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OnDemand

Weir, Judith Blond Eckbert (VS)

Score for sale (North America): http://www.halleonard.com/product/viewproduct.do?itemid=14035677&lid=8 Score for sale (UK, Europe and other territories): http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/00055092/details.html?kbid=1296 Information about work and materials for hire: http://www.chesternovello.com/default.aspx?TabId=2432&State_3041=2&workId_3041=2730

Chester Music Limited Part of the Music Sales Group


Vocal Score

Judith Weir

BLOND ECKBERT after Ludwig Tieck’s Der Blond Eckbert

CHESTER MUSIC (a part of the Music Sales Group) 8/9 Frith Street, London, W1D 3JB tel: +44 (0)20 7434 0066 fax: +44 (0)20 7287 6329

Exclusive distributor: Music Sales Ltd, Newmarket Road, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP33 3YB tel: +44 (0)1284 702600 fax: +44 (0)1284 702592 web: www.chesternovello.com e-mail: music@musicsales.co.uk

rev. 9.04


SYNOPSIS Act 1 Flying Prelude A bird is telling a story to a dog: ‘In a region of the Harz Mountains, there lived a man who was known as the Blond Eckbert. He led a secluded life, and was never involved in the feuds of his neighbours’. Eckbert’s home becomes visible, situated amidst the wild beauty of a mountain landscape. Scene 1: Eckbert and Berthe At Home Eckbert and Berthe are in their drawing room. Eckbert is anxiously awaiting the arrival of his friend Walther. Scene 2: Walther has arrived Walther arrives and tells enthusiastically of his travels on the mountain, and of its natural wonders. He asks to stay the night. Eckbert suggests that, to pass the last hours before midnight, Berthe should tell Walther the story of her youth ‘because it’s very strange and interesting’. Berthe agrees to do this – the first time she has spoken this evening – but she asks Walther ‘do not take my story for a fairy tale, however strange it may seem’. Scene 3: Berthe's Ballad Berthe tells her story in the form of an extended drawing-room ballad. The actors and scenery in her story emerge from the confines of the drawing room – from behind the sofa, from under the rug, and so on. Or perhaps she simply shows Walther a home-movie of her life. The bird and dog play the parts of the bird and the dog in this story. Her story is basically this: ‘I was born into a peasant family. I was thought of as stupid and clumsy. Eventually my parents were so angry with me that I escaped from home. I passed through difficult, hilly country until I came to a lush mountain pasture. An old woman found me, exhausted and starving, and took me to live in her house. She had a pet dog with which I used to play – I’ve forgotten its name – and a bird in a cage, which said intelligent things, and laid precious stones instead of eggs. The woman taught me to spin, which I turned out to be brilliantly talented at, and she was very pleased with me. Presently she took to leaving me at home working, whilst she went on long expeditions. Years passed in this way, and I was content, but I was still curious about my family, and eventually my curiosity got the better of me. One day, after the old woman went out, I tied up the dog, took a pocketful of the precious stones, and left with the bird in its cage. But as I travelled, the bird, still talkative, became abusive and accusatory, so I let it out of the cage and it flew away. After a long journey I arrived back at the village of my youth, but there was no-one there who remembered me – my parents were presumably long since dead. I sold the precious stones, and with the wealth that this gave me, settled down in the district. I met Eckbert and we got married – we are still living on the proceeds of those precious stones, as Eckbert had no wealth of his own’. Leaving to go to bed, Walther thanks Berthe: ‘you told the story so vividly – I could just imagine you playing with that friendly little dog, Strohmian’: he goes up to bed. Scene 4: Strohmian! Strohmian! It is a Hitchcockian moment. How did Walther know the name which Berthe has never been able to remember? Berthe also leaves for bed, fascinated; but Eckbert stays in the room, alone, and his illease takes him over. He replays the scene in his mind (and perhaps visibly) over and over – each time he thinks about it, Walther appears to be a more malevolent character. The night passes in this way. As dawn breaks, Eckbert hears Walther leaving the house unobtrusively, off on another mountain walk. Eckbert follows him out, taking a crossbow with him.


Act II Prelude: Walther’s Death A cold outdoor landscape. Walther walks through the trees absorbed in studying the leaves and the moss that he finds growing. Eckbert stalks him; eventually he shoots. The arrow’s course is seen in very slow motion – an aerial ballet. Walther drops dead, and Eckbert rushes away. Scene 1: Berthe's last words Out of the darkness following Walther’s death, Berthe emerges, anxious and on her deathbed, writing a letter to Eckbert. She describes her bewilderment and terror at Walther’s revelations. Scene 2: Accusation Eckbert finds himself alone in urban surroundings. A stranger emerges from the throng, and introduces himself as Hugo. With warmth and kindness, Hugo befriends Eckbert, and calms him down somewhat. As they walk Eckbert tells Hugo his version of the story; at first he feels that Hugo receives what he says sympathetically, but then, suddenly, he begins to think that Hugo is growing suspicious and critical of him. As they meet other walkers, it seems to Eckbert that Hugo is taking them aside and warning them about his evil nature. Then, as he looks at Hugo, he sees Walther’s face. Eckbert runs away. Scene 3: Eckbert, fugitive In seclusion, Eckbert finds himself in the countryside, in the landscape described by Berthe in her ballad. It is a jagged and uncomfortable journey. At one point he seems to recognise a passer by – as Walther. Scene 4: At the end Eventually, at the crest of a hill, he sees the old woman’s house; the dog is playing; the bird is chattering away. The way is barred by the old woman, who tells Eckbert ‘I was Walther; I was Hugo’ – and she reveals herself briefly as both these characters. Then she tells Eckbert ‘Berthe was your sister; your parents abandoned her in that village’. Eckbert cries ‘Why have I always imagined this dreadful thing?’. She replies ‘In your childhood you once heard your father talk about it; he could not keep his daughter, because she was the child of another woman. She was raised by a shepherd.’ At this moment – at the extreme point of Eckbert’s agony – the bird closes off the scene, finishing the story she has been telling for the duration of the opera, and flies away, chased by the dog.


This work was commissioned by English National Opera with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was first performed by English National Opera at the London Coliseum on 20th April 1994.

CAST Blond Eckbert

baritone

Berthe, his wife

mezzo soprano

Walther, his friend/Hugo, his friend/An old woman

tenor

A bird

soprano

A dog

non-singing role

Chorus (Act II Scene 2 only)* SATB

* The chorus is optional and could be offstage, or on tape. It might consist of four solo voices, electronically amplified.

ORCHESTRA 2 flutes (2nd doubling piccolo) 2 oboes (2nd doubling cor anglais) 2 clarinets in B flat (2nd doubling bass clarinet in B flat) 2 bassoons (2nd doubling contrabassoon) 4 horns in F 3 trumpets in C 3 trombones Timpani Percussion (1 player): glockenspiel, suspended cymbal, xylophone, tenor drum, bell or small gong, 3 cowbells (low, medium, high) Harp Strings

Duration: c. 1 hour 20 minutes Vocal score on sale: Order No. CH60901 Full score and orchestral parts are available on hire


Blond Eckbert Judith Weir

Act I Flying Prelude = 72 : Animato

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PIANO

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A bird flies across the stage, pursued by a dog. 4

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Š Copyright 1993 Chester Music Ltd.

CH60901

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Bird - way,

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and 3

long,

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far a way

and long 3

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and long

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The bird settles down, and begins to tell the dog a story.

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Bird long 3

a

go, 3

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91

Bird far

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a

way,

a

way...

...in

a

re gion of

the

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Bird Harz

moun tains,

there lived a

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3

.

man who was known as the

Blond

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8

Eckbert’s home becomes visible, situated amidst the wild beauty of a mountain landscape

98

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Bird Eck

bert.

He

led

a

se clud ed

life,

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3 103

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Bird and was

ne ver in volved in the feuds of his

neigh

bours.

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sempre 3

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108

Bird His

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wife

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113

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Bird loved

so

li

tude as much as 3

3

he;

they ap 3

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3 3

.

peared

to


9

117

Bird love each

o

ther deep

121

ly.

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Bird Mo de

ra

tion

reigned

in

his home;

tem

pe rance

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125

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Bird go verned his house hold.

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Bird On his own,

.


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Bird a

cer

tain re

serve

stole

o

ver

him,

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138

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Bird a

still,

re

tir

ing

me lan cho

ly. 3

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3

attacca

Scene 1 : Eckbert and Berthe At Home Eckbert and Berthe, at home in their drawing room. Eckbert stares out of the window. Berthe is absorbed in some domestic task. 143

= 116 : con fuoco 3

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quiet, withdrawn 180

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Eck. How

late

it

is, 3 3

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Eck. How

sul len the

sky.

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= 80: Animato 236

suddenly, a little animated

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Eck. How

soon the clouds

fly

past.

Is that a 3 3

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Eck. 3

light

in the dis

tance? 3

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Bird A fre quent 3

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guest was named Wal ther* 3

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Bird to whom he 3

at

tached

him self

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af 3

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* Walther: anglicised pronunciation (soft ‘w’, hard ‘th’). .

3

ter


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Bird find ing his

way

of

think

ing

the

same as

his

own.

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again, more detached 252

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Eck. 3

He seems to know the paths

well. 3

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3 255

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Bird Wal 3 3

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Bird ther’s home was in

Fran

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nia, 3 3

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,

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Bird But he of ten vi

si

ted Eck

bert’s neigh

bour hood,

ga ther ing plants 3

3 3

and stones,

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Bird and sort

ing them out. 3

Eck. 3

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He seems to

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268

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Bird He 3

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lived

on a

le

ga

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Eck. come near er, then far

ther a

way.

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3

3 3

3

.

cy,


18

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Bird and was con nec ted with no one. 3

a little animated Eck.

Can it be 3

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3 3

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275

3

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Bird Eck bert 3

fre quent ly

joined

3

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Eck. Wal

ther?

It’s so

late! 3 3

279

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Bird him,

in

his

se

que

stered walks,

and their friend

3

3

3 3

3 .

3

3

ship


19 282

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Bird grew

e

ver more in

ti mate. 3

3

(to himself) Eck.

There 3

are

times 3

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3 3

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285

Eck. when it is a grief

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Eck. to have

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Eck. a ny sec rets at all. 3

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20 296

3

3

poco

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Eck. In

such hours,

the

soul

longs

3

to

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3 3

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3

299

3

Eck. dis

close

to

a

friend;

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Eck. in

such

mo

ments

the

gen

tle

re veal

3

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305

3

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Eck. them

selves,

and

yet

it 3

3 3

.

can

hap

pen

that

one

can

re


21

3

308

Eckbert sees Walther’s face through the window.

3

Eck. - coil

with fear from

the

face

of

the

o

ther:

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3

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3

3

311

3

3

Scene 2: Walther Has Arrived Walther enters. In the first moments, he appears in a sinister light, but when he starts to sing, he is amiable and disarmingly enthusiastic. He is perhaps festooned with greenery and specimens gathered during his recent expedition.

= 96: Misterioso

3

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.

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22

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326

3 3

330

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Walt. 8

My

dear

est

friends,

333

the hour

3

3

Walt. 8

I

thought

of

you

3

336

3

3

Walt. 8

at 3

3 .

home

and

safe.

was

late.


23

339

3

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Walt. 8

I

found

my

path,

deep in

the

3 3

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3

342

3

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with

the

3

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Walt. 8

moun tains, 3

rush ing of wa ter and rus tle of

trees;

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345

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Walt. 8

I

mused

on

how

I had

left my fa mi

liar home, 3

3

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3

348

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3

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Walt. 8

a way from the round of the 3

e ver re cur

3

ring com mon place. 3

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3 3 3

.

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24

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351

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3 3

3 3

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354

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3 3

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5

3

Walt. 8

Storm

clouds moved a cross the sky

and were

lost. 3

5

3

3 3

357

3

3

Walt. 8

Birds sang from bu shes, and there were e

3

choes.

3

360

3

3

3

Walt. 8

I 3

3

.

sat on the bank of 3

3

3

a


25 363

3

Walt. 8

brook that foamed,

re gret ting

I could not com

pre hend its speech, 3

3

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3

3

366

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3

Walt. 8

but then

I looked, and it seemed I was cheer ful and hap

I seized new cou rage, and 3

3

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3

py.

3

3

3

3

369

3

3

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3 3

Walt. 8

star ted to sing in

a ring

ing voice,

a me lo di ous 3

3

3

372

Walt. 8

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

.

3

hunts

man’s song:


26

375

3

3

Walt. 8

Through

378

the

3

3

woods

the

3

3

Walt. 8

horns

re 3

3

soun

ding, from

the

rocks 3

3

3

the

3

cries re boun ding;

3

3 3

381

Walt. 8

‘Wel come, hun ter bro ther hood!’ 3

3

3

3

3

3

384

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3

3

3 .

3

3

3


27 387

3

3

3

Walt. 8

While

I

sang,

the sun sank

deep in the west, 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

390

3

3

Walt. 8

and there were sha

dows

on

the ground.

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

393

3

3

3 3

3

396

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3

3

Walt. 8

My

.

dear

est friends,

the hour was

late -


28 399

3

3

I

thought of

Walt. 8

you

3

402

3

3

Walt. 8

at

home

and

safe. 3

3

3

3

3

Poco pi첫 mosso 3

3

405

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3

impulsively 407

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3

3

Eck. Stay,

spend the night

in friend ly con

ver sa tion.

3 3

.

3

3


29 (408)

409

3

3

3

Eck.

3

Sleep

3

3

un til mor ning

in

one of our rooms.

3

3

3 3

410

Eck.

3

3 3

ther,

my friend,

3

3

3

Wal

3

3

3

3 (411)

3

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3

3

412

Eck. I have long meant to tell you . . . .

3 3

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3

3

3

3

3 413

3

3

Eck. I

mean,

you must let my wife

ex plain.

3 3 3

.

3


30 (414)

415

3

3

Eck. It 3

3

3

is

the his

to

ry

of

her youth.

3

3

3 416

Eck. It

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

is strange,

but

3

3

3

3

(417)

418

Eck. it

419

will

in

terest you.

They settle down.

3

Walt. 8

Glad 3

3 3

.

3

3

3

3

3

ly.


31 to Walther, with intensity and concentration

421

3

Bert. Pro

mise

me one

thing;

3

3

424

3

Bert. what

e

ver hap pens,

how

e

ver strange

it

3

3

427

3

3

3

Bert. may

sound,

do

3

3

430

3

Bert. for

.

a

fai

ry tale.

not

take

my

sto

ry


32

Scene 3 : Berthe’s Ballad 433

she tells her story with energy and complete involvement. with sudden animation

= 116 : semplice

3

Bert. I

was born in

a small

vil lage,

we lived in a 3

438

Bert. hut;

my fa ther

was a poor

shep herd.

Life

3

443

Bert. did not

go well

for

my

pa rents -

their moods

were black,

and they had no

i 3

447

Bert. - dea

how they were go

ing

to

feed

and

clothe

a child. 3

3

3

.


33

3 3

451

3

3

3

3

3

455

3

3

3

3

3

Bert. I

was

awk

ward

and clum sy, I

was

al

ways

3

459

3

3

Bert. drop

ping things;

I

could not

learn to

sew

or spin,

but

I

3

ossia

464

I

of

ten

I

of

ten

3

Bert. un

der

stood

my

pa

rents’ mi

se 3

3 3

.

3

3

3

ry;


34 467

3

dreamed

3

of

sud

den

wealth,

and

how

I

den

wealth,

and

how

I

would

shower

them

3

3

Bert. dreamed

of

sud

would shower

them 3

3

3

470

with

gold

and

pre

3

3

3

3

cious

trea

sures.

3

Bert. with

gold

and

pre

cious

trea

sures.

3

3

3

3

3

3 473

3

3

3

478

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3 3

3 3

3

3

483

.

3

3

3

3

3

3

5


35

488

3

3

Bert. My fa ther

was

al ways an

gry

be

5

5

3

3

5

493

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Bert. - cause I was

a bur

den

on the house

hold;

he 3

3

3

3

3

498

3

3

Bert. pu nished me most

harsh

ly;

I

de 3

ci ded to es 3

3

3

3 3

3

3

502

Bert.

5

5

5 3

3 .

5

5

cape. 3


36

507

3

Bert. I

crept

out

5

3

3

512

5

3

3

3

Bert. when day

be gan to

dawn.

I found my self in

o

pen fields,

3

3

3

3 3

3

517

3

5

Bert. and then a

fo

rest

with out the light of day, 3

5

5

3

5

3

521

3

3

3

3

Bert. and then through boul ders

to

the moun

tain side; 3

3

.

3

3

3

3

3

3

fear drove me 3

3

3

3


37

525

3

3

Bert. on -

I

al most

fain

ted

with

ter

ror.

3

3

529

535

eroica

3

Bert. I

ga thered all

my

strength;

541

3

3

Bert. I

.

walked

fas

ter and then

I

saw

woods

and mea dows,

dis

tant,


38

545

6

Bert. plea

sant hills,

and then I saw an old 6

3

3

3 549

3

Bert. wo

man

dressed

in

black,

and

she 3

3

3

so

subito

3

553

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

Bert. led me to her house

which was with in

a val ley full of birch

trees. 3

3

3

556

3

3

3

3

3

3

Bird Ah.

.

3

Ah.

Ah.

3

3


39

561

3

3

3

3

Bird Ah.

Ah.

Bert. As

566

3

we

de

3

3

scen

ded,

I

3

heard

a

mar

vel

lous

3

Bird Ah.

Ah.

Bert. song,

570

3

as

3

3

3

3

3

if

from

a

3

Bird Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Bert. bird,

and

it

sang:

3

3

.

3

3

3


40 suddenly blunt and shrewd 574

Bird * Wald

579

ein

sam

3

3

Bird - keit

I

feel

583

all

right;

A

3

lone

in

3

Bird wood,

things

go

as

they should.

All

588

Bird Wald

* German pronunciation .

ein

sam

keit.

day

and all night;

a


41

593

staccatissimo

598

3

3

Bird Ah.

Bert. You would have thought the horn

3

601

and the

3

o

boe were play

ing.

3

3

Bird Ah.

605

3

3

Ah.

3

3

Ah.

3

3

Meno mosso:

= 72

Bird Ah.

Ah.

6

.

6


42

609

3

3

3

Bert. In

side

the

house

there was the bird

in its

cage,

and

6

612

3

Bert. be

side

it

a

lit tle

dog

was

play

ing.

3

6

[SPOKEN:]

615

Bert. Now what was his name?

That lit tle dog!

I can never remember....

: deliberate 6

618

3

3

.

3


43

621

Bert. And

in

the

3

morn

3

3

ing

3

she

3

3

624

Bert. taught me

to

spin,

which

I

ea

si

ly

learned;

sim.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

627

Bert. and she gave

3

3

3

me

the

3

3

care

3

of the dog

3

3

3

and

3

the bird.

3

3

that

this

630

Bert. Soon 3

3

.

3

3

I 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

felt

3

3

way

it

should

3

3

3

was the

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


44

633

Bert. be;

that the wo man

was

not

ve ry strange,

3

3

636

Bert. and her dwel ling

was

nor

mal

and

com mon,

3

3

3

639

Bert. but the

3

3

3

3

3

bird,

3

3

the bird!

3

with its

3

3

3

song

3

3

and its beau

3

3

3

ti

ful

3

3

642

3

Bert. fea thers

3

.

of

3

my

3

ri

3

3

3

3

3

ad

co

3

lours:

3

3

that was not


45

645

Bert. nor

mal,

that

was

won drous

ly

odd,

and

stran

ger

and

pearls!

648

Bert. far;

it

seemed

to

lay

eggs

which were

je wels

651

Bert. We stored them

in

jars

,

654

Bert. a

way.

,

.

and

hid

them

by


46

657

Bert. Time

passed,

and

I

was

660

Bert. trus

ted:

she would

tra

vel

lit

tle

a

far

663

Bert. and

leave

me

in

so

li

tude.

666

Bert. My

.

spin

ning

wheel hummed,

the

dog barked,

the


47 669

Bird Ah.

Ah.

Bert. mar

vel

lous

bird

sang

its

song:

3

673

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Bird Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah. 3

Bert. No

3

3

3

one came there by

3

676

3

3

3

3

Bird Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

3

Bert. chance,

3

.

there was

3

3

3

calm all

3

a

round,

and

3

I

ne

3

ver

re


48 679

Bird

Bert. - mem

ber

a

storm

cloud.

3

682

= 92 : Poco agitato 685

3

3

Bert. My un

689

3

der stan ding grew;

3

Bert. my in

no cence left

me,

3 3

.

the

sun

shone,


49 693

Bert. the

698

trees

glis tened,

I thought of the out

side world.

3

Bert. I thought of

es

cape!

I

found

the

3

702

3

Bert. mo ment:

I tied up the

dog,

I

seized

the

3

706

Bert. bird,

.

I

stole

the stones....

Down

the path!


50

710

3

3

Bert. through the fo rests and rocks

sensed

be hind me

3

3

714

I

3

3

Bert. the

dis tant

cries

of

the

dog,

the re proach

ful stares

of

3

3

ossia it

puffed

718

up

its

fea

thers

3

Bert. the bird:

it

puffed up its fea

thers

722

Bert. and

fi

nal ly

star

ted

to

sing:

5

5

5

.

5

5


51

725

as if airsick

Bird A

lone

in

a

wood,

I

5

5

5

5

728

Bird don’t feel so good. 5

5

5

3

5

3 5

5

5

731

Bird You

took

me

a

way,

5

5

5

3

3 5

5

734

Bird You did

wrong

and you’ll

pay

All

5

5

.

day

and


52

738

Bird all

night

a

void

wrong

5

5 3

3

5

5

741

Bird and

do

right.

5

5

5

5

5

744

5

Bert. I

let

5

it

go:

it

5

rose

up

5

in

to

the

air

5

sim. 5

5

sim.

747

Bert. and

flew

a

5

5 5

.

way.

5

5

5


53

750

754

3

Bert. I came to a

vil

lage

it was the

758

one

I

had left, years

3

3

Bert. a go:

my

761

pa

rents were dead

3

and

3

no

one

re

mem bered me.

3

Bert. I sold

a

few

stones

and was

mo derate ly pros

pe rous.

3

.


54

765

3

Bert. In

a 3

plea

sant

town

I

3

ren

ted a

house

with a

gar den.

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

768

3

3

Bert. The world

did not

seem

as

I

had

i

ma

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

771

3

Bert. gined it.

I

be

gan

to

for

get,

3 3 3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

774

Bert. and

I lived quite con tent.

I

met this good man,

3

3

3 3

.

3


55

777

3

Bert. and here my

tale

is

at

an

end.

an impassioned outburst

Eck. You should have seen

her

3

5

781

3

Eck. then -

her

youth,

her

grace,

the

in

con cei

va

ble

charm that

her lone

5

3

3

3

5

786

3

3

3

3

Bert. It’s grow ing

late!

we must

Eck. - ly

life

had

gi

ven her! 3

3

.

3

3

go

to our

beds!


56 791

Bert.

3

Eck. I

had

no

for tune:

she

brought me pros pe

ri

ty -

our mar

riage has caused us

3

Walther rises, about to retire to bed.

796

Walt. 8

Dear

Eck. no

re grets.

3

802

3

3

Walt. 8

La

dy,

thank

you, 3

3

.

3


57

807

3

3

I

can real ly

Walt. 8

How

well

you

told your tale;

3

3

3

3

812

3

Walt. 8

- ma gine the

bird,

and

3

3

816

Walt. 8

dog,

.

Stroh

mi an.

that

friend

ly

lit

tle

i


58

Scene 4 : Strohmian! Walther leaves for bed: Eckbert and Berthe are left in (separate) amazement. Eckbert is worried, Berthe fascinated. 820

= 104 : Pi첫 mosso

3 3

3

3

825

3

3

3 3

3 830

3

3

3

3

3

835

3

3

3

5 3

3

840

3

3

.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


59

845

Bert. Was

it

by chance?

Was

it

by

Eck. Was

I

not

a

fool?

3

3

3

3

850

Bert. chance?

Eck. I 3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

855

Eck. my

self made my

wife

tell

her

sto

ry 3

3 3 3

.


60

860

Bert. Did

he

guess

the

3

3

865

Bert. name? 3

Eck. ‘Stroh

mi an!’

870

Bert. Did

Eck. Won’t he

a

3

.

buse

our trust?

3

he guess

the


61

875

Bert. name?

880

Did

he know it?

3

3

3

3

886

Eck. Won’t he

tell

our

tale

to

o

thers?

3

3

3

891

3

3

Bert. Did he

men tion it

de

3

li

berate ly?

3

3

3

.


62

898

3

3

904

Eck. Won’t he

be

seized

by

greed

for

our

pre cious

stones?

3

909

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

914

3

3

3

3

3

3

Bert. and

what

does

this

man

have

to

do

with

my

fate?

Eck. 3 3

3

.

Stroh


63

919

Eck. mi an!

924

Eck. Won’t

he

be

seized

by

greed

5

3

for

our

pre

cious

6

929

stones?

7

3

Eck. Won’t 6

he

con

spire

to

steal

them? 3

5

934

Bert. Stroh 3

3

3

3

mi an! 3

3

.

3

3


64

Berthe leaves for bed; Eckbert is left alone with his anxiety.

940

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

945

3

3

3

3

3

950

3

3

3

3

Eck. And

when

he

said

3

955

3

3

Eck. was 3

.

his

fare well

sin

cere?

"Good night",


65

3

960

3

Eck. Were

his

words

to

me

3

965

3

3

Eck. ho

nest?

Was

it

3

970

na

tu

ral

5

3

Eck. af

ter

the

in

ti

975

mate

words

5

Eck. said? -

.

in

ti mate

words! -

that were


66

3

980

3

Eck. My

sus

pi

3

985

cion

was a

roused;

it

3

3

3

Eck. will

990

find

con

3

Eck. - ma

995

.

tion.

fir

ma

tion,

con

fir


67

3

1001

3

Eck. I

1006

3

re

proach

my

self,

I

5

3

re

5

3

Eck. - proach

my self

for

my

mis

trust,

but

I

can not

free

my

1011

5

Eck. - self

from it.

I

my

5

1017

Eck. made my wife tell

5

her

sto

ry...

5

3

6 5

energico 5

5

.

5

5 5

5

6 3

6

self


68

1022

Eck. Did

he

guess

the

name?

Won’t

he

a

5 6

1027

Eck. - buse

our trust?

Did 5

he

know it?

3

6

5 5

5

6 3

5

6

5

1032

Eck. Won’t he 5

tell

our

tale

to

o

5

5

5

1037

Eck. - thers?

Won’t he 3

5

.

3

be

seized


69 1043

Eck. by greed

for

our pre cious stones?

5

5

5

1049

Eck. Won’t he

con

spire

to

steal

them? 5

5

6

5

5

5

The early light of dawn is suddenly apparent; Eckbert sees Walther leaving the house unobtrusively, off on another nature study expedition. 3

3

1055

3

3

3

1061

3 1067

3

.


70 3

3

3

1073

3

1079

3 1084

3

After some moments’ thought, Eckbert follows him, picking up his crossbow as he leaves.

1089

1094

1099

End of Act I .


71

Act II : Prelude Walther’s Death "It was a raw stormy winter day; deep snow lay on the mountains, and bent down the branches of the trees. He roved about; the sweat was standing on his brow. He found no game, and this embittered his ill humour. All at once he saw an object moving in the distance; it was Walther gathering moss from the trunks of trees. Scarcely knowing what he did, he took out an arrow, aimed; Walther looked round and made a threatening gesture, but the arrow was already flying, and Walther fell to the ground." [Ludwig Tieck]

= 60: Melancholy and still

PIANO

3

3 3

5

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3

8

3

3

3

3

3

3

11

3 3

.

3

3


72 15

19

24

3

3

3

27

3

3

3

5

3

3

3

3

3

30

3

.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

5


73

33

3

3

3

37

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

40

6

5

6 6

5

5

6

5

44

6

5

5

5

6

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

6 6

46

.

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5


74 3

3

48

6

5

5 6

6 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

3

5 5

50

6 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

3

3

3

52

5

5

6

5

6

5

5

5

5

5

5

6

5

6

5

3

5

5

3

3

3

5

54

6

6

5

6

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

6

5

5

5

5

5

56

3 5

3

3 5

3 5

3 5 5

5 .

5

5

5

5

3

3

3

5

5


75 58

3

3

3

Bird O 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

3

60

Bird Wald

ein

sam keit;

wie liegst 5

5

5

du weit!

3

5

5

63

Bird O 5

dich

ge

reut

3

Einst mit 5

65

5

3

der

Zeit

3

5

3

Bird Ach

einz

’ge

Freud,

Wald ein 5

5

.

5

3

3

sam 3

keit!


76

Subito molto mosso: 67

= 80

6

3

3

3

Bird O 6

6 6

69

Bird Wald

ein

sam

keit 6

6

72

Bird wie liegst

du weit! 6

6

6

6 6

6

75

Bird O dich ge reut

Einst mit der

3

.

3

3

Zeit 3


77

78

3

3

3

3

3

3

Bird ach 3

einz

’ge

Freud

ach

einz

’ge

Freud!

3

81

5

5

6

6

83

( = 104 = Più mosso) Broadly 86

3

3

3

3

5

3

3

5 3

88

3 3

3 .

3

3


78

90

3

92

3

3

3

3

94

3

3

96

3

3

3

98

3

3

.

3

3

3

3


79

100

3

3

102

3

3

3

3

3

3

Scene 1: Berthe’s Last Words Out of the darkness following Walther’s death, Berthe emerges, anxious and on her deathbed, writing a letter to Eckbert. 104

( =104) accel.

=112

Berthe My 3

6

3

est

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

107

dear

3

3

3

Berthe hus

band,

I

must

dis

close

to

you.... 3

3

3

3 3

3 3

3

.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


80

110

Berthe This has dri ven me out 6

3

3

6

The

blood

has

of

my

3

mind. 6

6

3

113

Berthe left

my

cheeks, 3

3

6

6

3

6

116

Berthe and

my

eyes

burn

with

fe

ver. 3

6

6

6

3

119

Berthe You

3

6

.

when

I

re

3 3

3

know

6

6

6

3


81 122

Berthe - called

my

youth,

no

mat

ter

how

3 3

3 6

3

3

6

125

Berthe I

tried,

3

I could ne

3

3

3

3

3

ver

re mem ber

3

3

the name

3

3

3

128

Berthe of the lit

tle

dog

I

loved,

but

6

6

Wal

3

3

that friend ly

lit

ther

3

3

3

131

Berthe spoke

to

3

.

3

me

6

of

3

3

6

tle dog.

“Stroh

3

3


82 134

Berthe mi an."

Did

he

3 3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

137

Berthe guess

the

Did

he know

3

3

3

3

name?

3

3

140

Berthe it?

And

3

3

3

3

3

what

3

3

does

this

3

3

3

3

In another part of the stage, Eckbert is seen reading the letter Berthe has written to him.

143

Berthe man

have

to

do

with

my

fate?

3

3

3

Eck. Some 3

3

I

3 3

3 .

times

3

3

strug

gle


83

146

3

3

Berthe Some

times

I

strug

gle

with

my

self,

3

3

Eck. my 3

3

6

3

6

3

3

3

3 3

149

Berthe as 3

if

I

was

on

ly

i

ma

gin

ing

3

Eck. self, 3

6

3

3

3

152

Berthe but

6

.

3

it

is

3

cer tain, all

6

too

3

cer

3

tain.

6

6

it;


84

155

Berthe When

a

stran

3

3

3

3

Eck. A

stran

ger

knew

my

tale. 3

3

3

3

3 3

3

159

Berthe - ger

knew

my

tale,

ter

ror

seized

3

Eck. my

tale

3 3

3 3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

162

Berthe me -

ter ror,

6

ter ror,

ter ror

seized

me.

6 3 3

.

5


85 165

Berthe Eck

bert,

what

do

you think?

5 3

6

3

3

5

6

3

168

Berthe What 5

5

3

do 5

3

you 5

think?

3

3

5

5

3

3

3

171

3

Eck. Ter

ror

seized

me.

3

3

3

173

3

3

5

6

3

3

3

5

3 3

Eck. What

do

you

think?

What 3

3 3

3

3

.

3


86 175

3

3

Eck. do

you

think?

3

3

177

3 3 3

179

3

3 181

183

3

3

3

3 3

3

185

3

3

.

3

3

3

3

3


87

Scene 2 : Accusation Eckbert is alone and unnoticed amidst the brutal business of an urban scene 187

(sempre =112) Molto animato

192

S A Chor. (Opt.)

Ah.

T B Ah.

197

S A Chor.

Ah.

T B Ah.

.


88 202

S A Chor.

Ah.

T B Ah.

206

210

S A Chor.

Ah.

T B Ah.

214

3

S A Chor.

Ah. 3

T B Ah. 3

3 3

3 3

3 .


89 218

S A Ah.

Chor. T B

Ah. 3

3

222

S A Chor.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

T B

227

3

Eck. I

saw

my

friend

ly

ing

S A Chor. T B 3

.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


90 232

3

Eck. in

the

wood,

I

saw

my

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3 3

3

3 236

3

3

3

3

3

Eck. friend

ly

ing

in

the

wood, 3

3

3 3

3

3 3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

240

3

3

Eck. and

then

a

bird

flew o

3

3

3

3

ver and

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3 3

244

3

Eck. said:

"Your friend

S A Ah.

Chor. T B 3

3

3

3

.

3

3

Ah. 3

3


91 249

Eck. died 3

in

the

3

3

3

wood." 3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

253

3

Eck. Dead

in

the

win try

3

3

3

3

3

3

wood! 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

257

3

3

3

Eck. Dead in

the

lone

ly,

win try

wood! 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

261

Eck. said

the

bird,

said 3

3

3

3 3

3

3 3

the

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 .


92 265

Eck. bird. S A Ah.

Chor. T B

Ah. 3

3

3

3

269

S A Ah.

Chor. T B

Ah.

274

S A Chor.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

T B

3 .


93 278

Hugo emerges from the throng, and tries to comfort Eckbert

Poco meno mosso ( = 104)

282

Hugo 8

3

Friend,

S A Ah. Chor.

3

T B Ah.

3

3 3

5 5

3

286

3

3

3

Hugo 8

my

name

is 5

Hu

go:

5

5

3

3

3

3

3

5

290

Hugo 8

Be

calm,

at

ease.

3

3 3

.

You

3

3


94 294

Tempo primo ( = 112)

3

Hugo 8

saw,

saw

your

friend

ly

ing 3

3

Eck. Ly 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

ing in the wood. 3

299

3

Hugo 8

in

the

wood?

You

saw

your

friend,

ly

Eck.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

304

3

3

3

3

3

3

Hugo 8

ing in the

wood?

and

then

a

bird

3

Eck. In

the wood.

and then

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

.

3

3 3

a


95 309

3

3

Hugo 8

flew o

ver

and

said:

Eck. bird

flew

o

ver and

said:

S A Mur

Chor. T B

Mur 3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

314

3

Hugo 8

"Your friend

died

in

the

wood.� 3

Eck. In

the

wood...

S A Chor.

- der!

T B - der! 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

.


96 319

3

Hugo 8

Dead

in

the

win try

wood. 3

Eck. In 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

the

win

3

3

try wood. 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3 323

3

3

Hugo 8

Dead in

the

lone

ly,

win try

wood, 3

3

Eck. In 3

3

the

win

try

3

3

3

wood,

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

327

Hugo 8

said

the

bird,

said

the

bird,

Eck.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3 .

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3


97

Poco meno mosso ( = 104)

331

3

Hugo 8

said

the

bird.

said

the

bird.

Stay

calm,

at

ease,

Eck.

5

5

5

5

3

3

3

5

3

3

335

5

3

3

3

Hugo 8

be

3

3

3

still

with your 5

5

5

5

5

5

self,

339

Hugo 8

breathe!

3

3

3

3

3

3

344

3

3

Hugo 8

Your

tale

moved

me,

5

3 5

.

3


98 348

3

3

Hugo 8

feel

no

shame.

3

3

Eck. Kind 5

5

stran

ger,

5

3

3

3

5

5

5

352

3

3

3

Eck. you

have

saved

me

5

I 5

5

5

3

3

356

5

5

3

3

3

Hugo 8

3

3

Be

still. 3

3

Eck. had

des

paired.

3

3

360

You

3

3

3

Eck. pa

tient,

3

.

dear

est

3

friend!

were

so

3


99 Suddenly the scene freezes as Eckbert sees Hugo in a new, threatening, light. 364

Tempo primo ( = 112)

S A Chor.

Mur

der

er!

Mur

der

er!

T B

369

Eck. I thought I saw a

ma

3

li cious smile

3

his face.

3

3

3

cross

3

3

3

a

3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

373

378

Eck. He was su spi cious

of my

in

ti mate re

ve

la

tion.

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3

.

3

3

3

3

3 3

3


100 382

Eck. He

3

spoke

to

S A Cri mi nal!

Chor.

3

T B Cri mi nal! 3

3

3

3

3 3

3

387

Eck. my

foes,

but

3

not

to me.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3 3

392

Eck. They asked him ques tions

in

a

sin

3

3

397

Eck. gu

lar

way.

3

3

.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


101 402

Eck. I looked at 3

3

Hu

go 3

and saw Wal

ther’s

3

3

3 3

3

406

3

3 3

3

3

face. 3

3

3

3

3

Eckbert leaves, hurriedly. Hugo, amidst the city scene, is left behind.

S A Chor.

Dead!

T B Dead!

411

Eck. All

his

fa

mi

liar

ex

pres

sions.

3 3

3

415

420

.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3 3


102

Scene 3: Eckbert, fugitive Eckbert finds himself in the countryside, in the landscape described by Berthe in her Ballad. 426

= 84 : Light, nervous 6

429

6

6

6

6

6

432

6

6

6

435

3

She came this way:

she was

here.

6

6

3

6

438

6 3

3

3

3

.


103 441

3

Eck. Down the path, 6

6

6 6 3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

444

6

6

6

6 3

3

3

447

3

3

Eck. through

the fo

6

6

rests

and

rocks,

9:8

9:8

3 3

3 450

3

Eck. she

sensed

be

hind

her 3

3

3

3

3 3

5

5 5 .

3

3


104 3

3

453

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

5 5

456

3

Eck. The

dis

tant cries

of

3

3

3 3

3

the

dog,

the

re proach

ful

3

5

5

459

Eck. the

bird.

3

3 3

8ba

A peasant passes by. 462

.

Relaxed, amiable

stares

of


105 465

468

471

474

Eck. That man

477

.

who passed,

that man

who passed

by,


106 480

Eck. I

could

be lieve,

I

could

be lieve

it.

483

3

486

3

Eck. I could

490

be lieve

it

was

none

o

ther than

Wal

ther:

3

3

Eck. it

was

Wal

ther!

3

.


107 3 494

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

497

3

3

3

3

3

3

rit.

500

3

3 3

503

= 76 : Poco meno mosso

,

506

,

,

Eckbert approaches the area near the Old Woman’s house. 509

,

3

.

3

3

3

3


108

512

3

3

3

3

Eck. The

trees

whi

sper

in

the

in

ter

,

, 5

5

515

3

Eck. - vals

,

518

5

3

521

Eck. The

6

.

6

mar


109 The Bird flies overhead. 524

= 72 : Pochissimo meno mosso

3

3

3

Bird Ah. 3

3

3

Eck. vel lous,

min

gled with the com mon place! 3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

527

3

3

3

3

3

3

Bird Ah.

Ah.

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

Ah. 3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

530

Bird 3

Ah.

A

lone

in a 3

5

5

5

at

3

3

3

3

3 .

wood,

3

3


110

534

3

3

3

Bird last

it’s

good.

3

Eck. 3

The mar

3

5

bird!

3 3

5

3

vel lous

3

3

3

537

3

3

3

3

you’ll

hear

3

3

Bird Now

no

thing’s wrong,

my

song.

Eck. 5

3

3

3

5 3

3

3

5

Broadening slightly 540

Bird

3

3

Ah.

In

Eck. Now hear 3

the song! 3

3

3 3

.

3


111

544

3

3

3

3

3

Bird truth’s clear, blind

ing

light -

Wald,

Wald 3

3

3 5 3 3

5 3

548

3

3

3

3

3

Bird - ein

sam

Wald

ein

sam 3

3 3

3 3

5 3

3

Scene 4: At the End 553

3

3

3

3

3

3

Bird - keit. like a folk song.

Ah. 3

Ah.

3

Old W. 8

Kommst

du 3

her,

mein’ schö

ner

Vo

gel?

3

3 3

.

3

3

3

3


112 556

3

3

Bird 3

3

Ah.

3

Old W. 8

Komm

3

zu

r端ck,

du

klei

ner

Vo

gel!

Eck. The path

ends. 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

559

Bird Ah. 3

3

Old W. 8

Komm

3

zu

r端ck,

du

Eck. No thought,

no

562

3

me mo ry

3

3

,

3

3

3

3

3

3

,

3

Bird Ah. 3

Ah.

Ah.

3

Old W. 8

klei

ner

Vo

gel! 3

3

3

3 3

3

3 3

.

3

3


113

,

565

,

3

3

3

3

3

3

Bird Ah.

Ah.

Ah. 6

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

suddenly confronting Eckbert

= 66 : Slightly broader

569

3

3

3

Old W. 8

Are you bring ing me my bird,

my

pre

cious

5

5

5

573

5

5

3

Old W. 8

jew

els?

3

3

Eck. Why

do you speak

to

me? 3

5

5 5

The Old Woman perhaps momentarily reveals herself in the guises of Walther and Hugo 577

3

3

3

Old W. 8

Eck bert, 3

.

I

was Wal ther;

I was

Hu

go.

3


114

581

3

3

Eck. In

what

so li

tude

have I

lived

my life! 3

3

urgently

585

3

Eck. 3

me

of

the

5 5

588

Old W. 8

She

was

your

sis

ter.

5

5

5

quietly and reflectively 592

3

Eck. Why

have

I

al ways

i

ma gined this dread

3

.

Ber

3

3

3

Tell

ful

thing?


115

595

= 60 : Broadly

Old W. 8

You heard your fa

in agony Eck.

3

ther

say

3

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

3

3

598

3

3

3

Old W. 8

it

when you

were

in agony

a

child.

3

3

3

6

3

Eck.

3

3

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah. 3

3

3 6

3

6

3

3

3

3

3

600

3

3

Old W. 8

She was the daugh

ter

Eck. 3

Ah.

Ah.

3

3

3

Ah. 3

3

3

.

3

3

of

a

knight,


116

602

3

Old W. 8

your

fa

ther’s

daugh

ter.

3

Eck. 3

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

3

3

3

604

3

3

3

3

3

3

Eck. Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

3

3

3

Ah.

3

3

3

606

3

Old W. 8

She 3

was

not

your

3

Eck. Ah.

3

3

3

.

mo

ther’s

child.


117

608

3

3

Old W. 8

Your

pa

rents

would

not

keep

her.

3 3

Eck. Ah.

3

3

3

3

610

3

3

3

3

Eck. Ah.

Ah.

3

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

3

3

612

3

3

3

Old W. 8

She

Eck.

was

3

3

.

raised

by a

shep

Ah.

3

3

3

Ah.

herd.


118 614

3

3

Bird Wald

ein

sam

keit,

my tale is

fi

nished. 3

3

3

Old W. 8

Her tri als and tri

3 3

bu

3

3

3

3

3

3

617

3

3

3

Old W. 8

- la

tions

were

al

most at

an

end. 3

3

Eck. 3

Ah. 3

3

3 3 619

3

Bird Eck

bert

lay

on

the

ground... 3

3 3

Eck. Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

3

3

3 3

.

3

Ah.


119 621

3

Old W. 8

Why,

why

did

she

leave

me?

3

Eck.

Ah.

3

Ah.

3

3 3

3

3 623

Bird 3

... in

3

sane

Old W. 8

For

shame,

that

Eck.

she

3

a

ban

doned

me.

3 3

Ah.

3

3 3

3

3

3

Ah.

3 3

3

625

3

Bird and

dy

ing...

3

3

Old W. 8

Her

3

Eck. 3 3

Ah.

3

Ah.

3 3

3

3 .

3

3

tri

3

als

and

tri

bu


120

627

3

3

3

Old W. 8

- la

tions

were

3

al

most at

an

end.

3

3

3

Eck. Ah.

Ah.

3

3

3

3

3 3 3

3

629

3

3

3

ossia 3

Numbed

and

be

wil

dered,

he

heard...

dered,

he

heard...

3

Bird 3

Numbed

and

be

wil

3

Eck.

3

3

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

3

3

3 3 3

3

.

3


121 631

Bird 3

The

Old W. 8

Why did she leave

me?

Eck. 3

Ah.

Ah.

Ah.

3

3

634

3 .

3

Bird old

wo man speak

ing,

and... 3

3

3

Old W. 8

in

your youth,

you

heard

it

said... 3

Eck. 3

Ah.

3

3 3

3

3 3

637

3

Bird ...the

lit

tle dog bark

ing.

3

3

Old W. 8

in

Eck.

3

3

Ah.

Ah.

Ah. 3

3 3

.

3

3

your

youth,

you


122 639

3

Bird and

3

the

bird

Old W. 8

heard

it

3

said...

Eck. Ah.

Ah.

Ah. 3

3

641

The bird closes off the scene and flies away, chased by the dog

3

3

Bird re

peat

ing her song:

3

3

Eck. Ah.

Ah.

3

3

3

643

Eck. Ah. 9

9

9

9

9

9

645

9

9

9

9

9

9

End of Opera .

Profile for ScoresOnDemand

Weir BLOND ECKBERT - Vocal score  

Opera; Vocal score; Chester Music; musicsalesclassical.com; 2730

Weir BLOND ECKBERT - Vocal score  

Opera; Vocal score; Chester Music; musicsalesclassical.com; 2730

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