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The

Bulletin Saginaw County Medical Society

March 2020 | Volume 78 | No 7

REGISTER NOW!

April Membership Meeting Physician Compassion/Fatigue p. 5

ROTARY

"Thanks for Staying" Scholarships Fund p.16-17

REGISTER NOW!

Free 8-Hour MAT DATA Waiver Training Meets LARA Opioid Awareness Requirements! p. 10-11

www.SaginawCountyMS.com


Cancer Care Center Support Groups

Covenant Regional

Revised February 2020

SUPPORT GROUPS ARE PROVIDED AS A FREE SERVICE TO OUR COMMUNITY

All Cancer Survivors and Caregivers Survivors with Oral, Head and Neck Cancer and Caregivers

Coping with Cancer When: 1st & 3rd Tuesday of each month

Support for Those with Treatment-Related Swallowing Difficulties (including Lung and Upper-Gastrointestinal Cancers) S.P.O.H.N.C. – Saginaw Chapter When: 2nd Tuesday of each month Time: 2:00-3:30 pm Women’s Cancer Support When: 2nd Tuesday of each month

Female Cancer Survivors

Time: 12:00 Noon-1:30 pm

Time: 6:00-7:30 pm

Young Women’s Cancer Support (suggested age 45 and under) When: 4th Tuesday of each month Time: 6:00-7:30 pm

Pulmonary Patients and Caregivers

Better Breathers Pulmonary Support When: 2nd & 4th Wednesday of each month Time: 2:00-3:00 pm

Grieving Spouses in the First Year of Loss

Spousal Loss – Introduction (six-week series) When: Select Thursdays by pre-registration only Time: 10:15-11:30 am

Quitting or Have Quit Smokers

Support for those who are quitting or have quit smoking When: 2nd Wednesday of each month Time: 6:00-7:00 pm Location for all support groups: Covenant Cancer Care Center 5400 Mackinaw, Saginaw, Michigan Third Floor Conference Room A For more information, please call: Gerry Bishop, LMSW, M. Div – 989.583.5267 Alison VanNorman, LMSW, OSW-C – 989.583.5268

©2020 Bus. Dev. (AQ/RF) Rev. 2/20 13076


The

Bulletin Saginaw County Medical Society

2019-2020 OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS President Mildred J. Willy MD President-Elect Anthony M. Zacharek MD Past President Julia M. Walter MD Secretary Caroline G.M. Scott MD Treasurer Miriam T. Schteingart MD Board of Directors Jorge M. Plasencia MD Tiffany K. Kim MD Mark G. Greenwell MD Harvey K. Yee MD Elizabeth A. Paulus MD Furhut R. Janssen DO Bulletin Editor Louis L. Constan, MD Retiree Representative Rustico B. Ortiz, MD Resident Representatives Mary J. McKuen, MD Anushka N. Magal MD MSMS Delegates Elvira M. Dawis MD Julia M. Walter MD Mildred J. Willy MD Anthony M. Zacharek MD Jorge M. Plasencia MD Christopher J. Allen MD Miriam T. Schteingart MD MSMS Alternate Delegates Caroline G.M. Scott MD

contents

5 7

SAVE THE DATE! THRIVE Welcomes the Surgeon General

LARA Opioid Awareness Training Requirements Training on pages 10-11 Satisfies Requirements!

9 10-11

4 5

5 6 7

7 8 12 15 15 18

Joseph P. Contino MD Kristine K. Spence DO Karensa L. Franklin MD Scott E. Cheney MD Michael W. Warren MD Peer Review Ethics Committee Waheed Akbar, MD, Chair Caroline G.M. Scott, MD James R. Hines, MD MSMS Region 7 Director Thomas J. Veverka, MD Executive Director Joan M. Cramer Administrative Assistant Keri Benkert

CMU College of Medicine Rotary “Thanks For Staying” Scholarships Fund

Michigan's Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS)

23 28 29

MC3 Depression Center

REGISTER NOW! MiHIA “Recognizing and Responding to Trauma with Clinical Tools to Promote Resilience”

19

President’s Letter SCMS Membership Meeting – Save the Date! HAPPY DOCTORS’ DAY!

20 24

From the Editor 11th Annual SCMS Foundation Golf Outing Physician Burnout Survey Barb Smith SR&RN Ascension St. Mary’s MSMS and Legislative Update Attention Retired Members CMU Health Offers Psychiatry Clinic on Wednesdays

CMU College of Medicine CMU Health Covenant HealthCare Nursing Scholarship Applications and Medical Student Loan Applications

25 April Birthdays 25 In Memory – Jack F. Martin, MD 26 New Members 26 Applications for Membership 26 Caduceus Meeting 27 THRIVE 30 Advertiser Index 32 Key Providers 32 Calendar of Events

The Bulletin can be viewed online at www.SaginawCountyMS.com under the Bulletin tab.

ON THE COVER: Holland Tulip Festival

Mohammad Yahya Khan MD Steven J. Vance MD

REGISTER NOW! Free 8-Hour MAT DATA Waiver Training Satisfies LARA Opioid Awareness Requirements!

Waheed Akbar MD Virginia R. Dedicatoria MD

16-18

REGISTER NOW! April Membership Meeting Physician Compassion/Fatigue CME Credit Available

EDITOR Louis L. Constan, MD EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Joan M. Cramer DESIGNER Lori Krygier

PUBLISHER Saginaw County Medical Society 350 St. Andrews Rd., Suite 242, Saginaw, Michigan 48638-5988. Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM. Web: SaginawCountyMS.com Telephone: (989) 790-3590. Fax: (989) 790-3640 E-Mail: jmcramer@sbcglobal.net

All statements or comments in the Bulletin are those of the writers, and not necessarily the opinion of the Saginaw County Medical Society. Contributions are welcome. We publish committee reports, letters to the editor, Alliance reports, public health activities of the members, and some personal items (birthdays, weddings, graduations and like events). The Editor determines which are accepted. Advertisements are accepted as space is available at our going rates. Members may advertise office information, professional services, skills, and procedures, also at our going rates. We do not accept advertisements from nonmembers, or non-Saginaw hospitals. The Bulletin is mailed free of charge to SCMS members as part of their membership. Complimentary copies are sent to various other parties. Others may subscribe at the rate of $50 per year.

The Bulletin | March 2020 3


PRESIDENT’S LETTER

Organized Medicine By Mildred J. Willy, MD

L

ast May, I presented the membership with two challenges:

• The first was to use your leadership skills to act as patient advocates in order to raise awareness about the problems our patients are experiencing. • The second challenge was to reach out to another physician and lend them encouragement and support. How do I do this you ask? Get and stay more involved with our Medical Society. If you're daring, step up and take a leadership role. I would like to share a few thoughts about what being involved in organized medicine means to me. It turns medicine into a small community that helps our patients and each other. It allows for opportunities for mentoring which I believe is important for personal and career growth particularly for medical students, residents, young professionals, women, and those who have smaller practices or are new to the area. There are opportunities to meet others with both similar

and different interests. It is great for networking at the local and state level. It allows for educational opportunities regarding practice improvement, resiliency, social determinants of health and legislative advocacy. It provides emotional support and social networking during stressful times, as well as, the opportunities to assist others with their struggles. It provides the opportunity to grow friendships and for spousal support. It provides opportunities to focus on work activities that provide the most meaning. It provides the opportunity to accomplish great things. A few final thoughts: I have gained more than I have contributed by just showing up and being involved. So please show up, get involved - the future of our medical community depends on it, and you can have a little fun while doing it like those before us who had great vision and passion. The SCMS is seeking members interested in serving in an elected position. The Nominating Committee (which consists of the President, Past President (chair) and President-Elect) will develop the slate of officers,

directors, delegates and alternate delegates for the 2020-21 program year later this month. The slate will be announced in April, and elections will take place at the annual meeting in May. The 2020-21 program year begins June 1, 2020. Elected positions are open to all SCMS members in good standing. We need members to serve as oneyear directors, as well as, alternate delegates. Pursuant to the Bylaws, all officers, directors, delegates and alternates must attend 50 percent of Board Meetings (five out of ten) in order to retain their position. Delegates have a vote, but alternate delegates do not. Generally, physicians new to the Board start as alternate delegates and work their way up to a director or officer position if they choose. Board meetings are held on the third Tuesday of the month (except for July and December) at 5:30 p.m. Board meetings are held prior to the membership meeting in January, April, May and September at Horizons Conference Center and at HealthSource Saginaw in continued on page 5

While all are welcome, we would particularly like to invite some of our younger members to join us on the Board - the time commitment is minimal.

4

The Bulletin | March 2020


SCMS MEMBERSHIP MEETINGS REGISTER NOW!

Tuesday, April 21, 2020, Membership Meeting

continued from page 4

October. Board meetings in February, March, June, August and November are held at the CMU College of Medicine on Stone Street in Saginaw, and dinner is provided. We try to keep Board meetings to an hour, although they do tend to run a bit longer on nights we don’t have a membership meeting as there is more time to discuss the issues at hand. We work at keeping those meetings to 90 minutes or less. Alternate delegates (in order of seniority) are asked to attend the annual MSMS House of Delegates (the policy-making body of MSMS), which is held the last weekend in April or first weekend in May, if we don’t have enough delegates that are available. The SCMS pays the cost of hotel and parking for delegates and alternates, and a ticket to the President’s Ball on Saturday evening. The 2020 MSMS HOD will be held Saturday-Sunday, April 25-26 at The Henry in Dearborn. The 2021 MSMS HOD will be held SaturdaySunday, May 1-2 at the Radisson in Kalamazoo. While all are welcome, we would particularly like to invite some of our younger members to join us on the Board the time commitment is minimal. We value your input as we work to address the needs of our members and work towards the future of medicine. Any physician who has been an SCMS member for at least five (5) years is eligible to become President. Those wishing to serve as president must serve a minimum of three years as a director, and one year as president-elect before taking office. A final year as past president is then required, with the member staying involved after that time as a delegate or alternate if desired. Please contact Joan Cramer at the SCMS office at 790-3590 or email jmcramer@sbcglobal.net if you would like to be considered for a position.

Register now for our Tuesday, April 21, 2020, Membership Meeting at Horizons Conference Center. The social with cash bar starts at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner, meeting and program at 7 p.m. Program: “Physician Compassion Fatigue” Speaker: Molly E. Gabriel-Champine, PhD, LP, Director of Behavioral Science, Family Medicine Residency at McLaren Bay The SCMS would like to thank Key Providers, Ascension St. Mary's, CQ Technologies and HealthSource Saginaw for their assistance in sponsoring tonight’s meeting. DISCLOSURE: The planner(s) and speaker(s) for this session disclose no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. STATEMENT OF ACCREDITATION: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Central Michigan University College of Medicine and the Saginaw County Medical Society. CMU College of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Central Michigan University College of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

NOTE: There will be an audio recording of the program. Click HERE to make an online reservation.

Tuesday, May 19, 2020, Annual SCMS and SCMS Foundation Membership Meetings Save the date for our Tuesday, May 19, 2020, Annual Membership Meetings at Horizons Conference Center. The social with cash bar starts at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner, meetings and program at 7 p.m. Program: “Annual Update on CMU College of Medicine” Email meeting notices will be sent in early May. Online reservations are required.

HAPPY DOCTORS’ DAY!

Thank You for Being a Member and Serving the Residents of Saginaw County for 118 Years! Joan M. Cramer Executive Director jmcramer@sbcglobal.net | Cell (989) 284-8884 Celebrating 30 years of serving the SCMS in 2020 The Bulletin | March 2020 5


FROM THE EDITOR

Wonderful, Wonderful By Louis L. Constan, MD

S

omething wonderful is about to happen. What? Where? When? We’ll get to the details later. For now, I am told that Jerome Adams MD is finalizing his “Surgeon General’s” report. And what, exactly is that, anyway? Very interesting, these Surgeon General reports. They’re always big news and they’ve always had an outsized impact on the health of our republic and on the way we practice medicine. You may remember C. Everett Koop MD, the Surgeon General in 1988, whose report on the link between tobacco and lung cancer started the anti-smoking movement in this country…a movement that leads the world in suppressing preventable deaths from tobacco. Hundreds of thousands of (our patients’) lives saved. Way to go SG Koop! Next there was SG Antonia Novello MD, who focused on the health of women, children and minorities, chastising cigarette companies for marketing to children and pointing out the connection between school success and good health. Our underage patients needed her efforts. SG Joycelyn Elders MD advocated for drug legalization. Though a decade or so before her time, and widely criticized at

the time, we should have listened to her then, and many thousands of our patients would have gotten treatment for their addiction rather than being thrown in jail. We just might not be in the opioid crisis we are in today. SG David Satcher MD pointed out the need to address tobacco use in minorities, a group that suffered disproportionately from tobacco-related illness. He could have invented the term “Social determinants of health,” which is now so de rigueur. SG Richard Carmona MD carried forward the torch by dealing with secondhand smoke, arguing that second-hand smoke caused cancer, and advocating the banning of smoking in public places, doubtless saving many thousands of innocent non-smokers who couldn’t help but breathe in carcinogens from those around them. My sainted aunt was one of those victims who developed lung cancer from second-hand smoke. Dr. Carmona’s work is very personal to me. SG Regina Benjamin MD started notable public health initiatives to prevent suicide; and to combat obesity and inactivity; all ongoing today, though much remains to be done. SG Vivek Murthy MD picked up on SG Elders’ efforts with respect to alcohol, drugs and their effect on health.

He argued that addiction is a medical, not a moral, problem and needs scientifically proven prevention and treatment efforts on a national scale. Again, much remains to be done. Well, our current SG, Jerome Adams MD, is not well known to us, probably because of the fact that, although he has been our Surgeon General for three years, he has yet to issue an official report. But his often repeated motto: “Better health through partnerships,” sounds suspiciously like what has been happening in our own neighborhood lately; and our community should thus find itself in the vanguard of the next big thing in public health in the United States of America. Who would have guessed! For information on such health partnership activities going on locally, you can read through this Bulletin until, towards the final pages, you will see where I describe activities of THRIVE, a major project of the healthcare consortium called MiHIA , and the four-county business consortium called Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance .

He argued that addiction is a medical, not a moral, problem and needs scientifically proven prevention and treatment efforts on a national scale.

6

The Bulletin | March 2020


PHYSICIAN BURNOUT SURVEY Researchers in the Department of Communication at the University of Kentucky are conducting a study to explore how attending physicians experience and talk about burnout. This information will help researchers better understand how communication about burnout experiences may impact social support and overall well-being. Participation involves having a conversation (in person or phone) with the researcher and completing a questionnaire. To participate, physicians must: • Have completed all training (i.e., medical school, residency, fellowship) • Currently be working in one of the following specialty areas: Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine, OB/GYN, Internal Medicine or Surgery • Have previous or current experience with burnout After completion of the study, participating physicians can choose to receive a $25 Starbucks gift card. If you are interested in participating, or would like to learn more, please email Alison Buckley at alison.buckley@uky.edu.

GOLF OUTING SAVE THE DATE!

The SCMS Foundation will host its 11th Annual Golf Outing on Saturday, June 6, 2020 at the Saginaw Country Club. The SCMS Foundation makes low interest loans to medical students with ties to the Saginaw area in the hopes of encouraging the students to return to Saginaw to practice. Interest and principal can be forgiven if they return to Saginaw to practice as SCMS members.

Saturday, June 6, 2020 Saginaw Country Club Four Person Scramble 12 p.m. Registration - 1 p.m. Shotgun Start Watch upcoming issues of The Bulletin for information and sponsorship opportunities!

The Bulletin | March 2020 7


115 CMU M1 Students Trained

In February, Barb Smith and Bethany Wirgowski delivered four safeTALK trainings to 115 first year CMU College of Medicine students in Mt. Pleasant. Thank you, Dean Kikano and Faculty of CMU College of Medicine for allowing your students to be trained in suicide awareness!

Peak Performance is your source for Professional PC Tech Support on-site or in-home. We specialize in virus removal, hardware troubleshooting, preventative maintenance and performance improvements for all brands of PC’s.

Saginaw Community Foundation Grant We are pleased to announce the Saginaw Community Foundation Board of Directors recently awarded the Network $10,000 for our training programs in Saginaw County! Thank you FORCE Youth and the Saginaw Community Foundation you are changing lives with this gift! The FORCE Youth Advisory Committee encourages local youth to get involved in solving problems in their community. This diverse group of teens, in grades 8-12, are actively engaged in community service and grantmaking. FORCE was established in 1992 as a result of a $1 million challenge grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. These funds were permanently endowed for the benefit of youth. The committee utilizes the income generated annually from this fund to support various community projects and programs that affect children and teens in Saginaw County. The goals of FORCE are to: • Encourage local youth to get involved in community problem solving • Provide youth with a meaningful experience in philanthropy and volunteerism • Grant funds that will enrich the lives of Saginaw County youth and improve our community To learn more about FORCE, contact Kendra Kempf at kendra@saginawfoundation.org or (989) 755-0545.

Thank you FORCE Youth and the Saginaw Community Foundation - you are changing lives with this gift!

With over 15 years in the industry, you can be sure the job is done right.

Call today to schedule an appointment

989-272-8123 IT Specialist to the SCMS and many physician practices Hours: MON-FRI 9 AM to 5 PM 8

The Bulletin | March 2020

All statements or comments in The Bulletin are those of the writer, and not necessarily the opinion of the Saginaw County Medical Society.


Opioid Awareness Training for Controlled Substance License Holders The Pharmacy Controlled Substance Administrative Rules were changed last year to require individuals with a controlled substance license complete a one-time training in opioids and other controlled substances awareness that meets the standards under Rule 338.3135. The rule was put in place to help with the opioid epidemic Michigan and the country is currently facing. Now, those applying for a Controlled Substance license are required to certify they have completed the one-time training in opioids and controlled substances awareness as part of the application process. Current controlled substance licensees will have to certify that they have met the training requirement when they renew at their first full renewal cycle. Meaning if the licensee was part way through their current license cycle when Rule 338.3135 went into effect (January 4, 2019) the licensee would have another full licensure cycle to meet the requirement.

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The rules also state that a prescriber or dispenser shall not delegate or order the prescribing, dispensing or administering of a controlled substance as authorized by this act to an advanced practice registered nurse, registered professional nurse or licensed practical nurse unless the nurse complies with the rule. The standards for the opioid and other controlled substances awareness training, including what topics need to be covered and who can offer the training, are covered in the administrative rules that can be found here. Should you have any questions, please contact the Licensing Division, Bureau of Professional Licensing at LARA at 517-3350918 or by email at BPLHelp@michigan.gov

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The Bulletin | March 2020 9


REGISTER NOW!

CMU Seeks Clinical Educators and Partnerships in MAT to Treat Opioid Use Disorders CMU Seeks Clinical Educators and Partnerships in MAT to Treat Opioid Use Disorders CMU Seeks Clinical Educators and Partnerships in MAT to Treat Opioid Use Disorders CMU Seeks Clinical Educators and Partnerships in MAT to Treat Opioid Use Disorders

Opioids (including prescription opioids, heroin, and fentanyl) killed more than 47,000 people in 2017, Opioids (including prescription opioids, heroin, and fentanyl) killed more than 47,000 people in 2017, and 40%(including of all opioid overdose opioids, deaths involved a prescription opioid. Thethan opioid epidemic is hitting close Opioids prescription heroin, and fentanyl) killed more 47,000 people in 2017, and 40%(including of all opioid overdose opioids, deaths involved a prescription opioid. Thethan opioid epidemic is hitting close Opioids prescription heroin, and fentanyl) killed more 47,000 people in 2017, to home – Michigan has experienced a 21% cumulative increase in drug overdose deaths since 2013. and 40% of all opioidhas overdose deathsainvolved a prescription opioid. Theoverdose opioid epidemic is hitting close to home – Michigan experienced 21% cumulative increase in drug deaths since 2013. and 40% –ofMichigan all opioidhas overdose deathsainvolved a prescription opioid. Theoverdose opioid epidemic is hitting to home experienced 21% cumulative increase in drug deaths since 2013.close to homeMichigan – Michigan has experienced a 21% cumulative in drug overdose deaths medical since 2013. Central University (CMU), has a goal to combatincrease the opioid epidemic by training and PA Central Michigan University (CMU), has a goal to combat the opioid epidemic by training medical and PA students with 8-hours of mandatory classroom learning using the American Society of Addiction Central University (CMU), has a goal tolearning combatusing the opioid epidemicSociety by training medical and PA studentsMichigan with 8-hours of mandatory classroom the American of Addiction Central Michigan University (CMU), has a goal combatusing the opioid epidemic by training medical and PA Medicine’s (ASAM)-accredited curriculum withtomedication-assisted treatment (MAT) Drug Addiction students with 8-hours of mandatory classroom learning the American Society of Addiction Medicine’s (ASAM)-accredited curriculum with medication-assisted treatment (MAT) Drug Addiction students with 8-hours mandatory classroom learning using the American Society ofDrug Addiction Treatment Act (DATA) of waiver training requirements. Additionally, CMU is seeking partnerships with Medicine’s (ASAM)-accredited curriculum with medication-assisted treatment (MAT) Addiction Treatment Act (DATA) waiver training requirements. Additionally, CMU is seeking partnerships with Medicine’s (ASAM)-accredited curriculum with medication-assisted treatment (MAT) Drug Addiction clinical educators at certified treatment facilities or primaryCMU care is offices that offer MAT to host Treatment Act (DATA) waiver opioid training requirements. Additionally, seeking partnerships with clinical educators at certified opioid treatment facilities or primary care offices that offer MAT to host Treatment Actfor (DATA) waiver training requirements. Additionally, CMU is seeking partnerships with our students clinical experience. clinical educators at certified opioid treatment facilities or primary care offices that offer MAT to host our students for clinical experience. clinical educators at certified opioid treatment facilities or primary care offices that offer MAT to host our students for clinical experience. our students for clinical experience. CMU is offering community educators free 8-hour MAT DATA waiver training through ASAM on: CMU is offering community educators free 8-hour MAT DATA waiver training through ASAM on: CMU is offering community educators free 8-hour MAT DATA waiver training through ASAM on: CMU is offering community educators free 8-hour Saturday, AprilMAT 25th,DATA 2020 waiver training through ASAM on: Saturday, April 25thth, 2020 9:00 am – 5:30 Saturday, April 25thpm , 2020 9:00 am – 5:30 pm Saturday, April 25 , 2020 CMU College of Medicine 9:00 am – of 5:30 pm CMU College Medicine 9:00 am Drive, –of 5:30 pm 2403 1280CMU E. Campus Room College Medicine 1280CMU E. Campus Drive, Room 2403 College of Medicine Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 1280 E. Campus Drive, Room 2403 Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 1280 E. Campus Drive, Room 2403 Registration Link: https://elearning.asam.org/p/mtpleasant425 Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 Registration Link: https://elearning.asam.org/p/mtpleasant425 Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 Registration Link: https://elearning.asam.org/p/mtpleasant425 Registration Participants will receive a $25 giftLink: card https://elearning.asam.org/p/mtpleasant425 for participating and completing a brief questionnaire along with Participants will receive a $25 gift card for participating and completing a brief questionnaire along with 8 Category 1 CME hours. Livestreaming willparticipating also be available at the CMUaCollege of Medicine along building in Participants receive $25 gift card for and completing brief questionnaire with 8 Category 1will CME hours.aaLivestreaming willparticipating also be available at the CMUaCollege of Medicine along building in Participants will receive $25 gift card for and completing brief questionnaire with located 1632 Stone St., Saginaw, MI. be Foravailable additional please the projectin 8Saginaw Category 1 CMEat hours. Livestreaming will also at information, the CMU College of contact Medicine building Saginaw located at 1632 Stone St., Saginaw, MI. For additional information, please contact the project 8 Category 1 Alyson CMEathours. Livestreaming will also atinformation, the CMU of contact Medicine building coordinator, Hill atStone Alyson.hill@cmich.edu oravailable at 989-746-7506 forCollege anyplease questions or ifthe you are in Saginaw located 1632 St., Saginaw, MI. be For additional project coordinator, Alyson Hill at Alyson.hill@cmich.edu or at 989-746-7506 for any questions or if you are Saginaw located at 1632 St., Saginaw, MI.MAT For additional information, contact interested in Alyson hosting student(s) to learn about practice setting. coordinator, Hill atStone Alyson.hill@cmich.edu or in atyour 989-746-7506 for anyplease questions or ifthe youproject are interested in hosting student(s) to learn about MAT in your practice setting. coordinator, at Alyson.hill@cmich.edu orin atyour 989-746-7506 for any questions or if you are interested in Alyson hostingHill student(s) to learn about MAT practice setting. This training willstudent(s) satisfy LARA opioid requirements interested in hosting to learn about awareness MAT in your practice setting. referenced on page 9.

10 The Bulletin | March 2020

CMU’s clinical sites and MAT (M) partnership sites as of 10/2019 CMU’s clinical sites and MAT (M) partnership sites as of 10/2019 CMU’s clinical sites and MAT (M) partnership sites as of 10/2019 CMU’s clinical sites and MAT (M) partnership sites as of 10/2019


REGISTER NOW! SEP 16, 2017 8:00 am – 12:00 pm The Pyle Center, UW-Extension 702 Langdon St Saturday, Madison, WI 53706

COST - $199 LOCATION LIVE IN-PERSON

April 25, 2020 | 9:00 am – 5:30 pm SEP 16, 2017 | 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Central Michigan University College of Medicine Room 2403 1280 East Campus Drive Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859

LIVE STREAM LOCATION

Central Michigan University College of Medicine Educational Building 1632 Stone St. Room 1008 Saginaw, MI 48602

COST FREE

REGISTRATION

https://elearning.asam.org/p/mtp leasant425

CONTACT

Email: education@ASAM.org Call: 301.656.3920

The ASAM Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder Course covers all evidence-based practices and medications for treating patients with opioid use disorder. The ASAM Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder Course is designed for: 

Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants, Certified Nurse Midwives, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists, and Clinical Nurse Specialists who wish to obtain a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine in an office-based setting for opioid use disorder. Clinicians and healthcare team members such as RNs, MA/LPNs, social workers, pharmacists, counselors, clinic administrators/office managers, and others working with providers who prescribe buprenorphine in an office-based setting to treat opioid use disorder.

Course Format: 8 hours live This training satisfies eight hours of education requirements for providers to qualify for a DEA DATA2000 waiver. Upon completion of this course, physicians qualify for the waiver to prescribe buprenorphine in an office-based setting. NPs and PAs can qualify after completing an additional 16 hours provided by ASAM, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, and the American Academy of PAs.

Are you an NP or PA? ASAM also provides the additional 16 hours required for NPs and PAs to qualify for a waiver free of charge.

ASAM is an approved provider by CSAT/SAMHSA of DATA 2000 training. ACCME ACCREDITATION STATEMENT: The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. AMA CREDIT DESIGNATION STATEMENT: The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 8 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The Bulletin | March 2020 11


Welcome New Providers Ascension St. Mary’s is pleased to welcome pediatrician, Areej Alwahab, MD to the medical staff. Dr. Alwahab recently joined Ascension Medical Group (AMG) and the practice of Mohammad Yahya Khan, MD located at 5821 North Colony Drive in Saginaw. Dr. Alwahab is a graduate of Baghdad University College of Medicine, and completed her pediatrics residency training at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, The Brooklyn Hospital Center. Dr. Alwahab, who has extensive clinical experience caring for patients from various cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Iraqi Medical Association and the Jordanian Medical Association. Dr. Alwahab is accepting new patients and can be reached at 989-797-1041. Toby Blosser, MS AT ATC recently joined AMG at the Colony Drive orthopedics office. With nearly 30 years of experience as a licensed and certified athletic trainer, Toby is part of the medical group’s growing sports medicine and orthopedics program. Most recently, Toby has worked as the head trainer at the Vancouver Canucks American Hockey League affiliate team, the Utica Comets. Prior to that, he spent 10 years working with Saginaw Valley Bone and Joint Center and eight years as the head athletic trainer for the Saginaw Spirit. Toby also worked three seasons with the Cleveland Browns, and was selected to work with Team USA Baseball during the 1993 World University Games. In addition to his time in the professional sports arena, Toby spent 11 years as the head trainer at SVSU (notably assisting with the Detroit Lions Saginaw training camp for five years) and one year at Northwood University. A 1991 graduate of the University of Toledo, Toby received his bachelor’s degree in exercise science, athletic training and sports medicine. He went on to earn a master’s degree from Michigan State University in physical education and exercise science with a specialization in athletic training and sports medicine. Toby is located at AMG Orthopedic Associates, 5275 N. Colony Drive in Saginaw and can be reached at 989799-1350.

Medical Mission at Home Event is March 21 Ascension St. Mary’s is hosting their first-ever Medical Mission at Home event on Saturday, March 21 from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. The free event will be focused around

12 The Bulletin | March 2020

diabetes screening, education and nutrition. The Medical Mission at Home will be held at Ascension St. Mary’s Health Education Center, 800 S. Washington Avenue in Saginaw. Medical screenings offered will include those for diabetes, foot care, vision, biometrics (height, weight, BMI, blood pressure), diabetes education and nutrition. For more information about Medical Mission at Home, contact call 989-907-8340.

Forefront Cancer Treatment Now at Ascension St. Mary’s

In a promising development for cancer patients in the greater Saginaw region, Ascension St. Mary’s Seton Cancer Institute is advancing their cancer fighting technology with the addition of a new state-of-the-art TrueBeam Radiotherapy System at their Saginaw medical center. The addition is part of Ascension’s $50 million reinvestment in the northern health ministries. Ascension St. Mary’s Seton Cancer Institute began treating patients at the end of January with this new, innovative system which was engineered to deliver more powerful cancer treatments with pinpoint accuracy and precision. They can select the optimal treatment for every type of cancer, and enable the cancer treatment team to bring a wide spectrum of advanced radiotherapy treatment options to patients. “TrueBeam enables us to treat even the most challenging cases with tremendous speed and precision,” said Salam Yanek, MD, DABR, Radiation Oncologist at Ascension St. Mary’s Seton Cancer Institute. “This system will make it possible for us to offer fast, more targeted treatments for tumors - even those that move when the patient breathes, such as lung tumors.” continued on page 14


Ascension Online Care Anywhere, anytime

Ascension Online Care is here for you and your family 24/7. From anywhere, at any time, talk with a doctor using your smartphone, tablet or laptop. Get the care you need and start feeling better for only $49 per visit. No insurance required. Get started at ascension.org/onlinecare or download the mobile app.

See us for a wide variety of symptoms and conditions, including: • Sinus or upper respiratory infections • Eye infections • Allergic reactions/ allergies • Cold/flu • Fever • Urinary tract infections

If you are experiencing a major emergency, go to the ER as soon as possible or call 911. © Ascension 2019. All rights reserved. The “Android” name, the Android logo, the “Google Play” brand, and other Google trademarks, are property of Google LLC. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc. All rights reserved.

The Bulletin | March 2020 13


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An open house was held on Thursday, February 27 at the Seton Cancer Institute. More than 100 physicians, staff and friends attended the event which included a dedication and blessing ceremony. In addition, a special memorial and recognition was held in honor of Dr. V. Elayne Arterbery and her dedicated commitment to bring this advanced technology to the Saginaw region. A plaque and bell were revealed in her honor.

Teaming Up With the Saginaw Spirit to Promote Trauma Awareness Integrating imaging and motion management technologies within a sophisticated architecture makes it possible to deliver treatments quickly while monitoring and compensating for tumor motion. “In our radiotherapy practice, patient outcomes, safety and comfort are key” said Charbel Habib, PhD, DABR, Medical Physicist at Ascension St. Mary’s Seton Cancer Institute and Clinical Assistant Professor at Central Michigan University College of Medicine. “This evolutionary technology is able to automatically synchronize imaging, beam shaping and dose delivery while performing accuracy checks every ten milliseconds throughout the entire treatment. It represents a quantum leap in our ability to help people fight cancer.”

Ascension St. Mary’s will team up with the Saginaw Spirit at their last regular season game on Saturday, March 21 to promote awareness about our Level II trauma center and many of the services offered including our Concussion Clinic. Group night tickets are now available for $14. Use the link below with the username and password to get tickets now before they are sold out. It’s the final game of the Saginaw Spirit’s regular season and is historically a sell-out. They face the Windsor Spitfires at 7:05 p.m. Watch for more details about the trauma awareness activities taking place in the Red Room. https://www.saginawspirit.net/groupsales/ Username: trauma321 Password: spirit

Commercial medications not meeting the needs of your patients? We produce customized medications specially suited to meet the patient’s needs; thus, allowing limitless prescribing opportunities. • Liquid solutions • Discontinued medications • Topical medications • Human Identical Hormone Replacement for men and women • Sugar free/dye free medications • Non narcotic pain medications

Key Provider to the SCMS

Healthway Compounding Pharmacy 2544 McLeod Dr. N. | Saginaw, MI 48604 | 989.791.1691 | www.healthwayrx.com 14 The Bulletin | March 2020


MSMS and Legislative Update ACTION ALERT! Keep the Pressure on Our Lawmakers: Support SB 612 (Prior Authorization) Prior authorization and step therapy/fail first requirements hamstring treatment, drive up nonadherence to medication and lead to diminished health. It’s onerous and needless insurance company Legislative Update bureaucracy, and it’s negatively affecting patients, physicians, providers and their practices. It’s time we cut out the red tape, because at the end of the day, health can’t wait. Hearings in the Senate Health Policy and Services Committee have ended. Testimony is available to view on the Health Can’t Wait Vimeo channel. Click HERE to send a pre-written, editable message to your lawmakers through the MSMS Action Center asking them to support SB 612. ACTION ALERT! Stop Lawmakers from Giving Insurers More Leverage Over Physicians (Out-of-Network Billing) Lawmakers in Michigan and around the country are debating the appropriate recourse to address unanticipated out-ofnetwork bills. Patients are receiving these high bills because the care they believed was covered, actually was not. This is a problem, but it is also a complex issue tied up in non-related matters. Click HERE to send a pre-written, editable message to your lawmakers through the MSMS Action Center. Announcing a Dividend Program for MSMS Members MSMS Physicians Insurance Agency (PIA) has launched a unique program with Hanover Citizens Insurance Company for the members of MSMS. The program allows physicians to qualify for extremely deviated rates and a dividend program for workers compensation policies.

Qualified physician offices are any offices whose workers compensation policy has a satisfactory claim record, and either the practice or at least one physician is a member of MSMS. To test this program, the agency sampled a large number of physician offices that are currently insured through MSMS PIA, and every insured practice saved between 30-40 percent off their current workers compensation policies with equal or better coverage limits. For a quick quote, please click HERE.

Save the Dates 9th Annual Spring Scientific Meeting Thursday-Friday, May 14-15, 2020 DoubleTree by Hilton, Dearborn More information coming soon 155th Annual Scientific Meeting Wednesday-Saturday, October 21-24, 2020 New Location The Westin Southfield Detroit 24th Annual Conference on Bioethics Saturday, November 14, 2020 DoubleTree by Hilton Ann Arbor North (formerly Holiday Inn near the University of Michigan) Fulfill Your Board of Medicine Requirements on Your Time MSMS offers numerous on-demand webinars that fulfill the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs requirements for continuing medical education, including: • A series of 12 covering Pain and Symptom Management • Three on Medical Ethics • Human Trafficking Download and watch at your convenience 24/7. For a complete list and to register click HERE

ATTENTION RETIRED MEMBERS! Retired physicians meet for lunch every Wednesday at 12 noon at IHOP, 2255 Tittabawassee Road in Saginaw. Those attending are responsible for their own lunch, and the informal gathering lasts about an hour. Join your retired colleagues whenever you like! If you have any questions, please contact Joan Cramer at the SCMS office at 790-3590 or by email at jmcramer@sbcglobal.net. The Bulletin | March 2020 15


College of

Medicine

"Thanks for Staying"Scholarships Fund

T

he Rotary Clubs in Mid-Michigan are committed to partnering with CMU College of Medicine (College) to develop scholarships that will help train and retain high-quality primary care physicians in underserved areas of Mid-Michigan. The Rotary Scholarships Fund (Fund) will assist students during their education, and as they go into practice as doctors, by graduating them with reduced debt. Less debt encourages our physicians to remain in the primary care specialties - part of the mission of the College. The goal of this Fund is to raise $1,000,000 by 2025, in order to establish an endowed scholarship fund. Setting up an endowed scholarship allows the principal never to be spent, so that a scholarship award can be given in perpetuity. The guidelines or criteria for recipients of the scholarship include: • Willing to choose primary care residency as their specialty in a Mid-Michigan hospital • Willing to practice in the Mid-Michigan area upon completion Primary Care Health Professional Shortage Facts • Nationwide, the demand for new physicians, especially primary care physicians, is growing faster than medical schools can graduate them. The U.S. physician shortfall is predicted to be 90,400 by the year 2025. • Nearly a quarter of the state’s 42,000 licensed physicians may be retiring in the coming decade. Michigan’s supply of primary care physicians meets only 63 percent of the state’s current need. • Of the 83 counties in Michigan, 51 are designated as Health Professional Shortage Areas by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 16

The Bulletin | March 2020

• The rural communities of Mid-Michigan are among those where physician shortages are expected to be acute. • The Citizens Research Council of Michigan recently examined the state’s physician shortage and determined “Michigan has 299 shortage areas, and that Michigan’s supply of primary care physicians only met 63.3 percent of need by the covered population.” Make A Difference By Contributing Today! Checks should be made payable to: CMU College of Medicine Note on memo line: Rotary Scholarships Fund Mail to: CMU College of Medicine Rotary Scholarships Fund 1632 Stone Street Saginaw, MI 48602 To donate online, click HERE and type “Rotary” in the search bar. The CMU College of Medicine Model The College, established in 2013, was founded with the mission to answer the growing need in Michigan and the Midwest for quality health care provided by well-trained physicians. Focused on helping the communities of Michigan provide their own physicians, College campuses are conveniently located in Mid-Michigan; one campus is located in Mt. Pleasant for first- and second-year students, and the other is located in Saginaw for 3rd- and 4th-year students to perform hands-on clinical studies. The College has attracted the best continued on page 18


“Thanks For Staying�

Rotary Scholarships 2020 Celebration Event Sponsored by the Rotary Clubs of Mid-Michigan

Wednesday, May 6, 2020 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. CMU College of Medicine, 1632 Stone St, Saginaw, Michigan Tickets available at the door for $50

www.thanksforstaying.org Questions? Please contact Mike Zehnder at mike.zehnder@cmich.edu or 989-774-7548


continued from page 16

and brightest students - more than 80 percent of them from Michigan. We want to continue to attract these students, and also retain them to serve as physicians in nearby communities. The Fund is our way of thanking them for staying. Choosing Mid-Michigan • Physicians born in rural areas are 2.4 times more likely to practice in those areas, and twice as likely to choose primary care as their specialty. More than 50 percent of physicians establish practices within 50 miles of where they complete their residency training. The College students reflect its mission: 85 percent of the first 272 students admitted to the College are from Michigan, and 76 are from northern and central Michigan. • The location in which medical students complete their residencies has a major influence on where they ultimately choose to practice. The College is connected with CMU Medical Educational Partners in Mid-Michigan, providing residency programs in a variety of disciplines. • Physicians who come from under-represented or minority populations tend to want to practice in those areas. Fifteen percent of the College’s students are from populations that are historically under-represented in medicine.

Your tax-deductible financial contribution to this important community initiative will be greatly appreciated. Pledges may be paid over time. Donor Contact Information Mike Zehnder Senior Director of Development CMU College of Medicine 1632 Stone Street Saginaw, MI 48602 989-774-7548 | 989-714-2468 Mike.Zehnder@cmich.edu To donate online, click HERE and type “Rotary” in the search bar.

CMU HEALTH OFFERS PSYCHIATRY CLINIC ON WEDNESDAYS CMU Health is now offering a Psychiatry Clinic each Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Referral Contact • Phone (989) 746-7500 or (989) 746-7792 | Fax (989) 746-7782 • Covenant providers can refer internally by placing the following order to Christopher Archangeli, MD (add his name as the Referred to Provider): Referral to Pediatric Psychiatry (REF80)

Clinic Location: 1000 Houghton in the CMU clinic adjacent to Covenant Clinic Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesdays Clinic Providers: Chris Archangeli, MD, Furhut Janssen, DO (cross-covering and anticipating she will see patients in the future) CMU Child Psychiatry Fellows starting Fall of 2020

Insurance: Most private insurances are accepted. At this time, we cannot see Medicaid patients. Medicaid patients can be

seen by Dr. Archangeli and the Child Psychiatry Fellows at the Great Lakes Bay Health Center at 3023 Davenport in Saginaw. Phone (989) 907-2761 18

The Bulletin | March 2020


College of

Medicine Addressing the Nationwide Physician Shortage Our mission is to educate diverse students and train culturally competent physicians to provide comprehensive health care and services to underserved populations in Michigan and beyond. We pride ourselves in advancing health and wellness through exceptional education, innovative research, quality patient care and strategic collaborations to improve the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities. Tina Thompson, CMU College Of Medicine Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, and Robert Muterspaugh, first-year medical student, recently spoke with ABC12 News regarding CMU’s impact on the national physician shortage. Watch the full story HERE.

Match Day 2020 Please join us in celebration of the Class of 2020 Match Day on Friday, March 20, 2020, at Horizons Conference Center in Saginaw. Doors open at 11 a.m. with the program beginning at 11:50 a.m. If you are unable to attend in person, there will be opportunities to participate in a live-stream viewing in Mt. Pleasant, Saginaw, Detroit or Lakeland.

Dr. Oliver attended medical school at Case Western Reserve University, where he also obtained his Master's degree in medical anthropology. He trained in family medicine at Case and practiced broad-spectrum family medicine in rural Alaska.

CMU Health Recognized for Economic Excellence CMU Health was among 38 local companies honored by Saginaw Future, Inc. with an Economic Excellence Award for outstanding contribution to Saginaw’s economy in 2019. The award recognizes the organization’s financial contributions to medical education and the creation of 71 new jobs for physicians and residents in the community. We are proud to contribute to the continual development and growth of Saginaw and the Great Lakes Bay Region as a whole. READ THE FULL STORY HERE.

Save the Date CMU College of Medicine Commencement 2020 When: Sunday, May 10, 2020, 1 p.m. Where: CMU Plachta Auditorium Speaker: Dr. M. Norman Oliver M. Norman Oliver, MD, MA, will be the keynote speaker for the CMU College of Medicine 2020 Commencement. Dr. Oliver is the State Health Commissioner for the Virginia Department of Health. He previously served as the Walter M. Seward Professor and Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, where he helped lead the transformation of the Department’s clinic sites into patient-centered practices focused on population health. Most recently, Dr. Oliver’s research interests lie in the area of improving our understanding of the role of racial discrimination, bias, and prejudice in establishing and maintaining these health inequities, and the understanding of the interplay between race and socioeconomic position in these disparities.

Strategic Design Solutions advertising | marketing | publications logo design | direct mail brochures | flyers | newsletters print and digital creative direction and consulting Lori Krygier | Graphic Designer 989.239.1056 | lkrygier@charter.net

The Bulletin | March 2020 19


Covenant HealthCare Named 2019 TCAR Center of Excellence for Innovative Treatment of Carotid Artery Disease to Help Prevent Strokes Covenant HealthCare was named a 2019 TCAR Center of Excellence for improving carotid artery disease treatment using a new procedure called TransCarotid Artery Revascularization (TCAR). TCAR (teekahr) is a clinically proven, minimally invasive and safe approach for high surgical risk patients to reduce their risk of stroke. Thanks to the work of vascular surgeons, Dr. Ryan Kim and Dr. Ron Bays, alongside the surgical team, Covenant is one of three hospitals in Michigan to receive this distinction. Carotid artery disease is a form of atherosclerosis, or a buildup of plaque, in the two main arteries in the neck that supply oxygen-rich blood to the brain. If left untreated, carotid artery disease can often lead to stroke. Carotid artery disease is estimated to be the source of stroke in up to a third of of cases, with more than 427,000 new diagnoses of the disease made every year in the U.S. alone. “It is a great honor to be recognized for our efforts to modernize the way we treat carotid stenosis. Having the latest technology in the hybrid operating room allows for this minimally invasive procedure to be available to patients who need it,” says Dr. Ryan Kim, vascular surgeon. “We appreciate the support of Covenant to make this happen.” Prior to the development of TCAR, the main treatment option for severe carotid artery disease was an open surgical procedure called carotid endarterectomy (CEA). CEA removes plaque from inside the carotid artery to restore normal blood flow to the brain, but the large incision leaves a visible scar the length of the neck and carries risks of surgical complications, including bleeding, infection, heart attack and cranial nerve injuries that

can cause issues with swallowing, speaking and sensation in the face. TCAR is unique in that blood flow is temporarily reversed during the procedure so that any small bits of plaque that may break off during the procedure are diverted away from the brain, preventing a stroke from happening. A stent is then placed inside the artery to stabilize the plaque, minimizing the risk of a future stroke. Patients recover quickly and almost always go home the next day to return to full and productive lives with less pain and small scars. TCAR developer, Silk Road Medical, reviewed hospitals across the country to recognize the centers that have embraced the TCAR procedure. TCAR Centers of Excellence have demonstrated excellent patient outcomes through appropriate patient selection and a well-trained and credentialed vascular specialist team. This recognition demonstrates the commitment of Dr. Kim, Dr. Bays and the Covenant Surgical Team to delivering the highest quality of care to their community. Save the Date | Pediatric Symposium | Friday, April 17, 2020 Horizons Conference Center, 6200 State Street, Saginaw 8 a.m.- 3:15 p.m. Presentations 3:15-4:30 p.m. Wine and Cheese Reception with Presenters Pediatric topics will include: • Patient Relationships and Vaccine Compliance – Donald Passal, MD • Pediatric Cardiology - Hani Zreik, MD • Infant and Child Nutrition - Lourdes Morales, MD • Sepsis Recognition and Management - Nicole Sinclair, MD • Head Shaping with Torticollis and Plagiocephaly Adam Schlichte, PT, DPT, C/NDT • Health Equity - Kenyetta Jackson, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services REGISTER AT www.covenanthealthcare.com/pediatricsymposium INFORMATION - Brenda Fitak at 989.583.4150 or Brenda.Fitak@ chs-mi.com Covenant Cancer Care Center | 6th Annual Breast Cancer Symposium | Friday, April 24, 2020 Horizons Conference Center 6200 State Street, Saginaw Topics will include: • Symptoms & Survivorship: Supportive Care in Younger Women • Toxicity Cost and Adherence to Endocrine Therapy • Evolving Radiation Opportunities: Personalizing Decisions

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• Testing Criteria for High Risk Assessment in Breast, Ovarian and Pancreatic Cancer • Gynecological Oncology Considerations in Diagnosed and High-Risk Breast Cancer Patients • Updates in Management of Breast Cancer 2020: Medical Oncologist’s Perspective Covenant Kids Week & Gala Support Purchase of Infant Transport Isolette Covenant Kids Week March 30 – April 3 The 2020 Covenant Kids campaign has a brand-new format. Tune in to Covenant Kids Week on WNEM TV5 from Monday, March 30 through Friday, April 3. Along with the week-long focus on our Covenant Kids program, we will be hosting phone banks on Tuesday, March 31 and Thursday, April 2 during the evening news programs to raise money to purchase a critical piece of equipment, an infant transport isolette. Please tune in for Covenant Kids Week on WNEM TV5 and

call in during the phone banks with your pledge on Tuesday, March 31 or Thursday, April 2 between 5-6:30 p.m. For more information about this year’s Covenant Kids campaign or how you can sponsor Covenant Kids Week, please contact the Foundation at 989.583.7600. Infant Transport Isolette Will Transport Babies Across Michigan’s Northeast & Thumb Regions For more than 40 years, families in the Great Lakes Bay Region and beyond have relied on Covenant HealthCare to provide the highest level of newborn care. This year, Covenant Kids Week and the Covenant Kids Gala on Saturday, April 4 will support the purchase of a state-of-the-art infant isolette transporter. This equipment will provide the safest method for bringing premature babies and sick infants to Covenant from regional hospitals who rely on the specialized equipment and advanced training Covenant offers. The new transporter can be used in the LifeNet Helicopter and is compatible with MMR’s updated ambulances. “The RNICU would greatly benefit from a new AirBorne Transport Incubator in order to provide the region with critical care of our tiniest patients. This equipment will allow us to continued on page 22

Wound Healing Center WE LEAD IN EXTRAORDINARY CARE • Wounds that fail to respond to traditional treatment after 30 days, have become infected, or appear to heal but continue to recur • Diabetic ulcers, especially on the feet • Venous or lower leg ulcers • Pressure ulcers, such as bed sores • Skin tears or lacerations • Failing skin/muscle grafts or flaps • Slow or non-healing surgical wounds • Post-operative infections • Bone infections (osteomyelitis) • Radiation tissue injuries • Lymphedema • Burn care • Brown recluse spider bites © 2020 Covenant HealthCare. All rights reserved. PK 1/20 11672

COVENANT HEALTHCARE WOUND HEALING CENTER 900 Cooper, Saginaw, Michigan 989.583.4401 covenanthealthcare.com

The Bulletin | March 2020

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continued from page 21

provide sick babies with the special equipment needed to survive, including high frequency ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide,” Staci Boyke, Covenant HealthCare Transport Team Coordinator explains. “Every year, we transport 150160 babies from outlying hospitals to Covenant, covering 17 counties in the region. The Airborne Transport Incubator is an essential part of each transport, and the purchase of this unit would be a tremendous impact on the care that we provide.” Covenant HealthCare is the region’s Children’s Hospital, in providing health care to children through the following services and more: • Level III Regional Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (RNICU) offering the highest level of critical care for neonatal infants • The only Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) serving midMichigan and the northern lower Michigan region designed to care for critically ill infants and children through the age of 17 • ACS-Verified Pediatric Trauma Center - one of only seven in Michigan verified to care for the whole family in an emergency • Region’s only Child Life program • Community-based urgent care through MedExpress • Extensive clinical programs for children (autism, diabetes, rehabilitation, cardiology and more) Visit www.CovenantKidsMI.com for information on Covenant Kids.

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Michigan’s Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS) Jeff Duncan, PhD, State Registrar and Director Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics Dr. Halbert L. Dunn, MD, chief of the U.S. Office of National Vital Statistics, used the analogy of a “Book of Life” in a 1964 paper published in the American Journal of Public Health and the Nation’s Health. Each person, Dunn wrote, creates a book beginning with birth and ending with death, with individual life events as pages of the book. If true, then the epilog to the “Book of Life” is surely written by a physician completing the medical section of the death certificate. Michigan law requires the medical section of a death certificate to be certified by an attending physician within 48 hours after the death of a person (MCL333.2843(1) (a)). As members of a profession dedicated to preserving life, physicians may at times view this requirement as a bureaucratic burden that detracts from time spent caring for the living. In fact, a thoughtful and detailed death certification represents a final act of care for a deceased patient, provides valuable information to surviving family members, informs public health and supports biomedical research. The cause of death information provided by physicians as text on a death certificate is coded to the International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision (ICD-10). These coded data are used to compile information on national and state leading causes of death (https://www.cdc.gov/ nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm) and burden of disease (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/ fullarticle/2678018) that are used to inform public policy and direct public health intervention efforts to reduce premature mortality due to preventable causes. In addition, death certificates are an important source of information for researchers conducting epidemiological studies, particularly those focusing on chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. Each year, staff in the Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics (DVRHS) work with researchers from Michigan and across the nation to provide high quality mortality data to support population-based studies. Death data are often linked to other data sets

including cancer and other chronic disease registries, hospital discharge data, notifiable diseases, and other public health data to extend the breadth of research questions that may be asked and answered. A search for “death certificates” in PubMed reveals the incredible utility, and unfortunately the limitations, of this data. Completing death certificates is easy with Michigan’s Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS). EDRS allows certifying physicians to log in and complete death certificates in a secure, online system that may be accessed in a web browser. EDRS allows for easy referral of cases to medical examiners when required, or when there are questions. Death certificates completed in EDRS are registered and coded more quickly, providing convenience to family members and added value for public health surveillance, especially for deaths due to emerging threats. We at DVRHS are working with the CDC, national standards organizations, and electronic health record vendors to integrate EDRS with electronic medical records. We have also engaged the help of our partners at the Michigan Public Health Institute to help train physicians on how to use EDRS and, more importantly, how to effectively document the sequence of diseases and events leading to death and how to describe events where that information is limited or unavailable. By writing accurate and effective death certifications, physicians are directly contributing to society’s knowledge of the prevention and epidemiology of disease, working toward the goal that each individual’s “Book of Life” may have many more happy and disease-free pages. Please feel free to email me at duncanj11@michigan.gov or if you would like more information on EDRS or on the death certificate process in general, visit www.MichiganEDRS.org.

An office remodel could prepare your practice for modern challenges for patient flow changes, documentation storage, HIPAA compliance, and succession

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www.wolgast.com/blog/topic/medical-office-construction The Bulletin | March 2020 23


NURSING SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE

MEDICAL STUDENT LOAN APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE

The SCMS Alliance and SCMS Foundation provide $500 nursing scholarships to Saginaw County residents. Over the years, we have awarded many scholarships to help students continue their nursing education.

Do you know of a medical student (with ties to the Saginaw area) in need of a loan? The SCMS Foundation may be able to help. The Foundation was formed in 1968 and originally funded through physician donation of earnings from educational and charity work. The Annual Golf Outing and donations now fund the Foundation which makes low interest loans to medical students with ties to the Saginaw area. The intent is to encourage physicians to return to Saginaw County to practice medicine. The terms of these loans are generous. No interest is charged while the student is in medical school, simple interest is charged at a rate of four percent per annum during a residency program, and interest is charged at a rate of eight percent per annum upon the completion of a residency program. As of 2012, the Foundation Board voted to forgive all interest if the student returns to Saginaw upon completion of a residency to practice. Additionally, the Board voted in May 2016 to start a loan forgiveness program. If the loan recipient returns to Saginaw to practice upon completion of their residency and they are a dues paying member of the SCMS/MSMS, 25 percent of the principal balance will be forgiven at the end of each year they are practicing in Saginaw County, with a maximum of $5,000 per year forgiven. The Foundation Board generally considers students who are past their first year of medical school, and among other things, according to: • Strength of connection to Saginaw • Financial need • Scholastic performance • Community service/extracurricular activities The intent of the Foundation loans are to assist and encourage students to return to Saginaw to practice medicine.

Requirements for consideration: • Must be a permanent resident of Saginaw County; AND • Currently enrolled in a nursing program or beginning nursing clinical core courses for award year; AND • Overall college GPA no lower than 2.79. Application packet MUST be complete for consideration. Incomplete applications will be denied. All applications must include a one page essay describing your nursing career goals and how this scholarship would help you financially in completing your nursing degree. Two letters of recommendation from past or current professors must be included. NOTE: Prior award recipients must complete a new application packet with new letters of recommendation. This scholarship is not for graduating high school seniors. Applications may be downloaded from the SCMS website www.SaginawCountyMS.com under the “Nursing Scholarships” tab. Deadline for applications is March 31, 2020.

Focusing our practice on the needs of our community, we provide the following services for both individuals and businesses: n Monthly Accounting n Tax Planning n Financial and Business Consulting Service n Payroll Service n Tax Preparation Service n Retirement Planning

Only applicants enrolled in a United States medical school will be considered. If any SCMS member knows of a medical student in need (with an interest in the Saginaw area), please encourage him or her to apply. Applications may be downloaded from the SCMS website www.SaginawCountyMS.com under the “Medical Student Loans” tab. Deadline for applications is March 31, 2020.

Contact us for a complimentary visit at 989-791-1040. Three convenient locations to serve you in: Saginaw | Vassar | Frankenmuth

24

The Bulletin | March 2020

“Attention to detail since 1980.”


APRIL BIRTHDAYS

IN MEMORY

Lauren Aiello (Student) Abiola A. Alaka (Student) Michael Aljadah (Student) Sindhura Ananthaneni MD H. Joseph Blair MD Samuel Borer (Student) Donald J. Cady MD David W.T. Chen MD Happy Special Birthday! Seth D. Coombs MD Erinn E. Croco DO Brian C. deBeaubien MD Megan J. Dutcher DO Daniel L. Elieff MD Peter G. Fattal MD E. Malcolm Field MD Happy Special Birthday! Victoria A. Haddad MD Theodore B. Hennig DDS Chelsea P. Houthoofd MD Michael Huber (Student) Mohamed K. Hussein MD C.R. Indira MD M. Sohail Jilani MD Min H. Kim MD Narendra R. Kumar MD H.F. Labsan MD Phillip W. Lambert MD Happy Special Birthday!

Jack F. Martin MD

Peter A. Lassing MD Matthew Lee (Student) Toby C.J. Long MD Emily R. Losinski (Student) Bapineedu Maganti MD Khalid M. Malik MD Joseph F. Marshall MD James McCourt MD Robert M. McNier MD Owen C. Morris DPM Felipe A. Pacheco Granda MD Aida B. Ponce MD Vasantha Rajagopal MD Sundhar R. Ramasamy MD Clinton E. Rogers MD Miriam T. Schteingart MD Zachary Schwager MD Caroline G.M. Scott MD Constance L. Scott DO Carrie L. Selvaraj MD Joseph Shin (Student) Aaron K. Smith MD Timothy A. Smith MD Jung K. Suhr MD Robert D. Thill MD Vina V. Tran MD Lisa M. WintonLi MD Michael J. Wolohan MD Samantha A. Wong DO

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Dr. Jack Martin of Chelsea passed away on Tuesday, February 18, 2020, at the age of 89 with his family by his side. Jack was born in Belding, Michigan on October 12, 1930, the son of Frederick John and Florence Ann (Neveril). Jack married Mary Jacqueline Shields in 1956 at St. Thomas Catholic Church in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Soon after graduating from the University of Michigan Medical School, Jack served two years in the U.S. Air Force stationed in Turkey. He then went to the Mayo Clinic before settling in as an orthopedic surgeon in Saginaw, where he and Jackie raised their family and remained for the entirety of Jack's medical career. "Dr. Jack" was the neighborhood doctor, always available at a moment's notice - at home, dinner or his private practice – to attend to the innumerable aches and sprains of his beloved community. After his wife, family and everlasting faith in God, Jack's greatest love was the game of golf. He made lifelong friends at the Saginaw Country Club. Thanks to his hard work and sacrifice, every place Jack called home, whether in Saginaw, Hilton Head Island or Bay Harbor, had a clear view of the links. In retirement, Jack kept the local booksellers in business with his avid reading, and his skilled hands busy building model boats and planes. And, of course, there was always golf. But Jack was happiest spending time with his wife and best friend, Jackie, his “Wild Irish Rose,” for 63 years of loving marriage. He also loved the holidays when his family came home to him. Jack leaves to cherish his memory his wife, Jackie; two sons, Bradley (Kathleen) Martin and Brian (Jenny) Martin; two grandchildren, Jackson and Benjamin; seven nieces and two nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and one sister, Jeanne. A funeral mass was held on Tuesday, February 25 at St. Francis Catholic Church in Ann Arbor, with burial in St. Thomas Cemetery. Those planning an expression of sympathy are asked to consider contributions in Jack's memory to the Alzheimer's Association.

COMPLETE DESIGN SERVICES Letterheads • Business Cards Envelopes • Brochures • Calendars Flyers • Cookbooks • Annual Reports Note Sheets • Newsletters • Mailings Large Format Posters • and much more… PRINT SERVICES Offset Printing • Die Cutting Foil Stamping • Embossing • Film Output Thermography • Black & White Copies Color Copies • Laminating • Union Bug The Bulletin | March 2020 25


NEW MEMBERS Gregory A. Bohn MD CMU Health - Surgery 912 S. Washington Ave., Ste. 1 Saginaw, MI 48601-2578 Office (989)-790-1001 Fax (989)-790-1002 www.cmich.edu/colleges/cmed/ Surgery - General, Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Chelsea P. Houthoofd MD Dermatology Associates of Midland 728 W. Wackerly St., Suite 200 Midland, MI 48640-4724 Office (989)-837-6868 Fax (989)-837-6837 nashdermatologyassociates.com Dermatology Kimberly S. Johnson MD Advanced Diagnostic Imaging, PC 3400 N. Center, Suite 400 Saginaw, MI 48603-7920 Office (989)-799-5600 Fax (989)-799-7430 www.adirads.com Radiology - Diagnostic Cristina M. Nituica MD CMU Health - Surgery Assoc. Program Director 912 S. Washington Ave., Ste. 1 Saginaw, MI 48601-2578 Office (989)-790-1001 Fax (989)-790-1002 www.cmich.edu/colleges/cmed/ Surgery - General

APPLICATIONS FOR MEMBERSHIP FIRST READING: Application for membership that may be recommended for acceptance at the April 21, 2020, Board Meeting: Derek J. Schaller, MD (CMU Medical Education Partners-Emergency Medicine Clerkship Director and Saginaw County Sexual Assault Response Program Medical Director) Specialty: Emergency Medicine - Board Certified 2014 Medical School: Wayne State University School of Medicine, 2010 Internship/Residency: Sinai-Grace Hospital Emergency Department Residency Program, Tenet Health System/Detroit Medical Center, 2010-13 Fellowship: ACEP Teaching Fellowship, Dallas, TX, 2017-18 Sponsors: Doctors Kathleen M. Cowling and Steven J. Vance SECOND READING: Application for membership that may be recommended for acceptance at the March 17, 2020, Board Meeting: Chet A. Morrison, MD (CMU Health - Surgery) Specialty: Surgery - General, Board Certified 1998 and Critical Care - Board Certified 2001 Medical School: George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Science, 1991 Internship: Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Aurora, CO, Surgery, 7/91-6/92 Military Requirement Before Residency: Camp Edwards Medical Treatment Facility, Republic of Korea, 7/92-6/93 Residency: Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Surgery, 7/936/95; and William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Surgery, El Paso, TX, 7/95-6/97; and University of Maryland and R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, Baltimore, MD, 7/996/01 Sponsors: Doctors John Blebea and Samuel J. Shaheen

Caduceus Meeting for Recovering Health Care Professionals Third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. | Zion Lutheran Church | 454 7th Street, Freeland, Michigan (Behind Pat’s Grocery Store on Midland Road in Freeland) Caduceus meetings are available to health care industry professionals, and have adopted many of the principles of 12-Step programs. Caduceus meetings are “closed” meetings for recovering health care professionals including, but not limited to, nurses, doctors, dentists and pharmacists. We engage in group discussions where members may want to speak up, ask questions or share thoughts with fellow members. 26

The Bulletin | March 2020

All statements or comments in The Bulletin are those of the writer, and not necessarily the opinion of the Saginaw County Medical Society.


Visible Means of Support By Louis L. Constan, MD

A

dmit it, the first thing we want to know when you meet a new person is: “What do you do for a living?” It’s not their favorite sports team, movie, book, place to vacation, or political party. We want to know what a person does because, most of the time, what a person does tells us who that person is. Fair or not, we tend to think of people in certain careers as having certain traits. Ministers are “Holy.” Nurses nurture. Professors like to lecture us. Salespersons compulsively selling something. Carpenters who love to build things with their hands (we wish we could do that). Firemen who lead a life of danger and excitement! Doctors, well, they know all our intimate secrets. Our job defines us, gives us meaning, encompasses our time, our lives, our thoughts, often our passions. It’s the reason we get up in the morning. In social situations, it takes little encouragement to get us to talk about what we do at work. If we’re not proud of our work, the chances are that we’re looking for another job. Most of us have an interesting story or two about work that we entertain with at parties. So, what happens to someone who does not have a job? If not their choice, then it’s embarrassing to tell a stranger that they are unemployed. Awkward! To be unemployed, even for a short time, can be a gutwrenching experience. It has not happened to me, but it has happened to loved ones and I do know of what I speak. Many unemployed individuals describe a feeling of being a “nobody.” Words like “worthless,” “aimless” and “undefined” are used. If unemployment is prolonged, depression can follow with all the negative health consequences, including weight loss, sleeplessness, cardiovascular disease. In addition, unemployed individuals have empty time on their hands and lack financial means to survive. Sometimes the combination of time, and a lack of money, can become a perfect storm and lead to criminal activity. It is no secret that areas with the highest unemployment rates have the highest crime rates. Unfortunately, our society reacts to high crime rates with more police, tougher prosecutors, longer sentences. This has led to burgeoning prison populations, broken families, little if any effect on the crime rate…but huge costs to society. And we continue with

these same wrong-headed policies year after year. Decade after decade. Until now. Saginaw, listed as one of the four Michigan cities that are among the top-ten in the country for high crime rates, started a program in 2014 called “Community Ventures.” (You know, of course, that Saginaw is quite economically challenged as well, and that high unemployment of course leads to high crime rates. An economically and criminally challenged area if ever there was one!) Community Ventures very ambitiously took on the challenge of finding employment for the worst cases of Saginaw’s unemployed individuals. Many of these people had never been employed, were functionally illiterate, poorly educated, even ex-offenders. They needed basic training with what it meant to hold a job, how to get to work, how to dress at work, how to act towards other employees and the boss, how to handle their paycheck, their bills. This program didn’t just find them a job, it helped them learn job and life skills as well. Amazingly, this program found work for 2,500 people and 80 percent retained those jobs for at least one year! Now, it is always difficult to assign cause and effect in social situations, but in the first five years of this program, the crime rate in Saginaw fell 23 percent. That is amazing! But surprising? Remember unemployment = high crime…and the reverse is certainly true. Thankfully, this program is now continuing under a statewide program called Michigan Works. Programs such as Community Ventures and Michigan Works deserve maximum state and local funding and support. As a Family Physician who has observed patients for 44 years, I see more benefits coming from this program. People with jobs are more physically active, which is hugely beneficial in itself; they can afford a more healthful diet; they can better afford to maintain their residence, improving community property values; they pay taxes; and they have a reason to participate in the civic and political life of the community. Perhaps, most of all, they have a reason to reach out and shake your hand at a community get-together and proudly share stories about what you each do for a living. Proud of yourselves, proud of your jobs, proud of your community, proud of Michigan.

Our job defines us, gives us meaning, encompasses our time, our lives, our thoughts, often our passions. It’s the reason we get up in the morning. The Bulletin | March 2020 27


What is MC3?

mc3.depressioncenter.org

The MC3 program offers psychiatry support to primary care providers in Michigan who are managing patients with behavioral health problems. This includes children, adolescents, young adults through age 26, and women who are contemplating pregnancy, pregnant or postpartum (up to one year). Psychiatrists are available through same-day phone consultations to offer guidance on: • diagnostic questions • medication recommendations • appropriate psychotherapy Your local MC3 Behavioral Health Consultant is also available to provide recommendations for local resources. How Does It Work? Only one phone call is necessary to get the process started. Here are the simple steps: 1. The treating provider or clinic designee initiates a call to the Behavioral Health Consultant (BHC), a masters-level mental health professional based locally. 2. The BHC triages the referral, responds to any questions that are within the scope of his/her expertise, and forwards appropriate cases to the MC3 psychiatrist for same-day phone consultation. In cases that are deemed urgent, the BHC will suggest local resources for referral. 3. Upon completion of the consultation between the psychiatrist and treating provider, a written summary of the consultation is sent to the provider along with local resources. In select regions, telepsychiatry evaluations may be available as an additional resource. Phone availability for U of M psychiatrists and local BHCs is Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., excluding holidays. Who Can Participate? Primary care providers in designated geographic counties are eligible to participate in the program. As part of their participation, they will be asked to sign a Provider Agreement that outlines program services and respective responsibilities. As an additional educational resource, participating primary care providers will be able to use the program website to access recommended practices for treatment of common behavioral health issues. What is NOT Included MC3 is not an emergency service. Emergency consultations over the phone or in person are not provided. If a PCP calls about a case requiring an urgent intervention, the Behavioral Health Consultant can offer appropriate resource recommendations. U of M psychiatrists do not prescribe medication or provide ongoing treatment, but rather support primary care providers as they provide care. For those cases beyond the scope of the provider, the BHC and psychiatrist will offer referrals to local or regional clinicians. For more information, website: mc3.depressioncenter.org; email: mc3-admin@umich.edu; phone: 734-474-0078. For more information, website: mc3.depressioncenter.org; email: mc3-admin@umich.edu; phone: 734-474-0078 28

Updated 11/6/19 The Bulletin | March 2020


REGISTER TODAY!

Recognizing and Responding to

Trauma with Clinical Tools to Promote Resilience

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2020 | 8:00AM - 12:00PM

HORIZONS CONFERENCE CENTER 6200 State St, Saginaw, MI 48603

Medical providers and clinical partners practicing in health care settings recognize the pressing needs for professional education to address community priorities for treatment and prevention of child trauma and ACEs-related health and social challenges. Primary care providers and teams are seeking more knowledge of how ACEs-related toxic stress and trauma lead to physical and emotional illness, how to put this science into practice, and/or how to share prevention strategies to help patients heal and build resilience. We will explore the pediatric medical provider’s role in identifying and supporting attachment and resilience in daily practice, strategies for the recognition of trauma symptoms, and practical tools to respond in the busy clinical setting.

SPEAKER: HEATHER C. FORKEY, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and The Joy McCann Professor for Women in Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Forkey leads programs to address the needs of children who are victims of abuse, neglect and emotional trauma. She received her undergraduate degree from Cornell University and medical degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. She completed her pediatric residency and chief residency at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Forkey has been the recipient of local and federal grants to address issues of children in foster care and to translate promising practices to address physical and mental health needs of children who have been traumatized. She is a recognized leader in the field of child trauma and foster care medicine, has published and presents nationally and internationally on the topic, and her work has been highlighted in the popular press as well, including Forbes, The Boston Globe and The Atlantic.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: • • • •

Define the 4 characteristics of a caregiving relationship necessary for healthy attachment Recognize the most common symptoms of trauma in children Identify seven resilience skills that should be supported in children Formulate a strategy to respond to children who present with trauma symptoms Central Michigan University College of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Central Michigan University College of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 3.25 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity and individual assessment of and feedback to the learner, enables the learner to earn up to 3.25 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME Activity provider’s responsibility to submit learner completion information to the ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Family Medicine Physicians and Teams including: Pediatricians, PA, Nurses, Psych, Counselors, Social Workers.

REGISTER HERE OR AT MIHIA.ORG/EVENTS/UPCOMING-EVENTS

REGISTER HERE OR AT MIHIA.ORG/EVENTS/UPCOMING-EVENTS

The Bulletin | March 2020 29


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The Bulletin | March 2020


Behavioral Medicine | Medical Rehabilitation | Long-Term Care

We are like no other hospital in the area. Our focus is recovery. We specialize in getting you back on your feet from surgery, debilitating illness or injury, chemical dependency or mental issues. Whether your rehabilitation journey is short or long, we’re at your side every step of the way.

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The Bulletin | March 2020 31


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID Saginaw, MI 48605 PERMIT #189

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2019-2020 KEY PROVIDERS

These Area Businesses Support Saginaw County Medical Society Membership Meetings. When you have a need for a service, please consider our Key Providers. Please mark your calendar for the following meetings and events for the first six months of 2020. You will receive an email meeting notice and reminder each month for SCMS events. Non-SCMS events are listed as a courtesy and you must contact the sponsor directly to register. SCMS Membership Meetings are held on the third Tuesday of January, April, May, September and October. The SCMS Board meets on the third Tuesday of every month (except July, August and December) at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 18, 2020 Horizons Conference Center - MiHIA’s “Recognizing and Responding to Trauma with Clinical Tools to Promote Resilience.” See page 29.

Saturday-Sunday, April 25-26, 2020 The Henry in Dearborn – 155th Annual MSMS House of Delegates.

Friday, March 20, 2020 Horizons Conference Center – CMU College of Medicine “Match Day.” See page 19 for information.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020 CMU College of Medicine, 1632 Stone Street, Saginaw – “Thanks for Staying” Rotary Scholarships 2020 Celebration.” See pages 16-17 for information.

Saturday, April 4, 2020 Horizons Conference Center – “Spring Chrysalis: A Gala for Covenant Kids.”

Sunday, May 10, 2020 CMU College of Medicine, Mt. Pleasant, Plachta Auditorium – “2020 Commencement.” See page 19 for information.

Friday, April 17, 2020 Horizons Conference Center – Covenant’s “Pediatric Symposium.” See page 20 for information.

Tuesday, May 19, 2020 Horizons Conference Center - SCMS Board meets at 5:30 p.m. Membership Meeting with Social (cash bar) at 6:30 p.m. followed by dinner and SCMS and SCMS Foundation Annual Meetings at 7 p.m. Program: “Update on CMU College of Medicine.”

Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Horizons Conference Center - SCMS Board meets at 5:30 p.m. Membership Meeting with Social (cash bar) at 6:30 p.m. followed by dinner and program at 7 p.m. Speaker: Molly E. Gabriel-Champine, PhD, LP, Director of Behavioral Science, Family Medicine Residency at McLaren Bay. Program: “Physician Compassion Fatigue.” See page 5 for information and to register. Friday, April 24, 2020 Horizons Conference Center – Covenant Cancer Care Center’s "6th Annual Breast Cancer Symposium.” See page 20 for information. Saturday, April 25, 2020 CMU College of Medicine, Mt. Pleasant, with livestreaming at the Saginaw Campus, 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Free eight-hour MAT DATA waiver training through ASAM. See pages 10-11 for more information and to register.

Saturday, June 6, 2020 Saginaw Country Club – 11th Annual SCMS Foundation Golf Outing. Four-person scramble. 12 p.m. Registration and Lunch, with 1 p.m. Shotgun Start. Tuesday, June 16, 2020 CMU College of Medicine, 1632 Stone Street – SCMS Board meets at 5:30 p.m.

Joan Cramer/SCMS | Office 790-3590 | Fax 790-3640 | Cell 284-8884 jmcramer@sbcglobal net | www.SaginawCountyMS.com

Profile for SCMS Bulletin

SCMS BULLETIN - March 2020  

SCMS BULLETIN - March 2020