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S E V E N H I LLS M I DDL E SC HOOL : AN I NTE NTI ONAL DE S I G N


THE

SEVEN

HILLS SCHOOL

7hills.org

Development Office 513.728.2430 alumni.news@7hills.org

Contents

students during an assembly in the Middle School Commons.

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Above photo: The Middle School Community Change Club designed a butterfly garden in the spring of 2015. Students, along with Middle School science teacher Jocelyn Coulter and Middle School English teacher Amanda Hayes, researched native plants and pollinators, as well as designed the garden’s layout.

Christopher P. Garten Head of School

Front cover photo: Head of Middle School Bill Waskowitz leads his

Fall 2016

A special thanks to Keith Neu for his sports photography. Seven Hills Magazine is a publication of The Seven Hills School. © 2016 The Seven Hills School

A Portrait of Life in the Middle By Head of School Christopher P. Garten

An Intentional Design By Karla Dejean

School News Alumni News and Class Notes Upcoming Alumni Events

Margo Kirstein Director of Development

Chris Hedges Director of Marketing & Communications

Karla Dejean Writer & Project Manager, photographer

Sarah Ott Lautar ’05 Director of Alumni Engagement

Taylor Evans Communications Specialist, photographer


Annual Fund

The Seven Hills B

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The Seven Hills Annual Fund and you What your gift does

and data networks, gifts to The Seven Hills

Your gift to the Seven Hills Annual Fund

Annual Fund elevate the excellence of our

provides the margin of excellence—the tools

students’ overall experience.

and technology for hands-on, inquiry-based

BEC AUSE OF YOU . . . OUR

instruction, the materials and equipment for inspiring fine and performing arts experiences, and inclusive character-building athletic programs. I N S H O RT, G I F T S TO T H E S E V E N HILLS ANNUAL FUND RE ACH E V E R Y S T U D E N T, E V E R Y D A Y.

How your gift helps Each year, tuition covers aproximately 80% of the cost of everything our school provides. A portion of the remaining gap, about $1,150 per student, comes from the Seven Hills community’s support of the Annual Fund. • Annual giving funds approximately 5% of the educational expenses of the school. • All gifts to The Seven Hills Annual Fund are 100% tax deductible. From maps to microscopes, art supplies to athletic equipment, field trips to technology

Goal =$1,325,000 $1,200,000 $1,100,000 $1,000,000

STUDENTS DON ’ T JUST RE AD

$900,000

A B O U T D I S C O V E R I E S —T H E Y MAKE THEM.

BREAKI NG N E WS ! If Seven Hills raises $50,000 in new and increased gifts, the

E.E. Ford Foundation will grant the school

$50,000!

Please help us get there!

$800,000

Did you know ... 100% O F SE VE N H ILL S FACULT Y A N D STA F F CO N T R IB U TE TO T H E A N N UA L F UN D!

$700,000 $600,000 $500,000

To make your gift today, please visit www.7hills.org/annualfund or call the Development Office at 513.728.2430.

$400,000 $300,000

Questions? Please contact Andi Fischer Simon ’98, Director of Annual Giving, at 513.728.2436 or via email at andi.simon@7hills.org.

Thank you for you r s u ppor t!

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“OUR TEACHERS WORK TIRELESSLY TO DESIGN LEARNING ACTIVITIES THAT STIMULATE THE CURIOSITY AND IMAGINATION OF YOUNG PEOPLE. THEY GIVE OUR STUDENTS A CHANCE TO EXPLORE, TO INQUIRE, TO IMMERSE THEMSELVES IN QUESTIONS AND ISSUES THAT SPEAK DIRECTLY TO STUDENTS’ OWN CURIOSITY ABOUT THE WORLD.”

S E V E N H I L L S : A P O R T R A I T O F L I F E I N TH E M I DDLE . . . . . . . . .

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ne of my favorite milestones of the academic calendar is the eighth grade graduation ceremony. It is, for all involved, a deeply moving occasion, as we convene to celebrate the tremendous growth that has occurred over a very brief period. Those who have been through it—teachers, parents, grandparents—know what I mean. When those eighth graders assemble on the stage, we see, as if they are sitting side-by-side, each student’s past and future. We see, in each, a new quiet confidence and clearer, deeper sense of self. In the weeks and months before, there have been, of course, a thousand signs of growth, but they have unfolded so slowly, so quietly, that we don’t see them all at once. But on that morning, with the force of a thunderclap, we see, in one instant, who the students are and what they are becoming. We see their emerging academic confidence: in their ability to read and write, to solve problems, and to think creatively. We see the greater depth of their thinking: in their maturing interest in the world and their incipient desire to find their places in it. We see the impact of their athletic endeavors: a new swagger in their step and a greater commitment to hard work, to dedication, and to teamwork.

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We see signs of their involvement in the arts: a new willingness to look within, to plumb their own depths, to take the risk of confronting and expressing their inner selves. We see, too, greater social confidence: a deeper awareness of the needs of other people and an emerging willingness to put others first. For those of us who know and love these students, it is an achingly precious moment. We are wistful for what they were, proud of what they are, and eager to see who they will become. The suddenness of our insight makes this growth seem miraculous, but in truth it is the product of a staggering amount of thought and planning, of a thousand careful decisions that have created the rich soil in which this growth can occur. Our students are fortunate to have families who have given them the gift of a school like this. They are lucky, too, to have peers who both challenge and support them and who, together, create such a warm, affirming environment for learning. Above all else, Seven Hills’ Middle School is a place where it is safe to take risks, to step out of one’s comfort zone, and to experiment with new interests. Each of our students plays a significant role in creating a community where they can share their excitement about learning and their eagerness to explore new aspects of themselves.


“Above all else, Seven Hills’ Middle School is a place where it is safe to take risks, to step out of one’s comfort zone, to experiment with new interests, and extend oneself to new people.”

. . . by Head of School Christopher P. Garten

Our students are fortunate, also, to be taught by dedicated and impassioned faculty who are deeply attuned to the unique emotional, social, and academic needs of students this age. Our teachers work tirelessly to design learning activities that stimulate the curiosity and imagination of young people. They give our students a chance to explore, to inquire, to immerse themselves in questions and issues that speak directly to students’ own curiosity about the world. They frame for students complex, meaningful questions and then give them the tools to explore those questions and to find their own creative solutions. They give students opportunities to apply what they know, to conduct experiments, to design and build prototypes. They make learning stimulating, exploratory, engaging, and relevant. And they also make it fun. The faculty’s pedagogical approach reflects training and research-based best practices about the learning needs of students this age, but what distinguishes our Middle School, I believe, is a school culture that has been designed, just as intentionally, to help students develop their social and emotional skills. Their teaching, as well as the complex matrix of programs the faculty has created, is informed by their interest in who our students are, not only as learners, but as people.

In the conduct of each classroom, the rules and assumptions that govern daily discourse; in formal advisory programs and special assemblies; in the Courage and Kindness retreats and community service initiatives; in the tone set by sponsors and coaches in extracurricular activities and on athletic teams, students are guided to live the school’s core values: personal responsibility, kindness and inclusiveness, and respect for the rights and abilities of others. All of this requires a faculty deeply committed to excellence, not only in teaching, but in their work as coaches, advisors, mentors and role models. It requires boundless patience and an abiding concern for students’ growth in all the aspects of their lives. This year marks the seventh year of Bill Waskowitz’s inspired leadership of our Middle School, and though he will be furious with me for doing so, I would be remiss not to acknowledge the profound impact he has had on this school. Bill and his faculty have created a safe and engaging place for students to learn and grow, and the pride we all feel in who our students are becoming is the harvest of all the seeds they have sown. I hope you will enjoy the portrait of life in the Middle that follows.

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An Intentional Design Except for the growth in a child’s first years of life, the time when the most rapid development takes place in a person’s mind and body is during adolescence. Typically, children ages 11-14 hold true to ideals—right is right, wrong is wrong—their bodies and brains are changing rapidly, and they live a daily dichotomy of wanting to be heard, wanting to make a difference, all while wanting not to draw attention to themselves, to what they do, and, possibly, who they believe they are.

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An Immeasurable Experience

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When you ask Seven Hills sixth graders what they like about the Middle School, you are reminded of what it feels like to

“I really like the lockers,” said sixth grader Ainsley Hubert. “I like the campus, too. I really

start a new chapter in your life. A sixth grader will ponder the

loved Doherty and I love my teachers there, but

question for a while before responding from the heart. The

I was ready to move to something bigger. I like

response takes a while, but when it comes, it is practical and dreamy, all at once. After all, everything is new.

assemblies and study hall. I had so much homework in fifth grade, but now that I have study hall,


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Propelled by a mission to help students answer one question— “Who am I in relation to the world?”—Seven Hills’ Middle School reflects the unique needs of adolescents. The innovative philosophies adopted by the Middle School have become part of an intentional design that has been researched, crafted, cared for, and defended over the past several years. Academic experiences are relevant and personally engaging, designed to enable students to explore the world in new ways. And the Middle School’s 36 faculty members, who guide students through numerous learning pathways, are described as one of the closest, most synchronized group of colleagues many have seen in any profession. “Our faculty is unbelievable in terms of the way they truly believe they have the power to make changes that will be the best for kids,” said Head

of Middle School Bill Waskowitz. “We want to make sure when students are at this age, they feel they can take control of their lives, try new things, and deal with difficult situations in a healthy way.” In 2009, Waskowitz left his position as Head of School at an independent school in Denver, Colorado, to do what he says makes him happiest—lead a dynamic Middle School. “I heard that Seven Hills was progressive. It was a place where I felt comfortable and at home, where faculty are not beholden to teaching a course just for credit,” said Waskowitz. “I came to Seven Hills for the opportunity to create a vision for the Middle School where we would love to connect, work, and build on the success of the school.” During his first year, Waskowitz asked questions to understand the needs of his faculty as much as those of his students. In turn, the faculty shared

their truths and perspectives. They openly told him what worked and what didn’t. Waskowitz listened. Following a personal philosophy that a Middle School’s pedagogy is only as good as the faculty who believe in it, Waskowitz allowed teachers to teach what they are passionate about and share their knowledge in ways that speak to pre-teens and young teenagers. Concrete measures were put in place— Waskowitz moved class blocks from 45 to 80 minutes, wanting students to have time to learn in low-pressure, nontraditional environments, and schedules were revised to better suit the needs of students—but much of his vision was continued. . .

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DeBlasio. “Now I can write about what I want to write.”

Sixth grader Mark DeBlasio places having an iPad at the top of

Seventh graders like to talk about their teachers. They know the ropes enough

his list, along with the independent reading log format with

now, so they have comparisons to share. They are quick to mention design

English teacher Emily Stettler, mainly because he likes the

thinking class, and they like the sense of comfort they feel in the routines they

idea of having more literary license. “At Lotspeich we had a

have been able to carve out during their second year in the Middle School.

lot of prompts and we had to answer certain questions,” said

continued. . . 7


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philosophical. Knowing that the adolescent brain “prunes” cognitive abilities that are not used and organically stimulated, he worked with teachers to build curriculum that reflects what students want to learn. He encouraged students

and teachers to dream, and even insisted upon its necessity. The result continues to be a vibrant, confident student community, and an intuitive

faculty membership that loves each other, loves what they do, and is passionate about teaching Middle School students. “For some, Middle School is a place where teachers move in and out,” said sixth grade math teacher Theresa Keller. “For us, we have made a choice to live in the Middle School forever. This is exactly where we want to be.” Keller’s professional fervor is echoed often by her colleagues. Maintaining this tailored learning atmosphere is an ongoing aspiration for Waskowitz and Seven Hills. Now in his seventh year, Waskowitz leads a Middle School that serves as a model of excellence, incorporating a principle upheld by the esteemed Association of Middle Level Education: that Middle education be relevant, rigorous, and integrative.

The quality and strength of connections made daily within Seven Hills’ Middle School has brought a new reality to the forefront during the 2016-17 school year: for the first time in recent history, the Middle School has a waiting list of families who want to enroll, a beaming testament to the faculty’s commitment to relevant, rigorous, integrative curriculum, and to students’ eagerness to pursue knowledge that helps them understand their world so they can help others. “Having visited top schools all over the country, I can honestly say that I believe our Middle School is, now, one of the finest in the country,” said Head of School Chris Garten in a statement this fall. “It starts with an incredibly engaged and committed faculty who are keenly attuned to the intellectual and academic needs of students this age. Middle School students need, above all else, a safe and engaging place to test themselves, and to discover new interests and talents.”

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An Immeasurable Experience continued... 8

Seventh grader Corinne Kieser said she

experience, she’s been up for the challenge her school athletic

appreciates being able to balance

and personal schedules provide. Kieser, a soccer and lacrosse

academics with her full athletic schedule.

player, swimmer, and equestrian, said she is also an avid

Because she learned organization from

reader who always looks forward to Mandy Hayes’ class.

Regina Daily in fourth grade on the Doherty Campus, Kieser said during her Middle School

“Right now we are reading Funny in Farsi,” said Kieser. “I really like the book and how Mrs. Hayes teaches the class because


Relevant

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dissect stanzas, and present layered takes on their favorite poetry. For now, however, Clemens wants to connect with her eighth graders. A few minutes into the project, she scans each group, running through a gamut of responses—“Good, you found one.” “Do you need help?” “Have you looked for anything yet?” Clemens senses the first step is coming along quite well.

“Find a poem you don’t hate.” Eighth grade English teacher Laura Clemens delivers the simple directive, which elicits a few giggles, before huddling with her students who sit in clusters throughout her classroom in mid-October. Over several weeks, her students interview a relative or friend to draw out his or her favorite poem, discuss tools used in poetry,

“Middle School is very much about meeting different students where they are—all at the same time,” said Clemens. “And they’re all in different places. If I look at my class, academically and socially, there are students who are more like sixth graders and some who are more like 10th graders. And they’re all in eighth grade.” The pull and tug of the ongoing academic and social-emotional needs of Middle Schoolers is something that Seven Hills teachers address naturally, a language they speak fluently. The quest for sharing knowledge that makes sense

P U R P O S E

to their students is an ongoing exercise that ranges from valiant and intentional, to slight and serendipitous. Clemens used this same approach when she sensed that Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 may have been a little too daunting for a rising eighth grader’s summer reading list. Instead, Clemens recommended Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game. The book was moved to the Middle School required summer reading list, offering the same concepts and fodder for meaningful discussion around a book the teacher thought would be easier for an adolescent mind to unpack. “Ender’s Game is about a 12-year-old who saves the world. That really speaks to kids,” said Clemens, who uses the assignment to help teach an extensive unit with eighth grade history teacher Judith Neidlein-Dial about power and group dynamics. “It’s much easier for the

W H AT M A K E S T H E MIDDLE SCHOOL TICK? Seven Hills’ Middle School connects with students and families on a multitude of levels because students, faculty, and administration engage daily, guided by the following curriculum: R I G O R O U S – Seven Hills’ Middle School teachers keep expectations high while presenting fair learning plans that speak to the unique needs of each student. R E L E VA N T – Seven Hills’ Middle School students understand why they need to know what they are learning; they pursue knowledge freely and out of necessity, to help them better connect their personal lives with the larger world around them.

I N T E G R A T I V E – Subjects in the Middle School are often delivered through a humanities lens. The line between different disciplines is often blurred and students regularly study issues and discuss ideas that span a number of academic subjects.

continued. . .

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It was beautiful,” Patchan said. “We were literally in the clouds. At its heaviest, you

Eighth grader Nate Patchan shared observations of the

could barely see five feet in front of you.”

total Middle School experience from the first day of sixth

In many ways, Patchan’s take on the Middle School affirms its mission. “The thing

grade to Adventure Trek, a four-day jaunt through Pisgah

about the Middle School teachers is, they all have something behind everything they

National Forest in North Carolina, that launched his eighth

do and everything they teach,” said Patchan. “They don’t give us work to keep us

grade year in September. “At Adventure Trek we were up in the mountains.

busy. We always know there is a real reason why we are learning.”

continued. . .

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students to get into. I felt like the students really like it and that, because of that, they appreciate Middle School literature.” Firmly planted in the belief that “If you don’t believe in what you are teaching, the students will know it,” Seven Hills’ Middle School faculty feel empowered to approach teaching in ways that engage their students, said Waskowitz. “I fear a world with an educational system that prizes only one way of learning.” Such a world is far from Seven Hills. When Waskowitz talks about teaching Middle School

students, his face brightens, he leans in, the anecdotes come tumbling out. This same energy accompanies him throughout his writing workshop classes. Waskowitz, a constant student of brain education, becomes his lessons. “Take your shoe off—show us!” Waskowitz said during a spirited writing workshop class this fall. “We want to see the shoe!” A sixth grader sheepishly slid off his shoe and Waskowitz hoisted it so classmates could see, while continuing his lesson. His students loved every minute. Waskowitz wove through desks and chairs, asking the same questions while his students took turns sharing descriptions of their favorite shoes. “Flip-flops,” one answered. “My Adidas,” “My Sperrys,” “The ones I’m wearing now,” other students say. Then Waskowitz asked, “What do your shoes feel?” “What have they seen?” The students had answers for that, too. And a few minutes later, the students were

discussing empathy, sharing writing samples that range from poetry to prose to rap—all about their shoes. Then Waskowitz shared a line from To Kill a Mockingbird, inviting his students to transfer their abilities to think from the standpoint of their shoes, to review the definition of empathy, and, as a consequence, more personally understand Harper Lee’s reference—“You never really understand a person until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” Waskowitz concluded the lesson by showing students a number of pictures of shoes— cowboy boots, ballet slippers, scuffed baby shoes, holey Chuck Taylors—none of which belong to the students. Yet, when asked to describe the way the shoes feel, the sixth graders’ responses were thoughtful and rich, such as, the threadbare Chuck Taylors feel “abandoned,” the baby shoes, “loved.”

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True. Kind. Necessary. 10

If you are a Middle School student at Seven Hills, you have heard these three words. Taking the three words from a long-ago


Relevant This poignant lesson was fascinating, yet common at Seven Hills’ Middle School, where making lessons relevant has become a sort of discipline. It is why science teacher and Innovation Lab director Karen Glum teaches circuitry to students by offering a number of stuffed animals to light up, instead of simply using a circuit board, or why social studies teacher Doug Huff modeled the Electoral

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College within the Middle School during an election year. It’s why Spanish teacher Philip Thornberry embedded several interactive links in the original online Spanish textbook he designed for his sixth graders, because, as Thornberry says, “Sixth graders love to talk about what they do, where they have been, and what they like. This helps them to engage.” Math in Keller’s sixth grade classroom is more about her students than the numbers they grow to understand and love. A north classroom window bears three clotheslines upon which hang index cards of students’ favorite numbers and a variety of numerical facts about each number. Keller launches the start of the school year with this activity, which gives students a personal connection to math.

P U R P O S E

Keller asks her students to work through math problems in groups because she knows, at ages 11 and 12, “they don’t want attention on them, especially in math class.” Instead, sixth graders reveal their math problems in front of the class as a group, often posting their answers on the board under a scoreboard format. If their group gets the correct answer, Keller adds tally marks to their portion of the board. But more importantly, the students learn from each other, said Keller, and they come away with a feeling that, like French or Spanish, math is just another language to be learned, and something necessary in everyday life.

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and empathy students, teachers, and administrators strive to exhibit in their daily interactions. “It’s a simple phrase,” said Waskowitz. “These three words have become foundational in the Middle School.” 11


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Rigorous

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In mid-October, Seven Hills Middle School students participated in an Ohio Junior Classical League Fall Forum in Columbus. The students returned with ribbons in the Academic

Pentathlon, Latin Recitation, Impromptu Art, and Certamen tournament, as well as a special award for a seventh grader who won “Best Myth.” During the winter, groups of Middle

School students have participated in Power of the Pen writing competitions that allow Middle School students from across the region and state to respond to creative writing prompts that are evaluated by a panel of judges, often resulting in awards of distinction for Seven Hills students. Historically, Seven Hills does very well in the MATHCOUNTS competition, often qualifying for the state competition, and every year the Middle School graduates 80-plus, well-prepared, ambitious students to Seven Hills’ Upper School. The story of

challenging academic exploration doesn’t begin or end, however, with these references to high achievement. The story of academic rigor within the Middle School is told daily on a personal level, lesson-by-lesson, student-by-student. While rigor in curriculum is a cornerstone of the Middle School, it is also a concept that is often misunderstood, said sixth grade science teacher Jennifer Licata, who, along with her science department colleagues, designs curriculum for very challenging topics, such as cell structure and function, genetics, human anatomy, and botany. “The word rigor is often used to describe an academic setting that is based on workload, often a very heavy workload, with hours of homework and tasks that can be so daunting they seem impossible,” said Licata, who structures the lessons in a way that provides students with hands-on experiences to make

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Unpacking Excellence 12

THE INTENTIONAL STRENGTH OF SEVEN HILLS’

SPIRALING CURRICULUM

MIDDLE SCHOOL IS A REFLECTION OF PLANNING

This term is used to describe how students grasp writing and

A N D O R G A N I Z AT I O N T H AT R E Q U I R E S E X T E N S I V E

literature. In the latter half of the year, sixth grade teacher Emily

FA C U L T Y C O L L A B O R AT I O N . TA K E A L O O K AT

Stettler teaches paragraph writing by asking students to write a

JUST A FEW EXAMPLES OF HOW IT’S DONE.

three-paragraph essay, which introduces the idea of finding


A CONSTANT QUEST FOR CHALLENGING AND EXPLORATORY CURRICULUM

many of the abstract concepts something they can manipulate. “Rigor in our curriculum requires students to explore, wrestle with, and understand challenging concepts with the focus on the process of learning, and not simply the outcome. Success is within the reach of each student, but requires that each student go through this process of learning,” said Licata. “Students need to know their teachers are willing to adapt to meet their needs. And, the Middle School teachers see the needs of the students change nearly every day.” Every fall, English teacher Mandy Hayes opens her class with clear goals. The students’ yearlong quest greets them at the front of the classroom in the form of a large sign posted under Hayes’ whiteboard: “How does where we come from shape who we are?” The “essential question,” as Hayes calls it, frames her curriculum for the rest of the school year.

“I present a challenging curriculum, but I build a lot of scaffolding into my program so the rigor is accessible to students of all different learning styles and all different levels,” said Hayes. “I certainly feel that, with the way literature is taught in all three Middle School grades, teachers focus on making sure the learning is challenging as we help the students move from the literal reading of words into the realm of critical and analytical thinking.” Hayes’ clear expectations and guided curriculum allow young seventh graders, who have previously learned how to write and

incorporate paragraphs into longer pieces, find their way to write a five-paragraph essay. Through the use of a curriculum-refining grant, Hayes and sixth grade English teacher Emily Stettler strategically crafted a “spiraling curriculum” in their department, which also carries through to Laura Clemens’ eighth grade class, ensuring that

The Middle School program is deemed challenging because it requires a lot of work. I believe much of our Middle School focuses on the process of learning and not the final outcome. – Science teacher Jennifer Licata

essential critical reading and writing skills are developed as students make their way through continued. . .

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assignment, but asks the students to refine it in a sophisticated essay,

picks up where Stettler left off and helps students build upon their knowledge of

embedding the evidence into their writing.

writing a thesis statement, using Stettler’s foundational lesson. Hayes then asks

TEACHING THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE

her students to use their knowledge of evidence to build a five-paragraph essay about To Kill a Mockingbird. In eighth grade, Laura Clemens assigns a similar

At the start of the school year, Doug Huff began working with Head of Middle School Bill Waskowitz to replicate the function of the Electoral College within

continued. . . 13


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Seven Hills Middle School. In essence, students will leave Stettler with a developing sense of what they will master in Hayes’ class. The same process takes place when they leave Hayes and prepare for the academic tone of Clemens’ curriculum.

outside of the classroom. Certainly our students complete work and are expected to study outside of the classroom, but we do not let the traditional idea of rigor—and the workload that goes with that—determine our program.”

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“We’ve been very purposeful with our creation of spiraling curriculum so every step along the way, students are reviewing the skills they’ve learned in the past and adding new skills on top of that,” said Hayes. The presentation of concepts, ideas, and knowledge overlap, and that makes Middle School students feel secure and confident with the challenging, exploratory projects they grow accustomed to researching, developing, and accomplishing. “Hours of homework does not equate to better understanding. We work to develop lessons that

help students really think about the topics we explore to better understand,” said Licata. “We want them to be challenged to really think about what they are learning, to develop a better understanding. This process may involve class discussions or research with very little work happening

Having visited top schools all over the country, I can honestly say that I believe our Middle School is, now, one of the finest in the country. – Head of School Chris Garten

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Unpacking Excellence

the Middle School. Huff’s project, which mirrors VOTES 2016,

campaign year, however, Huff prepared curriculum to get the

run by Jim Shea, a friend of Waskowitz and history teacher at

Middle School involved as well.

continued ...

Northfield Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts, typically

A P O E T I C TA K E O N H I S T O R Y

involves high schools only. Wanting to give the Middle School

Eighth grade English and history teachers Laura Clemens and

students an understanding of the process during a presidential

Judith Neidlein-Dial, respectively, used a 2016 summer grant to


Above all else, connect. TA K E A L O O K AT J U S T A F E W O F T H E M A N Y P R O G R A M S T H AT B R I N G S T U D E N T S , T E A C H E R S , A N D FA M I L I E S T O G E T H E R I N T H E M I D D L E S C H O O L .

P U M P K I N D AY – Middle School students work collaboratively on team-building events designed to encourage interacting productively with peers and teachers. After working against the clock to decorate pumpkins in teams, students survey the finished products.

I N S E C T D AY – Students, teachers, and administrators produce a day of innovation and inquiry every fall on I n s e c t D a y. S t u d e n t s a n d t h e i r p a r e n t s participate in a number of inquiry-based activities, including building insects u s i n g c i r c u i t r y, e x p e r i m e n t s w i t h termites, and creative writing with insects as a focus.

G L O B A L E D U C AT I O N D AY – This annual educational day offers dozens of workshops with community educators on a variety of topics and ends w i t h Amazing Race- l i k e a c t i v i t i e s i n the afternoon. Middle School students receive a glimpse of education around the world as they engage in dozens of l i v e l y, e y e - o p e n i n g , a c a d e m i c , a r t i s t i c , and athletic activities.

B I R D D AY – Sixth graders go on a field trip to Hueston Wo o d s S t a t e Pa r k w h e r e t h e y o b s e r v e t h e f i e l d w o r k o f D r. D a v e Russell, an ornithologist and professor a t M i a m i U n i v e r s i t y. T h e c o n c l u s i o n o f the unit also incorporates an all-day study with Drs. Dave and Jill Russell, and a display of students’ findings about bird behaviors based on the scientific method.

H U N G E R B A N Q U E T – Every few y e a r s , d u r i n g t h e s c h o o l ’s H u n g e r Banquet, dozens of Middle School students and their families immerse themselves in a simulated reality of the hunger crisis in developing countries. This event is designed to raise awareness of global issues.

A D V E N T U R E T R E K – Eighth graders enjoy this four-day trip to North Carolina that launches their school y e a r. T h e y s p e n d f o u r d a y s c a m p i n g and backpacking through the Pisgah National Forest with their teachers a n d t h e A d v e n t u r e Tr e k guides. Activities include rock climbing, hiking, creek stomping, campfires, and whitewater rafting.

•••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••• •••••••••••• ••••• build curriculum that asks their students to study poetry and photography from World War I. The students will study different tools of poetry, including propaganda-based, realistic poems, and those about women’s role in the war. The students will then choose poems and combine them with the photography in an iMovie production.

For some, Middle School is a place from which teachers move in and out. For us, we have made a choice to live in the Middle forever. This is exactly where we want to be. – Math teacher Theresa Keller 15


I N T E N T I O N A L

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Consistently building upon relationship-based teaching, Middle School teachers guide mindfully, with an eye on the changing relationships within the school as much as what is happening in the world. Inspired by a line in E. M. Forster’s Howard’s End, Waskowitz adapted an adage he lives by—“Above all else, connect”—which is as much about students connecting with their peers and their world as it is about ideas and concepts that span disciplines. A glimpse in any Middle School classroom, on any given day, may reveal students practicing math and chemistry concepts in art, English in history class, or physical education in science class. As it turns out, studying history, Latin, English, geography, anthropology and multiculturalism, and art in French class is pretty common, too. Jacky Kalubi’s French class recently studied the 11th century Battle of Hastings, a defining rebellion that, among several things, explains why the English language includes so many

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Integrative French words. During the study, Kalubi assigned a project in which the students portrayed the 230-ft. long Bayeux Tapestry by drawing and coloring scenes from the original The textile.

curiosity of her students with random, often provocative questions centered around French culture, during a brief segment of her class with

approach to learning in the Middle School is so thrilling. These kids can’t wait to get to school. The block class schedule beautifully teaches our kids to plan ahead, use excellent time management, and learn useful, relevant study skills. Often, homework is started in class, insuring understanding and alleviating anxiety.

“As we worked on this project, it was amazing to see how many aspects of learning were involved,” said Kalubi. “I tapped into the cultural backgrounds of the students, too. So, based on the cultural backgrounds – Middle School parent Heather Vecellio of my students, we took a look at Chinese, Roman, an activity called “vignettes.” The conversational and Hindi scripts, and the students looked up interaction takes place about every 10 days, and different ways of writing. always starts off with a question, which appeals to the trivia-hungry adolescents. “Although the Roman script is the most widely adopted system, there are many other writing systems and alphabets. Some of our students are familiar with the Hindi, Urdu, Korean, Arabic, Hebrew, Japanese (Kanji, Hiragana, Katakana), and Greek scripts.” Kalubi, a French and Spanish language teacher at Seven Hills for 27 years, often piques the

“Who was Maximilien Robespierre?” “Who was the most kissed woman in the world?” “What is Mount Pelée?” The students busy themselves with research on their iPads and come back together for meandering discussions that strengthen their emotional and intellectual quotients, said Kalubi.


VA L U I N G

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The exercises never go beyond 10 minutes, but they go a long way in sowing within each student a desire to appreciate research and pursue the quest for knowledge. “They like the break from the class routine,” said Kalubi. “It’s a kind of release.” While much of the integrative approach is academic based, it also plays a part in how comfortable the students feel in all settings. In addition to melding a number of disciplines into his lesson plans, geography teacher, dean of students, and Middle School cross country coach Andy McGarvey also uses an integrative approach in his interaction with students. He said teachers work just as hard on the socialemotional environment of the school as they do on academics. He attributes the Middle School’s current waiting list to the fact that

students are starting to feel like they can be who they are—kids. “The little things mean something and one of those things is that students don’t have to feel so grown up so fast,” said McGarvey. “The students feel good about that and parents are starting to notice that. We’re getting more and more families who know about our school culture, and they want to be part of it.” McGarvey ties history and current events into his geography classes to offer a more multifaceted, thorough understanding of the world. Knowing that his students like to move around during class, McGarvey used funds from the Parents Association to purchase stability balls for the students to use as chairs. And after serving as chairs for a few years, McGarvey recently found another use for them. Using blue tape on the stability balls, McGarvey asked students to turn their chairs into globes, noting that many of his students benefited from the hands-on lesson.

“I have no problem taking apart the classroom and teaching,” said McGarvey, adding that he was considering having the students pencil out and color in a world map on the classroom floor for an upcoming project. “I want to get the point across that the world is small and we’re all interconnected. Students don’t learn in a linear way, so why teach that way?” Whether the connections being made are between students and teachers, among faculty, or between students and new concepts, the integrative nature of Seven Hills’ Middle School program promotes the value of relationships. “Kids will forget a lot of things they will learn in Middle School,” said Waskowitz. “But they will remember the relationships they make in the classroom and the discussions they’ve had with teachers, the issues they were passionate about.”

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School News N E W

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We are pleased to welcome new Seven Hills faculty and staff! Angie Bielecki Doherty Guidance Counselor

Angie received her B.A. in sociology, with a minor in education studies, from The Colorado College and an M.Ed. in school counseling from the University of Cincinnati. Angie most recently held the position of school counselor at North College Hill Middle School, where she provided individual and group counseling, as well as conflict resolution, for students in grades five through eight. Angie is licensed as a professional school counselor in Ohio and Kentucky. She has presented her work at the National Evidence-Based School Counseling Conference and her group was chosen to serve on panels regarding the implementation of evidence-based counseling in Northern Kentucky.

Breitenstein Evans

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Donna Breitenstein Doherty Unit I Teacher

Donna received her B.A. in art history and a master’s degree in art education from the University of Cincinnati. Donna most recently held the position of long-term kindergarten substitute on the Doherty Campus, where she began working in fall 2015. She has also worked as a substitute at Lotspeich and Doherty since 2012. Previously, from 2000 -12, Donna was an art educator at Pleasant Run Elementary and Welch Elementary. She has earned several awards throughout her career, including Pleasant Run Elementary Educator of the Year in 2008 and Outstanding Graduate Student in Art Education, from the University of Cincinnati in 2000.

Taylor Evans Communications Specialist

Taylor received her B.S. in magazine journalism from Ohio University. Taylor most recently held the position of society editor and reporter at the Marysville Journal-Tribune in Marysville, Ohio, where she wrote articles about the city, local schools, and other agencies, and managed the paper’s society page. While at Ohio University, Taylor wrote for a variety of publications, including the university’s research magazine, Perspectives, and websites WOUB and Her Campus Ohio U. She has experience in photography and social media.

Michelle Foster Lotspeich Pre-K Teacher

Michelle received her B.S. in science and business from University of Notre Dame and an M.A.Ed. in elementary education from Benedictine University in Illinois. Michelle most recently held the position of second grade teacher at Ohio Virtual Academy, where she served as lead instructional support teacher for a class of 50 students enrolled in second grade who read below their grade level. She also developed weekly lesson plans. During the 2015-16 school year, Michelle served as an at-risk specialist and instructional support reading teacher. She also held the position of pre-kindergarten teacher at St. Jude the Apostle School, located in Louisiana.

Stephanie Godsell Encore Club Program Leader

Stephanie received her B.A. in elementary education from Morehead State University and an M.A. in education from Northern Kentucky University. She also studied early childhood education at the College of Mount St. Joseph. Stephanie most recently held the position of lead teacher of a pre-kindergarten class at KinderCare. At KinderCare, she organized and developed a class with learning centers and regular activities. Stephanie previously taught multiple elementary school classes in Cincinnati Public Schools and Kenton County Schools. She also taught preschool at Mt. Washington Presbyterian Preschool.

Marcie Handler Middle and Upper School Latin Teacher

Marcie received her B.A. in classical archaeology from Dartmouth College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in classics from the University of Cincinnati. She studied in the Post Baccalaureate Program in Classics at the University of Pennsylvania and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in Athens, Greece. Marcie most recently taught Latin and ancient-medieval world civilizations at Covington Latin School in Kentucky. She has had archaeological dig experiences in Greece and Italy. She is a member of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South, the American Classical League, Kentucky World Language Association, and Archaeological Institute of America.


School News N E W

Maxwell Helmsworth Encore Club Program Leader

Maxwell received his B.S. in psychology from the University of Cincinnati. Maxwell most recently held the positions of swim instructor and lifeguard supervisor at Lifetime Fitness, as well as on-call store manager at Games Workshop. As a swim instructor, he taught swimming skills to children and adults. Maxwell also served as a mental health specialist at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and residential associate at Solutions Community Counseling and Recovery Center. As a mental health specialist, Maxwell worked with children, adolescents, and their families, and facilitated group therapy sessions.

Dorothy Hogston Lotspeich Pre-K Assistant Teacher

Dorothy received her B.S. in early childhood education with a minor in Spanish at the University of Cincinnati. Dorothy most recently taught third grade reading and writing at the Winton Preparatory Academy during the 2015-16 school year. At Winton, she helped to motivate young girls in building confidence through the Girls on the Run organization. Prior to that, she served as a lead teacher in pre-kindergarten at the Gardner School. While attending the University of Cincinnati, Dorothy studied abroad in Madrid, Spain, at the don Quijote Spanish School.

Samantha Laffoon Middle School Guidance Counselor

Samantha received her B.A. in anthropology and sociology from Rhodes College and an M.Ed. in counseling from University of Houston. She also completed coursework in career and college planning, counseling theory, and human development and learning at Loyola Marymount University. She most recently served as president and chief psychotherapist at her practice in Houston, Texas. Laffoon has worked with children in various capacities. During her time in Houston, she served as an academic guidance counselor at Strake Jesuit College Preparatory and associate director of college counseling at St. Agnes Academy.

Sherri Linville Doherty Unit II Teacher

Sherri received her B.A. in education from Northern Kentucky University, her master’s degree in elementary education from Xavier University, and her master’s degree in gifted education from Northern Kentucky University. She most recently worked as an individualized learning instructor for children of different ages in public and private schools, where she worked to problem solve in areas such as how a child learns best and what materials they need to learn. Sherri has worked as a teacher at Mercer Elementary and Wilson Elementary. She also volunteered with Special Friends, a mentoring program for children.

F A C E S

Aaron McIntosh Technology Specialist

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Helmsworth

Aaron received his B.A. in English literature from the University of Cincinnati. He most recently worked as an IT field engineer at Global Business Solutions in Newport, Kentucky, where he assisted with help desk tickets, virtualized servers, and also worked on iPad management in a school environment. He has worked in the Cincinnati area, as well as in New York and Washington state, in various capacities as an IT engineer, videographer, technical director, systems administrator, and network administrator. He is a technical support professional with 10 years of experience in software, networking tools, and hardware.

Zoë Paraskevopoulos Lotspeich Fifth Grade Teacher

S E V E N

Zoë received her B.A. in French language and literature, with high honors, from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S.Ed. in childhood education and childhood special education from Hunter College, City University of New York. She also participated in the Teaching English as a Second Language Certificate Program at the Teachers College, Columbia University. She most recently held the position of third grade lead teacher at The School at Columbia University in New York, where she developed and directed integrated math, literacy, and social studies units. At The School, from 2009-11, Zoë also held the position of associate teacher for kindergarten and third grade.

Hogston Laffoon Linville McIntosh

Paraskevopoulos 19


School News N E W

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We are pleased to welcome new Seven Hills faculty and staff!

Paull Reenan Walston Wilson Wu 20

Caleb Paull Upper School English Teacher

Caleb received his B.A. in English from Brown University, and an M.A. in education and an Ed.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He most recently held the position of long-term English substitute in the Upper School. Paull has an extensive background in education. Before joining Seven Hills, he was the Associate Dean for Continuous Improvement and Director of Assessment and Accreditation in Georgetown College’s education department. He also served as Assistant Dean, Communications and Continuous Improvement, Assistant Professor of Secondary Education, and Technology Coordinator in Roosevelt University’s College of Education.

Colette Reenan Encore Club Program Leader

Colette received her B.S. in education, both elementary and special education, from the University of Cincinnati. Colette has extensive experience working with children, both outside and within The Seven Hills School community. Most recently, she worked as a substitute teacher at Seven Hills after briefly retiring. Before her retirement, she was a pre-kindergarten teacher in Lotspeich’s Wuerfel building. She has also worked as an early intervention specialist for Butler County and taught for the Hamilton County Board of Developmental Disabilities.

Douglas Walston Maintenance

Douglas holds an electrical master contractor’s license and completed a four-year electrical apprenticeship with Independent Electrical Contractors. He most recently held the position of electrical superintendent at HP2X Construction, where he fabricated specific electrical component parts and assemblies. He has worked as an electrician at Nutone as well. His expertise includes electrical equipment maintenance, blueprint fluency, and knowledge of the National Electric Code. He has experience in client account management and staff training and development.

Stacy B. Wilson Middle and Upper School Math Teacher

Stacy received her B.A. in chemistry from Miami University and her M.Ed. in secondary science from The Ohio State University. She most recently held the position of private tutor, where she tutored middle and high school students in math, science, and SAT/ACT preparation. Stacy returns to Seven Hills after teaching Middle and Upper school science, math, chemistry, and health from 1998 to 2006. She was involved in Seven Hills athletics as an assistant gymnastics coach in the Middle School. Stacy has also worked as a chemist at Procter & Gamble, and a teacher at Upper Arlington Middle School and Whetstone High School, both located in Columbus.

Mia Wu Middle and Upper School Chinese Teacher

Mia received her B.A. in teaching Chinese as a second language from Zhejiang University of Technology in Hangzhou, China, and her M.Ed. from Valparaiso University in Indiana. She most recently served as high school and intermediate Chinese instructor at Richmond Community Schools, where she completed curriculum mapping for the program and organized cultural field trips, as well as the after school Chinese cultural club. Mia has worked with lower grade levels as a student teacher at a high school and elementary school in Walkerton, Indiana. She has skills in curriculum design, the use of educational assistive technology, as well as classroom management in an urban setting.

Get a fresh start for today and dona the new year! Clean out closets te your items to the Resale Shop and cupboards . Happy New Ye ar!


School News N A T I O N A L

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Seven Hills Congratulates National Merit Achievers

AP Scholar Awards

Seven Hills continues its tradition of excellence with 21 students who received recognition from the National Merit Scholarship Program. Fourteen students were named Semifinalists, and seven

96% of AP Exam scores qualify for advanced standing in college

were named Commended Students in the 2017 National Merit Program.

Seven Hills National Merit Semifinalists are Calvin Arbenz, Samantha Chun, Shane DiGiovanna, Samantha Eng, Nina Fatuzzo, Chase Gardner, Daniel Grass, Jason Guo, Rosie Kilcoyne, Jack Lane, Katie Loeffler, Emily McLennan, and Sam Stevens. Seven Hills 2016 graduate Matisse Peppet, who graduated after her junior year, is also being recognized by the National Merit Scholarship Program as a Semifinalist. National Merit Commended Students are Scott Arnold, Chase Byington, Jake Moses, Henry Marquardt, Katie Corbett, Devi Namboodiri, and Andres Antonsson. National Merit Semifinalists Front: Nina Fatuzzo, Rosie Kilcoyne, Samantha Chun, Katie Loeffler, Samantha Eng, and Emily McLennan Back: Sam Stevens, Daniel Grass, Chase Gardner, Calvin Arbenz, Jack Lane, Jason Guo, and Shane DiGiovanna Not pictured: Matisse Peppet National Merit Commended Students Front: Henry Marquardt, Katie Corbett, Devi Namboodiri, and Andres Antonsson Back: Scott Arnold, Chase Byington, and Jake Moses

Of the 277 Advanced Placement exams in 15 subjects taken by 129 Seven Hills students in May 2016, 96% qualified for advanced college standing by receiving a score of 3 or better on the 1-5 national scale on at least one exam. Among those who qualified, 73 were named AP Scholars* by the College Board for their exceptional achievements for scoring 3’s or higher on more than three exams. Receiving National AP Scholar Awards for average scores of at least 4 or higher on all AP Exams taken and scores of 4 or higher on eight or more are 2016 graduates Tigar Cyr, Alex Jiang, Matthew Marquardt, Bennett Smith, Nicole Tiao, and Kathy Wang. Receiving the AP International Diploma was 2016 graduate Gary Wang. The International Diploma is granted to students who receive scores of 3 or higher on five or more AP exams in three or more subject areas. The globally recognized award is given to students planning to study at a university outside their native countries. Receiving AP Scholar with Distinction Awards for average scores of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken and scores of 3 or higher on five or more are seniors Andres Antonsson, Calvin Arbenz, Chase Byington, Samantha Chun, Nina Fatuzzo, Chase Gardner, Charlie Goldsmith, Daniel Grass, Jason Guo, Rosie Kilcoyne, Jack Lane, and Quinn Shim. 2016 graduates who received AP Scholar with Distinction Awards are Fatima Anwar, Kate Coley, Lauren Collette, Margaret Cox, James Coyle, Tigar Cyr, Audrey Ditty, Cathy Fang, Brian Hills, Ada Huang, Alex Jiang, Matthew Marquardt, Mike Nazzaro, Matisse Peppet, Bennett Smith, Zach Sorscher, Claire Stewart, Nicole Tiao, Gary Wang, Kathy Wang, Camille Williams, Kaylan Young, and L-A Zenezini. Receiving AP Scholar with Honor Awards for average scores of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken and scores of 3 or higher on four or more are seniors Elizabeth Bohinski, Joe Dizenhuz, and Barret Gao. Class of 2016 graduates who received AP Scholar with Honor Awards are Alyssa Akiyama, Maria Bobbitt-Chertock, Marney Briggs, Matthew Clayton, Carly Cohen, Clay Hausberger, Danny Mutasim, Kelly Pan, and Tziporah Serota. Receiving AP Scholar Awards for scoring 3 or higher on three or more exams are seniors Shelby Davis, Shane DiGiovanna, Samantha Eng, Lukas Geiger, Tim Hagemeister, Trey Kieser, Emily McLennan, Jake Moses, Noelle O’Neal, Laney Saggar, Lauren Saggar, Abby Schneider, Piper Spooner, and Jacob Weinstein. Class of 2016 graduates who received AP Scholar Awards are Catherine Bain, Abby Clark, Jacob Feldman, Claire McDonald, Sawyer Pardo, Mehul Patel, Claire Piorkowski, Kenneth Remaklus, Hayley Samson, Andrei Savu, Jeff Welch, and Matt Williams. 21 *Based on scores received in August 2016


School News H O M E C O M I N G

Seven Hills parents show off a table full of school spirit gear

Soccer clinic

Teachers enjoy some food fresh off the grill

Homecoming 2016: A night to remember!

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The Seven Hills community gathered for an amazing fireworks display to close out Homecoming

Golf clinic

It wouldn’t be Homecoming without our traditional shootout

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School News H O M E C O M I N G

2 0 1 6

Seven Hills staff serves up burgers and hotdogs

The photo booth was packed, and popular, all night

Volleyball clinic

Students enjoy the Homecoming cookout

There were smiles all around

Soccer clinic

Cheerleading clinic

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School News F A C U L T Y

Seven Hills Awards Hauck Faculty Chair to Liz Lorenz After extensive consultation with grade level teachers, Lorenz developed a new integrated project math program for first through fifth grades. Classes visit the Math Lab weekly, where students plan and execute real world projects that foster and extend their problem-solving skills.

Project math teacher Liz Lorenz is the recipient of one of Seven Hills’ highest faculty honors—the Frederick A. Hauck Faculty Chair in Mathematics and Science—in recognition of the excellence of her teaching. Nuclear scientist and philanthropist Frederick A. Hauck established the endowed Hauck Faculty Chair at Seven Hills in 1988.

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A versatile member of the Seven Hills faculty for 12 years, Lorenz has taught students spanning early childhood through fifth grade. After years of successful work as a kindergarten teacher, Lorenz transitioned to a new role as an instructional leader in mathematics at Lotspeich. Over the last six years, Lorenz has transformed the position from a support role to a true leadership position of math resource and enrichment coordinator.

“Liz has guided her students, her faculty colleagues, and Lower School parents through the transition to a comprehensive new math program for kindergarten through fifth grade,” said Head of School Chris Garten as he presented the award to Lorenz during an assembly last spring. “Liz’s guiding passion is her desire to meet the needs of all the students she serves. In her teaching role, she has developed a comprehensive program that is responsive to the unique learning styles of each child. She provides enrichment for those who need greater challenges, and alternative strategies and support for others. “Passionately committed to building a strong mathematical base for future success and confidence, Liz helps our youngest students approach math with curiosity, understanding, and selfassurance,” said Garten. “These are gifts that will last a lifetime.”

H O N O R S

Class of 1956 Fund for Excellence in Teaching Award: Mark Beyreis The Hillsdale Class of 1956 Award is given to a member of Seven Hills’ Upper School faculty who fosters a love of, and excitement about, learning among Seven Hills students. At a faculty and staff meeting last spring, Head of School Chris Garten announced the recipient of the Class of 1956 Fund for Excellence in Teaching Award, saying “Perspicacious. Sanguine. Altruistic. Astute. All of these adjectives are drawn from our English 9 and 12 vocabulary books, and all could be readily applied to English teacher Mark Beyreis . “Mark’s students value his love of literature, his exciting lessons and assignments, and his unflagging good nature. These qualities are evident in the projects that Mark undertakes with his classes,” said Garten. “From working with the ninth graders on filming scenes from Shakespeare, to preparing seniors to meet with our Books for Lunch authors, Mark inspires students to see the power and relevance of the written word. He is always in his students’ corner, rooting for them to do and be their best. His confidence in them gives them confidence in themselves. “Outside of the classroom, Mark can be found everywhere. As yearbook moderator, he and his camera are present at countless games and events. You will also see his editors everywhere, for he has fostered tremendous leadership among the students on yearbook,” said Garten. “The professionalism and enthusiasm with which they carry out their responsibilities is a credit to Mark, and a reflection of his own dedication. Always making time for others, Mark can routinely be found collaborating with other teachers on joint projects, sharing a kind word or a great story with a colleague, and working with his students outside of class. We are all grateful to have Mark in the Upper School, and it is a great pleasure to honor him with the Class of 1956 Award.”


School News F A C U L T Y

H O N O R S

Brodie Grants Honor Mimi Stricker, Barb Frey for Excellence in Teaching Two teachers are recipients of Brodie Grants for Excellence in Teaching from the Brodie Family Faculty Betterment Fund— Doherty art teacher Mimi Stricker and Upper School academic support faculty member Barb Frey. The Brodie Fund is an endowed fund that provides professional development opportunities for faculty and recognizes outstanding teachers at both early and later stages of their careers.

Mimi Stricker “Remarkable teacher. Extraordinary human being.” In a meeting last spring with faculty and staff, Head of School Chris Garten used these words to describe Mimi Stricker. Garten shared that

Stricker is an artist who brings energy, enthusiasm, and passion to each day and each project. “She takes her craft very seriously. Her curriculum is rich in content, and her methods full of patient inspiration,” said Garten. “Mimi challenges the artist in each one of her children, whether he or she is two or 10. She expects each student’s best effort and full commitment, and the results are nothing less than extraordinary. “Mimi’s impact on students is measured in moments when a student’s doubt turns to confidence or confusion to understanding. Her magic reveals itself in those moments, astonishingly frequent in her case, when a child comes to believe in his or her own inner artist. Mimi is a true blessing to the Seven Hills community.”

Barb Frey Garten praised Barb Frey for her versatility, energy, and expertise. “For decades, Barb has tutored, strategized with and about, nurtured, and cared for our students. Her day may start with helping one student understand how to develop a thesis, how to organize an argument, how to use evidence in history and English,” said Garten. “Then the bell rings and she turns to the next student, but this one is frustrated by quadratic equations. The door opens

again, this time on a boy who needs help organizing a presentation on the Cold War. “Barb’s days are filled with block after block of oneon-one work, finding new ways to explain, new ways to reinforce, new ways to help kids understand not just one discipline, but many. She is there, as teacher and coach, always trying to understand each child’s very individual needs, always working not only to help them master the task at hand but to acquire the skills they’ll need to eventually become independent of her. Barb’s investment in each student is legendary. Students remember her and are grateful to her all their lives.”

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School News

H I L L S D A L E

Hillsdale Campus Track Undergoes Renovations The track on the Hillsdale Campus is a hub of activity. On any given day, Lotspeich students are running around the track during gym class, or Middle and Upper student athletes are completing laps. The well-used track recently underwent major renovations, becoming an up-to-date facility for students. Athletic Director Brian Phelps said this is the first major renovation to the track since the 1980s. “The new track is a great addition to our athletic facilities,” Phelps said. “Students have enjoyed the track and it has been put to good use since the renovation.” The track was completed in August 2016, with work happening throughout the summer. Phelps said he is pleased with the update, which includes a corrected slope, new surface,

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and new foundation. Fencing was also added around the track in early November. There is an additional benefit to the overhaul. Because of the renovations, the school will be able to hold the Seven Hills Track and Field Invitational for the first time in two years. The event will be held at the end of April 2017, and student athletes in the Middle and Upper schools will participate. Phelps is excited about the upcoming invitational. “Seven Hills now has the opportunity to host its own track invitationals, showcasing our athletes and campus to the community,” he said.

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Books for Lunch 2017 The 2017 Books for Lunch committee, co-chaired by Seven Hills parents Maria Kalomenidou and Ingrid Handl-Geiger, is honored to present this year’s guest author, best-selling novelist, journalist, and critic Thrity Umrigar. Umrigar is the author of several novels, including Bombay Time, The Space Between Us, and The Story Hour, selected as a “Choose to Read Ohio” Book for 2017 and 2018. “We are thrilled to bring Ms. Umrigar to Seven Hills. She is a gracious, insightful writer in tune with human nature,” said Kalomenidou. “We are particularly impressed with the way she uses her dual culture, Indian and American, while crafting her characters. We look forward to having her share her thoughts and insights about being a global citizen with our Middle and Upper School students this year.” In its 31st year, Books for Lunch invites noted authors to Seven Hills for a morning with Upper School students and a luncheon with parents and the Greater Cincinnati community. If you haven’t participated before, you are invited to come and see what it is all about. And if you have, please join us again for what promises to be an extraordinary event. Save the date for Feb. 3, 2017, luncheon at Xavier University’s Cintas Center. Tickets are $50. Please visit www.7hills.org/BooksForLunch for more information about Umrigar and her work.

S av e t h e D a t e

The Se ve n Hill s Sc

ho ol pr

Le c tu re Lu n c h e o esents n an B o o k S ig n in g d

Friday, February 3, 2017 11 a.m. Luncheon and book signing at the Cinta s Center, Xavier Uni versity For more informa tion visit www.7hills.org /BooksForLunc h


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Fall Sports Honors Championships, outstanding teams, and talented student athletes made Seven Hills’ fall sports season a triumphant one. Seven Hills student athletes and coaches earned recognition in golf, girls tennis, boys cross country, volleyball, boys soccer, and girls soccer. Congratulations to our student athletes who made the Seven Hills fall season so successful, receiving a number of accolades and recognitions during the fall sports awards.

The girls varsity tennis team, coached by Tim Drew, dominated throughout the season.

Tennis Doubles The team was undefeated in the Miami Valley Conference (MVC) for the fourth year in a row and won their flight of the Greater Cincinnati Coaches Classic. Their record was 14-4 overall, and 6-0 in the league. The team also went to the Southwest District Finals. Two doubles teams competed in the state tournament in October. The teams included Laney and Lauren Saggar, and Jillian Blatt and Natalie Choo.

Varsity Golf The Seven Hills golf team ended a strong season with its first-ever state championship, and the third sports state championship in the school’s history. The boys advanced to state after winning the Division III districts in Beavercreek and then sectionals at Walden Ponds. The team, led by coach Doug Huff, claimed the championship in mid-October at the Division III Ohio State Golf Tournament at NorthStar Golf Club. Team members included Jack Lane, Daniel Grass, Max Lane, John Stewart, Ben Agin, and alternate Austin Murph. They shot a two-day total of 648, winning the tournament by 10 strokes. Jack Lane was named First Team All-State, and Max Lane was named Second Team All-State.

The boys varsity cross country team proved to be tough competition last fall. In October, Chase Gardner won the Miami Valley Conference varsity boys division. Gardner and Matthew Maring advanced to state after a strong showing at regionals. Cross Country

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season, including a first-ever victory over Cincinnati Christian School. The team was 18-5 overall, and 11-2 in the MVC. Ava Romerill was also named First Team All-City and Player of the Year in the MVC.

Boys varsity soccer ended a dynamic season with a second place finish in the Miami Valley Championship. The strength of the team showed when they finished 5-1-1 in the MVC, and 9-4-3 overall.

Volleyball

Boys Soccer

Seven Hills girls varsity

soccer took on some of the best teams in the city this fall. Their hard work paid off when they finished third in the Miami Valley Championship. The team boasts an 8-6-2 record overall, and 5-3 in MVC play.

Girls Soccer

Boys soccer coach Nick Francis, volleyball coach Michell Cowherd, and tennis coach Tim Drew received the MVC Coach of the Year award, while Jack Lane received the Dick Snyder Sportsmanship Award, which is awarded to students who display integrity and general sportsmanship throughout the season. The girls varsity volleyball team claimed its title as league champions in October. The team, led by coach Michell Cowherd, had a great fall

Seven Hills had a total of 63 Scholar Athlete award recipients this season. To qualify, recipients must be a varsity athlete and have a minimum first quarter GPA of 3.495.

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K I N D E R G A RT E N A N D T H I R D GRADE TEAM UP FOR MONARCH STUDY Kindergarteners and third graders teamed up this fall to learn everything about monarch butterflies—from their migration path, to their life cycle, to their habitats. Kindergarteners in Theresa Cohen and Diane Schulteis’ classes and third graders in Lynn Niehaus and Kim Walden’s classes are taking part in the lesson. Many schools in the path of monarch butterflies migration, which can be found in parts of the United States and Mexico, are also participating in the international project. In October, students decorated a small butterfly, and later, each of the classes planned to make a large butterfly to send to Lotspeich’s sister school in Mexico. The butterflies, which Cohen called ambassador monarchs, will represent the classes and Lotspeich. In the spring, the students in Mexico will send butterflies back to Lotspeich. 28

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STUDENTS LEARN CITY DEVELOPMENT FROM A PRO Fourth graders in Liz Lorenz’s project math class are working on a building-sized assignment this year: simulating the design and development of the four-block area above Fort Washington Way. To get the project rolling, John Deatrick, project executive for the Cincinnati Streetcar, spoke to Lorenz’s class in September. Deatrick, the former project manager of Fort Washington Way and The Banks, gave a history of the development of the two locations and explained the streetcar project in detail. He told students about the importance of public transportation and the reasons why the city pursued the project. Throughout the presentation, students asked lots of questions. When Deatrick finished, Lorenz encouraged the fourth graders to think critically about their projects.

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FIFTH GR ADER S CONDUCT SUNLIGHT STUDY The garden beds around the Doherty Campus were the subject of a project by fifth graders in Bill Schmidt’s Unit III class. The class broke into three groups to conduct sunlight studies on each bed, in late October. “This project is a part of our

unit on energy, which is a main focus in fifth grade science, and as a model of how to use the scientific process,” Schmidt said. Fifth graders would take turns monitoring the beds for one hour each to see how much sunlight the beds received. Every hour, they monitored the shady areas of the bed and colored in that area represented on a map of the


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gardens. The groups also created bar graphs to illustrate the amount of sunlight that hit the beds per hour. Finally, they also researched seeds to find which plants would grow best in each bed. T H E C O L O R O F O B S E RVAT I O N Pre-kindergarteners on the Doherty Campus exercised their observational skills through a color search activity in early fall. Guided by their teacher Katie Dawson, the students walked around the grassy areas outside Haile and Jones Halls and selected a color based on their assignments. The students then took

pictures of their colors with a shared camera. “We discussed our favorite colors and painted with watercolors to explore how colors mix and how they look compared to others,” said Dawson. “Each child has had the opportunity

to document color in our outdoor environment with their photographs.” Dawson said the children took photos of the grey and black they could see in the driveway, of green leaves, and “red that looks kind of brown” bricks, to mention a few. Dawson said the color search activity encouraged the children to use their observational skills to build an awareness of the variations of color that exist all around them. Dawson said color is an underlying focus for the class throughout the school year. ACCL AIMED JA ZZ SINGER PERFORMED FOR UPPER SCHOOL Jazz singer Carla Cook took Founders Hall by storm in mid-October, teaching Upper School students the elements of her art and performing jazz standards. Cook, who is also the Taft Museum of Art’s 2016 Duncanson Artist-inResidence, discussed the important elements of jazz, such as syncopation and scatting, and quizzed students about the information. She also performed the classic Route 66, by 1940s songwriter Bobby Troup. Cook reminded the audience that jazz laid the foundation for several genres of music they listen to today. “This is yours,” Cook said of the music. “It belongs to you.” The assembly closed with the singer teaching students Duke Ellington’s C Jam Blues. All students in the audience joined in for a rousing rendition of the jazz staple.

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SIXTH GRADERS LEARN THE BA SICS OF POWER TOOLS Walking by the Middle School in late September, one could hear the whirring of power tools through the open window in the Innovation Lab. The sounds were coming from sixth graders, who, under the guidance of science teacher Karen Glum, learned how to use scroll saws, sanders, chop saws, and a nail gun to create their own jigsaw puzzles and iPad stands. “When we work with tools in class, the students rush to the room and ask if they can please start right away, before the bell rings,” Glum said. “Do we need a better reason than that to teach them to use tools?” Glum said there are several benefits to students learning how to use tools, including lessons in self-reliance, trust, and responsibility. Academically, they learn how to think in three dimensions, and learn math principles in an active way. “Tools give kids some hands-on experiences to help anchor basic

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physics and math principles, such as forces, friction, angles, and more,” Glum said. C H I N E S E S T U D E N T S R A P, LEARN CALLIGRAPHY The foundation for Chinese language fluency is being laid in Mia Wu’s seventh grade class.

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In mid-September, students learned how to pronounce Chinese phonetically using pinyin. Students crafted a “pinyin rap” to present to the class. “We have been learning pinyin in the past week, so the rap is a summative assessment which checks students’ understanding of pinyin pronunciation in a fun way,” Wu said. Wu then gave a presentation on hanzi, or Chinese characters. She compared characters to Legos because they need to be assembled. “You really need to be creative when thinking about the characters,” she said. “We put different parts together to have characters.” Students learned eight basic hanzi strokes,

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which, when combined, form radicals. Radicals are the small parts of the characters. Students put their new knowledge to the test. Wu wrote a sentence on the board for students to copy, using calligraphy brushes and special practice paper. They then used ink to write on rice paper. Wu said calligraphy serves as a cultural lesson. As students practice the ancient art, they are also immersing themselves in Chinese. STUDENTS CR AFT BUSINESS PROPOSALS IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP CL ASS Students in Seven Hills’ new semester course entitled, Seminar in Experiential Learning: Entrepreneurship, recently learned how to build a foolproof pitch. The students heard from retired Procter & Gamble executive and Board of Trustee member Stephen Baggott, who took them through the steps to develop a solid business proposal, during a September class discussion. Throughout the detailed workshop, Baggott discussed a number of principles necessary in a solid business pitch, including but not limited to, the overview, background, recommendation, and suggestions for the proposal. Baggott urged students to use concise, unambiguous language, and explain quickly and clearly how the product or idea would make financial sense. “After your overview and background presentations, your readers should be nodding,” said Baggott. His sage advice also included, “There are never more than three good reasons to do anything. If you

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have more than that you are probably including more information than you need.” Baggott explained terms like “gross profit margin” and “conversion” so students would feel comfortable using the terminology naturally in their conversations and future work. Students later had an opportunity to craft and present their business proposals to their classmates. The entrepreneurship seminar class is co-taught by Seven Hills Experiential Learning Director Nick Francis and Seven Hills alumni parent Mike Collette, founder and CEO of Patient Point and an Executive In Residence at CincyTech, a public-private venture fund that invests in early stage start-ups in Southern Ohio. The class, which recently formed a partnership with local Sixteen Bricks Artisan Bakehouse

owner/baker Ryan Morgan, is also applying their knowledge of business development and strategy to formulate a customer feedback mechanism for Morgan.


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Creating Conversations speaker series

Our speaker series continues this year and features experts in their fields relating to raising bright, healthy, happy children. shared anecdotes and family stories, and learned from each other during the three-hour workshop.

Seven Hills parents of teens participated in a three-hour workshop with local clinical psychologist Jessica Thiede, during the school’s first installment of the Creating Conversations speaker series on Sept. 10. Thiede asked the group of 30 parents to discuss a number of case scenarios in which students demonstrated changes in behavior, such as missing more than one sports practice, sleeping for longer periods of time, uncharacteristically leaving a bedroom messy, listening to music about feeling invisible or angry, or dressing in black clothes, to name a few. While parents need to pay attention to these changes, said Thiede, they also need to understand that many of the changes in teens are typical and isolated incidents that have no connection to a bigger problem. Parents in attendance asked questions,

Mindfulness was the topic of discussion during our Oct. 14 workshop, led by local therapist Julie Kippins, school counselors Judy Arnold and Angie Bielecki, and second grade teacher Danielle Necessary. Kippins led about 50 parents through a number of relaxation practices that encouraged them to focus on being present, quietly observing their surroundings, and thinking more intentionally, ending each mini-session with an awakening bell often used in yogic practices. Kippins, Necessary, Arnold,

and Bielecki encouraged parents to build a number of practices into everyday routines with children. “After school take five to 20 minutes to go for a walk,” said Kippins. “Don’t be in the head as much as in the body.” Necessary, who is studying to be a mindfulness educator, recently launched an initiative to teach mindfulness to Lotspeich students during their Monday assemblies over the next several months. M O R E C R E AT I N G CO N V E R S AT I O N S Don’t miss a special presentation on “digital life,” a revealing discussion with breakout sessions, led by members of Seven Hills’ counseling department. The workshop, entitled, “Managing Social Media and Understanding Your Child’s Digital Life,” will take place at 7 p.m. on Jan. 19, 2017, on the Hillsdale Campus.

The Seven Hills School speaker series, Creating Conversations, welcomes you, your family, and friends to attend these free-of-charge events. To register for the The Seven Hills School Speaker Series January session or learn more, visit www.7hills.org/CreatingConversations. 31


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Renovations Revive Jones Hall Doherty students are finding inspiration in the brilliant colors and brightly illuminated spaces of the newly renovated Jones Hall, which

“Our school community is thrilled to be able to work within such a beautiful building everyday,” Guethlein said. “Our classrooms, hallways, library, and Creation Studio have a new energy even more conducive to learning and exploration.” Upstairs is the Creation Studio, a makerspace that allows students to explore STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) concepts and their own creativity. A wall has been taken down to make the room larger. It is equipped with lab tables, computers, and a variety of components and materials to allow students to build and discover.

houses first grade through Unit III. The building underwent an extensive restoration in the summer of 2016, thanks to the hard work of The Seven Hills School family, faculty, and friends. Jones Hall’s new front doors and renovated foyer are the first thing to greet students. Lower School Head of Doherty Patti Guethlein said when children come to Jones Hall, they are entering a home-like, soothing environment. 32

“The desire in a child to create is nothing new,” said Tracy Hickenlooper, director of program design and technology. “This new Creation Studio shows that we value the ingenuity and the limitless possibilities of creation that our children possess.” Hickenlooper said these renovations accommodate children in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade, and, more importantly, open a new world for these young creators.

“To maximize a student’s ability to create, they need flexible, large work areas, and a diverse array of tools and materials that involve arts, crafts, engineering, and technology,” she said. “The openness of this multi-purpose space fosters collaboration, creative thinking, critical thinking, communication, and flexibility.” The library has also undergone major changes, becoming a bright space with a vibrant blue and green color scheme. Guests first pass through a reading nook, complete with a couch and comfortable beanbag chairs. The shelves have


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Librarian Linda Wolfe called the new library a “dream space.” “The feeling of the library in the basement is gone, and in its place—its exact

same place—is a welcoming, light and airy space to read, research, and learn,” Wolfe said. Wolfe praised the library’s new technology, including projectors and large screen, and more. “Students coming to access the book catalog computers have new large screens, adequate space to search, and do not interfere with any of the learning taking place in the library,” Wolfe said. “The new floor plan means you can find students of all ages and interests involved in any number of quests throughout the day.” Other work throughout Jones Hall included painting classrooms and installing new floors, lighting, carpeting, and ceilings. Landscaping and repaving of entrances and exits updated the exterior. Paving was completed because of the generosity of Seven Hills Board of Trustees member Jim Jurgensen.

Guethlein said ultimately, the Doherty community is enthusiastic about the restoration and its benefit to students. “The renovations provide a rich, bright space in which to learn,” said Guethlein. “All the choices, from lighting to paint color to furniture, were deliberate and designed to enhance our daily learning experience.”

Doherty renovations

been redesigned and new furniture added. The room’s big windows now allow natural light to stream in, and offer a view of the beautiful courtyard.

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Seven Hills Abroad

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Seven Hills Upper School students experienced a broad array of travel opportunities in 2016, from participating in an exchange with Spanish students to completing community service projects in the Dominican Republic. This March, Seven Hills will travel to Bondues, France as part of a student exchange.

SPAIN From May 26 through June 29, 2016, 13 Seven Hills students immersed themselves in Spanish culture on an exchange trip to Getafe, Spain. Chaperoned by Spanish teachers Teresa Bardon and Ismael Godoy, Upper School students attended classes at Colegio Los Angeles with their host students and explored the region. The group took day trips to Toledo, Madrid, and Segovia. One of the highlights of the exchange was a day at a Spanish university, where students participated in hands-on workshops. On the weekends, students stayed with their host families, experiencing the dayto-day life of the culture.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Ten Seven Hills students, as well as one nonSeven Hills student, accompanied by Upper School science teacher Jen Torline and math and science teacher Lenore Horner, took the trip of a lifetime June 20-28, 2016,


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prepping garden beds. In addition to completing community service, the goal of the trip was to expose students to different parts of the world and push them outside their comfort zones.

visiting the Dominican Republic for Seven Hills’ first-ever community service and environmental learning trip. Students toured the country, tried new foods, and volunteered at the Environmental School in Jarabacoa. They completed a variety of service projects, including clearing a new trail and

FRANCE French students from LycĂŠe de la Croix Blanche, located in Bondues, France, visited Seven Hills as part of an exchange between the two Upper Schools. French students stayed with Seven Hills host families and attended school with students from Oct. 14-25, 2016. Throughout the week, the visitors went on several trips around Cincinnati. As part of the exchange, 21 Seven Hills students will travel across the world to

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visit their exchange students in France from March 16-29, 2017. Their itinerary of amazing places includes sightseeing in Paris and Ghent, Belgium.

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Lotspeich Celebrates 100 Years!

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The legacy of the late Mrs. Helen Lotspeich is storied and expansive, starting with the founding of the Clifton Open-Air School in 1916. It was later renamed Lotspeich School, which the Seven Hills community knows it as today. In October 2016, Lotspeich celebrated its 100-year anniversary, inviting local alumni and former faculty to visit the halls of their historic school. The centennial was an all-day celebration, organized by the Seven Hills development department. Guests attended a luncheon in the library then toured the year-old Nellie Leaman Taft Early Childhood Center, where the youngest Lotspeich students attend school.

During a special assembly for all students in the Lower School, Mrs. Lotspeich’s grandchildren, Sylvia Lotspeich Greene ’55 and David Lotspeich ’60, and greatgrandson Brendan Duckett were in attendance. Greene and Lotspeich recounted stories of their grandmother, as children eagerly listened and enthusiastically asked questions about Mrs. Lotspeich and their 100-year-old school.

The children also had the opportunity to take center stage when fifth graders performed the Happy Birthday song from their fall musical,

The Hundred-Year Snooze. The assembly closed with a sing-along to the much-loved Give a Cheer for Lotspeich! Head of Lotspeich Carolyn Fox said that even 100 years after its founding, the “home-awayfrom-home feel” of Lotspeich perseveres. “The thread that binds us together is a lasting legacy for current children to understand Mrs. Lotspeich’s values and her educational philosophy,” Fox said. She added it is important for alumni to realize that this legacy continues. “It’s not lost in the years.”


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Lotspeich and College Preparatory schools.

Seven Hills Director of Development Margo Kirstein said connections to Lotspeich last a lifetime. The school has an abundance of history, she explained.

Like the metal phoenix that sat atop the building for many decades, Lotspeich underwent another rebirth. In the summer of 1987, the school was struck by lightning, causing a blaze that destroyed the historical structure. The fire resulted in the loss of most of the original building, Mrs. Lotspeich’s 1930 school, and numerous books, files, and pieces of Seven Hills history. Despite this setback, faculty soldiered on, holding classes in trailers until the new Lower School was completed.

“I think Lotspeich School’s resilience is rooted in the fact that we have a common educational goal for our children that goes beyond academics,” Fox said. “The core has not been lost.”

“Even as new students pass through the school’s halls, Lotspeich remains steadfast in its commitment to its community and excellence in education,” Kirstein said. “It’s important to show the rich history of Lotspeich and how lucky we are to have a place that’s so special.” That rich history can be found throughout Lotspeich’s different incarnations. In 1930, the school was moved from Mrs. Lotspeich’s backyard to its current location on the Hillsdale Campus. Mrs. Lotspeich remained at the school until her retirement in 1947. In 1974, Lotspeich was officially established as a pre-kindergarten through sixth grade Lower School during the merger of Hillsdale-

families. Even as Lotspeich has physically grown, changed, and even been rebuilt, Mrs. Lotspeich’s educational philosophy is still at the forefront today.

A brand new Lotspeich, modeled after the building lost in the fire, reopened in 1988, thanks to the hard work of Seven Hills friends and 37


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New Athletic Program Fosters Student Leaders

In the fall, for the first time in the history of Seven Hills’ athletic program, the school formalized the Seven Hills Athletic Leadership Team, an ongoing initiative set around a 10-week program structure, that brings together coaches and select student leader athletes for workshops and guided discussions. The program is based on sports leader Jeff Jansen’s The Team Captain’s Leadership Manual.

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The program sprang from Athletic Director Brian Phelps’ desire to educate students on athletic leadership. “Historically, school coaches elect or appoint captains, but don’t focus on teaching students to be captains or leaders,” said Phelps. “In the past, we expected our student athletes to know how to lead others just by giving them the title.”

Phelps’ vision starts with a student-teacher partnership with four Seven Hills coaches—Bryce Carlson, Tim Drew, Nick Francis, and Erin Wierzba—who, along with Phelps, lead the program. In August 2016, the coaches nominated students representing every Seven Hills Upper School athletic team to participate in the program’s pilot year. Some of the students are team captains, others are student athletes who embrace their roles, regularly bringing positive energy to their teams. The Seven Hills Athletic Leadership Team adds a new layer of responsibility and leadership to an already strong athletics program. “Sports leadership at Seven Hills is built upon a foundation of trust and clear expectations,” said Phelps. “We are committed to promoting sportsmanship, ethical behavior, and integrity.”

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In Memory of Jack White Beloved former Upper School teacher Jack White passed away on Sept. 11, 2016, following a battle with Parkinson’s disease. Born on March 30, 1944, John Larkin White III joined The Seven Hills School in 1984, where he taught English and mentored Upper School students as Dean of Students. On the alumni Facebook page, many former students shared tributes and stories of Mr. White’s commitment to teaching and his memorable wit. What follows is a small sampling of these numerous posts. Howard Konicov ’84 recalled Mr. White as “an extraordinary writing teacher.” Like all great teachers, Mr. White’s lessons have stayed with his students. In a note to Mr. White, Andy Paris ’89, wrote, “When I teach, there are a few

people I attempt to humbly channel. And you are one. And you also happen to be one of the kindest, gentlest humans I have ever met.” As Dean of Students of the Upper School, Mr. White posted detention notices on pink slips of paper near Four Corners. Patrick Conlon ’04, shared, “I had somehow made it through Upper School without ever being in detention…. so he wrote me up for an ‘audacious display of machismo’ for posing with a DeLorean in my senior photo. I got a laugh out of it and still have that detention slip somewhere.”

Gretchen Peters ’87 said, “Mr. White had a profound impact on my approach to writing and storytelling that has stayed with me through my life and career. I also remember his great sense of humor and humanity.” Family and friends gathered in Hillsdale Commons on Saturday, Oct. 1, for a memorial of Mr. White’s life. We thank his family for sharing him with Seven Hills for so many years.

Above all, Mr. White truly cared for and rooted for his students. Kristin Hendricks Jordan ’88 recalled, “My favorite memory of him was holding his youngest daughter (an infant) while making spaghetti for his family. For some reason I was doing a home stay, and Mr. White opened his door to this student. I can’t imagine, looking back, what an open and dedicated teacher it takes to do such a thing.” Like all great teachers, Mr. White’s lessons have stayed with his students throughout their lives. A Chuck Close-inspired painting of Jack White hangs in the Donovan Arts Center 39


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Catching up with Helen Chatfield Black L’35, H’41

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Helen Black co-founded and served as vice president of the Cincinnati Nature Center, was president of the Ohio chapter of The Nature Conservancy, and was instrumental in preserving Redbird Hollow as green space in Indian Hill. She was also the 1983 recipient of Seven Hills’ Goodall Distinguished Alumna/Alumnus Award.

Can you tell us a bit about your time at school and your pursuits after graduating from Hillsdale?

and ninth grades. I remember that I was

and other places to look at the stars. It

wearing my best Harris tweed skirt. When

absolutely gave me an interest in nature

I stood up to write on the blackboard, I

and conservation.

Helen: My mother sent me to Lotspeich

felt warm water on my legs. Without my

when Mrs. Lotspeich moved her school to

knowing, the girls had put water in the

Madisonville. In the spring, she took me

seat of the chair which ran down the back

to the Lotspeich house in Clifton, and I

of my legs when I got up.

had an interview with a big, tall lady. Mrs. Lotspeich started me in the second grade. I was tall, and the first grade was full. My mother said that I couldn’t read, and Mrs. Lotspeich said, “She can learn over the summer.” I learned to read that summer. I adored Hillsdale. I loved the wonderful teachers. After college, I worked as a helper to Miss Ferguson at Hillsdale and taught English to the seventh, eighth,

In what way did your time at Lotspeich and Hillsdale influence your involvement in environmentalism and conservation?

What are some of your favorite memories from Lotspeich or Hillsdale? Helen: At Christmas time, the “Miracle Play” was wonderful. It was like a cathedral in the gym. I also remember going on the trip to Washington, D.C. We stayed in a hotel, went to the United

Helen: A few times a week, Mrs. [Lulu]

States Mint, we did everything in three

Brand, a naturalist, came to school to

days, including Mt. Vernon. At Mt.

teach us. She would take the streetcar or

Vernon, I had a stomachache, so I stayed

bus from Clifton to Red Bank Road, and

outside. I caught a turtle by the river,

she would take us on nature walks from

which I hid it in my pocket and took

the school. She also taught us astronomy,

home. It was marvelous.

and we would go at night to Mt. Lookout

*Read about Mrs. Black’s son and granddaughter in this segment. 40


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Catching up with Steve Black L’60 Steve Black worked as an attorney at Graydon Head & Ritchey from 1975 - 2013. He also served as a Seven Hills Trustee from 1992 - 2000 and was the 2003 recipient of the Goodall Distinguished Alumna/Alumnus Award.

What have been some of your pursuits and volunteer activities since retiring from practicing law? Steve: I raise Belted Galloway beef cattle. We have five and are expecting two

calves, so five to seven cattle. Three years

really more tackle. Mr. [Ted ] Wuerfel

ago, I helped start a board to raise money

coached the soccer and football teams.

for the Ohio Innocence Project. The

I won’t forget Jim Strumph (gym teacher)

program focuses on overturning wrongful

punting a football for what seemed like

convictions in state courts in Ohio. I am

forever—it was more rolling fields then.

also head of the Board of CET, and I am on the Board of the Taft Museum, Twin Lakes/ Twin Towers retirement community, and the Cincinnati Law Library.

Helen Black, Steve Black, and Heidi Black, with Heidi’s twin daughters, Helen and Elizabeth.

What are some of your favorite memories from Lotspeich?

It looked more rural. In what ways did your time at Lotspeich prepare you for your life after leaving the school? Steve: Lotspeich provided me with a love of learning and reading. It was a good foundation. As an alum, a former parent, and former trustee, what role has the school played in your family’s life? Steve: Pretty significant. Our kids all

Steve: I remember

went to the school. It met different needs

playing touch football

for different kids in a variety of ways, and

during recess, but it was

they all got a lot of support.

*Read about Mr. Black’s mother and daughter in this segment.

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Catching up with Heidi Black ’98

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Heidi Black ’98 serves as Senior Manager of Innovation for StriveTogether in Cincinnati. She also volunteers her time as a board member of Shelterhouse (formerly the Drop Inn Center) and with the school as a member of the Alumni Board of Visitors.

Please tell us briefly about your education, career path, and any volunteer work after graduating from Seven Hills.

What are some of your favorite memories from Seven Hills?

chose to work in education and become a I am still working to make a difference in

MA, and a year at the Springer School

Heidi: As a Seven Hills “lifer” I have so many fond memories from Seven Hills – Doherty’s Winter and Summer Concerts, moving to the new (at the time) Middle School, the 10th grade rafting trip, playing varsity sports in Upper School (competing at State in track), and the

in Cincinnati. While I was at Springer,

senior lounge are just a few.

A Seven Hills (or Hillsdale and Lotspeich) education is a shared experience in your family. What role has the school played in your family’s life?

Heidi: I attended and graduated from Skidmore College with a degree in Elementary Education. From there I went on to teach for six years—five in Marblehead,

I worked on a congressional campaign,

After three years on Capitol Hill, I returned

In what way did your time at Seven Hills (teachers, classes, or friends) influence your career path first in education and then politics, and now a combination of the two?

to Cincinnati and began working at

Heidi: My experiences at Seven Hills

caught the political bug, and ended up working as an education policy aide and scheduler for two members of Congress.

KnowledgeWorks and its subsidiary, StriveTogether, where I work with communities across the country to improve their education systems.

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*Read about Ms. Black’s grandmother and father in this segment.

have definitely influenced and shaped my career path. While I was at Doherty, I was diagnosed with a learning disability. Because of the incredible support I received from my teachers at Doherty, I

teacher. Although I am no longer teaching, education every day. Not everyone is lucky enough to attend Seven Hills so it’s my goal to ensure that as many children as possible have access to high quality education.

Heidi: Beyond the strong education foundation we all received, Seven Hills helped to further cement the importance of giving back to our community through a variety of experiences – making lunches for the homeless at Doherty, working at the Resale Shop in Middle School, and fulfilling volunteer hours to graduate.

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Alumni News A L U M N I

S P O R T S

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Fall Alumni Sports Day On Aug. 6, we welcomed alumni athletes back to Seven Hills for the annual Alumni Sports Day! Alums returned for coed tennis, women’s volleyball, women’s soccer, and men’s soccer. Thank you to all the alumni who put on cleats and kneepads and picked up a racquet to come play!

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Alumni News The Seven Hills Annual Fund “Seven Hills has always held an important place in my heart. I carry the school’s mission and values with me every day. I still hold myself to their high expectations and standards. In my life, I’ve found that I haven’t come across an environment quite like Seven Hills. In school, I was encouraged to not only think about the answer to a question but also why I was answering it in the first place. The essence of the question at hand was always present, as was its implication in the world as a whole. Even in college, I did not have such a comprehensive scholastic experience. These students are brought up to become intellectuals and to look for the good that they can achieve in the world. I think that will always be worth supporting.”

Alumni Map Seven Hills alumni live all across the U.S. and around the globe! If you would like to connect with alumni in your area, contact Sarah Ott Lautar ’05 at sarah.lautar@7hills.org or 513.728.2432 to find out who lives near you. Whether it’s serendipitous or long-planned, please keep in touch by letting us know and sending photos of your Seven Hills meet-ups. States with alumni WA MT

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ND VT

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IL MO

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NJ MD

KY NC

TN AR

SC MS

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Thank you!

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- Didi Mamaligas ’08

Make your gift To make your 2016-17 Annual Fund gift, please visit: www.7hills.org/annualfund, or call Andi Fischer Simon ’98, Director of Annual Giving, at 513-728-2436.

OH

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MA CT RI

NY

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SD

AL

GA

LA

AK

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Numbers of alumni in these states: Ohio: 1,793

New York: 201

Illinois: 108

Colorado: 90

California: 241

Florida: 167

Kentucky: 108

North Carolina: 83

D.C./Maryland/ Virginia: 204

Massachusetts: 157

Virginia: 101

Michigan: 82


Alumni News # Throwback

Like! Follow! JOIN!

A Lotspeich outing program camping trip in 1975, chaperoned by longtime former Athletic Director Duke Snyder

Connect with us on social media! We would love to hear from you via Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn. Like the Seven Hills School Alumni Page on Facebook! Follow @sevenhillsalumni on Instagram! Join the Seven Hills School Alumni group on LinkedIn!

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Alumni News R

reunion 2017 april 7 & 8

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Lotspeich classes of 1941, 1946, 1951, 1956, 1961, 1966, and 1971 Seven Hills classes of 1977, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1997, and 2002 The classes of 2007 and 2012 will celebrate their reunions on Saturday, Nov. 25, 2017.

Class representatives are needed to help make this a special weekend for your class. Please contact Director of Alumni Engagement Sarah Ott Lautar ’05 at sarah.lautar@7hills.org or 513.728.2432 to volunteer. T O

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CPS & Hillsdale classes of 1942, 1947, 1952, 1957, 1962, 1967, and 1972

W E L O O K F O R WA R D T O S E E I N G Y O U T H I S S P R I N G !

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reunion schedule 9 - 9 : 3 0 A . M . B R E A K FA S T in Young Family Library 9 : 3 0 - 1 0 A . M . W E L C O M E and State of the School with Head of School Christopher P. Garten, Assistant Head of School Susan Marrs, and Head of Upper School Matt Bolton 1 0 - 11 A . M . Alumni visit classes 12 - 2 P. M . C L A S S I C S L U N C H E O N for CPS & Hillsdale alumni from 1937-1967 and Lotspeich alumni from 1936-1966 Cincinnati Country Club, 2348 Grandin Road, 45208 2 - 3 P. M . C P S T O U R O F D O H E RT Y C A M P U S with Patti Guethlein, Head of Doherty, 2726 Johnstone Place, 45206

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Saturday, April 8: More information regarding class events to come from your class representative H O T E L I N F O R M AT I O N : A block of rooms has been reserved at Courtyard by Marriott at Rookwood. Reference “Seven Hills Reunion group” for group rate before March 7, $149/night, plus tax 3813 Edwards Road, 45209 513.672.7100

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6 - 8 P. M . C O C K TA I L R E C E P T I O N Hillsdale Commons, 5400 Red Bank Road, 45227

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INTERE STED I N BEING A REP FOR YOUR CLASS ?

5 - 5 : 3 0 P. M . T O U R O F U P P E R S C H O O L A N D E A R LY C H I L D H O O D C E N T E R Meet in front of the Upper School, 5400 Red Bank Road, 45227

Friday, April 7:

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Sally and Ray (L’67) Leyman

Lifelong Connections to Seven Hills

legacy

We are pleased to honor our family of Miss Doherty’s College Preparatory School (CPS), Hillsdale, Lotspeich, and Seven Hills alumni and friends who remembered the school in their estate plans. The Seven Hills School has a rich history, which, from 1974 to the present, has combined the traditions and standards of educational excellence of three well-known Cincinnati schools: CPS, the Hillsdale School, and the Lotspeich School.

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Sally and Ray (L’67) Leyman have been connected to our school, in myriad ways, throughout their lives. Sally’s mother, Genny Edwards Hilmer H’47, attended Hillsdale, and Ray attended Lotspeich, along with all of his siblings. Their own children, Sarah ’07 and Baker ’10, were lifers at Seven Hills. “It has been a wonderful community for our entire family. We certainly credit Seven Hills with giving our kids the great foundation that launched them into successful college careers and careers in life,” the Leymans said. “There’s no better investment in your child’s education. The skills and tools they learned at Seven Hills will last a lifetime. Both of our kids became great writers at Seven Hills!”

Baker, a University of Alabama graduate, works in advertising and sports media in Chicago. Sarah, who earned a degree from Amherst College, graduated from Ohio State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in May 2016.

in high school, Seven Hills shaped how they learned, how they problem solved, and helped them grow into moral, hard-working adults. How can we not support an organization that has been a part of our world for over 20 years?”

Sally and Ray have chosen to give back to the school by supporting the Seven Hills Annual Fund yearly and volunteering their time. Sally and Ray have each served on the Board of Trustees, and Sally continues her involvement with the school by coaching Middle School girls’ sports teams for 16 years, and now helping with the Upper School girls’ soccer team. “I get to see that the community remains strong and committed to our mission statement, ” Sally said.

If you would like information about becoming a member of The Seven Hills School Legacy Society, please contact Margo Kirstein, Director of Development, at 513.728.2437 or margo.kirstein@7hills.org.

They have also chosen to support past capital campaigns, “out of gratitude for the great launching pad that Seven Hills was for our kids.” With that sense of connection and hope to support the school for future generations, Sally and Ray have chosen to provide for Seven Hills through a life insurance policy. “We always want Seven Hills to have that sense of community and support for the entire child while finding the strengths of each child,” the Leymans said. “Whether your kids were lifers like ours, were there for the early years, or joined the community

Including The Seven Hills School in your estate plans makes possible the full richness of the Seven Hills experience. Learn more about the Legacy Society at 7hills.org/giving/plannedgiving.


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Connections to Last a Lifetime By Scott Carroll ’85, Outgoing Seven Hills Alumni Association Board Chair

assistance and input to the school, and we are fortunate to have him.

As we ring in the New Year, this column has allowed me a moment of reflection on my time as the Alumni Association Board Chair. It has been a pleasure and a privilege to represent the diverse, successful, and interesting alumni of CPS, Hillsdale, Lotspeich, and The Seven Hills School as your Board Chair.

Scott Carroll is a Seven Hills lifer who entered Lotspeich in 1973 and graduated in 1985. Scott, his wife Erin O’Grady, and their daughter Grace ’15, live in Cincinnati. Scott is the managing partner and litigation manager of the Cincinnati office of Jackson Lewis P.C.

In my years representing alumni to the Board, I have learned that our alumni remain involved in the school by volunteering their time and expertise, by attending events and reconnecting with old friends, and by supporting the Annual Fund. I encourage all of you to remain involved with the school in each of these ways. Not only will you maintain friendships going back decades and make new friends, but you will help ensure that the school is able to provide the same excellent education that we all received and benefit from today.

First, a heartfelt thank you to Scott Carroll for all of his hard work and dedication over the past couple of years as the Alumni Association Board Chair.

I would also like to welcome Ben Glassman aboard as your incoming Alumni Board Chair. Ben is a dedicated Seven Hills volunteer, giving his time as a Class Representative and member of the Alumni Board of Visitors. Despite his very busy schedule as the U.S. Attorney for the South District of Ohio, he provides valuable

By Ben Glassman ’93, Incoming Seven Hills Alumni Association Board Chair

volunteer activities. Please do not hesitate to reach out, either to me or to Sarah Ott Lautar ’05, Director of Alumni Engagement, with questions about getting involved. We would love to hear from you! Ben Glassman graduated with the class of 1993. He is the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. Ben, his wife Jennifer Morales, and their twins, Sam and Rosie, live in Cincinnati.

After working alongside Scott and the Alumni and Development Office during the past few months, I am excited to represent the alumni community as the Board Chair. I believe in the importance of supporting Seven Hills as an alumnus because it is a special and unique place. I choose to give back to the school— even though I am not a current parent or employee—simply for the reason that I believe in its mission. By giving back to the school, we can ensure that it remains the special place that we all know and love.

Scott Carroll ’85

Ben Glassman’93

S TAY C O N N E C T E D ! Follow @ sevenhillsalumni on Instagram Join the Seven Hills Alumni group on LinkedIn

I look forward to meeting and getting to know more alumni at future events and through 49


Seven Hills 2016-17 Roadshow S A N

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On Thursday, Sept. 29, Bay Area alumni gathered for a Seven Hills Roadshow reception at the Waterfront Restaurant in San Francisco, California. Thank you to hosts Deborah Koons Garcia H’67, Ellen Haude ’88, Missy Wyant Smit ’94, and Preston Comey ’03 for your efforts and enthusiasm!

(photo at right) Deborah Koons Garcia H’67, Melissa Mechem Congdon ’76, and Lucinda Barnes H’69

(photo below) Julianne Richardson Wagner ’88 and Paul Silverman ’85

Preston Comey ’03, Missy Wyant Smit ’94, and Yvo Smit

(photo at left) Deborah Koons Garcia H’67, Lucinda Barnes H’69, Ellen Haude ’88, Ed Donovan ’89, Amy Mitchell Cherry ’78, and Bradley Potts ’81

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Julianne Richardson Wagner ’88 and Ellen Haude ’88


Seven Hills 2016-17 Roadshow C I N C I N N A T I

On July 21, alumni in the Cincinnati area gathered for a happy hour at Taft’s Ale House in Over-the-Rhine.

(photo at right) Jacob Bergman ’08 and David Clodfelter ’85

(photo at left) Walker Schiff ’10 Ben Glassman ’93 Asia Reid ’05 and Lisa Zaring ’03 (photo at right) Valerie Runge ’08 Ammon Hollister ’08

(photo at left) Jacob Bergman ’08 Valerie Runge ’08

(photo at right) Kate Brandy ’10 Charlotte Fabe ’10 Allie Horwitz ’10

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Alumni News Curtis Sittenfeld’s Eligible includes Cincinnati and Seven Hills Backdrops For the first time in its history, Seven Hills found itself in a popular novel with the 2016 publication of Curtis Sittenfeld’s Eligible. Eligible, a modern retelling of Jane Austen’s classic Pride & Prejudice, is the fifth book by the best-selling author, who attended Seven Hills through the eighth grade. Sittenfeld wrote the book while participating in HarperCollins’ Austen Project, which invited authors to update Austen for the current day.

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The novel takes place in familiar territory. Eligible, set in Cincinnati, tells the story of the five Bennet sisters, all of whom attended Seven Hills.

hospitals, bowling alleys, etc. I don’t know why I wouldn’t use real places. So, of course, the school the Bennet sisters attended is real as well.

Q: With anywhere in the world to set

Q: A few Seven Hills references made it

a book, what made you pick Cincinnati? What made you decide to name Seven Hills rather than create a fictional school?

into Eligible , including a Harvest Fair T-shirt and the Resale Shop. What school traditions or memories stick out in your mind?

A: Part of what made me set Eligible in

A: As a Lotspeich student, I loved May

Cincinnati is that, unlike New York or L.A., people don’t think of it as a default location for a novel. But of course, interesting things happen to people everywhere. As with a 19th century English village, people outside Cincinnati might not imagine it as juicy, but its inhabitants lead lives containing conflict, intrigue, crushes, etc. Almost all the settings in the book are real—the restaurants, shops,

Fete. I still know the words to the Lotspeich song and recently entertained my children by singing it to them. I have very fond memories of being read to at Lotspeich, by Mrs. [Eileen] Driscoll in her office and by Mrs. [Bobbi] Kuhn when I was in the third grade. I remember keeping a daily journal with Mrs. [Diana] Hilligan in the second grade. I could go on and on. I truly

loved Lotspeich and it fostered my lifelong personal and professional interests. In recent years, my first grade teacher Mrs. [Margaret] Vitz has attended several of my readings, which is lovely of her. She has, however, mentioned that she’s still troubled by my pen grip when I sign books.

Blockbuster to rent a movie, but I didn’t know the city as an adult. I did do research while writing, including interviewing my brother [Cincinnati City Council member] P.G. [Sittenfeld ’03], to figure out where my characters would live, eat, work, etc.

Q: You have not lived in Cincinnati for

attended Seven Hills, and each has a different personality and career. Is there something about a Seven Hills background that encourages siblings to choose different paths?

a number of years [Sittenfeld resides in St. Louis, Missouri]. Did you see your hometown differently when you looked at it as a book setting?

A: Because I left for boarding school in Massachusetts in ninth grade, when I was 14, my knowledge of Cincinnati was in some ways preserved in amber in 1989. I could tell you how to get to the

Q: All five of the fictional Bennet sisters

A: I remember Seven Hills as a place that would encourage you to be the best version of yourself, no matter your interests or talents, rather than recognizing only one way of being successful.


Cincinnati A L U M N I

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Alumni gathered at the University Club on the evening of Oct. 5 for a reception featuring wine and food from around the world. The wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres made for a wonderful evening of reconnecting with old friends.

(photo below) Asia Reid ’05, Karen Jones Koch ’75, Emily Jolly H’70, Janet Allen Reid ’76

Howard Konicov ’84, Linnea Bowling Nadel ’81, David Robinson ‘84

Wynne McCarthy Curry H’71, Lissy Fabe H’71, Julie Rust Webster H’71

Head of School Chris Garten addressing the crowd

Kristen Snyder ’01, Ali Fischer ‘99, Kenya Brock ’98

Brian Hill, Grace Allen Hill ’80, Kelly Myers ’91, Brian Smyth

Nancy Todd VandenBerg ’77 and Sara Barnes Osborn ’77

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Alumni Class Notes 1934 New job? Recently married? Written a book? If you have stories to share, please don’t hesitate! Go to www.7hills.org/alumniupdates. Drop us a line and send photos (jpeg format, please) to

sarah.lautar@7hills.org.

William “Parlin” Lillard (L)(Delray Beach, FL) passed away on June 3, 2016.

1936

Marjorie Perin Hunt (H)(Vero Beach, FL) passed away on June 11, 2016. Frances Boswell McClure (C)(Cincinnati) passed away on July 11, 2016.

1938

Juliet Esselborn Fechheimer (C)(Sarasota, FL) passed away on May 24, 2016. Our condolences to family and friends who lost loved ones as reported in this issue.

Richard Stirling, longtime former faculty member and friend of the school, passed away on Oct. 26, 2016, at the age of 78. Stirling taught French, first at CPS and then at Seven Hills after the merger, until 1989. After retiring from Seven Hills, Mr. Stirling embarked on a successful second career as a photographer, during which he photographed many Seven Hills students for their senior photographs.

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Josephine Farny Little (H)(Piedmont, CA) passed away on Sept. 22, 2015.

1941

Patricia “Patsy” Pogue Couper (C)(Morrisville, VT) passed away on Feb. 17, 2016. Nancy Homan Ireland (H)(Vero Beach, FL) passed away on Jan. 16, 2015. Helen Juliet “Julie” Bausch Rust (H)(Cincinnati) passed away on May 20, 2016.

1943

Carol Finke Maxon (H)(Leland, MI) passed away on May 9, 2016.

1945

Frances Garvin Byrne (H)(Pocahontas, TN) passed away on Nov. 5, 2014. Ann Dorsel Monroe (H)(Cincinnati) passed away on Sept. 13, 2016.

Patricia Burke Phelps (H)(Camden, ME) passed away on April 8, 2016.

1946

Janet Hengstenberg Hauck (H)(Cincinnati) wrote to tell us that her daughter Amy HauckHamilton H’71, is going to Japan to work for architectural company KZF Design.

1947

Sayers Hill Sarran (C)(Cincinnati) passed away on Feb. 11, 2016. Joan Harshman Thomas (C)(Palm City, FL) passed away on Jan. 31, 2016.

1948

Edith “Edie” Shattuck Johnson (H)(Cincinnati) passed away on Oct. 28, 2015.

1949

Mary Ann McIlwain Dodson (H)(El Paso, TX) passed away on Sept. 19, 2016.

1954

Elizabeth Wiehe Carr (H)(Scottsdale, AZ) wrote to us: “I’m living happily with my husband Bill near a daughter and her family in Scottsdale, Arizona. We’re very comfortable in a CCRC (Continuing Care Retirement Community).”

1957

Sally Steman Whittaker (C)(Cincinnati) passed away on April 10, 2016.

1958

Julia “Susie” Bauer McCauley (H)(Dublin, OH) passed away peacefully after a long illness on June 1, 2016, in Dublin, Ohio. Susie was born and raised in Cincinnati and attended Lotspeich, graduated from Hillsdale, and received a degree in medical technology from the University of Cincinnati in 1962. She married William (Bill) McCauley, Jr. in 1961 and they moved to Columbus, Ohio, in 1963. Aside from raising their three children, Susie was active in many types of sports. She loved their family pets, reading, painting, and ballroom dancing with Bill. Susie was preceded in death by her brother Joseph Bauer. Susie is survived by her devoted husband, their three children, and five grandchildren. Married for 55 years, Susie and Bill shared a wonderful, loving life together. Betsy Benedict Peabody (H)(Thedford Center, VT) tells us she has two new hips and is doing well.

1962

Pamela Lee Lowry (H)(Santa Cruz, CA) recently published her novel The Lost Horse, the final novel in her trilogy including If You Needed Me and Judge Not. Pam tells us, “This is it. No more books after this one. The trilogy is a thinly disguised autobiography, focusing on the trials and tribulations of late marriage, step-motherdom, and living abroad. In real life, Allen and I have definitely reached the ‘happily-ever-after’ stage, and while it’s wonderful, it would be pretty boring to read about. We’re well settled in Santa Cruz, California, with gorgeous weather (we’re not near any fires), luscious fruit, superb organic markets, great volunteer


opportunities, entertaining pets, and a demanding garden. We also have a cozy guest room, and love having visitors!”

1975

Mary Mitchell (Half Moon Bay, CA) died on Sept. 27, 2016. Helen Richards (Camden, SC) writes to us, “Had the best time at our reunion in 2015. Everyone who was there I think enjoyed it. Thanks to all who put it together—even Avril, who was a no show! We missed you, Avril!”

1977

Elizabeth Marble (Peterborough, NH) died on Sept. 12, 2016, after a battle with breast cancer. Marsha Williams ’77 wrote to us, “She earned her bachelor’s degree at Miami University (Ohio), and then moved to Boston, where she completed her master’s degree at Leslie University. It’s been said that there are two kinds of people in this world— gardeners and flowers. Elizabeth Marble was most certainly a gardener. She thrived on giving to others, nurturing children, and championing causes that aim to make the world a better place. Elizabeth thoroughly loved teaching children, and many of the relationships she built as a teacher are still celebrated decades later. She enjoyed spending time with family and friends, skiing, sailing, swimming, playing in leaves, snowstorms, museums, travel, and eating Graeter’s Ice Cream!”

1981

Susan Kaufman Campbell (Davidson, NC) wrote to us, “It was wonderful to catch up with classmates who were able to attend our recent 35th reunion gathering at Betsy Urban’s home. Thanks to all who made the effort to attend and organize!”

1982

Congratulations to Dr. Warren Anderson (Elgin, IL) for receiving Judson University’s award for Alumnus of the Year in 2016! Warren graduated from Judson University with a degree in English in 1986, and earned a doctorate of worship studies from Judson in 2010. Warren has been on faculty at Judson for more than 25 years, and he currently serves as dean of the Chapel, director of the Demoss Center for Worship, and teaches in the worship arts and music departments at Judson University in Elgin, Illinois, where he lives with his wife, Lea, and children Amie and Austin.

1988

Dr. Laura Kaufman (University Place, WA) is moving up in the organization at Group Health Cooperative in Washington, where her primary work has been as an occupational medicine doctor in the Tacoma clinic. Her new titles are medical director of COHE (Center for Occupational Health Education) at Group Health and assistant medical director of occupational medicine for the south region.

1990

The Sittenfeld family welcomed their muchloved exchange student from Japan, Mie Akatsu (Japan), who visited them this summer with her husband Naoaki Kobayashi and daughter Tamaki Kobayashi. Mie and her family visited with Paul

and Betsy Sittenfeld, Tiernan Sittenfeld ’92 and her husband, Darren Speece, and children Alexander and Porter Speece, and Jo Sittenfeld ’98 and her husband, Thad Russell, and children Polly and Curtis Russell.

1996

Tim Wyant (Brooklyn, NY) sent us an update on the success of the National Urban Squash Education Association (NUSEA), of which he is executive director. NUSEA, which helps to launch and support squash and education programs in cities, enrolled more than 2,000 students in its programs this fall, and welcomed its 19th member program in the U.S. Three hundred fifty-five participants enrolled in college this fall.

1997

Stephen Zoepf (Palo Alto, CA) recently started a new role as executive director for the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford University.

2000

Charlie Black (Iowa City, IA) recently began graduate school at the Writer’s Workshop at the University of Iowa.

2001

Congratulations to Frenika Mudd Rivers (Silver Spring, MD) and her husband, Dameon, on the birth of Mykah!

2003

Congratulations to Preston Comey and Shannon Comey on the birth of their first child, son Thomas Preston Comey, on July 24, 2016! Congratulations to John Findlay (Chicago, IL) on his marriage to Julia E. Hamm on May 14, 2016. John and Julie celebrated their wedding in Naples, 55


FL, with several Seven Hills family and friends in attendance. Pictured in photo: Alex Rush ’03, Alex Derkson ’03, P.G. Sittenfeld ’03, John Findlay, David Colman ’03, Chris Black ’03, Ian Hayes ’03, and Ramsey Reid ’03.

and Sarah is in the first year of her medical residency, currently at Christ Hospital, and will be specializing in radiation oncology.

2004

Congratulations to Ashleigh Lyons Marable (Cincinnati) on her marriage to Dr. Ryan Marable, which they celebrated on Sept. 4, 2016, in Cincinnati. Fellow alumni Carroll Wallace ’04 and Lena Eastin ’04 attended the wedding. Ashleigh manages the Kroger c-stores

INTERESTED IN BEING A REUNION REP FOR YOUR CLASS?

Please Contact Sarah Ott Lautar ‘05, Director

LinkedIn recently named Dr. David Mou to its list of 10 “stars” changing the face of healthcare in its spotlight on professionals 35 and under. David co-founded and serves as medical director of Valera Health, which focuses on prevention and treatment of behavioral health issues.

2005

Best wishes to Melissa Andress Deprizio (New Buffalo, MI) on her marriage to Joseph Deprizio on Sept. 4, 2016, in Niles, Michigan.

of Alumni Engagement sarah.lautar@7hills.org 513.728.2432

New job? Recently married? Written a book? If you have stories to share, please don’t

Congratulations to P.G. Sittenfeld (Cincinnati) and Sarah Coyne Sittenfeld on their marriage! P.G. and Sarah were married on June 4, 2016, in Cincinnati, where they first met. P.G. is in his second term serving Cincinnati on City Council,

hesitate! Go to www.7hills.org/alumniupdates. Drop us a line and send photos (jpeg format, please) to

sarah.lautar@7hills.org.

division’s talent, where she leads diversity and inclusion, succession and workforce planning, leadership development, and training for more than 10,000 associates. The couple resides in Cincinnati.

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Best wishes to Libby Ferguson Mock (Cincinnati) on her marriage to Chris Mock in Cincinnati on June 11, 2016, in Cincinnati. Several Seven Hills friends served as bridesmaids, including Sadie


Alumni Class Notes Ferguson ’04, Emily Hastie ’05, Alex Hue ’05, and Hannah Wheatley McNeil ’05.

Congratulations to Kerri Martin Rizzolo (Rochester, NY) and her husband, Mike Rizzolo, on their April 12, 2015, wedding and the birth of their son Isaiah on May 2, 2016! Seven Hills

friends and family in attendance at the wedding, from left to right, were Merri Martin ’05, Brittany Nelson-Turner ’05, Marsha Williams ’77, Dana Jason ’05, Donna Williams Martin ’74, Lyneise Williams ’75, Terri Martin ’05, Katherine Schram ’05, Carroll Wallace ’04, and Benjamin van der Horst ’05. Congratulations to Mary Wulsin (New York, NY) on her marriage to Leighton Tugger Zema on Oct. 8, 2016, at Red Stone Farm in Cynthiana, Ohio. Several alumni attended the wedding, including Rachel Habbert ’05, Emily Hastie ’05 and Dan Schultz ’05, Anna Wulsin Hathaway ’06, Alex Hue ’05, Sebastian Hue ’02, Beth Krone ’05, Sarah Ott

Lautar ’05, Emily McDonough Murphy ’05, Asia Reid ’05, Annie Rittgers ’05, and Drausin Wulsin ’03, who served as the officiant.

2006

Peter Dumbadze (Brooklyn, NY) wrote to us: “I’m currently enjoying the ubiquitous Brooklyn, New York, dream of living in a shoebox-size studio somewhere north of Red Hook and somehow south of Dumbo. When I am not hunting for the next food craze (shh … knishes will be all the rage in 2017), I work as an architect by day… and as an architect by night. The hours … well, they are what they are. In the little free time I have, I freelance as an architecture critic for a Belgian design magazine. I’m still not sure how I landed that gig, but whatevs.” 57


Alumni Class Notes Best wishes to Erin Harbaugh Reese (Phoenix, AZ) and her husband, Russell Reese, on their marriage.

studied at the Florence Academy of Art and currently teach part time at the Glasgow School of Art. They live in a studio in Largs, on the west coast of Scotland.

2007

2008

Sarah Leyman (Columbus, OH) received her doctorate of veterinary medicine on May 7, 2016. Sarah was also awarded the Class of 2016 Scholarship Award for highest GPA in her class at veterinary school. She will pursue a yearlong internship at Garden State Veterinary Specialists in New Jersey. Best wishes to Sarah Margaret Gibson (Largs, Scotland) on her marriage to Lee Craigmile. Sarah Margaret and Lee were married on Sept. 6, 2016, at Achnagairn House in Scotland. The couple both

58

Congratulations to Henry Antenen (New York, NY) on his recent marriage to Maisha Chowdhury. Henry and Maisha were married on Sept. 26, 2015, in Florida, and celebrated with a second ceremony in the bride’s hometown of Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Dec. 7, 2015. Seven Hills alumni in attendance at the wedding included Jay Antenen ’03, Donald Antenen, Lennie Cottrell ’08, Alex Shifman ’08, Beau Garrett ’08, Matthew Grosinger ’08, Sam Laber ’08, Aaron Tami ’08, Mark Portman ’08, Tyler Troendle ’08, and Spiro Mirkopoulos ’08.

2009

Steven Young (Charlotte, NC) recently opened Zablong Peculiar Pizza, a fast-casual pizza restaurant in Charlotte. It has already been named best pizza in the state of North Carolina by Yelp.

2011

Lauren Truncellito (Burlington, VT) tells us that she graduated from the University of Vermont in 2015 with a B.S. in dietetics, nutrition, and food science. “I’m currently working as a public health nutritionist in the WIC clinic at the Vermont Department of Health while pursuing my Master of Public Health degree.”

2012

Isabel Arjmand (San Francisco, CA) graduated from Stanford University in May 2016. She majored in management sciences in the school of engineering with a 4.0 grade point average and completed an honors thesis in the school of education. After spending a month studying in Barcelona, Spain, over the summer, Isabel began work at Givewell, a private charitable foundation in San Francisco, California.


Alumni Events \

S A V E

THE SE VEN

T H E

D A T E

HILLS S CHOO

L INVIT E

CINCIN S N AT I A REA AL UMNI OF CPS , HILLS DALE, AND LO TSPEIC CLASSE H S 19 3 7 -67 TO THE

CLASS

ICS LU NCH

F R I D AY

Save the Date The Seven Hills School presents

Books For Lunch Lecture Luncheon and Book Signing

New York Times bestselling author

, APRI L

12 - 1 : 3

7, 201 7

0 P. M . N AT I C OUNTR Y CLUB 2348 G RANDI N ROA D, 452 08 CINCIN

The lunc heon is complim the Alum e n t a r y, c ni Assoc ourtesy o iation an f d Develo pment O I N V I TAT I ffice. ONS W ILL BE M AILED

IN FEBR U A RY

Thrity Umrigar

Friday, Feb. 3, 2017

11 a.m. Luncheon and book signing at the Cintas Center, Xavier University For more information visit www.7hills.org/BooksForLunch See page 26 in School News

EON

Our 2015-16 Annual Report is available for viewing online at 7hills.org/AnnualReport.

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Alumni Calendar 2016-17 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017 Cincinnati Alumni Happy Hour Cork & Cap 2637 Erie Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45208 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 1, 2017 Seven Hills Roadshow in New York City Doubles Club, Sherry Netherland Hotel 783 5th Avenue, #414 New York, NY 10022 6-8 p.m. Friday, April 7, 2017 Alumni Visit Day Breakfast with faculty Welcome and state of the school Visits to classes Young Family Library 9-11 a.m. Classics Luncheon For alumni from classes of 1937-67 Cincinnati Country Club 2348 Grandin Road, Cincinnati, OH 45208 12-1:30 p.m. Reunion Cocktail Reception Hillsdale Commons 6-8 p.m. Saturday, April 8, 2017 Individual Class Reunion Activities Info to come from your Class Reps! April 2017 Seven Hills Roadshow in Chicago Details to follow 59


Hillsdale Campus 5400 Red Bank Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45227

2016-17 Seven Hills Board of Trustees Front Row: Meghan Nelson Lalitha Chunduri Jennifer Stein

Elizabeth Schiff Chris Garten Margaret Avril Lawson ’75 Karen Meyer Dorothy Kim Corbett ’84

Back Row:

Lair Kennedy Rob Anning ’86 Tom Garber ’96 Jim Jurgensen Abram Gordon

Ron DeLyons Michael Coombe L’72 Jennifer Dauer Dan Schimberg ’80

Not pictured:

Kerrin Antonsson

Steve Baggott Cathy Smale Caldemeyer H’72 Scott Carroll ’85 Marc Fisher Margot Good

Jan-Michele Lemon Kearney Sashi Kilaru Michael Nordlund Andrew Quinn Jim Shanahan

Seven Hills Magazine - Fall 2016  

2016 Fall Magazine

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