__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

EDITION WILHELM HANSEN WH32705

Juliana Hodkinson

TURBULENCE an opera in three scenes libretto by

Cynthia Troup


Commissioned and premiered by Chamber Made Opera Melbourne 2013

Juliana Hodkinson TURBULENCE or, ´the underlying forces usually hidden’ an opera in three scenes

libretto by Cynthia Troup SCORE Duration: c. 40 min.


‘Therefore … love your solitude and try to sing out with the pain it causes you. For those who are near you are far away … and this shows that the space around you is beginning to grow vast. … don’t expect any understanding; but believe in a love that is being stored up for you like an inheritance, and have faith that in this love there is a strength and a blessing so large that you can travel as far as you wish without having to step outside it.’ Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet


Turbulence or, ‘the underlying forces usually hidden’ an opera in three scenes f or soprano voice with electro nic poc ket piano* a nd gro ovebox*, yo u ng f ema le actor with hand- held mi crophone an d short wave radio, vintage f ans, audio sa mples (* ma y be re distrib uted to of f -stage pla yer or sou nd desk )

i from a state of quietness ii sudden transitions iii a critical point

total duration: circa 40 minutes

The libretto and score for T ur bul ence were commissioned by Chamber Made Opera in 2012. T u r b u l en ce was first performed by Deborah Kayser (soprano) and Anneli Bjorasen (actor), and directed by David Young, with sound design in performance by Jethro Woodward—the premiere season opened in Melbourne on 3 October 2013, as part of Chamber Made Opera’s Living Room Opera series. The parts of Pilot, Announcer, and Baby were pre-recorded; Margaret Cameron performed the voice of the Pilot, Sana Mukarker Schwippert the voice of the Announcer, and Emilia D. Hodkinson the voice of the Baby. The audio samples mentioned in the score were recorded, mixed, and mastered by picaroMedia in Berlin.


Turbulence CONTENTS Parts and instrumentation Instrumental notes Table of audio cues Notes on fans and installational aspects Setting Beginning the opera Notes on the libretto text Libretto i from a state of quietness (the Baby is heard beginning to whimper) ii sudden transitions (Mother: ‘And external factors’) iii a critical point (the cabin lights flicker again)

p. ix p. x-xii p. xiii-xiv p. xv p. xvi p. xvii p. xvii

pp. 1-2 pp. 3-6 p. 7

Score i from a state of quietness ii sudden transitions iii a critical point

pp. 9–26, from bar 1 pp. 27–40, from bar 153 p. 41, from bar 277

Libretto appendix

p. 43


PARTS AND INSTRUMENTATION Parts are all female: — Mother, soprano or mezzosoprano voice, optionally playing electronic pocket piano* and small sampler**. — Daughter, young female actor portraying a young woman, say 19 years old, with hand-held microphone, shortwave radio, and various accessories (e.g. a small hand-held fan; a packet of peanuts for rustling; earphones; clothing props). — Pilot, pre-recorded or performed live via radio contact/with electronics, a voice relaying remarks and communiqués ‘unintentionally’ transmitted from the cockpit. The Pilot’s words are always preceded by interference. — Announcer, pre-recorded or performed live via radio contact/with electronics, a voice with variations to suggest intentional announcements made by a flight attendant. — Baby: pre-recorded or live, not seen, but heard whimpering and vocalising at times, in short bursts.

— Vintage fans. — * Electronic pocket piano may be played by soprano, or distributed, as for the premiere season, to an off-stage player. The pocket piano also requires a tuner (e.g. guitar tuner). Electronic pocket piano = portable Critter & Guitari Pocket Piano synth (GR). Another synthesiser could be used instead, but this would require extensive moderation of the pocket piano part as scored. — ** Small sampler, e.g. Roland SP-404 SX or similar, for soprano to cue audio. Alternatively, the audio samples may be redistributed from the sampler to the sound desk, as for the premiere season.

ix


    

    















 x






  





                               xi




  



                              













    

   xii


INSTRUMENTAL NOTES (CONTINUED)

Explore sounds with microphone and hair, e.g. wrapping hair around microphone, etc.

TABLE OF AUDIO CUES The audio part includes live mixing of the fan sounds. BAR NO.

CUE NO.

DURATION

DESCRIPTION

28

1

13 sec.

heartbeat 80 bpm

37

2

28 sec.

heartbeat 80–120 bpm

45

3

10 sec.

heartbeat 180 bpm

47

4

6 sec.

radio Polish

49

5

53 sec.

radio Polish RVRS + cabin fittings 1 + Baby 1 waking

51

6

9 sec.

heartbeat 165–160 bpm

58

7

8 sec.

radio Spanish and German

93

8

< 1 sec.

lockers

93

9

< 1 sec.

lockers

94

10

1 sec.

lockers

95

11

1 sec.

lockers

95

12

1 sec.

lockers

xiii


xiv

97

13

38 sec.

radio stop + Pilot: ‘in suitable conditions/’ + Baby 2, whimpering

102

14

32–43 sec. (fade ad lib.)

radio Gertrude Stein

107

15

30–56 sec. (fade ad lib.)

radio Indian song

109

16

< 1 sec.

radio stop 2

114

17

32-105 sec. (fade ad lib.)

radio Buchanan Brothers, fade out

114

18

27 sec.

cabin fittings 1

152

19

26 sec.

cabin fittings 2

159

20

25–51 sec. (fade ad lib.)

cabin fittings 3 & Baby 2

160

21

16 sec.

Announcer: ‘Ladies and/’ + Pilot + Announcer: ‘Cabin crew, please be seated’

162

22

25 sec.

cabin fittings 4

175

23

10 sec.

Pilot: ‘is there something you can tell us/’ + cabin fittings 5

194

24

25–51 sec. (fade ad lib.)

cabin fittings 3 & Baby 3

207

25

11 sec.

Announcer: ‘Ladies and gentlemen […] a zone of/’

211

26

7 sec.

cabin fittings 5

248

27

25 sec.

Baby 4

255

28

3 sec.

Baby 5

256

29

25 sec.

Baby 4 RVRS

271

30

15–33 sec. (fade ad lib.)

cabin fittings 6 + 8

277

31

22 sec.

cabin fittings 9 (may be looped or otherwise extended)

278

32

10 sec.

Announcer: ‘For your own safety […] the safety of fellow/’

280

33

4 sec.

Pilot: ‘can modify completely/’ + Announcer: ‘in your seat, thank/’

282

34

6 sec.

Pilot: ‘in this case/ […] a medical emergency/’


NOTES ON FANS AND INSTALLATIONAL ASPECTS Overture Over a low-grade intercom or tannoy system, flight tower control broadcasts are heard intermittently. For the premiere season, communications from Heathrow sourced from YouTube were used; these were played from smartphone into the front door intercom system, while the audience waited on the street downstairs before being ushered in to the performance (‘cabin’) space. Transit installation One vintage oscillating pedestal fan (turns from side to side), with vintage microphone and vintage amplifier, installed between the entrance and ‘cabin’, where members of the audience file past to enter the aeroplane. This fan emits a hum that alternates (as the fan head turns) with turbulent air/microphone noise; it is switched on before the first audience member arrives, and is turned off when the ‘motor’ starts at the beginning of the opera. In the ‘cabin’ space A battery of vintage table fans (circa 1950s) is displayed, such that when all are switched on, a wind is directed towards the audience. These fans are all controlled from the same single switch; all can be switched on or off simultaneously. In addition, three individual table fans are installed at strategic places in the cabin: FAN 1: Small table fan (e.g. Philips, 1950s). When amplified, this fan emits a steady bass. Installed towards the back of the cabin. FAN 2: Medium table fan (e.g. Pye, 1950s). When amplified, this fan has an impressive start-up sound, taking some time to reach full speed and hit a steady hum. A slight rattle is acceptable. Installed prominently within the sightline of the audience, possibly at the front of the battery of other table fans. FAN 3: Oscillating table fan (e.g. Elcon, 1950s). When this fan is amplified, the microphone alternately picks up the motor sound and turbulent air stream. Installed within the sightline of the audience, but not prominently—for example, to one side of the audience.

xv


SETTING Interior, the passenger cabin of a small aeroplane, mid-flight. This closed cabin comprises the stage for the opera. Seating for the audience is divided by one or two narrow aisles. These are extensions of the aisle or aisles that are part of the set design. Depending on audience numbers, in each successive row of seating, the number of seats becomes fewer; the aisle(s) and this tapering of rows suggest the audience as passengers, ranged towards the rear of the aeroplane cabin that they share with the performers. Passengers and performers all face the same direction when seated. At the front of the passenger cabin, curtains screen off the aisle or aisles. Towards the front of the cabin, the opera’s protagonists: a daughter and her mother. Each has an aisle seat, one row apart, so that the two women are positioned diagonally across from one another, the daughter on left side, in the row behind. The part of the Mother resembles a monologue. However, ideally it will be performed as though one, well-heard half of a conversation between the Mother and another female passenger—a stranger—who is seated beside her. Premised on the Mother’s presence and words, the part of the Daughter resembles reactive, self-referential attempts at dialogue, although it too might be described as a monologue, in this case one of a defensive nature. It is important to convey the oppositional tone of the Daughter’s utterances. The Mother’s manner is freely animated. Her lines are timed and modulated more consistently than those of the Daughter; except for the aria, their tone is decorously reflective, agreeable, equanimous. Daughter and Mother communicate directly only once, between scenes ii and iii, when they stand, and meet one another’s gaze. This is also when the audience see the Daughter’s face for the first time. The aeroplane evoked by the set design can date from any era after 1939: this was the year in which passengers for short-haul flights on DC-3s operated by the American commercial airline TWA (Transcontinental and Western Air) were first provided with in-flight radio broadcasts through loudspeakers. A so-called ‘master receiving unit’ ‘controlled by the airhostess’ was tuned into radio stations and programs picked up along the plane’s course. The same broadcasting system (or circuit and loudspeakers) was used for in-flight announcements made by the pilot—in effect, this was the first passenger aeroplane intercom system (see Diamonds in the Sky, pages 92–93; details listed below, page 43). The part of the Announcer has a basis in the sonic qualities of an unreliable or faulty intercom system, which ‘accidentally’ transmits to the passenger cabin fragments of conversation and air-to-ground communication from the cockpit. The same intercom also broadcasts formal announcements intended for the passengers’ benefit.

xvi


BEGINNING THE OPERA DAUGHTER enters with audience. MOTHER enters with last audience member. FAN 1 and air-conditioning are switched on before audience enter. When all members of the audience are seated, FAN 2 is switched on (and most other motor sounds off), simulating a turbine on take-off. As FAN 2 settles into a steady ‘cruising altitude’ hum, FAN 3 is switched on and very gradually faded in. For 10 minutes or more, allow the mix of these amplified fans to vary within a narrow register poised between monotony and dynamic movement, creating the subtly varied monotony of the beginning of a long haul flight. For example, fading up FAN 3’s motor sound more strongly may be coupled with the MOTHER and DAUGHTER leaning to one side in synchronisation, evoking the shared, embodied sense of a plane banking.

NOTES ON THE LIBRETTO TEXT A forward slash [ / ] sitting against a word (or the last word in a line) indicates that the end of the word collides fleetingly with electrical noise, while it is heard more or less continuously with the beginning of the following utterance (see page 1, for example). Where the Mother and the Daughter each has a line positioned ‘parallel’ in the libretto (see page 2, for example), this indicates a simultaneity. Any line can be repeated as considered necessary.

xvii


Turbulence

libretto by Cynthia Troup music and sound by Juliana Hodkinson


T u r b u l en ce

LIBRETTO i from a state of quietness

The opera begins mid-flight: the aeroplane passenger cabin is brightly lit, and the scene overall is unhurriedly set through immersive sound. Slowly and gradually, low, variegated â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;flight noiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and other sonic materials build from a state of comparative quietness to a more active soundscape, Throughout the opera, this irregularly includes effects of static and other noise from the aeroplane intercom. From a direction other than that of the Mother and Daughter, the Baby is heard beginning to whimper. Pilot

in suitable conditions/

Mother

Yes, the act of giving birth is arguably the major event in a life, also intuitively appealing.

Daughter

the theory is beautiful in its self-consistency

Mother

Given the puzzling and violent nature of energy released,

Daughter

brute force as a matter of fact

Mother

the emergence of consciousness, degrees of freedom, the progressive accelerating ascent,

Daughter

the more warning one gets, there is a threshold that can be calculated

Mother

tremors or vibrations,

1


T u r b u l en ce

LIBRETTO (CONTINUED)

Daughter

absence, fracture and fatigue

Mother

come together in one critical instant

Daughter

loom over and shape the psychological state

Mother

—the explosion to infinity—

Daughter

all three create the potential for extreme behaviour

Mother

starting at the highest level from the mother! The universe of conceivable irrational behaviour patterns is much larger than the set of rational patterns.

Daughter

allowing for irrationality opens a Pandora’s box of ad hoc stories the main story we are telling is the vulnerability of civilisations the fight between order and disorder normal times, normal times are when disorder wins

Mother

(attacca)

2

the explosion to infinity of a normally behaved quantity


T u r b u l en ce

LIBRETTO (CONTINUED)

ii s u d d e n t r a n s i t i o n s Mother

And external factors affecting the mother always ruin the lives of some of them.

Daughter

(with the Mother’s ‘always’) always ruin the lives of some of them

A long pause in the flow of words, during which the ambient soundscape begins to change. The Baby’s whimpering is heard again, and intensifies before fading. Announcer

Ladies and/

Pilot

obviously harder to predict/

Announcer

Ladies and gentlemen, please remain seated and please/ fasten your seatbelts, thankyou. We are now approaching a zone of turbulence./ Cabin crew, please be seated.

Lights pop and flicker through the passenger cabin, though they remain switched on. Daughter

the underlying forces are usually hidden by an almost perfect balance

Mother

External factors, certainly … . How can one unravel this complexity?

Pilot

is there something you can tell us/

Daughter

we are taught that it is out of reach from a fundamental point of view

The Daughter stands up. She grips the seat in front of her to remain upright as the plane pitches for a slow moment.

3


T u r b u l en ce

LIBRETTO (CONTINUED)

Mother

Well, cracks make the problem more subtle.

Daughter

it is a curious fact that the agents typically do not know each other

Mother

What is the law if any? Of course one of the parameters is the time of failure.

Daughter

the only way to decide is to test for the existence of critical behaviour let them evolve in time

Mother

Has human nature changed?

Announcer

Ladies and gentlemen, for your own safety and the safety of fellow passengers please remain/ seated. Please ensure that all/ seatbelts are fastened, thankyou. We are now crossing a zone of/

Daughter

another curious fact: the rules for the interactions are presumed identifiable and known in the long run our personal lives are shaped by a few key decisions or events

The Baby coos.

The Daughter steps unevenly into the aisle, and forward, so that she is standing beside and above her Mother, who is still seated. Daughter

for the real earth

The Mother rises, and for a concentrated time, Daughter and Mother hold one anotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gaze. The Daughter then walks further forward along the aisle, while the roughness of flight occasioned by turbulence makes itself felt again. The Babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice rises briefly. Daughter

4

(Calling behind her) for the real earth we do not know yet


LIBRETTO (CONTINUED)

T u r b u l en ce

The Daughter disappears from view behind the aisle curtain. The cabin lights pop and flicker for longer now, eventually sputtering into a changed lighting state. The Mother stays standing, gazes calmly out of the aeroplane window, then turns to sing out to the audience, expansively). [aria ‘For those who are near you are far away’] Mother

sky as blue as a baby’s eye sea as blue as a baby’s eye acres of smooth sand solitude lungs keep filling, filling give me this— a child’s trust belief in a love stored up as Rilke says like an inheritance sky as blue as a baby’s eye sea as blue as a baby’s eye acres of smooth sand solitude lungs keep filling, filling [end of aria]

Pause.

5


T u r b u l en ce

LIBRETTO (CONTINUED)

Mother

(Still standing, sighs deeply) Even the most thorough postmortem analyses are typically inconclusive.

The Daughter reappears in the aisle, steadying herself as best she can in front of the curtain while the plane pitches violently. Daughter

in a single season, as a matter of fact

Mother

Though the few important things like health, love and work, which account for our happiness, have been shown to provide healing.

The Mother steps into the aisle and begins walking in the direction of the Daughter; that is, away from the audience. Her posture is very upright, though she walks somewhat shakily due to the effects of the air turbulence. Mother

(As she moves) We are probably at the beginning of our understanding of it ... . (attacca)

6


T u r b u l en ce

LIBRETTO (CONTINUED)

iii a c r i t i c a l p o i n t The cabin lights flicker again, but for a last time: the whole cabin is plunged into darkness. Ambient and electronic noise of every kind increases, including the rattling of cabin fittings. Announcer

(After a delay) For your own safety, ladies and gentlemen, and/ the safety of fellow/

Through the ambient noise, and overriding the last word of the announcement, a resounding ‘crack’ is suddenly very clearly heard, resembling the crack of skull bones onto a hard and brittle surface. The crack is accompanied by a short, sharp cry of shock in a female voice—then scuffling. Pilot

can modify completely/

Announcer

in your seat, thank/

An extended pause, during which only the sound changes. Pilot

in this case/ not that it will make any difference we are declaring a medical emergency/

END

7


8


Turbulence

FAN 1 on pre-show, as audience enters (and leave on) FAN 2 on for ‘take off’ (and leave on) FAN 3 on at ‘cruising height’ (and leave on)

ª

Mother & Daughter

2

8 sec.

8 sec.

ff

O

3 sec.

ffth

O

th

ffth

8 sec.

O

8 sec.

8 sec.

3 sec.

ff

ss

ssff

8 sec.

3 sec.

O

ffth

O

O

ª

7

Mother & Daughter

FAN 3 more audible 3 sec.

O

ssff

O

ssff

© 2015 by Edition Wilhelm Hansen, Copenhagen Engraving by Ritornel

O

O

9


2 12

30 sec.

w

Mother & Daughter

vv ª 13

STAGING

MOTHER & DAUGHTER lean to one side + indicate plane banking FAN 2 more audible

FANS

4 sec.

O

Mother & Daughter

kkhh

7 sec.

O

kkhh

mouth open

8 sec.

O

hhi:

7 sec. half-closed

O

4 sec.

O

kkhh

ª 18 STAGING

MOTHER & DAUGHTER straighten up, from leaning position FAN 3 more audible again mouth open 4 sec. 7 sec.

FANS

O

Mother & Daughter

kkhh ª 23

Mother & Daughter

10

30 sec.

w

vv

O

hh

8 sec.

7 sec.

O

O

kkhh

O

4 sec.


3 24

LIGHTING change

STAGING

FAN 2 OFF

FANS AUDIO Mother & Daughter

1

O

O

O

O

5 sec.

6 sec.

8 sec.

6 sec.

kkhh

kkhhss

ssth

kkhhss

(13 sec.) [heartbeat 80bpm]

74

O

5 sec.

kkhh

ª 29 AUDIO

q = 40

Mother

P ( >) 7 4 ‰ . R‚ O i:

IPA

45 O .

Ó.

Œ

∏

49 ‰ .

Ó

i:

π

‚ O. R

∑

y

i:

Doppio movimento q = 80

® ‚ ‚ ‚ 44 ‚ J

π

ye

∏

i: ye: i:

Œ

≈ ‚ ‚

i: ye

Œ

ª 33 Mother

≈ ‚ ‚

Œ

i: ye

≈ ‚. ‰ R i:

‚.

i:

i:

‚ J

i:

≈ ‚ . J i:

‚. J i:

≈ Œ

‚ J

i:

‚.

i:

‚ ‚ ‚.

i:

i:

Œ

45 ‚ . i:

o Daughter

w ON

‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ ‚.

i:

i:

i:

44

O

i:

o 5 4

4 4 OFF

11


4 37

FAN 1 OFF

FANS

2

(28 sec.) [heartbeat 80-120bpm]

AUDIO

Mother

44 ≈ ‚ ‰ R i:

‚.

‚ ‰

i:

i:

‚ J

≈ ‚

i:

‚ O

i: hhi:

15 4 O

O.

hhi:

hhi:

ON Daughter

44

(

O.

O

OFF

w>)

ª

poco accel.

44 ‚ J

41

Ye

Daughter

12

ON

≈ ‚ i:

‚ ‚ J

i: ye

≈ ‚ ‚ ‚ i: ye i:

ye i:

‚.

‚ ‚

i: ye i:

≈ ‚ . J i:

‚. J

i:

≈ ‰

‚ J

i:

‚.

i:

‚ ‚ ‚.

i:

i:

‚.

i:

‚ ‚

i:

i:

‚ ‚. i:

‚ ‚ i:

i:

OFF


5 3

45

(10 sec.) [heartbeat 180bpm]

4

(6 sec.) [radio Polish]

AUDIO

15 4

Mother

q = 86 - 92

45 ‚ .

∑

hhi:

‚.

ye hhi:

‚ ‚.

ye hhi:

‚.

‚ ‚.

ye hhi:

ye hhi:

ye

49 W

ss

emphatic scrunch OFF

ON Daughter

P

ª

5 (53 sec.) [radio Polish RVRS + cabin fittings 1 + baby waking]

48 AUDIO

Mother

7 ‚. 4

hhi: ye

ON

‚.

5

‚.

5

3

‚ J

‚.

5

‚.

5

‚.

11 O 4

ss

O.

5 4O

hhi:

‚ OFF

Daughter

13


6 51

6 (9 sec.) [heartbeat 165-160bpm]

AUDIO

Mother

O

hhi:

44

∑

∑

3

i: hi: i:

ON

‚ J

hi:

Œ

≈ ‚ ‚ ‚

i: hi: i:

‚ J

hi:

45

‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ Ó

i: hi: i: hi:

OFF

Daughter

ª

56

FAN 3 OFF

FANS

7 (8 sec.) [radio Spanish + German]

AUDIO

Mother

45 ‚

i:

3

hi: i:

‚ J

Ó

hi:

‚.

i:

hi:

44 ‚ . i:

hi: i:

hi: i:

‚ ye

‚ J

≈

‚. J

i:

49 ‚J

∑

ye

Set to Pocket Piano Daughter

14

(twist hair round MIC)

∑ VIBRATO SYNTH D

(release)

R

T

V

45


7

o bw. & 46

Poco più mosso q = 88 - 96

œ

59 Mother

i:

bœ.

je

œ Bbú . J

bœ. i:

i: je

ú.

œ.

je

bœ.

i:

je

Bœ.

nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Âw

nú.

6

gliss.

(µ œ)

o

6

o µw

Ó

i:

VIBRATO SYNTH D

Pocket Piano

6 &4

R

V

∑

œ.

T

V

V

V

w.

‰ ú.

R

w.

w.

w.

ª 65 Mother

Pocket Piano

& &

π œ

œ

je

µœ

µœ

3

œ µœ nœ µœ

œ µœ nœ ˜œ 5

œ

œ

œ

œ Âœ

œ #œ µœ µœ

(vary V ad lib.)

bw.

Mother

&

tone

œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Âw

je

3

3

trem.

3

Bw

bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

tone

µw.

air

bœ œ œ œ œ œ 3

ú.

R

w.

ª 68

nw.

trem.

3

gliss.

air

¿‰Ó (œ ) J Ó. ss

w.

V

o ¿. ss

P ¿ œ 6 B œ n œ µ œ ‰ 8 i:- in -

3

t-

V Pocket Piano

&

b ww ..

D

ww ..

R

ww

œœ

b Rœ

68 15


8

Poco più mosso q = 92 - 102 vary vibrato in free duo with pocket piano’s synthetic vibrato

& 68 µ œ .

71 Mother

ju -

Pocket Piano

74 w

µœ.

i:-

ti -

& 68 ú .

ú.

45 Â ú .

œ

ú.

45 # ú .

úú

vvv -

74 w

Mother

œ J

pu -

Pocket Piano

-

-

zzz V

bú.

&

F j #œ

ª 80 Mother

Pocket Piano

& ∑ &

RATE:

Π(

)

∑

-

w

gliss.

-

-

-

subito

-

-

(# œ )

-

subito

w

p 54 µ w

!

74 # w

)

∑ úúú ... T

74 www

w

ΠV

V D

œ

vi-

w

œ

R

µú. o-

T

ww

µw

len-

œœ

nú.

www

(B œ )

V œœœ

>. ¿ 58 J

Ó

45

subito tacet

45

-t

85

MONO FM SYNTH H

16

Ó

- ling____________________________________(mm)__________________________

f son vibrato estremo/subito non piano 74 # w ú. nw subito

74 ú .

œ J

3

gliss.

w 45

and

Bbœ

li: [ord.: ap - peal - ing end of IPA] V

ª

fP 75 > #œ. & J

!

più vibr.

E

T

V


9

Poco meno mosso

Mother

q = 88~ 96

f

& 45

85

w

prr -

Pocket Piano

p w

π

-

œ

-

(µ œ )

- ro -

-

w

- gres -

-

-

œ.

- sive

ac -

j Âœ œ -

- ca

Meno mosso

AUDIO

w & 44

(µ œ )

-

& 44 # w

-

-

>. ¿ J

‰ Œ

t

œ -

le

œ

µœ

- ra - ting

œ

44

3

a - scen

-

44

8 ( 1 sec.) [Lockers]

q = 76 ~ 84

90

Pocket Piano

ú

H

ª

Mother

œ Âœ

T

E

& 45

-

#ú.

Ó

con vib.

œ

ú 46

œ

Âú

49

5:4

one

H

µœ

reset:

µœ.

µœ

¿. J

(tongue click)

µœ nœ œ œ œ œ nú.

cri -

9 ( 1 sec.)

-

6

-

-

-

- ti -

-

-

45

H E T V

ª 94 AUDIO

Mother

11 (1 sec.)

10 (1 sec.)

œ. 5 &4 -

¿. J

(tongue click)

-

-

c

-

œ al

µœ

#ú. 46

in -

12 (1 sec.)

ú. -

-

-

U w.

- stan

17


10 97 STAGING

FANS

FAN 1 on

U

13 (38 sec.) [radio stop; pilot: ‘in suitable conditions’; baby 2]

AUDIO

¿. J

Senza misura Mother

(spoken gently and slowly)

t

Yes, the act of giving birth is arguably MONO FM SYNTH

Pocket Piano

Senza misura

H

E

T

V

RADIO on actions

18

the major event in a life O. S. on

H

w

text Daughter

[softly whistle a held tone with uneven airflow, and begin to tune radio frequency]

w


11 100 STAGING

FANS

14 (32~43 sec.) [radio Gertrude Stein] AUDIO

[whistle high tone]

U

Mother

U ∑

5 - 15 sec.

[fluctuate within semitone] [fluctuate within semitone]

also intuitively appealing

(spoken gently, as before) Given the puzzling and violent nature

[sing low note]

Pocket Piano

(H)

& #w

U

U

reset silently V

∑

the theory is beautiful in its self-consistency

U

U ∑

5 - 15 sec.

V

w

H

U

Daughter

[continue to tune radio frequency]

[whistle a held tone again, with uneven airflow and slightly fluctuating pitch, and continue to tune radio frequency]

19


12 104 STAGING

FANS

AUDIO

[whistle high tone]

Mother

[bring in low sung tone]

∑

of energy released O.S. off [reset:]

O.S. on

Pocket Piano

H

’ # wE

&

H E T V

∑

brute force as a matter of fact

’ Daughter

[leave radio on]

20

∑

MIC on [blow into MIC lightly with uneven airflow]

∑

MIC off

[clutch it in palm ∑ of hand]

MIC on

[move hand ever so slightly]


13 107 AUDIO

15 (30~56 sec.) [radio Indian song]

Pocket Piano

V

&

w

Daughter

Mother

the emergence of consciousness,

degrees of freedom, the progressive

H

H

E

[move hand slowly off MIC, and blow unevenly into MIC again, using tip-noise and spit] ª 108

16

( 1 sec.) [radio stop]

AUDIO

Mother

accelerating ascent reset, fast, to:

Daughter

w

tre-

VIBRATO SYNTH. D R T V

Pocket Piano

[adjust pitch slowly by glissando, in direct or contrapuntal relation to pocket piano]

(

V

b ww

(sounding pitch may vary)

D

)

(

)

R

R D

the more warning one gets,

there is a threshold MIC off

MIC on

21


14 [vary vibrato radically, in respect of both amplitude and speed]

110 Mother

-mors (

Pocket Piano

&

#w

#w

# # ww

n ww

w

#w

&

or

vib-

ra-

)

(R)

[vary D and R wildly on each note]

D

n ww

# ww

ab-sence

that can be calculated Daughter

frac-ture RADIO off

MIC off

ª 112 Mother

Pocket Piano

&

U

#w

tions

22

œ

µœ

come

to

µœ

-

ge

-

œ

ther

[vary R wildly; follow Mother's timing]

& ww

œ

and fatigue Daughter

[vary vibrato freely; extend vowels ad libitum]

RADIO on

∑

œ

œ

µœ

œ

in

one

U RADIO off

∑

cri

-

œ

ti

œ

-

cal

œ

œ

in

œ

-

µœ

stant


15

[radio Buchanan Bros.] 17 (32~105 sec. - fade out) 114

18 (27 sec.) [cabin fittings 1]

AUDIO

Mother

&

[sing a medium-range tone and whistle a high tone]

w

re-set to silently D R T V

Pocket Piano

loom over and shape the psychological state Daughter

[move MIC so that occasional syllables are randomly amplified]

MIC on ª 115

o

AUDIO

Mother

Pocket Piano

Daughter

&

&

œ

µœ

#œ J

The

œ

ex

-

œ.

plo

-

µœ J

sion

œ J

to

D R T V [vary R ad lib.]

ú

[play with RADIO ad lib.]

∑

œ

#œ J

molto vibr.

œ.

in - fi -

# œœ .. ∑

-

œ. J

- ni

j œœ ..

œ -

µœ.

gliss.

gliss.

ty

œœ

T

œœ ..

∑

[slower, more freely]

œ

the

ex

œ

-

µœ

plo - sion

[reset pitch silently] [vary R ad lib.] [slower, more freely, while following Mother's voice] T

∑

all three create

∑

œ

œ

w

∑ 23


œ

-

- mal -

œ

œ

-

- ly

œ

∑ ∑

ing’ for an irrational expression] extreme

∑

∑

olto vibr.

œ. J

œ. µœ. #œ. Âœ. J J J J

r - ting at

œ.

the high - est

#œ.

meno vibr.

œ

, œ. bœ. nœ. J J

molto vibr.

le - vel from the mo -

ú

, œ . b œ . n œœ ..

16

Mother

to

Pocket Piano

œ

œ

119

o

µú

œ

gliss.

in - fi - ni - ty

&w

w

∑

œ

of

a

∑

w

∑

µœ

œ

œ

œ

œ

nor -

-

- mal -

-

- ly

∑

n # www

∑ ∑

[cautious timing, but with timbral exploration - ‘testing’ for an irrational expression] the potential for extreme Daughter

[RADIO ad lib.]

∑

µœ

œ

be

-

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

ª 125 Mother

&

œ haved

nœ quan

bœ -

œ

œ

œ

ti

-

ty

œ

U ∑

U ∑

molto vibr.

µœ. J

œ. J

œ. µœ. #œ. Âœ. J J J J

Star - ting at

the high - est

meno vibr.

œ

b ww

& # ww be -

ha -

vi -

U ∑

U ∑

[explore RADIO] solo

[snap OFF]

our

Daughter

[RADIO ad lib.]

24

œ.

œ.

#œ.

, œ. bœ. nœ. J J

molto vibr.

le - vel from the mo -

R Pocket Piano

ú

, œ . b œ . n œœ ..


17 129 Mother

&

œ

bú.

∑

- ther!

the

poco vibr.

ú.

u -

- ni

#ú. -

verse

poco a poco più vibr.

nœ.

of

-

∑

œ J

∑

w

œ J

µœ.

con - cei -

µœ J

- va - ble

Âœ , µœ J

ir

-

R

(R) Pocket Piano

bú.

bú.

∑

& œ

Daughter

bú.

ú.

#ú.

allowing

for irrationality

[MIC oblique]

[RADIO on]

w

#w

ª

& Â œJ

134 Mother

.

nœ. J

µœ

- ra - tio - nal

Pocket Piano

#œ J

be - ha

µœ -

(always hold down four latest buttons)

& w

#w

#w

nw

#œ Âœ Âœ. J

viour

slow, wide vibrato ad lib.…

œ

µœ. J

pat - terns

[reset:] D

nw opens up a Pandora's box of ad hoc stories

Daughter

[RADIO]

RADIO off

R

is D

w

µœ

much

w

µœ.

lar -

-

-

-

R

[change of tone; more factual] the main story we are telling

25


18 139 Mother

& œ

-ger

Pocket Piano

&

œ

than

the

bw

set

of

D

R

bw is the

œ

œ

µœ

œ.

ra - tio - nal

w

w

vulnerability

#œ.

,

U

,

pat - terns D

#w

#w

R

civilisations

of

U

Daughter

∑

,

the fight

∑

ª 150

LIGHT off

STAGING

FAN 1 OFF

FANS

19 (26 sec.) [cabin fittings 2] AUDIO Mother

Pocket Piano

Daughter

26

&

U ∑

&

U ∑

∑

U∑

∑

between order and disorder

∑

[reset] OCTAVE CASCADE R D T V

normal times

normal times are when disorder wins

[and retune to C]

44 44


19 153

Mother

q = 72 ~ 76

& 44 Π.

3 F œ œ µœ œ nœ. J œ

And

U & 44 ú

D V

Pocket Piano

98 Π.

ex-ter - nal

Œ

P

r B œ b œ ≈ œ œ œ µ œ Œ 3

fac -tors D

98 œ .

Ó.

3

44 Ó

af - fec -ting

F ‰ œJ œ . B œ 43 œ J

Ó

the Mo - ther

44 ú

D

œ ‰ Œ J

œ ú 43 ‰ b œœJ úú

f µœ.

j ‰ µœ nœ ‰ œ œ

44

j ‰ œ

44

Al - ways

Œ.

3

ru - in

nœ J

Daughter

27


20 158

LIGHTS flicker/buzz

STAGING

FANS

20

(25-51 sec.) [cabin fitting 3 + baby 2]

AUDIO

Mother

Pocket Piano

& 44 ‰ .

& 44 œJ .

bœ Bœ R

the lives

≈ Œ

nœ J

œ ¿

# œœ œ

œ. œ .

3

28

∑

∑

∑

of some of them

3

Always ruin the lives of some of them. Daughter

¿

Senza misura

(16 sec.) [announcer: ‘Ladies and... Cabin crew, 21 please be seated.’]

œ.

22 (25 sec.) [cabin fittings]

P œ µœ µœ J

∑

b œœœ .. .

∑

ex - ter - nal

Senza misura

∑

∑

∑ The

œ Bœ

∑

fac -tors,

underlying

# œœœ

∑ forces are


21 166 STAGING

FANS

AUDIO

Mother

&

ú. 13 8

œ. bœ Bœ

cer - tain-ly

F P œ µœ Âœ

How

œ #œ Âœ nœ

can one un - rav - el this

42

∑

42

∑

F œ 44 œ µ œ # œ µ œ # œ com - plex

-

reset to: MONO SYNTH Pocket Piano

&

usually

œ.

# n b úúúú ...

H

E

∑

T

hidden by an

V

13 8 ú.

ú

œ.

44 w

T

almost perfect

Daughter

29


22

(10 sec.) [pilot: ‘is there something you 23 can tell us...’ + cabin fittings 5]

174 AUDIO

Mother

nœ œ µœ Âœ #œ µœ #œ µœ J & -

Pocket Piano

&

-

5

-

-

i

-

Senza misura

ty?

∑

∑

∑

f w

vv Senza misura

Reset:

∑

T V

∑

balance.

We are taught

gliss.

2 1

H E T V

w

Daughter

ª

FAN 2 ON

f

178 Mother

Pocket Piano

&

w

vv H E T V

& that it is out of reach

Daughter

30

w

44

[glissando may be uneven] œ(

)

µ( œ

)

reset to: MONOGLIDER D G T V

V

from a fundamental point of view.

?

4 4 4 4 44


23 180 STAGING

Mother

44

[The plane pitches for a slow moment.] [Suddenly take BRACE position]

q = 60

& 44

# w>

kkhh

(sounding pitch)

?4 4

vv µœ

w

gliss.

(change wave)

MONO GLIDER

Pocket Piano

gliss.

4 & 4 # # ww ª

185 Mother

(sounding pitch)

&

?

zzhh bœ

(change wave) Pocket Piano

w #œ

w

gliss.

brr #œ

gliss.

µœ

(change wave)

& ( # # ww)

31


24 190

FAN 2 OFF

FANS

(25-51 sec.)

24

[cabin fittings 3 + baby 3]

AUDIO Mother

(sounding pitch)

Senza misura

&

?

#w

µœ

(change wave) Pocket Piano

∑

reset to MONO FM SYNTH release and let fade

∑

& ( # # ww)

ª

195

FAN 1 on

FANS

Mother

&

¿ R

j œ

¿ R

FAN 1 off

(bass well amplified)

œ

Well, c- ra -cks make the

œ

prob -

œ

-

œ -

œ -

œ -

œ

-

œ -

œ µœ

- lem

œ

∑

more sub - tle

w

Wha

MONO FM SYNTH Pocket Piano

Daughter

32

&

w

H

E T V

-

[O.S. on] [reset:

E

∑

]

It is a curious fact that the agents typically do not know each other

H E T V

w

¿ R t


25 198 Mother

& œ

is

Bœ the

ú

µœ µœ µœ

law

if

,

œ bú

a - ny?

of course one of the pa - ra [O.S. off] subito

Pocket Piano

nœ µœ bœ Bœ Bœ nœ Bœ nœ Bœ bœ bœ

&

H

,

H E T V

-

me -

œ

œ

- ters

œ µœ

is

œ

œ

the

œ

H

bw

Daughter

ª 200

FAN 1 on (or amplification on)

FANS

Mother

& nœ #œ µœ nœ Âœ time

Pocket Piano

Daughter

&

œ µœ nœ bœ

of

fail -

œ Bbœ B œ -

-

-

œ bœ nœ bœ -

-

œ Bw

[reset to:]

- ure

H

H E T V

∑

the only way to decide is to test for the existence of critical behaviour.

33


26 202

FAN 1 off

FANS

(or amplification off)

Mother

Pocket Piano

Daughter

34

&

&

U ∑

∑

w

Has

U ∑

∑

U

let them evolve in time

T

w

w

hu

-

w

man

œ

na

Bœ -

œ

µw

,

(slower)

w

ture changed?

Has

,

H E

w

w

hu -

-

w

- man

œ Bœ

na -

œ

-


27 206

FAN 1 on (or amplification on)

FANS

25

AUDIO

Mother

[announcer: ‘Ladies and gentlemen... ... a zone of’]

& µw

bw

- ture

Daughter

&

( œ)

∑

changed? (H)

Pocket Piano

(11 sec.)

∑ [Set silently to: 2-OCTAVE ARPEGG.

V

∑

R E T V

∑

∑ ...and tune silently (with headphones)]

another curious fact: the rules for the interactions are presumed identifiable and known

∑

in the long run our personal lives are shaped

35


28 210

Daughter steps into aisle, to stand beside and above Mother

STAGING

FANS

Mother

&

36

#### 6 8

FAN 1 off (or amplification off)

#### 6 8

[cabin fittings 5]

#### 6 8

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

by a few key decisions or events Daughter

Daughter walks further forward; more turbulence.

26

AUDIO

Pocket Piano

Mother rises, and they hold one another's gaze.

for the real earth

∑

∑

#### 6 8 #### 6 8

V

# # # www

for the real earth we do not know yet

#### 6 8 #### 6 8


29 Mother

e = 56 - 63

## & # # 68

215

∑

% œ œ 5 œ œ . œ œ . œ Uú 8

œ. œ œ œ

∑

Sky as blue

as a

2-OCTAVE ARPEGG: Pocket Piano

## & # # 68 úú ... ú

. úúú ..

## & # # 48 ú

85 œ .

ª

224 Mother

sand

Pocket Piano

# # # # 4 úú & 8ú

œœœ ...

œ

ú

sol - i - tude

85

œœœ .. œœœœ œ ..

úúúú

œ J

ba - by’s eye

œœœ .. .

% 58 ú úúú

Þ j œ ú

j œ

Þ œœœœ úúúú

œœœœ

j œœœ œ 68 Œ

68 ú . úú ..

‰ Œ

U úúú ú

≈ œ Sea

as blue

‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Œ.

T

úúú .. ú ..

œœœ ... œœœ .. .

œ 3œ œ 85 œ

œ.

≈ œ . œ Jœ œ J J 3

as a ba - by’s eye

j 7 œœœœ 8 œœœœ

ú œ œ úúú

‰ Œ.

78 œj œ œ . œ

œ. œ

ac - res of soft

œœ .. œœ œœ .. œœ ‰ ‰ Ó

[slowly dip pitch max. 1 semitone]

úúú .. ú ..

j œœœ œœ œ

85 # úúúú

‰ Ó

ú. úúú ...

48

‰ Ó

[resume original pitch]

‰ ‰

œ. œœœœ ... œœœ ... .

48

œœ ..

Œ.

‰ ‰ ‰

ú. # úúú ...

ª

# ## & # ‰ ‰ ‰ Œ.

235 Mother

Pocket Piano

[bend pitch as before] T

#### ú . ú. &

‰ ‰ Ó

‰ Ó

o ú.

(mm)

úúú ...

œœœ .. œœœœ .. . œ ..

úúú ú

ú.

[resume original pitch]

ú

n n n# œ .

3 œ œ # œ œ 85 œ n œ œ œ œ . ≈ J J 3

Lungs keep filling

n n n # # úúú ... ú.

fil - ling

85

n úúú ú

j œ

œ œ œ œ. 3

give me this

ú # úúú

48 ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ . J

œ J

a child’s trust

j œœœœ 48 œœœœ œœœ

úúú

85 85

37


30 245

27 (25 sec.) [baby 4]

AUDIO

Mother

Pocket Piano

# . & 85 œ # & 85 úúú

‰ Jœ 68 b œ

œœœœ œœ ú

be - lief

in

a love

‰ ‰ 78

œ.

ú

stored up

j 6 œœœ 8 b úúúú ....

78 œ ú n œœ úú

úúúú ... .

œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ

5

as Ril-ke says

œ

like an

85

œœœ ...

úúú

œ 85

78 œ œ œ œ œ .

œ J

in

-

3

he - ri-tance

j œœ 78 # œœ œœ œœ

úú úú

úú úú

# ‰ # # # 68 ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ

Sky

j # œœ # # # 68 ú . œœ úú ..

ª

Dal % al Þ

253 AUDIO

Mother

# ## œ œœ œœ & # œ. as blue

Pocket Piano

38

&

####

œœœ ...

as a

Dal % al Þ

œœœ .. .

CODA 28 (3 sec.) [baby 5]

ú. CODA

úúúú .. ..

29

ú.

nnn# œ .

# úúúú ... .

n n n # # úúú ... ú.

(25 sec.) [baby 4 RVRS]

3 œ œ #œ œ

Lungs keep filling

œ n œ œ œ œ . ≈ B œ œ b œ œ . J J J 3

fil - ling

T

n úúú .. ú ..

fil - ling

[incrementally detune]

úúúú ... .

‰ ú

œ

ú.

gliss.

ffi:

úúúú ... .

# úúúú ... .

gliss.

úúúú ... .

úúúú ... .


31 263 AUDIO

Mother

&

o

# (gliss.)

T

Pocket Piano

# & b b úúúú ....

R

úúú ... ú.

gliss.

úúú ú

n œœœœ

œœœ œ

j b œœœ #œ

b œœœœ .. ..

.

œœœ œ

œœœœ

œ

ª

(15 - 33 sec.) 30 [cabin fittings 6 + 8]

268 AUDIO

Mother

&

#

[spoken in the spirit of a tired winding-down glissando]

∑

∑

Even the most thorough postmodern analyses are typically inconclusive.

V Pocket Piano

(T) # (R)

& n # # œœœœ

V T

b # œœœœ

n b œœœœ

b n n œœœœ

# b núúúú

úúúú ...

úúúú ....

R

úúúú ...

39


32

STAGING

The Mother steps into the aisle and begins walking in the direction of the daughter; that is, away from the audience. Her posture is very upright, though she walks somewhat shakily due to the effects of the air turbulence.

The daughter reappears in the aisle, steadying herself as best she can in front of the curtain, while the 273 plane pitches violently.

FANS

AUDIO

Mother

Senza misura [whispering, merging sonically with cabin fitting noise]

Senza misura Pocket Piano

Though the few important things like health, love and work, which account for our happiness, have been shown to provide healing.

∑

∑ in a single season as a matter of fact

Daughter

40

∑

We are probably at the beginning of our understanding of it.

∑


33

STAGING

Through the ambient noise, and overriding the last word of the announcement, a resounding ‘crack’ is suddenly very clearly heard, resembling the crack of skull bones onto a hard and brittle surface. The crack is accompanied by a short, sharp cry of shock in a female voice – then scuffling.

277 The cabin lights flicker again, but for a last time the whole cabin is plunged into darkness Ambient and electronic noise of every kind increases, including the rattling of cabin fittings.

FANS

31

[announcer: ‘for your 32 (10 sec.) own safety... of fellow/’]

(22 sec.) [cabin fittings 9]

AUDIO

ª

An extended pause, during which only the sound changes.

280 STAGING

FAN 2 ON

FANS

[pilot: ‘can modify completely/’ announcer: 33 (4 sec.) ‘in your seat, thank/’] AUDIO

U

U

ALL FANS ON

U

ALL FANS OFF

[pilot: ‘in this case/ not that it will make any difference 34 (6 sec.) we are declaring a medical emergency/’] THE END

41


42


Turbulence or, ‘the underlying forces usually hidden’ libretto for a Living Room Opera in three scenes commissioned by Chamber Made Opera Melbourne 2013 THE FOREGOING BORROWS VARIOUSLY FROM THESE SOURCES:

Holland, Kenneth, ‘Update 2: Four Injured on US Airways Flight to Denver Due to Extreme Turbulence [photo, video, audio]’, Airnation.net, 17 April 2002, available at http://airnation.net/2012/04/17/four-injured-us-airways-denver-turbulence/ [audio: http://cdn.airnation.net/wpcontent/uploads/2012/04/us-airway-turbulence.mp3]. Rilker, Rainer Maria, Letters to a Young Poet [1903–1908], translated by Stephen Mitchell (Boston: Shambala, 1993), pp. 56–58. Sornette, Dider, ‘Predictability of Catastrophic Events: Material Rupture, Earthquakes, Turbulence, Financial Crashes, and Human Birth’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 99, no. 3, Supplement 1, Arthur M. Sackler Colloquium of the National Academy of Sciences. Sackler Colloquium on Self-Organized Complexity in the Physical, Biological, and Social Sciences (19 February 2002), pp. 2522–2529. ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Hudson, Kenneth, and Julian Pettifer, Diamonds in the Sky: A Social History of Air Travel (London: The Bodley Head and the British Broadcasting Corporation, 1979). Jasper, Margaret C., ‘Staying Safe During Turbulence’, Transportation Law: Passenger Rights and Responsibilities. Legal Almanac Series: Law for the Layperson (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 16–18.

43


WH32705 ISBN 978-87-598-3665-1

Profile for ScoresOnDemand

Hodkinson TURBULENCE  

Opera and Music Theatre; score; Edition Wilhelm Hansen; musicsalesclassical.com; 49188

Hodkinson TURBULENCE  

Opera and Music Theatre; score; Edition Wilhelm Hansen; musicsalesclassical.com; 49188