kindergarten child feels very grown up. A second grader paired with a fifth grader looks up to his Big Buddy like a rock star.” The student-driven effort is an example of how and why teachers are always aware of Bloom’s Taxonomy – a universal classification of learning objectives within education authored by American educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom — and why teachers place such importance on making sure students are given the opportunity to reach the peak of Bloom’s pyramid, which states that learning becomes more sophisticated as a student begins to analyze, evaluate, and finally, create.

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“We always talk about recycling and reusing but at the same time the cafeteria was using plasticware. The students noticed we weren’t practicing what we preach,” said fellow Unit II teacher Bill Schmidt, whose eco-friendly habits have generated composting stations for leftover snacks in each classroom. “Their efforts were an example of Bloom’s Taxonomy – how we are always trying to push our students higher on that pyramid. The students saw what they perceived to be a problem and they fixed it.” Teachers like Linda, Sarah, and Bill share knowledge from a personal, contextual, tactile standpoint, and they encourage students to use that knowledge to tackle obstacles, challenge the status quo, and raise meaningful questions. Students are conditioned to solve problems when their questions are validated, said Sarah, and that validation comes through gaining confidence in the classroom, through the willingness to make mistakes, and the vision to learn from those mistakes. It is the sense of confidence and guided authority students are allowed to wield in the classroom that gives them the ability to hone their vision out in the world.

Teaching Them to Think Like a Teacher The scene cuts to a hazy sunset, with shots of a Seven Hills student saxophone player and beach scenes of a tide rushing in. As a schmaltzy George Michael tune emerges, the crooner’s voice is confident and steady, telling a story of a day at the beach — in Spanish. The voice is also familiar, but it’s not George Michael. It’s a Seven Hills Spanish III student who put together the video as part of Spanish teacher Teresa Bardon’s assignment on grammar and sentence structure. When Teresa announced her “Me Encanta la Musica (I love music)” project, many of her students thought the process would be mostly entertaining and minimally difficult. “They thought they were going to translate the original lyrics and act out a video to the music,” said Teresa, who recently traveled to Spain during spring break with several students. “But then I told them the lyrics had to be original, they had to sing them, and they had to be grammatically correct.”


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The students paired up and started production for the videos. Each had to participate equally, each had to be seen in the video, and each had to sing, speak, or rap in Spanish. Students had an opportunity to check in with Teresa to let her know what their lyrics would be but the projects were not graded until viewing day in class. Teresa could have grouped up her students and asked them to act out a skit in front of the class but she would have stumbled into a classic rut. “Whenever you ask someone learning a language to have an impromptu conversation in that language, you get things like ‘Hi, how are you? I like ice cream – do you like ice cream?’ It becomes really basic conversation that doesn’t require much thought or incorporate grammar and the true art of conversation.” So rather than guide students into the path of least resistance, Teresa gave them five weeks to perfect something that would require them to work in pairs, research their words, write concise lyrics that rhyme and make sense, edit their work, and present it to their toughest critics – their peers. The videos were graded with care, with a heavy emphasis on grammar and sentence structure. Because they knew the entire class

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circles are composed of five participants, each with different roles in the discussion.

would be watching, students took on the Spanish video projects with the conscientiousness of short independent film producers. Teresa said her students ended up learning much more about correct grammar usage simply because they reviewed and re-reviewed their finished project before their presentations. A few hundred feet away in the Lotspeich building, the same classroom dynamic is taking place. Fifth graders in Karla Balskus’ class settle into papasans, stools, or sit cross-legged on the floor. They open their books and read for 35 minutes. They read with a purpose and with a sense of accountability because they have a thoughtful discussion plan to follow and responsibilities to carry out. Karla’s literature

Recognizing that the privilege of autonomy places on them more accountability for the finished product, students approach their topics with a different bent; they know they must reach for polish and innovation, and that at times their willingness to solve a problem may be more important than the answer itself. Like many Seven Hills teachers, Karla incorporates the “flipped classroom” model in her teaching, which means she sets clear expectations for the work students are supposed to get done at home. When they return, class time is much more meaningful, their learning experiences are layered, and their questions, more informed. This frees her up to guide her students through the learning process. She is closer to them mentally and physically as she shares with and receives information from them.

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PARENTS CREDIT SEVEN HILLS FOR NURTURING E N V I R O N M E N T, CURRICULAR INNOVATION

continued. . . Students view lifelong learning principles as the rule because they are constantly learning to adapt to changing situations. The learning bridge is natural and expected. Parents of Upper School students who started out at Seven Hills in the very early grades cite a very solid web of support that forms early on to give students a feeling of security and confidence. Seven Hills parent and Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Cincinnati Dr. Gregory Rouan quotes a mantra used by medical faculty at UC to explain his interpretation of what Seven Hills teachers and administrators do well. “In terms of the educational mission, we are entrusted by the public to train the next generation of doctors … we explicitly state we need to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and attitude to allow them to be successful as doctors,” said Gregory, whose children Mollie, a junior, and Connor, a senior, have attended Seven Hills since pre-kindergarten at Lotspeich. “I think that can be extrapolated to what Seven Hills does. With the new curriculum and more hands-on learning skills and knowledge base, I can definitively tell you that what students are learning in eighth and ninth grade is what was being taught in medical school – at least decades ago.”

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Transformational, Transformational, Innovative Curriculum (continued) “I’ve been teaching my students to think like a teacher all year and they are,” said Karla. “If they really do think like a teacher, they not only are better able to understand the most salient points of the course, but also are able to share the information - Junior Jessica Seibold with their peers, which gives everyone a richer understanding of the concepts.” In the literature circles, Karla asks her students to read the book while rotating their roles over 17 days. The “artful artist” draws a picture based on that day’s reading. The “connector” writes down two or three personal thoughts they had about the reading. The “passage picker” selects a poignant passage from the book and explains why. The “discussion director” presents three provocative questions to the group and boils down the meaning of the reading. Students also are in part responsible for the vocabulary words their peers will learn. They select the words they think are most important and share them with 12

their group. In one group, four boys decided they should take apart the word “perspective” to ensure they knew its true meaning. Karla and Teresa inherently hand their students a sense of ownership that quickly sends the message that, in many ways, students are responsible for their own learning. And, as innovative teachers do, they always find ways their lessons can prepare students for the next level. “It’s an important bridge for next year when students truly have to take ownership for their learning,” said Karla.

Across Campus, and the Globe When Yu-Chun Lin introduces her Chinese III course, she asks her students to immerse themselves in another culture. She said it isn’t enough for them to know the language. They have to understand from where the language comes. She asked her Upper School students to do the same thing when she began her unit on the Chinese New Year. Students spend much of their time preparing to teach a lesson about the culture and history of the Chinese New Year to

Education is “kindling a flame,” not simply “filling a pail.” second graders – a lesson in both local and global community building. “As a big school community, it is nice to know we are doing things for the second graders,” said Yu-Chun. “I want my Upper School Chinese III students to think of themselves as second graders so they will attract the younger students’ attention and tell their stories vividly.” During Chinese New Year, Yu-Chun Lin designs a School community lesson that enriches the lives of her Chinese III students and the second graders at Lotspeich. Students research the year’s festivities and customs and select key points so that they can impart the knowledge to eager second graders who participate in traditional papercutting and storytelling. That familiarity and closeness to another custom or culture fuels students’ desire to seek what they do not know about other communities, whether those communities are across campus, across


Innovative Curriculum P R E PA R I N G

town, or across the world. From the Good Apples character education program at Lotspeich, the Green Team environmental club at Doherty, International Dinner and Family Night, Global Education Day in Middle School, and a plethora of varied experiences, including exchange student opportunities at the Upper School level, the avenues to understanding different local and global communities are boundless. Students learn early on that understanding a lifestyle, custom, or process that resembles their normal routine not only enhances their learning experiences, they are their learning experiences. It is one of the reasons why Seven Hills teachers impress upon students to take an interest in their own School community as much as they would another country. Although their disciplines are different, Upper School math teacher Melissa Khoo teaches math from a community perspective as well. While Melissa is breaking down the aspects of building a handmade clinometer, a device that measures the angles of slope elevation, she places a community lens on her lessons. Melissa’s data

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collection project is math plus conversation. She brings math to a real-world level as she teaches students to engage their peers and other members of the School community in their math projects. “Math is just as much about partnerships and communication as it is about solving problems on a page,” said Melissa. “A lot of times we forget that math is often used to help people, help communities, resolve issues, and create options for others.”

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Teachers bring this pursuit to life when they expose students of all ages to languages, authors, theories, and challenges that represent the globe. They innovate in the way they present this information to students and, through the time and care they give the lessons, they send a message of its critical import.

“Kindling a Flame” The Seven Hills School community embraces curricular innovation fully, in every aspect and execution of the educational experience. Any number of Greek philosophers have been credited with saying education is “kindling a flame,” not simply “filling a pail.” These educational sparks ignite new perspectives and ideas among students, whether they are at home, on the fields, on stage, or serving their communities. As our faculty continue to share foundational knowledge that will help prepare students to navigate our rapidly changing world, the Seven Hills community will continue to respond to and serve our students now, and 40 years from now.

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continued. . . From the buddy system in Lower School to Personal Challenge in Upper School, Gregory said the nurturing tone that exists throughout the faculty across divisions offers students a unique learning experience that boosts their confidence and lets them know that risk-takers are supported here. That collaborative learning environment extends to parents as well. Kerrin Antonsson said Seven Hills teachers put parents’ minds at ease when they explain the versatility of their teaching methods. “If the kids can’t understand something one way, teachers like seventh grade math teacher Carri Haskins will come back around and make sure they get it another way. She has shown us during parent night that there are four ways to solve a problem, even in math where you think there is only one answer.” Sherri Remaklus said she has watched her two very different children – sixth-grader Katie and sophomore Kenneth – blossom under the tutelage of the same teachers. “What brought me to the School was the personal attention, individualized work, and understanding of what my children could be and do,” said Sherri. “At Seven Hills, I have found that to be a promise fulfilled.”

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Creating a community of learners Seven Hills’ Educational Philosophy comes down to constantly placing students in collaborative learning environments that are purposeful, thoughtful, and authentic. Nationally known educational consultant Ann Anzalone said true learning occurs when the brain changes, and the brain changes as a direct result of social interaction with people. “The concept of independent study doesn’t enhance learning. It’s the discussion that enhances it and allows students to integrate information,” said Ann. “Students have to interact while they’re learning. Learning that engages students is key.” With brain-based education at the forefront, Seven Hills teachers share knowledge – not just facts – and they teach students how to listen to, work with, and teach 14

others. Ann said schools like Seven Hills have a unique opportunity to maximize the benefits of a collaborative education because faculty members consistently create opportunities for students to work together across grades and divisions. Fifth graders from Lotspeich and Doherty come together to participate in events throughout the year, such as the Kindness Retreat. Upper School students read to pre-kindergarteners in a special literacy program, and world language students teach Chinese culture and customs to second graders. The International Dinner is an all-school event that brings students and their families together every year. “When we bring students of different ages together we are giving them opportunities to learn from each other. The message that sends to our students is, ‘your ideas have worth and value. We listen to you,’” said Ann. “You are creating a community that takes care of its own.” That empowering sense of community advances more meaningful learning across disciplines as well. Upper School environmental science students feel encouraged to discover solutions

for maintaining the health of the Ohio River, sixth graders will confidently pursue their quests to build community with acts of kindness, and second graders will feel supported to challenge the status quo with more eco-friendly alternatives. Today’s grade school students adapt to learning environments in a different way than their parents did. Woven into the fabric of Seven Hills’ Educational Philosophy is a commitment to make curriculum relevant, to require students to solve problems with others, take responsibility for their learning, and care for community. “It’s okay not to know the answer,” said Doherty Unit II teacher Sarah Roberts. “It’s not okay to not know where or how to find the answer.” As our students advance through their years at Seven Hills, their actions, work habits, and character will embody the continuity and purpose of the School’s philosophy, further preparing them for successful, meaningful experiences in college, and in life.


Innovative Curriculum Becoming their research number of levels, said Head of Lotspeich Carolyn Fox. By mid-February, students have chosen the historical leader they would like to get to know better and have written a persuasive paragraph convincing Melissa and fellow fourth grade teacher Sara Snyder of their ability to portray their leader. Once they have received approval, students work hard over the next few weeks to bring their leader to life.

On a late winter morning, Melissa Woodard’s fourth graders label file folders, drop in a few papers filled with notes, and pop open hard plastic index card holders. “Do we write our names on the label?” a student asks. “No,” Melissa tells her students. “Write the name of your person. You are becoming the person you will research, remember?” It is that sense of absolute ownership that fuels the fourth graders’ desires to engage fully in the eight-week Living Biography project. They are given just two requirements – that the subject of their research is deceased and that the person made a significant positive impact on society. Other than that, the experience — how they learn and how they teach their peers — is up to them. The project is organic and emerges as the natural next step in each student’s yearlong study of leaders who shaped history.

“Students will dress up as their researched person and present to their classmates, parents, and teachers. The process constantly taps into a higher order of thinking, not unlike that of a written proposal,” said Melissa. “From the moment they read their project description, they are building cases, fortifying their knowledge, gauging their audience, using multi-media research techniques, lobbying their cause, and gaining consensus.” Weeks away from the stick-on moustaches, graying wigs, theatrical bowties, and everything else it takes to put together costumes depicting a multitude of world leaders, the young students are excited and brimming with ideas. One of the signature projects in the fourth grade, the Living Biography has a unique mission to engage students in experiential learning on a

“By the time they finish the Living Biography project, they have explored the life of their leader while gaining preliminary research skills they will

LIVING BIOGRAPHY PROJECT Students chose to “become” a number of noted global leaders. Here are a few of the subjects for the fourth grade Living Biography project: Anne Frank Mother Theresa Crazy Horse Nelson Mandela Martin Luther King, Jr. Rosa Parks Socrates Jackie Robinson Pocahontas Dian Fossey Christopher Columbus Clara Barton Eleanor Roosevelt Steve Jobs

expand upon in Middle and Upper School,” said Carolyn. “This high interest and integrative project instructs and encourages students to organize their thoughts and materials at the fourth grade level providing the building blocks for the more complex writing assignments students experience in Middle and Upper School.”

P.J. Paul

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School News Seven Hills named Ohio Academic Champion by Gerber Analytics For the seventh year in a row, Seven Hills has again been named among the Top Academic Schools in Ohio; this year earning the rank of sixth out of 1,006 Ohio schools. Additionally, we are one of only three schools in the state, and the only coed school, to have made the list of Champion Schools in all seven years since the rankings were developed.

Director of College Counseling Susan Marrs Appointed to University Board The Seven Hills School congratulates Director of College Counseling Susan Marrs for her recent appointment to the University of Michigan’s High School Counselor Advisory Board. The prestigious appointment was

The annual Gerber Analytics study identifies the best

In addition to rating Ohio schools based on proficiency

based on Mrs. Marrs’ “commitment to

schools in Ohio based on each school’s performance on

rates, Gerber Analytics also calculates a “Performance

higher education and our appreciation

the Ohio Graduation Test (OGT), a test administered

Index Score (PIS)” for each school, which, according to the

each year by the Ohio Department of Education to all

report, most “accurately reflects the overall performance

10th graders in the 1,006 schools across the state.

of a school.” This year, Seven Hills’ PIS score was the sixth

Director of Admissions.

highest in Ohio.

Susan’s appointment will be effective fall of 2014. She will join

This year, just 93 schools, or 9.2 percent of the schools

process,” said William Kelly Cox, University of Michigan Associate

14 high school counselors from Michigan and around the

in Ohio, had at least 91 percent of their tenth grade

“The strength of this analysis is that it represents the depth

students pass the test. At Seven Hills, 98.7 percent of the

of preparation that all of our students achieve,” said Head

procedures, and recruitment activities. Advisory Board terms

students passed all five subject-area tests, the highest

of School Chris Garten. “It looks not just at the school’s

traditionally last for two years with the option to extend for

proficiency rating in Cincinnati. Overall, 91 percent of

success in preparing its top students, but also at the

Seven Hills students scored “Accelerated” or “Advanced”

achievements of the entire class. We are deeply proud of all

on all five of the subject tests, and Seven Hills was

the hard work, by teachers and by students, that this level of

on several esteemed boards, including The Princeton Review

listed among the top 25 schools in the state in all five

achievement requires!”

National College Counselor Advisory Board and the Fiske

subject areas. 16

for her critical role in the admissions

country to offer the university feedback on school policies,

a third year. Susan continues to serve in several capacities at Seven Hills, including Assistant Head of School and Director of Studies for grades six through 12. In addition, she has served

Guide to College Counselors Advisory Group, to name a few. Susan has been the Director of College Counseling at Seven Hills for 32 years.


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Seven Hills Senior named candidate in 2014 Presidential Scholars Program

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Seven Hills Congratulates Six National Merit Finalists

Seven Hills senior Brian Hu has been named a candidate in the 2014 Presidential Scholars Program, one of the nation’s highest honors for graduating high school seniors. Presidential Scholars are selected on the basis of academic achievement, personal characteristics, leadership, and service activities. The Commission on Presidential Scholars will make final selections of up to 141 Academic Scholars (including one male and one female from each state) and up to 20 Art Scholars.

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Congratulations to our National Merit Finalists, all of whom were named as Semifinalists earlier this year. The National Merit Scholarship Program honors talented U.S. high school students each year for academic excellence. Approximately 1.5 million students from 22,000 high schools across the country enter the Program each year. Ultimately, less than one percent of the nation’s high school graduating seniors are honored as finalists. The Seven Hills 2014 National Merit Finalists are: (left to right) Ben Sorscher, Andrew Ligeralde, Angie Li, Panos Skoufalos, Gregory Sun, and Brian Hu. Brian Hu

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ay, 9 a.m. through Saturd open Monday is op August 1. h Sh le ug sa ro th mmer! The Re from June 22 er m m su e th Stock up for su r d fo op will be close to 3 p.m. The sh

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School News scholarships

2014 Frederick A. Hauck Scholarship Winners

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The Seven Hills School has awarded the 2014 Frederick A. Hauck Scholarships in Math and Science to sixth graders Rohan Patil and Andrea Stancescu, seventh graders Greg Kalin and Felix Karthik, sophomores Abby Clark and Tigar Cyr, and juniors Lindsay Abby Clark, Ellie Pasquale, Tigar Cyr Finn and Ellie Pasquale. World-renowned nuclear scientist and philanthropist Fredrick A. Hauck established the Felix Karthik, Andrea Stancescu, Rohan Patil, Hauck Scholarships and Greg Kalin at Seven Hills in 1983 to recognize students who are demonstrating outstanding achievement and commitment in mathematics and/or science. Winning students entering grades 9–12 receive a one-year scholarship of $1,000 to be applied to the 2014–2015 tuition at Seven Hills Upper School. Winning students entering grades 7–8 receive a grant of $250 to be applied to tuition for an approved summer enrichment program.

Lindsay Finn

Congratulations to new members of Cum Laude Society The Upper School honored its new inductees in the Seven Hills chapter of the Cum Laude Society, a national honor society that recognizes academic excellence, at the Cum Laude Dinner on April 9. New members are juniors Stefan Antonsson, Grace Cawdrey, Alayna Choo, Jeff Dedeker, Pearce Kieser, Ben King, and Ellie Pasquale; and seniors Zachary Abraham, Roshni Bagli, Hadiya Harrigan, Brian Hu, Ben Sorscher, and Phoebe Um. The event also honored the members who were inducted last year as juniors: Andrew Ligeralde and Gregory Sun. Guest speaker at the dinner was Mary Lynne Boorn, mother of junior Pearce Kieser. Head of School Chris Garten said, “Modeled after Phi Beta Kappa at the college level, the Cum Laude Society recognizes academic excellence in some of this country’s most prestigious high schools. Membership is strictly limited to schools with exemplary academic programs, and Seven Hills is one of just a handful in Ohio. Induction today means that these students are being recognized as among the best of the best in secondary education in the nation.”

Cum Laude Inductees: Stefan Antonsson, Hadiya Harrigan, Brian Hu, Phoebe Um, Pearce Kieser, Grace Cawdrey, Ben King, Alayna Choo, Zachary Abraham, Roshni Bagli, Jeff Dedeker, Ellie Pasquale

Cum Laude Faculty Committee: (l to r) Barbara Scarr, Tricia Hoar, Tina Kuhlman, Melissa Khoo, Wynne Curry, Lowell Wenger

Mary Lynne quoted Harry Potter series author J.K. Rowling saying, “It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all – in which case, you fail by default.” Mary Lynne encouraged students to embrace and learn from their failings and focus on the importance of being resilient. As part of the annual Cum Laude Society induction dinner, it is tradition for faculty members of the Cum Laude Committee to address each new member with remarks compiled from quotes from the student’s teachers. Those remarks may be found in The Buzz (April 10) at www.7hillsbuzz.org. For a direct link to the remarks, download a QR Code app to your smartphone and scan the code to the right.

Ben Sorscher


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Upper School News Seven Hills welcomes Dr. Matthew Bolton as our incoming Head of Upper School, and congratulates current Head of Upper School Nick Francis for his new position as Director of Experiential Learning.

Chris. “He is a highly skilled communicator with a clear and well-articulated vision for meeting the evolving needs of Upper School students, but he is also an eager listener with a sincere desire to build the strong relationships so essential in his new role.”

“Nick has been intimately involved in the planning for this new program,” said Chris. “He brings a deep knowledge of our community, close relationships with students and their families, and a strong passion for helping students.”

Seven Hills Head of School Chris Garten said Matthew has strong experience as a problem solver, having worked for six years with students and parents as the Matthew Bolton Dean of Students at Loyola School in New York. In addition to his skills as an administrator, he has rich experience as an innovative classroom teacher, having taught English for almost 20 years.

Chris said both Matthew and Nick have a deep understanding of independent schools and a sincere appreciation for the unique culture of Seven Hills. As Director of Experiential Learning, Nick will be developing programs to engage Upper School students more fully in “real world learning” and guide students towards meaningful involvement beyond Seven Hills, including career exploration and internships, service learning, leadership training, and entrepreneurial opportunities. Earlier this school year, Chris said Nick “caught me by surprise” when he indicated he wanted this new role but added that the decision was a “no-brainer.”

Please join us in congratulating Nick as he prepares to transition into this meaningful new role and in welcoming Matthew to our Seven Hills community this fall.

“Beyond his resume, the committee and I were most impressed by Matt’s interpersonal qualities. Everyone who met him found him to be extraordinarily warm and genuine,” said

welcome

Nick Francis

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Books for Lunch 2014 Presents Robert Edsel

David. Mona Lisa. Last Supper. Mention of these great works is second nature for avid lovers of 16th century European art. But the poignant value of these iconic images lies with their widespread appeal and familiarity, said Books for Lunch guest author, documentarian, and art historian Robert Edsel, author of The Monuments Men. Robert Edsel with Seven Hills students

“I’ve shown the Mona Lisa and David to people who say they know nothing about art and aren’t particularly passionate about art but they all knew the names of these works and some of them knew where the art is located,” said Edsel. “When I asked them if they would care or be upset if this art was stolen or destroyed they said, ‘Well, of course. They are important.’ ” Books for Lunch 2014 included a Lecture Luncheon and book signing at Xavier University’s Cintas Center on April 11, a dinner with Edsel at the home of Bill and Margy (Highlands H’61) Gale, an assembly with Upper School students, and meetings with students in the Young Family Library. During his two-day visit with members of the Seven Hills community, Edsel explained that the universally-shared value of the art is one of the striking reasons why heroes like Lt. George Stout and Officer James Rorimer risked their lives to save millions of art pieces stolen by the Nazis during World 20

War II. While seven men and one woman were depicted in The Monuments Men movie, dozens of middle-aged men and women took on this path even as they were Books for Lunch co-chairs Brandi Vo ss, left, and Vicky Carro ll, with Robert Ed sel. enjoying the happiness of their comfortable jobs and families. “They were happy. They were in the best situations, but they volunteered,” Edsel told Seven Hills students. “They believed in what they were doing. I encourage you to embrace your passions and champion the causes in which you believe as well.”

Books for Lunch 2014 dinner hosts Bill Gale and Margy (Highlands H’61) Gale (not pictured), and Brandi Voss and Robert Edsel.

Robert Edsel’s message to Seven Hills students: Edsel encouraged Seven Hills students to pursue careers in provenance because “some mysteries have not been solved.” “People have risked their lives for centuries to preserve art. It has long been a challenge and it will continue to fall into the laps of our next generation of “Monuments Men.” Robert Edsel signs books for Seven Hills seniors Hannah Silverman and Allie Feuerlein in the Young Family Library.


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Celebrating the rich diversity of our school community at the Sixth Annual International Dinner Seven

Hills families came together March 8 to celebrate the rich diversity of our School community at the Sixth Annual International Dinner. Families enjoyed a wide variety of food and edu-tainment activities from different countries and cultures.

Students and faculty presented a number of musical and dance performances that honored the Irish, Spanish, Chinese, and Indian cultures. Congratulations to Nate

Gleiner, English teacher and Equity and Justice Coordinator, and parent Rica Ligeralde, Chair of the International Dinner

Planning Committee, who organized the event, including the performances and activities for the young participants.

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2013 Miriam Titcomb Memorial Fund grants for enrichment - trip recaps Since 1978, the Miriam Titcomb Fund, an endowed enrichment fund established by alumnae, has made it possible for more than 100 Seven Hills faculty and staff to have meaningful travel and study experiences. These adventures are personally and professionally inspiring for our faculty and staff, and their increased scholarship and enthusiasm enriches the entire School community. The recipients for the 2013 Titcomb awards were Theresa Cohen, Elissa Donovan, Mitzie Moser, and Natalie Williams. L OTS P E I C H K I N D E RG A RT E N TE ACHER THERESA COHEN Theresa Cohen was awarded a grant for her project, “Bringing Honey to the Hive.” In an effort to expand her knowledge about honeybees, honey production, and keeping hives in her own backyard, Theresa traveled to France and England to learn from beekeepers and apiarists in Europe. “My fascination with honeybees began after taking an animal psychology course in college. Theresa and her husband Howard tend a hive.

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Buzzzzzzz!

I was humbled studying the social interactions, the hierarchy, and productivity of a species that many people take for granted, myself included,” Theresa explained. “My interest and curiosity was reawakened when I began teaching a unit on honeybees to my kindergarten class. I realized I wanted to learn more about bees, to experience the workings of a colony in a hive, and to share my passion and respect for honeybees with future generations.” Because of her regard for the value of hands-on learning from “master teachers,” Theresa chose to study with Steve and Sylvia Humphrey who are apiarists in Parthenay, France. Theresa explained, “They taught me the theory I need in order to understand the workings of a colony as well as the requisite procedures to attend the hives — knowledge I will share with my students and a hobby my husband and I will pursue together.”

M I D D L E S C H O O L A RT T E A C H E R E L I S S A D O N O VA N Elissa Donovan was awarded a grant for her project, “Sanskriti School, India – Researching a Student Exchange.” Following a period of long-distance communication with the Head of the Sanskriti School, Mrs. Abha Sahgal (aunt of Lotspeich parent Nupur Anand) in New Delhi, India, Elissa was invited to visit this past summer. Her goal was to learn more about the school and region in hopes of forming future opportunities for collaboration. Elissa was excited to travel to India and begin an exploration of Asia, fulfilling a lifetime dream of visiting all seven continents. Elissa shared, “India is such an amazing and vibrant place. I felt so at home at the Sanskriti School. It is very similar in character and makeup to Seven Hills, with a focus on excellent education, global awareness, and service to others. As a result of my trip to Sanskriti School, my eighth grade Elissa Donovan in New Delhi, India


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students have worked with their peers in India to create sculptures from recycled materials that depict endangered animals. The Middle School art teacher, Sarika Khurana, will be visiting Seven Hills this May. We hope Sculpture created from recycled to continue the materials collaboration that currently connects our two schools.” D O H E RT Y CO U N S E LO R & D I V E R S I T Y C O O R D I N ATO R MITZIE MOSER Mitzie Moser was awarded a grant for her project, “Climbing ‘My Father’s’ Mountain,” which

Mitzie pursued to fulfill a personal challenge to climb Aspen Mountain in Colorado — an effort which both honored her childhood past with her father and the rest of her family, and also introduced her husband and children to this important place, so central to forming who Mitzie is today. “The trip to Aspen was truly amazing. I cannot adequately describe how it felt to have my children experience a place that has always been so important to my family. Making the 12,000foot ascent up Aspen Mountain was truly the most difficult task I have ever undertaken — physically, mentally, and emotionally. I almost turned back several times along the way. Luckily, I didn’t,” Mitzie shared. “This trip was a life changer for me in so many ways.” LOTSPEICH SCIENCE T E A C H E R N ATA L I E W I L L I A M S Natalie Williams traveled with her Titcomb award to the Asian island of Borneo to study primate conservation, as part of a Miami University Master of Global Science degree she is pursuing. Reflecting on her fascinating experience, Natalie said, “A personal highlight for me was having the opportunity to observe and study orangutans in their natural habitats.” Mitzie with her daughter, Julia

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Among the many things she learned about Borneo, Natalie gained increased awareness of important environmental issues, saying, “While I learned a lot during this trip, the biggest takeaway is the growing conservation concern in the region. Palm ... and this red leaf monkey oil plantations are steadily destroying natural habitats of primates and other organisms in Borneo. As the demand for palm oil continues to climb, the number of primates continues to dwindle as primary and secondary forests are being destroyed to plant palm trees for the oil, a common ingredient in many foods and cosmetic products. I have learned to check labels and have stopped using many products that include palm oil as an ingredient.” 23


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The Miriam Titcomb Memorial Fund and Alma Stanton Lacy Fund 2014 grant recipients The following faculty are recipients of the 2014 grants from the Miriam Titcomb Memorial Fund. D O H E RT Y U N I T I & I I C O O R D I N ATO R E L I S A M A C K E N Z I E has been awarded a grant for her project, “Learning to dance in the rain.” Elisa and her daughter Eryn ’14 plan to travel to Paris as part of the journey of healing they have been on together this past year. Elisa looks forward to incorporating aspects of her Parisian experience into her projects with Doherty students. LOTSPEICH SECOND GRADE TEACHER DANIELLE N E C E S S A R Y has been awarded a grant for her project, “Cooperative for Education’s Guatemala Snapshot Tour.” As Lotspeich begins its partnership with CoEd (Cooperative

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for Education), Danielle looks forward to learning much about Guatemala and the Cooperative for Education, and sharing what she’s learned with her students and colleagues. UPPER SCHOOL ENGLISH TE ACHER ERICH SCHWEIKHER has been awarded a grant for his project, “Coastto-Coast: in the footsteps of William Wordsworth.” For this project, Erich has planned a trip to England’s Lake District and Yorkshire Dales, to experience the landscapes that so influenced the great Romantic writers and thinkers that he admires. To do this, Erich will take a 150-190 mile, two-week “walk” during which he will backpack along Alfred Wainwright’s famous trail from the eastern

coast of England and the Irish Sea to the western coast of the North Sea. The following faculty member is the recipient of the 2014 grant from the Alma Stanton Lacy Fund. LOTSPEICH SPANISH T E A C H E R M EG A N H AY E S has been awarded a grant for her project, “Cooperative for Education’s Guatemala Snapshot Tour.” In order to deepen her knowledge of Guatemalan life and expand the authenticity of her already engaging Spanish program, Megan will travel to Guatemala to absorb, firsthand, the life and culture of this fascinating country. Megan looks forward to sharing her experiences with her students.


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To our Parents, Alumni, Grandparents, Parents of Alumni, and Current and Former Faculty and Staff… a tremendous thank you to the more than 1,400 donors who so far have supported the Seven Hills Fund this fiscal year which began July 1 and ends June 30. Your support makes so much possible, adding richness to the classroom and beyond…

Goal =$1,215,000

} $50,000 to go

Join Us!

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iPads in the classroom • team shirts for athletes • maps art materials • musical instruments • field trips theater props and costumes • photography equipment professional development for teachers • speakers

Thank you!

If you have not yet done so, please make a gift online at www.7hills.org/thesevenhillsfund by June 15, 2014. Questions? Please contact Andi Simon ’98, Director of Annual Giving, at 513.728.2436 or andi.simon@7hills.org.

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Creating Conversations Ann Anzalone: “The Stress Connection” On February 27, nationally recognized education consultant Ann Anzalone shared practical tips for eliminating stress in parents’ and their children’s lives. The event was the third in this year’s Creating Conversations parent education speaker series. E A SING ACADEMIC STRESS In a lively workshop that had audience members jumping, teetering on one foot, shouting out letters in the alphabet, and huddling in groups, Ann Anzalone imparted helpful tips on how to de-stress. Known for her expertise in brain education and wellness, Ms. Anzalone offered members and friends of the Seven Hills community a number of scenarios to help families ease academic stress, math anxiety, and fatigue. A large piece of the stress puzzle is sleep deprivation, she said. “Restorative sleep boosts our immune system and human growth hormone,” she said. “If you have a choice of doing one more thing or putting your child to bed, put the child to bed.” Ms. Anzalone led an eager group of parents through a number of exercises that required them to use cross-lateral movement, 26

apply deep pressure to their feet and hands, and invert from a standing position. The exercises she demonstrated with the participants were examples of easy movements that children can employ to “reset” the neurotransmitters in their brains, which will allow them to absorb

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E A SY DE-STRESSING TIPS FO R FA M I L I E S ··Anxious? Sit on your hands. The pressure helps “reset” the brain and organize thought. ··Restless? A little taste of sea salt with a glass of water is a calming agent and can be used right before bedtime. ··Can’t concentrate? “Earthing” – walking on the grass, sand, or unsealed floor tile – helps calm down the system. ··Wobbly? Walking around in five-fingered shoes and socks helps establish and re-establish balance.

knowledge more effectively in learning environments. Ms. Anzalone also touched on how the brain responds to sugar, protein, and electronics. “We are a culture surrounded by technology and it has its place, but our bodies are sensitive to all electronics,” she said. “Most people don’t know that electronics actually cause inflammation in our bodies.” Parents of children in grades pre-kindergarten through 12 benefited greatly from the interactive presentation and came away with new ideas, many indicating that the simplicity of the suggestions would make it easy to incorporate into their daily family routines.

··Fitful sleep? Make sure there are no electronics in your room. The light and energy from electronics disrupts sleep patterns.

W W W. A N N A N Z A L O N E . C O M

The Seven Hills School Speaker Series


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The girls varsity basketball team finished 15-10 and tied for third in the scarlet division of the Miami Valley Conference. The team matched up with FelicityFranklin High School in the finals of the sectional tournament. The Miami Valley Conference named senior Lauren Weems Player of the Year. Lauren was also selected as District 16 Division IV Player of the Year and picked for the AP All-State Team. Other District 16 honors

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The varsity boys basketball team finished 10-12 overall and 6-7 in the conference. The boys earned the No. 6 seed in the sectional tournament, and won their first round game against Riverview East Academy. Senior Roderick McFarland was named first team All-MVC as well as All-District 16. Roderick was also selected to participate on the District All Star team for Divisions II-IV. Junior Tucker Robinson was named to the second team All-MVC and All-District 16 team for Division IV. Varsity gymnastics started the season with perseverance and dedication, coming in just one point short of the team’s 120-point goal. The gymnasts came in sixth out of 16 teams in the city and 12th out of 30 in the district. The gymnastics team will miss the leadership of captain senior Reena Sengupta. Reena received the District Sportsmanship Award, while senior Hadiya Harrigan was named District Scholar Athlete. The varsity cheerleaders exhibited phenomenal School spirit this year during a busy season. The team demonstrated a very strong work ethic and put forth effort to keep up with a fast-paced season. Hannah Silverman was named to the MVC First Team. The fourth grade girls basketball team placed first in the Cincinnati Premier Youth Basketball League (CPYBL) Tournament Championship. Congratulations to the girls and to coaches Tim Drew and Todd Couch.

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included senior Alexis Lindsay (first team) and junior Maggie Gosiger (second team).

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The Seven Hills boys bowling team finished their Miami Valley Conference regular season with a perfect 5-0 record and capped it off by winning the inaugural MVC Championship. Sophomore Corey Wilson led the way with a high series of 402 in the Championships and was awarded MVC Bowler of the Year. Corey’s mother and Lotspeich music teacher Robin Wilson was selected the MVC Coach of the Year. The team finished third at sectionals, moved on to the District tournament in Beavercreek, and finished 11 out of 16.

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The sixth grade boys basketball team “Blackmon” finished as CYO City Championship Tournament runner-up. They also were League Champions during the regular season and finished with a 13-1 overall record. Devin Garrett received the Dick Snyder Sportsmanship Award for displaying integrity and good sportsmanship throughout the season. Eryn MacKenzie received the Hirsch Award, given to one MVC athlete who displays courage in the face of extremely difficult circumstances.

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meet, and the boys also placed fourth in the state tournament – all unprecedented accomplishments for our Stinger swimmers. The boys team finished ahead of traditional swimming powers, such as Wyoming, Mason, Lakota East and West, Sycamore, and Mariemont. The swimmers also broke records in several categories, including sophomore Claire McDonald (200 free); sophomore Tigar Cyr (200 free); senior Panos Skoufalos (50 free); junior Pearce Kieser (100 free and 100 breast); freshman Henry Marquardt (500 free); and sophomore Matthew Marquardt (100 back). Relay teams also broke several records, including Matthew, Pearce, Panos, and freshman Jason Guo in the 200 Medley; Panos, Tigar, Pearce, and Matthew in the 200 free; and Matthew, junior Sean Yoshitomi-Gray, Pearce, and Panos in the 400 free. In addition, Ellie Wilson finished seventh in the 100 breaststroke. Head Varsity Coach Allie Henges said the success of this amazing group of swimmers can be attributed to many things, including hard work and determination. “They put in hard work, swim dozens of hours a week, and they’re very positive,” said Allie. Panos, Pearce, and Tigar were all named MVC Swimmers of the Year. Allie was named MVC Coach of the Year for boys swimming. For more swimming team details go to www.7hills.org/athleticsoverview.

Maggie Gosiger

For detailed sports news, visit www.7hills.org/buzz.

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In an outstanding show of effort and skill, the varsity swimming team completed a recordbreaking season. A number of swimmers went on to compete at the state level, a powerhouse boys swim team finished fourth overall in the Classic

Seven Hills Middle School swim team enjoyed much success at the Junior High Championships at Countyside YMCA. This is the inaugural season for the 13-member team, coached by Meredith Jackson and Erin Ragouzis. The team placed second in the overall (boys and girls) small school division, with the team winning the boys division and placing seventh in the girls division. Two new records were set by Seven Hills swimmers, Tindar Cyr in the 100 IM, in the time of 58.72, and Matthew Maring, who set a new 25 breaststroke record of 14.98, besting the previous record by .08 of a second.

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Winter Sports Honors

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A N N UA L PA N C A K E B R E A K FA ST A N D A RT S A L E B E N E F I T S E D U C AT I O N I N G U AT E M A L A Doherty’s Pancake Breakfast and Student Art Auction was a huge success. Funds raised at the all-school event went to The Cooperative for Education, which creates sustainable textbooks, computer center, reading, and scholarship programs in Guatemala. The event was a largely collaborative undertaking. Art teacher Mimi Stricker organized art projects for all students from toddlers in the Beginnings Toddler & Parent Enrichment Program through Unit III, the Student Council made banners and signs and put together the keynote for an all-school assembly before the breakfast, music teacher Maria Eynon directed a lively dance show that conveyed a message about helping others, Spanish teacher John Krauss incorporated Guatemalan culture into his classes, and kindergarteners made table decorations for the breakfast. During the event, teachers flipped pancakes and students helped clear and clean tables. Doherty’s Service Learning Committee is composed of several faculty members, including Mimi Stricker, Mitzie Moser, Aimee Burton, Sarah Roberts, Judy Davis, John Krauss, Vaishali Sarbhoy, Patty Dawson, Ann Vanoy, Lindsay Pietroski, and Maria Eynon.

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M A RT I N LU T H E R K I N G , J R . C O N V O C AT I O N Unit III students shared a message of hope and courage during an annual convocation inspired by the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The convocation honored the Tuskegee Airmen and the 555th First All-Black Parachute Infantry Battalion, also known as the “Triple Nickels,” who served in World War II. The student-led program focused on a number of historical highlights related to the pilots and soldiers who simultaneously fought for their country and civil rights. Doherty’s Martin Luther King Convocation, written every year by Unit III teacher Regina Daily, honors Dr. King and sets the tone for Black History Month in February. Regina, creative dramatics teacher Russell White, and music teacher Maria Eynon coordinate the event each year.

FACT A N D FA B LE S In a uniquely collaborative lesson, Linda Ford’s Upper School environmental science students paired up with Natalie Williams’ first grade science students for presentations of original fables about keystone species – animals that have disproportionate effects on the environment. The pairing was a blend of academics and storytelling that both groups thoroughly enjoyed. The environmental science students wrote fables about keystone species and read the stories to the first graders. The first graders were familiar with keystone species because they studied it in science class. M E D I E VA L F E A S T Fourth graders celebrated their study of Newbery Medal winning novel The Door in the Wall by Marguerite de Angeli by having a medieval feast. Students enjoyed getting into character among the medieval place settings, costumes, and foods for their feast in the Lotspeich Library. Former NKU professor Margo Jang spoke about the medieval lifestyle while students feasted on chicken legs and soup.


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O LY M P I C R E S E A R C H When the 2014 Sochi Olympics began, fourth graders were just finishing up their persuasive writing unit. Students in Melissa Woodard’s class used this historic occasion to apply their skills to a writing project. After researching the Sochi 2014 website, students wrote an opinion piece and surveyed their classmates on their favorite sport. One student made a voting box and directions for the class, while others produced a list of all Olympic sports. Students graphed the results and included a roundup of the top six medal-earning countries. They found that among those students surveyed, figure skating received the most votes, followed by snowboarding, and ramp skiing. “The students came up with much of this on their own,” said Melissa. “Their leadership and initiative made it easy for me to foster and support their passion for learning.” S P E E D - D AT I N G F O R T H E PERFECT BOOK Sixth graders experienced speed dating with books as part of their unit on nonfiction. In Emily Stettler’s English class, students

convened in the Young Family Library for a speed dating round and the chance to be set up with their nonfiction book of choice. The idea, adapted by Middle and Upper School librarian Suzanne Dix, was to engage Middle School students in nonfiction reading. The students were given four minutes to choose a nonfiction book from each table. They used a chart to rate the “look” and “personality” of their books, with the option to take them to the next round.

Students also heard from Sam Bloom, the Children’s Librarian at Blue Ash Public Library, who taught students about the Sibert Awards. The national Sibert Award recognizes distinguished nonfiction books every year. M O D E L U N I T E D N AT I O N S CLUB PL ACES IN SEVER AL C AT E G O R I E S The Model UN Club in the Upper School spent two days at the Model UN Conference at Earlham College in Richmond, IN. Senior Kayla Kavanaugh won the Most Engaged Delegate award for representing Jordan on the

Security Council, and junior Srishti Kapur won Best Delegate, the top award available in each committee, for representing Japan on the UN High Commission on Refugees. The 15 students represented Japan, Jordan, Malawi, and Cuba. This marks Seven Hills’ fifth year of participation in Model UN, which usually draws about 200 students from schools in Indiana and Ohio. N KU P R E S E N TS C L I N I C TO U P P E R S C H O O L T H E AT E R S T U D E N T S The NKU Improvisation Troupe recently presented an animated clinic for Upper School theater teacher Stephanie Park’s students. The unpredictable presentation in the Donovan Arts Center Black Box gave students a revealing glimpse into the unique world of improvisation, as NKU students collectively transformed into a buffalo; the city of Paris, France; a clock; a roller coaster; and an amoeba, all from on-the-spot requests from Seven Hills students in the audience. The class was not only a spectator event – several Seven Hills theater students volunteered to participate with the troupe as well, which included a drumming session, rock opera, and impromptu lyric composition session.

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Next they headed to Beijing where they toured the Forbidden City, visited the Beijing Zoo, the Great Wall of China, and other sites. From Beijing they headed back home.

Middle School students study marine biology in Florida Keys

The famous Guggenheim Museum Puppy.

Seven Hills students meet players from Club Fútbol Athletic.

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As part of our international exchange program, over spring break two groups of Upper School students left Cincinnati — one group headed to China, the other to Spain.

T R AV E L TO S PA I N Twenty-six Upper School students spent March 13-27 traveling through Spain visiting important historical and modern sites and attending school at Colegio Askartza Claret as part of the Seven Hills Spanish Exchange Program.

B LO G P O STS BY B U S Y T R AV E L E R S Throughout their trips, both groups kept family and friends updated with their doings through

Seven Hills students make new friends at Liuzhou High School.

Starting in Madrid, the group visited the Spanish Royal Palace, the famous Prado Museum, Plaza de Toros (the largest bullfighting ring), and even learned to dance Flamenco! In Bilbao, Spain, the students spent 10 days as guests of host families and attended Colegio Askartza Claret with their host siblings. Here students experienced the daily home and school life of Spanish teenagers as they attended classes, visited area sites, and lived with their host families. While in Bilbao, students visited the Guggenheim Museum, where they were

greeted by the famous “Puppy,” a three-story-tall sculpture of a puppy made of flowers which stands just outside the museum. They also met the professional soccer players from Club Fútbol Athletic. Then, before they knew it, it was time to say goodbye to host families and head back home to Cincinnati. T R AV E L TO C H I N A Meanwhile, 10 Upper School students spent March 16-30 traveling through China, learning about the culture, eating local foods (and the local versions of some of the United State’s biggest food chains), seeing sites, and making new friends. In a busy whirlwind of wonderful experiences, the group started in Shanghai where they visited many sites, including the world famous Bund, Chinatown, and the Shanghai Museum.

Students take a break to sample Peking Duck in Biejing!

daily posts to their “China Trip” and “Spain Trip” blogs. The student’s posts provided not only a wonderful journal of the sights, sounds and tastes they were experiencing along the way, but also a sense of how they felt about what they were experiencing, as well.

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Seven Hills students travel: to China and Spain

They then traveled to Liuzhou, where each student stayed with a host family and attended Seven Hills’ sister school, Liuzhou High School, with their host siblings for three days.

Students visit The Great Wall of China.


Summer at Seven Hills Make it an unforgettable summer! Transform your child’s summer from uninspiring to UNFORGETTABLE! Choose from more than 100 programs for children ages 3-18.

To learn more plea

se visit 7hills.org/sum merprogram or call 513.7 28.2380

Weekly Summer Programs open to all Greater Cincinnati children, with more than 100 half-day and full-day programs available! To learn more visit 7hills.org/SummerProgram or call 513.728.2380. Register for one week ‌ or all eight! (Weekly programs available, starting June 16.) Early Care and After Care available.

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From Seven Hills I learned exactly what a stellar high school education looks like, so I have that vision for my students .... reflecting on how outstanding my teachers were reminded me that I could use my interest in math and science to change our society through education.

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Tell us briefly about your work. Kerri: I am a ninth grade teacher at North Star Academy College Preparatory High School in Newark, New Jersey. This is my second year teaching and it is wonderful! Last year I taught physics and this year I am teaching Algebra I and Algebra II. North Star is a high-performing charter school and is part of the Uncommon Schools charter network.

What was your path to this work? Kerri: As a mechanical engineering major at Tufts University, I realized that I found engineering interesting and challenging, but I also really wanted to work with kids. I did not know in what capacity; I tried counseling, tutoring, and mentoring. Through all of that work I came to the conclusion that I truly valued education as a means to life opportunities, so the best way for me to serve students would be as a teacher. Trying out a variety of roles, along with taking the time to identify what I truly valued, led me to teaching.

What were your goals after school, as you entered the work world? Kerri: When I started teaching, my goal was to brilliantly change my students lives in the one year I had the pleasure of teaching them, encourage most — if not all — of them to pursue STEM careers, and then become a principal after about five years of teaching.

What are your goals now? Kerri: My goals now are somewhat different. My colleagues have reminded me several times about Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hour rule. Gladwell suggests that talent plus 10,000 hours of practice will lead to mastery. He also studied some of the most brilliant composers and concluded that it took them 10 years to become exceptional. Whether 10,000 hours or 10 years, it takes much longer than I anticipated to become great! So I am now comfortable with the idea of teaching for 10 years or more. Then when the time feels right I may still consider educational administration. Or I may stay in the classroom forever … who knows! I am comfortable doing what feels right at the moment.

What have been the significant points along your career path? Kerri: Each day is its own significant moment! Knowing that I have a “do-over” every class period is refreshing; if I felt as though I didn’t teach the material well the first time, I have two or three more times to get it right that day. Teaching is hard; I work longer and harder than I ever have before. There are days when I’m not sure I can keep going, but knowing that my students expect me to be there eventually gets me into my classroom and ready to teach. When I see my students I feel much more calm and am reminded that everything will fall into place.

What gives you the most satisfaction? Kerri: I am most satisfied when my students show they understand the material — they can solve a problem in different formats, will confidently explain it to their peers or other teachers using correct mathematical vocabulary, and work together to do so. It is

so rewarding to be in a classroom in which students support each other in solving a challenging problem.

What impact have your days at Seven Hills had on your life? Kerri: I am so grateful for my Seven Hills education!!! I was well-prepared for undergraduate and graduate studies (and sometimes wished my professors challenged me more). From Seven Hills I learned exactly what a stellar high school education looks like, so I have that vision for my students. My math and science classes, particularly calculus and physics with Mr. Abineri, are what led me to an engineering degree. Then reflecting on how outstanding my teachers were reminded me that I could use my interest in math and science to change our society through education. I so appreciate all of my teachers in all of my subjects; I left high school as a well-rounded 18-year-old and now I’m fortunate to pass that on to another group of 14- to 18-year-olds!

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Reflecting back on my teachers at Seven Hills, it seems obvious to me that time and experience lead to excellence. So, my goal right now is simply stated, but less simply accomplished — to work hard to become the best teacher I can possibly be.

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Tell us briefly about your work. Sarah: I teach 10th and 12th grade history at Somerville High School, an urban public school in the Boston area. I came to Boston after graduating from Seven Hills and taking a gap year, in order to attend Tufts University. After finishing my undergraduate degree in history, I stayed at Tufts to pursue my Masters of Arts in Teaching. I now teach in the community where Tufts is located, and feel passionate about giving back to one of the places that has contributed so much to my own education.

What was the interest that brought you to this work? Sarah: Teaching fulfills many of my greatest interests and passions in life: I get to think about history all day, and I get to ask myself and my students those same big picture questions first introduced to me by Turansky. For me, teaching is my response to the question that every Seven Hills teacher asks of his or her students — how are you going to contribute to the world around you and use your own strengths and interests to positively impact others?

How did you discover this in yourself? Sarah: It started with Beth Driehaus and an eighth grade history class that I never wanted to end. I don’t even remember what we studied that year, but I will never forget those feelings of excitement and curiosity. Most importantly, Beth made me feel like my ideas and personal discoveries were significant. She valued all of her students’ opinions and took them into consideration in her teaching. This gave me the confidence to tackle high school with both a seriousness of purpose and a practiced joy in learning. Once in high school, I continued to be inspired by my teachers and was encouraged by some of them to try out a different role in the classroom. During my junior year I applied and was accepted to teach math with Breakthrough Collaborative Cincinnati, a nonprofit that seeks to provide educational enrichment for motivated middle school students and inspire high school and college students to pursue careers in education. That summer after junior year was the first of five that I would spend working with Breakthrough.

What are your goals now? Sarah: My heart is in education. This is not something I am trying out on the way to the next thing. Reflecting back on my teachers at Seven Hills, it seems obvious to me that time and experience lead to excellence. So, my goal right now is simply stated, but less simply accomplished — to work hard to become the best teacher I can possibly be.

What gives you the most satisfaction? Sarah: I strongly believe that an education in history is a crucial aspect to becoming a conscientious and engaged citizen. To me, there is nothing more satisfying than leading a student to question the world around them and their place within it. From these inquiries comes personal agency, and that, I suppose, is my biggest professional dream – to enable young adults to act on behalf of themselves and their communities.

Is there anything you would like to share with your Seven Hills teachers?

Sarah: I love what I do and I am thankful for this every day. I know that I am in this position because I had the privilege to discover and explore my interests early in life. At Seven Hills I had 13 years to play, try new things, make mistakes, build important life and academic skills, and feel celebrated for my accomplishments. This is all in thanks to my dedicated teachers. I can honestly say I think about you every day as I embrace the challenge of being a first-year teacher trying to figure out my own teaching style. To the teachers at the Upper School – thank you for your high standards and quirky senses of humor. I would be remiss if I didn’t give a personal thanks to Diane Kruer. Because of you and the professionalism you brought to your ceramics classes I consider myself not only a lifelong learner, but also a lifelong artist. And to Mrs. Guethlein, Mrs. Davis, Mrs. Hickenlooper, and all the other wonderful teachers at Doherty – thank you for your care and the hours you spent making sure that no learning differences of mine would ever get in the way of my love of school or potential for success.

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The Seven Hills School Professional Pathways Program Seven Hills is pleased to make the following three programs available to rising juniors, seniors, and college-age alumni. At the same time, we are seeking the support of Seven Hills alumni, current and former parents, or friends who are interested in supporting the following important career-building programs. JOB NET WORKING For the past 14 years, the Seven Hills Job Networking Program has helped provide paying summer jobs for rising juniors and seniors as well as collegeage alumni who return to the Cincinnati area for the summer. Since its inception, nearly 200 students have secured employment as child care providers, camp counselors, administrative assistants and receptionists, servers or hosts, and retail sales associates. SUMMER INTERNSHIP Two years ago we developed a parallel program, the Seven Hills Summer

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Internship Program, to help rising juniors and seniors as well as alumni attending college, secure unpaid summer internship opportunities. This program pairs Seven Hills students and alumni with professional mentors for summer internships of at least 80 hours. Each Summer Internship mentor works with

us to design an opportunity for a student to explore, in a serious way, what it means to work in a given field. In the past two years we have placed interns in fields as diverse as marketing and advertising, retail sales, journalism, legal services, banking and investment counseling, medical research and administration, graphic design, and nonprofit administration.

SHADOWING Shadowing allows any Seven Hills Upper School student to follow a professional from one day to a full week, to gain an overview of a specific profession. H O W Y O U C A N H E L P
 If you or your company can provide one or more of these opportunities for Seven Hills students or alumni, please complete our Job Network/Summer Internship/ Shadowing form found at www.7hills. org (click on Alumni, then click on Job Networking). You will receive a follow-up call to clarify your needs or requirements and help identify and screen potential applicants. On behalf of our students, thank you for your participation in this valuable program. QUESTIONS? Job Networking: Contact Nancy McCormick Bassett ’83, Director of Alumni Engagement at 513.728.2432 or nancy.bassett@7hills.org Internships/Shadowing: Contact Dean of Students David Brott at 513.728.2466 or david.brott@7hills.org.

Thank you! Thank you to everyone who has offered a job, internship, or shadowing opportunity. This program would not be possible without your support.


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Career Café

Connections to Last a Lifetime

Thank you to the recent participants in the

REC APPIN G OUR RECENT ALUMNI SURVEY Our recent survey revealed that Seven Hills alumni share a deep abiding affection for our alma mater. Thank you to the 697 alumni who responded; the response rate was well above the national average.

Career Café program, including Christina McIntosh Whitehead ’94, Quality Control Engineer & QS/ISO Representative with GE Aviation; Dr. Santa Ono, President of the University of Cincinnati; and Dr. Gregory

Christina McIntosh Whitehead ’94, Mollie Rouan ’15, Avery Coombe ’15

Internal Medicine and Professor of Medicine in the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati.

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As a group, we place a high value on the education we received at Seven Hills, which continues to resonate throughout our lives well after graduation. We place critical emphasis on maintaining the School’s greatest strength — our faculty. We see the School’s service to the “whole child” as a competitive advantage and we admire the impact our School continues to have on the larger community. You have shared your feedback and we are listening. Robust communication, broadened regional programming, and enhanced reunions are on the horizon. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to let us know how else we alumni can continue to pass along the benefits and unique experiences of a Seven Hills education.

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Juliana Yip-Ono ’16, Dr. Santa Ono, Gwendolyn Yip

with parents and alumni who hold leadership positions in a variety of professions and careers.

Mollie Rouan ’15, Dr. Gregory Rouan, Connor Rouan ’14

To sustain the impact we feel in our own lives and help ensure that opportunity for generations to come, we must be willing to financially support Seven Hills. Contributions of any amount are welcome. Your continued support makes a difference. Seven Hills Alumni Association Board Chair Scott Carroll is a Seven Hills lifer who entered pre-kindergarten at Lotspeich in 1973 and is a Seven Hills graduate—Class of 1985. Scott, his wife, Erin O’Grady, and their daughter, Grace (a junior at Seven Hills), live in Cincinnati. Scott is the Managing Partner and Litigation Manager of the Cincinnati and Dayton offices of Jackson Lewis P.C.

S TAY C O N N E C T E D ! Like • • • NEW Seven Hills School Alumni Page (Facebook) Join • • • Seven Hills School Alumni group (Facebook) Download • • • Seven Hills Alumni mobile app, available FREE through the Apple iTunes App Store and Android Google Play 35


Alumni Holiday Party Alumni from the classes of 1993-2013 gathered at The Stand on December 23, 2013, to celebrate the season.

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(photo at right) Frances Stilwell Elinor Adick Kline


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Download the Seven Hills Alumni mobile app Attention Seven Hills Alumni! Download the free Seven Hills School Alumni App for iPhone and Android. When you sign in using the email address on file with the Seven Hills Alumni Office, you can access contact information and the LinkedIn profiles of fellow alumni. No matter where you live or how busy your schedule, you can connect with alumni and keep up with the latest Seven Hills and alumni news.

F E AT U R E S I N C LU D E : • Alumni directory searchable by “Name” or “Class Year” • Update your contact information • “Nearby” function lets you search for fellow alumni by location and view the result on a map • Integration with LinkedIn • Access to the Seven Hills’ Career Mentoring Network • Access to alumni and school events calendars • Facebook, Twitter, and Flickr feeds • Easily upload photos and class notes to the app • Make your gift to The Seven Hills Fund

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Join our Seven Hills School Alumni Page on Facebook Thank you to the alumni who have already joined the Seven Hills Alumni Group.

Now we’d like to ask you to join the Seven Hills School Alumni Page, as well as the Alumni Group.

Our new Seven Hills alumni mobile app requires us to use a Facebook page, not a group, to share information. We will continue to post news in both places with the goal of eventually using only the Alumni Page.

It’s easy and takes only a minute!

Added incentive: For every 100 people who sign up on the Seven Hills School Alumni Page, we will raffle off swag from the Spirit Shop.

Thank you for your help!

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Leslie Bennett McNeill (C’61)

Alumna, Former Parent, and Former Trustee Generously Gives Back to Seven Hills We recently caught up with Les Bennett McNeill to ask her about her Legacy Society gift .

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Leslie “Les” Bennett McNeill C’61 credits the excellent educational foundation she received at Miss Doherty’s College Preparatory School (CPS) for much of her success. “My husband, Red, and I want to support the future of the School with a planned gift. Seven Hills provides an outstanding educational experience by encouraging, challenging, and energizing students,” Les remarks. Some of the many advantages of attending CPS for Les and her sister, Celia Bennett Varick C’56, included lifelong friendships, small class sizes, and the expectation of leadership. Les explains, “With small classes we were encouraged to question, and our outstanding teachers provided the atmosphere and the tools that enabled us to confidently step up to be leaders. We were expected to lead, to serve, and to give back.” Les has been honored throughout the community for her passion for helping others, and she knows the importance of giving back. She is a former Seven Hills Trustee and just a few of her many community accomplishments include founding

The Women’s Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation, fundraising for Cincinnati’s YWCA and Talbert House, and being named a 1996 Enquirer Woman of the Year. “I’m a proud CPS alumna, but, more importantly, our children attended Seven Hills. Red and I watched as the School built their confidence and provided them with opportunities to be strong, relevant leaders — skills which they utilized while at school and also after graduation. Our children received an exceptional education at Seven Hills, where they acquired skills including critical thinking and problem solving, creativity, collaboration, and teamwork.

Les states, “If we needed support, the School was there for us. Now it’s time for us to be there for the School. Our gift will help to ensure that Seven Hill’s high-caliber education remains for generations to come. “The value of the foundation the School gave me and our children is without price.” If you would like information about becoming a member of The Seven Hills School Legacy Society, please contact Marney Hupper, Major Gifts Officer, at 513.728.2431 or marney.hupper@7hills.org.

We are pleased to honor our family of Miss Doherty’s “Their time at the School nurtured their curiosity, College Preparatory School allowing our children to live amazing, worthwhile lives that have touched others and made a difference for Girls (CPS), Lotspeich, Hillsdale, and Seven Hills in the world. We are grateful for this,” Les explains. alumni and friends who Daughters Saunie ’85, Erin ’84, and Sarah ’83 remembered the School in were outstanding graduates of Seven Hills. their estate plans. The Seven Saunie now works as Director of Native Arts Hills School has a rich Programs for the Alaska Council on the Arts; Erin history, which, from 1974 to achieved a doctorate in reproductive biology and the present, has combined the promoted women’s rights throughout the world traditions and standards of for USAID before she passed away in 2003; and educational excellence Sarah teaches special education in Australia. Son of three well-known Benn attended Lotspeich and the Middle School Cincinnati schools: CPS; the before graduating from Walnut Hills. He lives in Lotspeich School; and the Cincinnati and works for Bromwell’s as a certified Hillsdale School. chimney sweep.

Including The Seven Hills School in your estate plans makes possible the full richness of the Seven Hills experience. Learn more about the Legacy Society at http://7hills.giftlegacy.com.

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Reunion Reps Reunion reps are needed to help make this a special weekend for your class. Please volunteer to help organize a reunion event for your class. The more people from the class, the better your reunion will be. Although there are always school-sponsored events during reunion weekend for everyone to enjoy, all class-specific events are organized by people from the class itself.

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Alumni Reception A record-breaking crowd of alumni enjoyed each other’s company at the Alumni Reception, held at the University Club on Thursday, Feb 13, 2014. During the reception Board Chair Sarah Steinman and Alumni Association President Scott Carroll provided a brief update on future plans for the school.

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Why is this important? • Alumni giving helps maintain the experience of excellent education, exceptional faculty, small classes, fine arts, athletics, and close-knit community that are part of Seven Hills and its predecessor schools. • Alumni participation is important in helping Seven Hills receive foundation and corporate grants. • Your gift, no matter the size, has an impact. Participation is the goal — your support makes a difference. Please make your gift to The Seven Hills Fund before June 15 by visiting www.7hills.org/TheSevenHillsFund Thank you for your support!

Give now – Learn more!

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. . . to enjoy the evening . . . to enjoy Homecomi ng . . . to celebrate the 40 th Anniversary of Seve n Hills

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Reunion 2014 Classics Luncheon

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Alanna Quinlan ’14, Scott Carroll ’85, Sarah Shim ’14 Hillsdale 1944

Mary “Mollie” Kreimer, Marilyn Miller Logan, Marke Kite Yeiser, Sharon Smith Iltis H’73

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Ann Weichert Kranbuhl C’64 sharing her experiences at Miss Doherty’s

Bottom row: Nancy Butler Accetta, Kathleen Grace, Alison Keeler Carrillo, Carol DuBois Williams, Mary Russell Yablonsky, Jane Porteous Ellsworth Top row: Susan Deck Brown, Jill Bertsche Mitchell, Talie Morrison, Ann Shepard Bulger

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Reunion 2014 Classics Luncheon

Congratulations on your 50th Reunion, Class of 1964!

On Saturday, the Hillsdale 1964 group rode the bus downtown to enjoy the riverfront and gorgeous spring day. Thank you to bus driver Glenn Shillinger.

Suzanne “Susie” Armstrong Beutler H’49 Jon B. Boss L’48 Sandy Hauck Elliott C’49

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Cocktail Reception Alumni came together on April 11 and 12 for Reunion 2014. They enjoyed the Classics Luncheon at the Cincinnati Country Club, a musical performance by Upper School students, tours of Lotspeich and the Upper School, a reception in the Hillsdale Commons, and individual class events.

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Goodall Distinguished Alumna Award presented to Mary Ida Sloneker Compton ’77 and Judy Robinson Williams H’67 Family and friends gathered on a lovely evening in April to reconnect during our spring reunion and take time to recognize Mary Ida Sloneker Compton ’77 and Judy Robinson Williams H’67, who were honored with the Goodall Distinguished Alumna Award. Seven Hills highest alumni honor, the Goodall Judy Robinson Williams H’67 Mary Ida Sloneker Compton ’77 Award acknowledges an individual “who has achieved distinction in a public or private career or activity bettering the lives of others.” That description aptly suits our co-honorees, who are recognized around Cincinnati and especially within the Hyde Park community, for their Hyde Park Famers Market, which was founded by Mary Ida and Judy 10 years ago to fill a void they both felt for available local organic and conventionally grown produce. And while both women have a passion for wonderful, locally grown and produced food,

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they and their Market have other goals as well. As Mary Ida and Judy say on their website, they seek to contribute to the quality of life in the Hyde Park area through their pleasant, vibrant market, which connects residents with each other and consumers with farmers (and vice versa). Award presenter and former Goodall Award recipient Shannon Kelly Carter H’67 acknowledged Judy’s and Mary Ida’s “vision, passion, and determination,” saying, “Judy is the ‘gatherer’ of the partnership and works hard toward getting the community to the Market. Her valuable contributions include communications with constituents and promoting locally grown food.” She continues, “Mary Ida is the ‘grower’ of the duo and is all about food … identifying the farmers, getting to know them, and recruiting them for the Market.” In summing up, Shannon described the Market, but also the character of our cohonorees, saying, “The core ingredients

for the Market’s ‘recipe’ are commitment, hard work, and dedication. Douse that with passion, energy, and continuous improvement over ten years and the result is a remarkable success.”

Betsy Robinson Schram H’70, Judy Robinson Williams H’67, Harry Robinson

Carl Compton ’15, Marshal Compton, Mary Ida Sloneker Compton ’77, Mary Sloneker Donahue

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Reunion 2014

Individual Class Events Classes got together for individual events to catch up and enjoy time with eachother.

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(photo at right) Murray Monroe Helen Mattheis Laura Wilson David Robinson

(photo at right) Bottom row: Bob Mai JoAnn Strubbe Mai Mary Ellen Romney Baude Barb Kuhn Guggenheim Susie Armstrong Beutler Top row: Barbara Lutz Thoman Rich Thoman Frances Black Turner Hugh Baude Fred Beutler Adelaide Bieser Ottenjohn Tom Ottenjohn

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(photo at right) Bottom row: Emily Lenherr Karr Mindy Lowry Lewis Cecile Blaine Duhnke ’80 Holly Jurgensen Fay CCDS ’79 Lisa Vadis Turner Center stage: David Bavis

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Top row: Susan David Lindsey Kemper Burgess Tom Lewis Carrie VanDerzee Doug VanDerzee Kathryne Gardette Charles Miller Alan Schwartz Anne Newstedt Phelps Ted Phelps

Not pictured: Michael L’72 and Tucker Jones Coombe Caroline Elder Prem Larry Pauly

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(photo at right) Bottom row: Ann Shepard Bulger Alison Keeler Carrillo Carol DuBois Williams Talie Morrison Nancy Butler Accetta Top row: David Parlin L’58 Merrie Cord Kathleen Grace Susan Deck Brown Mary Russell Yablonsky Jill Bertsche Mitchell Barbara Vilter Wilson Jane Porteous Ellsworth

(photo at right) Sudie Anning Casey Wood Santora Howard Konicov

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Alumni Class Notes New job? Recently married? Written a book? If you have stories to share, please don’t hesitate! Go to www.7hills.org/alumniupdates. Drop us a line and send photos (.jpeg format, please) to nancy.bassett@7hills.org.

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Florida. My oldest daughter and middle child, Lucy (C’71), lives in San Mateo, California. My younger daughter and youngest child lives with her husband, Evan, in Westfield, New Jersey.”

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Monte Richardson (C) (Asheville, NC) writes, “At 101 years old, I think I may be the oldest CPS alumna!”

Margaret “Peggy” Keagy Whittemore (H) (S. Yarmouth, MA) died on February 22, 2014.

70th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Margery Hill Webb (H) (Lima, OH) writes, “I have finished three family histories: Hill’s (my father’s), Sebastian’s (my mother’s), and Webb’s (my husband’s). They have been sent to various libraries in Cincinnati and Boston. ”

1940

Cynthia Taft Morris (H) (Washington, DC) died on July 16, 2013.

William MacCrellish Jr. (L) (Newton Lower Falls, MA) died on August 7, 2013.

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Patricia “ Patsy” Canning Packard (C) (Eureka, CA) died on January 20, 2014.

1941 Our condolences to family and friends who lost loved ones as reported in this issue.

Marie Mitchell Tate (H) (Amelia Island, FL) died on January 31, 2014.

1944

Gaius “Barrie” Rich IV (L) (Quogue, NY) died on January 11, 2013. Patricia LeBlond Clasgens (H) (Cincinnati) died on March 25, 2013.

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Joan Fleischer Reckseit (L’38, H) (Cincinnati) writes, “I have been retired now from my practice as a Clinical Psychologist for 16 years and am enjoying living at Maple Knoll. My son and oldest child, David, lives with his wife, Sandy, in Williston,

1946

Idalee Fox Vannatta (H) (Marion, NC) died on January 27, 2014. Jean Stuebing Maggrett (C) (Santa Rosa, CA) shared memories of her time at Lotspeich and CPS. “… By the fourth grade I became discouraged about reading. I had been made to read too many Fun with Dick and Jane-type stories. My mother had read me The Wizard of Oz and Winnie the Pooh, and I wanted to read more books like those. My mother recognized the problem, so the summer before fifth grade she enrolled me at Lotspeich. My teacher, Joan Wuerful, said that before fall I would have to read at least one book. I said I didn’t want to read any boring books. She brought me The Hobbit; I devoured it and have been an avid reader ever since. Ted Wuerful was our teacher in

fifth grade. I remember him because he took us on fossil hunts and had us play soccer. Mrs. Lotspeich, who conducted the study hall, habitually left the classroom windows open even on cold winter days. She explained that the meaning of study was ‘to desire.’ I later transferred to College Preparatory School. I enjoyed learning badminton there, and competed successfully. In English class I read Beowulf and other classics, which fascinated me.”

1947

Betty Lazarus Antonoff (L) (Palm Beach Gardens, FL) died on July 20, 2013.

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Sandy Hauck Elliott (C) (Cincinnati) wrote, “I had another bad fall in the garden last spring. I had much pain but my water aerobics class got me going again. I am still able to do my volunteer work at the animal shelter. I also still have lunch every Wednesday with my sister Francie Hauck Pavey C’52, Jean Mathis, and Adelaide Bieser Ottenjohn H’49.” Sue Armstrong Beutler (H) (Ann Arbor, MI) writes, “I’m looking forward to our 65th reunion in April.”

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65th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015

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Judith “Judy” Johnson Postler (C) (Cincinnati) died on February 13, 2014.


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Ellen Caldwell Sewell (H) (Cincinnati) writes, “I finally retired at 77. I have lots of fun, interesting things to do, including lunches with Seven Hills alumni friends.”

1955

60th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed for CPS and Hillsdale.

1959

Muriel “Missy” Richards Holzman (H) (Cincinnati) shares, “We are delighted to have our two granddaughters at Doherty. They are the fourth generation to attend The Seven Hills School.”

1960

55th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed for CPS and Hillsdale.

1964

Tuckie Bartlett Westfall (C) (Alexandria, VA) writes, “My husband, Don, retired in November. We have purchased a lot in Maine and will be building a house in Harpswell.” Talie Morrison (H) (Crested Butte, CO) reports, “I’m still following my passion for backpacking. I am looking forward to our 50th reunion in April.”

1965

50th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed for CPS and Hillsdale. On September 7, 2013, Polly Adair Culp’s (H) (Cincinnati) son, Will, married Mia Simpson, the daughter of Dana Fabe H’69. Gathered in Louisville, KY for the celebration were:

Carol Smith Hesser C’65 Lee Adair Adams H’58 Nancie Newkirk Loppnow H’65 Susan Newkirk Wright H’63 Dana Fabe H’69 Polly Adair Culp H’65 Lissy Fabe H’71 Molly Hirons Diesbach H’70 Randol Foote Haffner C’60 Susan Krehbiel Holzapfel H’65 Nickie Adair Kuhn C’61

1966

Diana Mara Henry (C) (Newport, VT) presented a photo-documentary about one-room schools in Vermont. The show was at the Vision & Voice Gallery in Middlebury, Vermont, from February 14 to May 10, 2014.

1967

Congratulations to Judy Robinson Williams (H) (Cincinnati), co-recipient of the Goodall Distinguished Alumna Award, along with Mary Ida Sloneker Compton ’77, for cofounding the Hyde Park Farmers’ Market. See page 47 for more information. Congratulations, as well, to Judy on the birth of her newest grandchild — DeCourcy “DeeDee” Ryan Williams who was born on November 17, 2013.

Shannon Kelly Carter (H) and Judy Robinson Williams (H) hosted a holiday gathering for Cincinnati classmates, friends, and former Hillsdale faculty members on December 20, 2013. Bottom row: Shannon Kelly Carter H’67 Nan Sikes Witten H’68 Cathyrn Hosea Hilker H’49 (former faculty) Carol Iannitto Euskirchen H’61 (former faculty) Madame Reneé Lowther (former faculty) Vera Sanker (former faculty) Kathy Dowd Baumann H’66 Top row: Emma Egbert Tracy H’67 Robin Smith Armstrong H’67 Sissy Lambert Stearns H’67 Jenny Lamson Magro H’67 Judy Robinson Williams H’67 Nancy Pechstein Aubke H’67 Kitty Hawley Schmidt H’66 Weenie Schweitzer Rush H’68 Rhoda Allen Brooks H’67 Delle Christensen Jones H’67 Leezie Walker Borden H’67 Missy Kinne Norton H’66 Pattie Scifres Jamison H’68

INTERESTED IN BEING A REUNION REP FOR YOUR CLASS?

Contact Nancy McCormick Bassett ‘83, Director of Alumni Engagement nancy.bassett@7hills.org 513.728.2432

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In an article in the Feb. 7, 2014, issue of the Cincinnati Enquirer, a reporter spoke with Margaret Farmer Planton (C) (Chillicothe, OH) about her father’s role as part of the first post-war wave of Monuments Men. Author Robert Edsel and his book, The Monuments Men, were featured at Seven Hills’ 2014 Books for Lunch. (see page 18). To read more about Margaret’s father’s role as a Monument Man scan this QR code: INTERESTED IN BEING A REUNION REP FOR YOUR CLASS?

Contact Nancy McCormick Bassett ‘83, Director of Alumni Engagement nancy.bassett@7hills.org 513.728.2432

Our condolences to family and friends who lost loved ones as reported in this issue.

Lynn Woodhouse (H) (Ponte Verde Beach, FL) writes, “I am partially retired as of September 1, 2013, while still doing some consulting. I am enjoying hiking with my son, Peter, spending time with my daughter Lesley’s 16-yearold son, Liam, and traveling with my husband, Bill.”

1968

Robin Hawley Wood (H) (New Providence, NJ) shares, “My husband, David, and I are still enjoying our more than full time jobs as tutors. Just the other day, I told one of my students about an amazing high school teacher I had — Mrs. Richardson. She used to come into history class dressed as various historical figures and teach the class from those individuals’ perspectives. Fabulous!”

1973

Paige Streit Coombs (H) (Pomfret, CT) died on October 14, 2013.

1975

40th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed.

1976

Melissa Mechem Congdon (Mill Valley, CA) writes, “As our youngest heads off to college, I am adjusting to being an empty nester <sniff>. I continue to love living in Northern California and practicing medicine as a fibromyalgia consultant.”

1977

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See 1965 class notes for news about the marriage of Dana Fabe’s (H) (Anchorage, AK) daughter.

Congratulations to Mary Ida Sloneker Compton (Cincinnati) co-recipient of the Goodall Distinguished Alumna Award, along with Judy Robinson Williams H’67, for cofounding the Hyde Park Farmers’ Market. See page 47 for more information.

1970

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45th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed for CPS and Hillsdale.

1972

Jay Moore Reighley (H) (South Freeport, ME) writes, “I still look back fondly on friendships gained at Hillsdale. I met up with Janie Yeiser 54

Woods H’72, Lisa Lillard Caldwell H’72, Bye Robinson Watson H’72, and Franny Lamson Bailey H’72 for a fantastic reunion last spring on Gasparilla Island, Boca Grande, Florida — love my gal pals!”

35th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed.

1985

30th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed.

1990

25th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed. Nate Tucker (Brookline, MA) writes he married Alice Wong ’00 on May 19, 2012 in Boston, MA. Congratulations!

1991

Class of 1991 members and families made a trip to the Cincinnati Zoo over Thanksgiving weekend. Enjoying the outing are: David Monroe, Jason Cohen, Sean Donovan, Sarah Buzzee Fairweather, Mandy Hayes, Kelly Myers, and Vanessa Holmes

1992

Congratulations to Zan Dumbadze (Brooklyn, NY) on the publication of his book Bas Jan Ader: Death is Everywhere. To learn more scan this QR code:

1995

20th ReunionApril 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed. Kalpana Kotagal’s parents shared that Kalpana (Washington ,DC) is busy being an attorney, mother, wife, and mentor. She recently became a partner at Cohen Milstein civil rights law firm.


Alumni Class Notes 1996

Thank you to Michelle Glassman Bock’s parents for sharing that Michelle has transferred to Cologne, Germany, along with her husband, Patrick, and two-year-old twins, Liesl and Lily. John Snyder (Cincinnati), his wife Sara, and big brother Jack (3) welcomed Stella Davis on December 12, 2013. “We were so excited to welcome Stella to the world on December 12. She has been a wonderful addition to our family. Jack has been a fantastic big brother to her!”

2001

Andrew Ain (Cincinnati) is Founder and CFO of Maritime Global, a seafood brokerage firm.

2002

Noah Bendix-Balgley (Pittsburgh, PA) was named first concertmaster of the Berlin Philharmonic, one of the world’s most prestigious orchestras (in general, European orchestras have more than one concertmaster). Currently, Noah is completing his third season as concertmaster of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

1999

Meera Kotagal’s parents shared that Meera (Seattle, WA) is a fifth year surgery resident, has a Master’s of Public Health, and is in Rwanda to help train surgeons.

15th Reunion-April 10 & 11, 2015 Reunion reps are needed.

10th Reunion-November 28, 2015 Reunion reps are needed.

New job? Recently married?

Brian Hepp (Los Angeles, CA) writes, “I’ve been living in Los Angeles for almost five years and beginning my fourth in the music industry. I am currently Director of Licensing at Fundamental Music, providing songs for film, television, commercials, and live events. Our clients include ABC, NBC, Disney, and numerous independent production companies. I’ve recently begun expanding our business outside of California. Along with Fundamental, I write a monthly feature for The Bluegrass Situation which focuses on bluegrass, Americana, and folk music throughout the country. I’d love to hear from any SHS alumni on the West Coast and will return to Cincinnati this summer to catch some Reds baseball. See you all at the ten year reunion!”

stories to share, please don’t

Written a book? If you have hesitate! Go to www.7hills.org/alumniupdates. Drop us a line and send photos (.jpeg format, please) to nancy.bassett@7hills.org.

2006

Elida Kamine (Cincinnati) is the Director of Policy and Communication for the Office of Cincinnati Council member P.G. Sittenfeld ’03.

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Alex Maggio (Los Angeles, CA) married Christine Garver on November 9, 2013. The ceremony took place in San Diego, CA. Gabriel Pagani ’03 and Neeraj Singh ’03 were in the wedding party.

Lindsay Degen (Brooklyn, NY) created custom knit pieces for the December 2013 Victoria’s Secret fashion show. A team from Victoria’s Secret spotted her work at a knitwear factory where she was consulting. The costumes created were specifically for the show but the techniques and ideas that she developed will most likely find their way into her next collection for her own label DEGEN. To learn more about DEGEN scan this QR code: 55


Alumni Class Notes 2007

Michael Makris’ parents shared that Michael (Irvine, CA) completed his Master of Building Sciences (MBS), Architectural & Building Sciences degree at the University of Southern California. He was awarded the Outstanding Thesis Award.

Drew Kohn Mark Portman Sam Laber Seth Rau Tyler Troendle Chris Vermillion Connor Smith Matt Murphy Jade Corcoran Middle row: Melissa Springer Elizabeth Brandy Jazmin Harris Chelsea Hatcher Mara Robertson Sarah Jane Smith Lennie Cottrell Alex Shifman

2008

The Class of 2008 celebrated their fifth reunion over Thanksgiving weekend. Our condolences to family and friends who lost loved ones as reported in this issue.

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Those in attendance were: Top row: Kyle McCall Julia Constable Mayilan Balachandran Suzanne Kahle Elise Suna Julie Habbert Abbey Wood Matthew Grosinger Jessalyn Reid

Bottom row: Jennifer Williams Jacob Bergman

2010

5th Reunion-November 28, 2015 Reunion reps are needed. Kyle Neu (Danville, KY) was named the Southern Athlete Association’s Player of the Week on Feb. 25, 2014. The senior pitcher at Centre College tied the school record for complete games in a season last year. In a game on February 22, against Wheaton College, he went nine innings and allowed only one unearned run on five hits. He struck out seven batters and did not walk a batter in throwing just over 100 pitches.

Emory’s Jake Davis (Atlanta, GA) was selected by Division III News as the Player of the Month for February 2014. Davis averaged a team-high 24.0 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.6 steals in helping the Eagles to a February record of 5-2. Taylor White’s parents shared that Taylor (Miami, OH) has accepted a position working for Epic in Madison, WI. He will graduate with honors from Miami University in May 2014.

Other Seven Hills Notes:

We are sad to report the death of Cynthia Hudzik (Cincinnati). She was a beloved teacher, counselor, mentor, and friend to students from 1977-2003. Former faculty member Margaret Schwab (Big Bear City, CA) shares, “I went to the Cayman Islands with Lena Buzzee in April 2014.” Roger E. Loud, (Lake Placid, NY) former faculty member and Head of School writes, “I am finishing my 56th year of teaching; hiking and climbing all summer.” Former faculty member Dr. Charles Woodward (Cincinnati) writes, “I retired from school counseling in 2011 and now work seasonally reviewing freshmen applications at UC. I still do psychological evaluations for a local psychiatrist.” Samuel Sheffield, Jr. (Cincinnati), former Doherty art teacher, died on March 12, 2014.


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Seven Hills alumni gathered on December 21, 2013, to play in the annual basketball games. Thanks to all the family and friends who were there to cheer them on!

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of The Seven Hills School Upper School field, Hillsdale Campus 5400 Red Bank Road Friday, September 26, 2014 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

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4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Middle School soccer games 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. All school picnic 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Sports clinics 8:00 p.m. Bonfire & pep rally All events are free of charge Families invited B R I N G Y O U R FA M I LY B A C K T O C A M P U S

. . . to enjoy the evening . . . to enjoy Homecoming . . . to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of Seven Hills

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Tuesday, D ecember 2 3, 2014 5:00 p.m.7:00 p.m.

50 West B rewing Co mpany 7668 W ooster Pike , Cincinna ti

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E N AND TH S O C I AT I O S A I N M U T THE AL S PRESEN BOOSTER AT H L E T I C

Day s t r o p S ls l i H n Seve i and Varsit y Teams fo r A lu m n

45227 Bank Road, d e R 0 0 4 5 m p us , H il ls d a le C a o-ed): Volleyball: 5p.m. Kalnow Gym Upper School

Soccer:* uys:5p.m. Girls:3p.m. G soccer ol ho Sc r pe Up tspeich Lo nd field, behi

Tennis (c 3p.m. Courts Carol Brestel trance en ol ho sc t rs Fi Rd. nk Ba d Re off of

arrange their game to inutes before m s. 30 er e ay riv pl l ar al ould ovided for All players sh irts will be pr positions. T-sh will be open. Concessions contact: ill play, please us know you w or , let 41 to 24 d 8. an n 72 rmatio ills.org, 513. For further info ills.org, n.phelps@7h ia 7h Br t@ , et ps ss el Ph ba Brian nancy. mick Bassett, Nancy McCor 3.728.2432 51

S O C C E R

B A L L V O L L E Y

Please Join Us for

S av e t h e D a t e an Alumni Recepti on at Peterloon

8605 Hopewell Roa d, Cincinnati Thursday, October 2, 2014 6:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m .

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Saturday . . . Alumni Sports Day Aug. 2, 2014 Soccer: Girls 3:00 p.m., Guys 5:00 p.m. Tennis: Coed 3:00 p.m. Volleyball: 5:00 p.m. Hillsdale Campus, Red Bank Rd. Friday . . . 40th Anniversary of The Seven Hills Sept. 26, 2014 School at Homecoming 4:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Hillsdale Campus, Red Bank Rd. Thursday . . . Alumni Reception at Peterloon Oct. 2, 2014 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. 8605 Hopewell Road, Cincinnati Sunday . . . Alumni Basketball Games Dec. 21, 2014 Girls: 2:00 p.m., Guys: 4:00 p.m. Kalnow Gym, Hillsdale Campus Tuesday . . . Young Alumni Holiday Party Dec. 23, 2014 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. 50 West Brewing Company 7668 Wooster Pike, Cincinnati

T E N N I S

* Alumna

Soccer Players: This year we are asking alumna soccer players to let us know if you will be playing in the game. As you may remember from your days as a player, there are a set number of scrimmages that the team is permitted to have. Athletic Director Brian Phelps is asking you to let us know by Friday, July 25, if you are able to play. If we don’t have enough players by this date, we will have to cancel the girls game so the team can schedule another scrimmage. We love having this game and want to see you there! Please let us know you are able to play by July 25.

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Hillsdale Campus 5400 Red Bank Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45227 Intellectually vibrant, individually attuned, future-ready learning for students two years through grade 12.

The Seven Hills School 2013-14 Board of Trustees

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Cincinnati, OH Permit No. 9695


Seven Hills Magazine - Spring 2014