SCMS BULLETIN - December 2022

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BulletinThe Saginaw County Medical Society December 2022 | Volume 80 | No 8 www.SaginawCountyMS.com REGISTER NOW! TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2023 MEMBERSHIP MEETING p. 7 RENEWING YOUR MEDICAL LICENSE IN 2023? WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW! p. 11 ELECTRONIC PRESCRIBING FAQ s p. 13 HOW TO WRITE A RESOLUTION TO THE MSMS HOUSE OF DELEGATES p. 16
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Saginaw County Medical Society

2022-2023

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS

President Tiffany K. Kim MD

President-Elect Mark G. Greenwell MD

Past President Anthony M. Zacharek MD

Secretary Caroline G.M. Scott MD

Treasurer Miriam T. Schteingart MD

Board of Directors

Christopher J. Allen MD

Furhut R. Janssen DO

Mary J. McKuen MD

Kai Anderson MD

Jennifer M. Romeu MD

Elizabeth M. Marshall MD

Bulletin Editor Louis L. Constan MD

Retiree Representative

Caroline G.M. Scott MD

Resident Representatives

Jessica H. Faris MD (OB)

Mohammed A. Saiyed MD (FM)

Yuri J. Kim MD (IM)

Medical Student Representatives

Ann Sobell, MD Candidate, Class of 2023

Mary Galuska MA, MD Candidate, Class of 2024

MSMS Delegates

Elvira M. Dawis MD

Anthony M. Zacharek MD

Christopher J. Allen MD

Miriam T. Schteingart MD

Kala K. Ramasamy MD

Jennifer M. Romeu MD

Karensa L. Franklin MD

Judy V. Blebea MD

Elizabeth M. Marshall MD

MSMS Alternate Delegates

Caroline G.M. Scott MD

Waheed Akbar MD

Mohammad Yahya Khan MD

Nicholas E. Haddad MD

Mary J. McKuen MD

Kai Anderson MD

Claudia C. Zacharek MD

Cecilia E. Kraus-Horbal DO

Peer Review Ethics Committee

Waheed Akbar MD, Chair

Caroline G.M. Scott MD

James R. Hines MD

MSMS Region 7 Representative

Mildred J. Willy MD

MSMS President

Thomas J. Veverka MD

Executive Director

Joan M. Cramer

Administrative Assistant

Keri L. Benkert

MSMS Member Service Representative

Heather L. Foster (517) 336-5719

SCMS/MSMS 2023 Membership

Dues Payable 12/31/22

Register Now for 1/17/23 Meeting & Calendar of Meetings and Events for 2023

Barb Smith SRRN Mental Health Awareness Night With the Saginaw Spirit 2/11/23

Proposed Amendment to SCMS Bylaws

SCMS Mission, Vision and Values

President’s Letter

Guest Writers Welcome

Office Space for Sale or Lease

From the Editor

Retirees Meet for Lunch

Birthdays – January

Applications for Membership

GLBHC Accepting Adult Outpatient Psychiatry Referrals

CMU College of Medicine CMU Health • CME Survey Closes 12/31/22 • Tele-Mental Health Symposium Save the Date 2/24/23

Thank You Advertisers!

Ascension St. Mary’s

MSMS • Tom George, MD Named MSMS Interim CEO

Renewing Your Medical License in 2023? What You Need to Know! 13-15 LARA Electronic Prescribing FAQs Effective 1/1/23 16-17 How to Write a Resolution to the MSMS House of Delegates 28 MiHIA – SVSU Dean

Marcia Ditmyer to Lead Board Dr. Catherine Baase Becomes Chair Emerita

• Legislative Advocacy Alert – H.R. 8800

• MiACCT

• Advocacy Alert – AMA Downcoding Resources 25 PRiSMM Telehealth Suicide Prevention Toolkit 26 Covenant HealthCare 27 In Memory – 2022 28 Caduceus Meeting for Recovering Health Care Professionals 29 Health Professional Recovery Program 30 Thank You Key Providers! 30 Advertiser Index 31 10 Facts About Physician Suicide and Mental Health 32 Key Providers 32 Calendar of Meetings and Events for 2023

The Bulletin can be viewed online at www.SaginawCountyMS.com under the Bulletin tab.

COVER PHOTO COURTESY OF BROOKE KOWALSKI

EDITOR

Louis L. Constan, MD

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Joan M. Cramer

DESIGNER

Lori Krygier

PUBLISHER

Saginaw County Medical Society

350 St. Andrews Rd., Ste. 242, Saginaw, MI 48638-5988

Telephone (989) 790-3590 | Fax (989) 331-6720

Cell (989) 284-8884 | jmcramer@sbcglobal.net

Hours By Appointment | SaginawCountyMS.com

All statements or comments in the Bulletin are those of the writers, and not necessarily the opinion of the Saginaw County Medical Society. Contributions are welcome. We publish committee reports, letters to the editor, Alliance reports, public health activities of the members, and some personal items (birthdays, weddings, graduations and like events). The Editor determines which are accepted. Advertisements are accepted as space is available at our going rates. Members may advertise office information, professional services, skills, and procedures, also at our going rates. We do not accept advertisements from nonmembers, or non-Saginaw hospitals.

The Bulletin is mailed free of charge to SCMS members as part of their membership. Complimentary copies are sent to various other parties. Others may subscribe at the rate of $50 per year.

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First, Do No Harm

As I sat in front of a patient recently and went through all the preventative recommendations, I realized I should be saying “Do as I say, not as I do.” When was my last mammogram?? Two years ago! Oh, that colonoscopy I should have had at age 40 because of family history…almost four years later, yep still haven’t done it. This isn’t because I don’t believe in the evidencebased screening recommendations, nor is it that I don’t think it is important. Time just slipped by. I encourage many patients every day to do what I haven’t. Why?

There are many reasons why physicians may not follow the adage Do No Harm for themselves. Sometimes it can just be life and the busyness of it that causes us to not do what we teach. (Hmmm…maybe we need to remember that when patients come back without completing our orders!) But are there other reasons we are not taking care of ourselves like we recommend for our patients? Burnout? Moral injury? Something else?

The continuing weight of administrative tasks that get put on physicians, in addition to their actual job

or more often “calling,” which is to take care and heal. It can feel like a ton of bricks.

The term “burnout” was coined by German psychologist Herbert Freudenberger in 1975, who identified it as the presence of symptoms like malaise, fatigue, frustration, cynicism, and inefficacy that emerge when the workplace makes excessive demands on energy, strength, or resources of workers. The staff burn-out syndrome in alternative institutions.

But the phrase BURNOUT has a lot of physicians shaking their heads and rolling their eyes and denying their symptoms…why?

In their STAT article, Physicians aren’t ‘burning out.’ They’re suffering from moral injury, Drs. Talbot and Dean write that “the concept of burnout resonates poorly with physicians. It suggests a failure of resourcefulness and resilience, traits that most physicians have finely honed during decades of intense training and demanding work.”

What is moral injury? Originally used in reference to war and what soldiers experience once they return home, a/k/a PTSD. It has been since used in the context of physicians. “Failing to

consistently meet patients’ needs has a profound impact on physician wellbeing — this is the crux of consequent moral injury” according to Drs. Talbot and Dean. As physicians, we are here because we want to help others, put patients ahead of everything else. That is our calling. So why is doing what we love also causing us so much pain? Physician suicide is soaring in the United States. What is in the way? Everything…hospital administration, electronic medical records, insurance companies, the list goes on and on. When we know what a patient needs to get better, but all the constraints make it impossible, too many hoops, to get to where we need to be…that is our moral injury.

So, knowing what to call it is half the battle – how do we fix it, so the next generation of physicians won’t have the same experiences? Well, from the sounds of it, it isn’t going to be an easy or quick fix, but if we all work toward that goal it is possible.

Here are some of the recommendations from Drs. Talbot and Dean from their article, Reframing Clinician Distress: Moral Injury Not Burnout.

“The concept of burnout resonates poorly with physicians. It suggests a failure of resourcefulness and resilience, traits that most physicians have finely honed during decades of intense training and demanding work.”

4 The Bulletin | December 2022 PRESIDENT'S LETTER
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1. Work together – invite the administrators to join in rounds or follow you for a 24-hour call. In turn, follow the administrators to understand what are the obstacles that they face. If we understand each other and what we are facing daily, it will allow for perspective and empathy, which hopefully will allow for meaningful communication on the struggles faced by physicians to care for patients appropriately.

2. Know our legislators – communicating patient needs (their constituents) to the legislators and helping them understand what they can do to bring about change, i.e., a candidate forum through the SCMS is a wonderful starting point (see our November Bulletin for details!) and our presence at the House of Delegates in April.

3. Reestablish a sense of community among clinicians –physicians need to support each other. We are all working toward the same goal: Providing the best patient care possible. Another plug for the SCMS… we provide a place for physicians to develop relationships that provide them camaraderie, mentorship and support.

Unfortunately, none of this will be fixed this week, month or year. But putting a name to it and talking about it is a start. It seems like such a daunting task to take on, but if each of us remembers that our calling and our work is important and it is worth fighting for, maybe we can make the change our healthcare system so desperately needs.

SCMS/MSMS 2023

MEMBERSHIP DUES NOW PAYABLE

If you have not already done so, please pay your 2023 SCMS/ MSMS membership dues which are payable 12/31/22. If you are unsure if your dues are paid or need a copy of your invoice, please contact Joan Cramer at jmcramer@sbcglobal.net or text (989) 284-8884

HOW TO PAY

• Online CLICK HERE

• Fax to (517) 481-3976

• Mail to: MSMS Membership Department | PO Box 950 East Lansing, MI 48826-0950

• Installment payments available – call (517) 336-5716

Tax Information

SCMS/MSMS dues are not deductible as a charitable contribution but may be deductible as an ordinary and necessary business expense (check with your tax specialist). SCMS dues are 100 percent deductible, and 81.1 percent of MSMS dues are deductible (a portion of MSMS dues is attributable to lobbying activities). The SCMS and MSMS are non-profit organizations focused on improving the lives of physicians so they may best care for the people they serve. Click HERE for Benefits of SCMS Membership.

The strength and effectiveness of SCMS/MSMS as your professional association is predicated on strong membership.

WHY PAY DUES?

• Because all physicians need to “fund their voice.”

• National polls show physicians as one of the most respected professions. Sadly, they don’t use their clout often enough to preserve their profession and protect their patients.

• There is strength in numbers. Together we are stronger.

If you would like to write an article of interest to your colleagues for publication in a future issue of The Bulletin, please contact Joan Cramer at jmcramer@sbcglobal.net for further information.

Articles are not designed for self-promotion, but rather as information for members.

The Bulletin | December 2022 5 continued from page 4 Medical Arts Building I 4705 Towne Centre Road, Suite 204 Saginaw, Michigan 48604 2,450 square feet Call for details (989)
OFFICE SPACE FOR SALE OR LEASE
284-2659
GUEST WRITERS WELCOME!

FROM

EDITOR

A

t the climatic end of the first act of “Les Misérables,” the blockbuster musical based on the best-selling historical novel, Jean Valjean sings about a turning point in his life. You see, he, as a young man, had been branded as a criminal and spent 19 years in prison for stealing a loaf of bread. After his release, even as he is hounded by Javert, a lawman determined to return him to prison, he strives to live a life of altruism and self-sacrifice. Still, Valjean largely accepts the notion that he is, at heart, a criminal. Finally, at a dramatic turning point, as he sings “Who am I?”, he begins to realize that he has self-worth; that society’s, and Javert’s assessment of him is wrong. That he is a valuable person, blessed by God.

top law enforcement official of Indiana, she deserved to lose her license over this. Extreme? Certainly, and we can easily recognize that attorney general as a modern-day Javert bent on imposing simplistic views of morality on a physician who was providing a needed service to a suffering patient.

Clearly, we doctors live in tumultuous times. That Ob-Gyn surely asked herself “Who am I?” as she put the welfare of her patient first and stood up to the most powerful law enforcement official in her state.

And “Who are we?” is no less an important question to ask ourselves as we confront a plethora of challenges to our ability to practice our profession. I need not list these challenges but will do so anyway:

• The impugning of medical science and evidence-based treatments

• The appalling ignorance of those who are allowed to decide how we can practice medicine

• The outright threats to doctors who stand up to those who spread misinformation about viruses, viral treatments and vaccinations

• The underfunding and belittling of the role of important institutions such as the FDA, the CDC and NIH

• The laws in some states that forbid doctors from giving complete information to patients

Benjamin Franklin, after he signed the Declaration of Independence, warned that: “We must all hang together, or assuredly, we shall all hang separately.”

While not as hallowed a document as the Declaration, our Mission/Vision/ Values does serve a vital role. It answers important questions. We, as a medical society, are a diverse group of individuals. Some independent and some employed. Academic and community physicians. Multiple specialties. But what holds us together? What drives us, what dreams do we dream, what values do we hold dear? Mission/Vision/Values attempts to answer those questions.

Over the next few months, I will be presenting commentary on those Mission/Vision/Values. Our Board worked hard on this document and we are in their debt. We, individually, may not agree with every single word, phrase, or punctuation mark; but it is important for all of us to wrestle with its content. We may be asked about them. We may be challenged by those who do not value the doctor/patient relationship; who do not believe we can be trusted to make ethical decisions; who give a social media posting as much weight as a doubleblind study. Armed with this document, we will be better able to stand up and defend our values; to answer the question “Who are we?”

6 The Bulletin | December 2022
I thought of Valjean recently as our SCMS Board did some introspection by asking, not “Who am I?” but “Who are we?” and came up with a set of Mission/ Vision/Values (more later on that). I also thought of Valjean as I learned that the attorney general of the State of Indiana asked Indiana’s Board of Medicine to revoke the license of a particular Indiana physician. This Ob-Gyn, who had aborted a ten-year-old rape victim (which is strictly permitted by Indiana law…but unpopular in certain quarters) was called on the carpet for a minor reporting error over that very necessary medical procedure. According to the THE
By Louis L. Constan, MD

Note: No lunch on 12/21/22 or 12/28/22

RETIREES MEET FOR LUNCH!

Retired physicians meet for lunch every Wednesday at 12 noon at IHOP, 2255 Tittabawassee Road in Saginaw. Those attending are responsible for their own lunch, and the informal gathering lasts about an hour. Join your retired colleagues whenever you like!

THE GROUP ALWAYS MEETS IN THE BACK ROOM. If you are told no one from the group is there, please go directly to the back room and check for yourself!

If you have questions, please contact Joan Cramer at (989) 284-8884 or Dr. Caroline Scott at (989) 295-2721.

If you find it difficult to communicate with your doctor; if you find it hard to get personal attention from an 'impersonal healthcare industry'; if you don't understand all those insurance-company rules; if you don't know how to change your bad health habits; if you think you may be on unnecessary medications; if you are perplexed by those annoying health-product advertisements; and if you'd like to know which are your greatest health risks - you'll appreciate this Family Doctor's advice, gleaned from 44 years of practice.

Each chapter is illustrated with real-life examples from his and other doctors' practices. Each chapter ends with 'bonus' essays written by the author and published in newspapers and magazines giving the doctor's viewpoint. This will give you a unique perspective and allow you to 'get into the mind' of a doctor. Sweet!

Available on Kindle (different cover but same book) and paperback.

Available on Amazon by clicking HERE 1

CALENDAR OF MEETINGS AND EVENTS FOR 2023*

REGISTER NOW!

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - Horizons Conference Center, 6200 State Street, Saginaw Board Meeting - 5:30 p.m.

Membership Meeting Joint with the Saginaw County Dental Society - Social (cash bar) at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner, meeting and program at 7 p.m.

Speakers - Monica Lamble DDS, Nishtha Sareen MD and Claudia C. Zacharek MD

Topic - "The Link Between Oral, Cardiac and Systemic Health” Online reservations are required

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A RESERVATION or scan the QR Code

IN CASE OF EXTREME WEATHER THAT WOULD NECESSITATE CANCELLATION OF THE MEETING, PLEASE CHECK YOUR EMAIL/TEXT MESSAGES FOR NOTICE FROM THE SCMS AFTER 2 P.M. ON THE DAY OF THE SCHEDULED MEETING

Tuesday, February 21, 2023 - CMU College of Medicine, 1632 Stone Street, Saginaw Board Meeting - 5:30 p.m.

There is no Membership Meeting in February.

Tuesday, March 21, 2023 - Via Zoom Board Meeting - 6:30 p.m. (Note time change)

There is no Membership Meeting in March.

Tuesday, April 18, 2023 - Horizons Conference Center, 6200 State Street, Saginaw Board Meeting - 5:30 p.m.

Membership Meeting - Social (cash bar) at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner, meeting and program at 7 p.m. Topic - Inspirational TED Talks

Email meeting notices will be sent in early April. Online reservations are required.

Saturday-Sunday, April 22-23, 2023 - The Henry in Dearborn 158th Annual MSMS House of Delegates

All statements or comments in The Bulletin are those of the writer, and not necessarily the opinion of the Saginaw County Medical Society (SCMS).

The Bulletin is made available electronically for members as an informational service. Reliance on any such information is at the user's own judgment.

The SCMS, its officers and employees, cannot guarantee the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of any information, and may not be held liable for any individual’s reliance on our web or print publications. For questions or the latest information, please contact Joan Cramer of the SCMS at (989) 284-8884 or jmcramer@sbcglobal.net.

Tuesday, May 16, 2023 - Horizons Conference Center, 6200 State Street, Saginaw Board Meeting - 5:30 p.m.

Annual SCMS and SCMS Foundation Membership Meetings Social (cash bar) at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner, meetings and program at 7 p.m.

Email meeting notices will be sent in early May. Online reservations are required.

12th Annual SCMS Foundation Golf Outing – date TBD

*Subject to change

The Bulletin | December 2022 7

Proposed Amendment to SCMS Bylaws

Delegate and Alternate Delegate Voting Privileges

In March 2022, the Nominating Committee consisting of Dr. Millie Willy, Past President as Chair, Dr. Tony Zacharek as President and Dr. Tiffany Kim as President-Elect, asked the SCMS Board to consider amending the Bylaws to allow all delegates and alternates to have a vote. It was the Nominating Committee’s opinion that if we have active and retired members giving of their time and serving the SCMS, they should be entitled to a vote. New members to the Board generally start as an alternate delegate as they learn the Board process. Past presidents serving as alternate delegates offer a wealth of history and experience on SCMS issues.

Per the Bylaws, officers and directors have voting privileges. Each June, the officers and directors vote for three delegates who are not already serving in a voting position as an officer or director to be voting members of the Board. Any additional delegates and alternate delegates do not have a vote. Alternate delegates include past presidents who want to stay involved on the Board. SCMS quorum is one-third of voting Board members.

After thoughtful consideration, the Board voted at the September 18, 2022, Meeting to approve an Amendment to the Bylaws. The relevant sections of the Bylaws follow, with text to be removed in red-strikethrough, and text to be added highlighted yellow:

CHAPTER XIII DUTIES OF OFFICERS

Section 6. DELEGATES AND ALTERNATE DELEGATES. The delegates, and in their absence or disability, the alternate delegates, shall attend and faithfully represent the members of this Society in the House of Delegates of the Michigan State Medical Society, and shall make a report of the proceedings of the House of Delegates at the next following regular meeting

JANUARY BIRTHDAYS

Jamal U. Akbar MD

Wasef Al-Khateeb MD

Sarosh Anwar MD

Edward Austin MD

Steve Balian MD

Alia M. Bapary MD

John K. Bartnik MD

Ronald A. Bays MD

Abbas Bekhrad MD

Robert L. Borenitsch DO

Tony Bourdkane MD

Gary A. Brooks MD

Paul B. Bry MD

Lowell A. Butman MD

Marcello L. Caso MD

Doris D. Cataquiz MD

Bryon C. Chamberlain MD

Moonyoung S. Chung MD

Louis L. Constan MD

Elvira M. Dawis MD

Angie Lynn F. Domingo MD

Patrick A. Fewins Student

Rica A. Generoso Student

Steven D. Hale MD

Gabriel S. Hamawi DPM

Leatha B. Hayes DO

Gregory C. Hazen MD

Alicia Hoban MD

Ali E. Ibrahim MD

Mohammad Jafferany MD

Shakeel M. Jamal MD

Ashley Jones MD

Roger N. Kahn MD

Sreevastav T. Kalangi MD

of this Society. To be eligible for election as a delegate or an alternate, the member must have been an active member of this Society for at least two years.

CHAPTER XIV BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Section 1. The Board of Directors shall consist of the president, president-elect, the immediate past president, the secretary, the treasurer, the editor of the Bulletin, six directors to be elected from among the membership, and three members which shall be elected from the pool of MSMS Delegates the duly elected delegates and alternate delegates. The current president shall act as chair of the Board. The secretary of this Society shall act as secretary of the Board. The Past President will remain on the SCMS Board whether s/ he retires or remains in active practice. The Board will appoint a retiree representative to the Board to serve a one (1) year term. The Board of Directors shall have the power to appoint resident representative(s) and medical student(s) for terms to be determined at their discretion to serve on the Board. The resident representative(s) and medical student(s) shall not be subject to Section 2 of Chapter XIV herein requiring attendance at fifty percent (50%) of Board meetings, but the resident representative(s) and medical student(s) shall make every effort to attend as many meetings as possible so as to effectively represent their peers. The retiree representative, resident representative(s) and medical student(s) will be non-voting members of the Board.

In accordance with the Bylaws and SCMS policy, the proposed Bylaws Amendment will be published in two issues of The Bulletin, and brought before the membership for a vote to approve at the next occurring Membership Meeting on Tuesday, January 17, 2023.

If any member has questions or concerns about the proposed Bylaws Amendment, please email Joan Cramer at jmcramer@sbcglobal.net by December 31, 2022.

Nadim Kanaan MD

Charles A. Keane MD

Mohammad Yahya Khan MD

Young H. Kim MD

Haley Kopkau Student

Ayushi A. Kumar Student

Menelito D. Lilagan DO

Marko Lubardic Student

Mark R. Ludka MD

Hamza Malik MD

Ben R. Mayne MD

Matthew F. McDowell DO

Vickie B. Mello DO

Babu L. Nahata MD

Sunil P. Pandit MD

Alan I. Rebenstock MD

S. Sethu K. Reddy MD

Emily Ridge Student

Douglas J. Saylor MD

Susan K. Schmiege MD

Happy Special Birthday!

Michael L. Schultz MD

Maliha N. Shaikh MD

Jacquelyn G. Small DO

F. Ann Sobell Student

Shravani Sripathi MD

Molly Stanford Student

Angelika A. Urbaniak MD

Matthew N. Vartanian MD

Venkatramana R. Vattipally MD

Daniel J. Wechter MD

Arno W. Weiss, Jr. MD

SCMS Mission, Vision and Values

The SCMS Board of Directors formed an Ad Hoc Committee of Drs. Chris Allen, Lou Constan, Tiffany Kim, Miriam Schteingart and Tony Zacharek to develop the Mission, Vision and Values Statements of the SCMS. The Committee met on Tuesday, August 16, 2022, via Zoom.

The purpose of the Committee was to establish the Mission, Vision and Values Statements of the SCMS based on prior Board discussion.

• The MISSION STATEMENT communicates the purpose of the organization.

• The VISION STATEMENT provides insight into what the organization hopes to achieve or become in the future.

• The VALUES STATEMENT reflects the organization’s core principles and ethics.

The Committee’s recommendations were approved by the SCMS Board of Directors at their meeting on Tuesday, September 18, 2022.

MISSION STATEMENT

• Bringing physicians together for the common good

VISION STATEMENT

• We aim to improve the lives of physicians and the patients we serve

VALUES STATEMENT

In accordance with SCMS policy, the proposed Mission, Vision and Values Statements will be published in two issues of The Bulletin, and then brought before the membership for a vote to approve at the next occurring Membership Meeting on Tuesday, January 17, 2023.

If any member has questions or concerns about the proposed Mission, Vision and Values Statements, please email Joan Cramer at jmcramer@sbcglobal.net by December 31, 2022.

120 Years of Serving the Residents of Saginaw County!

www.SaginawCountyMS.com

10 The Bulletin | December 2022
Service
Advocacy Genuine Health Inclusive Networking Always Learning We Lead

Renewing Your Medical License in 2023? What You Need to Know!

As a reminder, physician license renewals are quickly approaching. One third of licensed osteopathic and allopathic physicians are required to renew their three-year license every year. Please see the information below to assist with the process and requirements.

CHECK YOUR LICENSE NOW

MICHIGAN MEDICAL DOCTOR (MD) LICENSING GUIDE (revised 9/28/2022)

MICHIGAN OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN (DO) LICENSING GUIDE (revised 9/28/2022)

BUREAU OF PROFESSIONAL LICENSING MEDICINE FAQs

In October of 2021, the Bureau of Professional Licensing (BPL) migrated over 700,000 licenses to a new licensing platform called MiPLUS. The benefits of MiPLUS include an online account and an electronic application. As soon as your license is issued or renewed, you will receive an electronic copy of your license via email. Electronic copies of licenses are also stored in your MiPLUS account and can be accessed at any time.

Due to the functionality of MiPLUS, paper copies of licenses will no longer be automatically mailed upon issuance or renewal. Instead, licensees will be able to choose if they’d prefer to have a copy of their license mailed to them during the application or renewal process. Licensees benefit because an electronic copy is immediately available to them.

To access your MiPLUS account, please visit www.michigan. gov/miplus. If you have any questions, please contact bplhelp@michigan.gov or 517-241-0199.

Every 3 Years

Medical doctors are required to complete 150 hours of continuing education of which a minimum 75 hours of the required 150 hours must be earned in courses or programs designated as Category 1 programs. The remaining 75 hours may comprise of Category 1 and 2 credits within the maximums allowed. Click HERE for a brief description of each category and the number of allowable hours and acceptable documentation.

Osteopathic physicians are required to complete a minimum of 60 hours in Category 1. Click HERE for a brief description of each category and the number of allowable hours and acceptable documentation.

Required CME

Within the 150 hours of continuing medical education, a minimum of one hour of continuing education must be in the

area of medical ethics and three hours must be in the area of pain and symptom management (with at least one of the three hours specifically on controlled substance prescribing).

In addition, effective June 2022, a minimum of three hours every three-year relicensing cycle is required in Implicit Bias education. Renewals in January 2023 need one hour; renewals in 2024 need two hours; and renewals in 2025 need three hours. Then after, every three-year renewal cycle will need to report three hours. Hours earned after June 2021 can be used.

One-Time Requirements

Effective January 4, 2019, LARA announced a one-time Opioids and Controlled Substances Awareness Training Standards for Prescribers and Dispensers of Controlled Substances. This is separate from continuing education for an individual seeking a controlled substance license or who is licensed to prescribe or dispense controlled substances.

Also, separate from continuing medical education requirements, physicians must complete a one-time human trafficking requirement.

Recognition of Hours Worked Responding During the COVID-19 Emergency

Include your hours claimed on behalf of Executive Orders 2020-13, 2020-49 and 2020-82 which stated that LARA may recognize hours worked responding to the COVID-19 pandemic as hours toward continuing education courses or programs required for licensure. These orders were in effect from March 17-June 9, 2020. Physician members were directed to submit hours to the MSMS Education Department for processing.

Renewal Grace Period

There is a 60-day grace period in which you may renew your license without having to go through the relicensure process. If you renew during the 60-day grace period, there is an additional $20 late fee when you renew your license.

However, if your license is not renewed within the 60-day grace period after your expiration date, your license will lapse. The expiration date will reflect the original expiration date - it will not include the grace period. For example: If your license expires January 31, you have until April 1 to pay your renewal fee. If you do not renew by April 1, the end of the 60-day grace period, your license is considered lapsed as of January 31. Please note that when your license lapses, you can no longer practice your profession, nor can

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you identify yourself as a licensed individual.

If you have not completed your CME requirements by your license renewal date, you are allowed to use this grace period to complete those credits. Do not submit your renewal prior to completing your CME but do not exceed the 60-day period.

Continuing Medical Education Waivers

The Board of Medicine may waive the continuing medical education requirements for a license renewal if the failure of the license was due to the licensee’s disability, military service, absence from the continental United States, or a circumstance beyond the control of the licensee which the board considers sufficient.

To request a waiver, a written request must be submitted by mail to Bureau of Professional Licensing, Attn: Board of Medicine, P.O. Box 30670, Lansing, MI 48909, or by email to BPLHelp@michigan.gov and will need to include supporting documentation for the reason for the waiver. A waiver cannot be requested after an application for renewal has been submitted. The board cannot prospectively waive continuing education requirements.

Renewing Your License

Physicians will be sent a renewal notification to both your mailing and email address on record approximately 90 days prior to the expiration date of your license. You will not be able to renew before that time. Remember to notify LARA of any address change by submitting a MiPLUS modification. LARA states that it is the providers responsibility as a licensed health professional to renew your license on time. Failure to receive the renewal postcard, email notification, or to notify LARA of an address change does not exempt physicians from renewing their license on time.

To renew your license, go online to your MiPLUS account at www.michigan.gov/MiPLUS. Renewal payments can be taken by using a debit or credit card containing a Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover logo.

12 The Bulletin | December 2022
Online CME Courses Online CME courses including the required content areas are available here>> Details on the required and one-time CME are available here>> For more information or for questions on Online CME Courses, please contact Brenda Marenich or Rebecca Blake at MSMS. 5161 Cardinal Park Drive, Saginaw, MI 48604 1601 Marquette, Suite 1, Bay City, MI 48706 • Custom Lasek Surgery • No-Stitch Cataract Surgery • Macular Degeneration Treatment • Oculoplastic Surgery • Cornea Treatment • Low Vision • Optical Boutique • Retinal Surgery “Come See The Difference !” www.anderseneye.com 989.797.2400 Lori Krygier | Graphic Designer 989.239.1056 | lkrygier@charter.net lorikrygier.com Healthcare Marketing & Helping practices create and design a wide range of professional visual materials for healthcare marketing initiatives LOGOS & BRAND ASSETS | PRINT MATERIALS FORMS/PATIENT FOLDERS | PRESENTATIONS TRADESHOW & PROMOTION MATERIALS DIGITAL AD GRAPHICS | WEBSITE DESIGN Proud to be the Designer for the Saginaw County Medical Society Put creativity to work for your practice! Read previous issues of The Bulletin at www.SaginawCountyMS.com under the Bulletin tab

Electronic Prescribing FAQ November 4, 2022

Electronic Prescribing FAQ November 4, 2022

1. I do not currently electronically prescribe. Which software should I use?

1. I do not currently electronically prescribe. Which software should I use?

MCL 333.17754a will soon require all prescribers to electronically transmit all controlled and noncontrolled substance prescriptions unless otherwise exempt under the statute (see question 3 below for exemptions)

MCL 333.17754a will soon require all prescribers to electronically transmit all controlled and noncontrolled substance prescriptions unless otherwise exempt under the statute (see question 3 below for exemptions).

The department does not recommend specific software. Please refer to MCL 333.17754a(1) and (2) for guidance on the type of software that can be used. You may also want to contact your professional association for guidance. Additionally, the Drug Enforcement Administration has approved various entities to provide the certification of electronic prescribing systems.

The department does not recommend specific software. Please refer to MCL 333.17754a(1) and (2) for guidance on the type of software that can be used. You may also want to contact your professional association for guidance. Additionally, the Drug Enforcement Administration has approved various entities to provide the certification of electronic prescribing systems.

2. When does the electronic prescribing requirement go into effect?

2. When does the electronic prescribing requirement go into effect?

The Bureau of Professional Licensing’s (BPL) enforcement of the electronic prescribing standard will coincide with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) enforcement schedule for Part D prescription drug programs. As a result, BPL will initiate enforcement of Michigan’s new electronic prescribing standard on January 1, 2023.

The Bureau of Professional Licensing’s (BPL) enforcement of the electronic prescribing standard will coincide with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) enforcement schedule for Part D prescription drug programs. As a result, BPL will initiate enforcement of Michigan’s new electronic prescribing standard on January 1, 2023

3. Are there any exemptions to the law?

3. Are there any exemptions to the law?

MCL 333.17754a(5) provides a number of exemptions to the law. In addition, BPL will soon be accepting applications for a waiver of the electronic prescribing requirements. Listed exemptions in MCL 333.17754a(5) include:

MCL 333.17754a(5) provides a number of exemptions to the law. In addition, BPL will soon be accepting applications for a waiver of the electronic prescribing requirements. Listed exemptions in MCL 333.17754a(5) include:

(a) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who is a veterinarian licensed under Article 15 of the Public Health Code

(a) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who is a veterinarian licensed under Article 15 of the Public Health Code.

(b) If the prescription is issued under a circumstance in which electronic transmission is not available due to a temporary technological or electrical failure.

(b) If the prescription is issued under a circumstance in which electronic transmission is not available due to a temporary technological or electrical failure.

(c) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who has received a waiver from the department under MCL 333.17754a(7).

(c) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who has received a waiver from the department under MCL 333.17754a(7).

(d) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who reasonably believes that electronically transmitting the prescription would make it impractical for the patient who is the subject of the prescription to obtain the prescription drug in a timely manner and that the delay would adversely affect the patient's medical condition. A prescriber who does not electronically transmit a prescription under this subdivision shall document the specific reason for his or her belief that the delay would adversely affect the patient's medical condition.

(d) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who reasonably believes that electronically transmitting the prescription would make it impractical for the patient who is the subject of the prescription to obtain the prescription drug in a timely manner and that the delay would adversely affect the patient's medical condition. A prescriber who does not electronically transmit a prescription under this subdivision shall document the specific reason for his or her belief that the delay would adversely affect the patient's medical condition.

(e) If the prescription is orally prescribed under section 7333(3) or (4).

(e) If the prescription is orally prescribed under section 7333(3) or (4).

(f) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber to be dispensed outside of this state.

(f) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber to be dispensed outside of this state.

(g) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who is located outside of this state to be dispensed by a pharmacy located inside of this state.

(g) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who is located outside of this state to be dispensed by a pharmacy located inside of this state.

1 of 3

The Bulletin | December 2022 13 continued on page 14 Page 1 of 3
Page

(h) If the prescription is issued and dispensed in the same health care facility and the individual for whom the prescription is issued uses the drug exclusively in the health care facility. As used in this subdivision, "health care facility" includes, but is not limited to, any of the following:

(i) A hospital.

(ii) A hospice.

(iii) A dialysis treatment clinic.

(iv) A freestanding surgical outpatient facility.

(v) A skilled nursing facility.

(vi) A long-term care facility that provides rehabilitative, restorative, or ongoing skilled nursing care to an individual who is in need of assistance with activities of daily living.

(i) If the prescription contains content that is not supported by the National Council for Prescription Drug Programs Prescriber/Pharmacist Interface SCRIPT Standard.

(j) If the prescription is for a drug for which the FDA requires the prescription to contain content that cannot be transmitted electronically.

(k) If the prescription is issued under circumstances in which the prescriber is not required to include on the prescription a name of a patient for whom the prescription is issued including, but not limited to, a prescription issued under section 5110.

(l) If the prescription is issued by a prescriber who is prescribing the drug under a research protocol.

(m) If the prescription is dispensed by a dispensing prescriber.

(n) If the prescription is for a dialysis-related drug that is administered as part of or incident to a home-based dialysis treatment.

4. Are orally prescribed prescriptions still allowed?

Pursuant to MCL 333.17754a(5), an orally prescribed prescription for a controlled substance issued pursuant to MCL 333.7333(3) or (4) is exempt from the electronic prescribing requirement.

5. I am retired, have left active practice, or do not practice in Michigan at this time. Am I required to electronically prescribe?

MCL 333.17754a will soon require all prescribers, even those retired or not in active practice, to electronically transmit all controlled and non-controlled substance prescriptions unless otherwise exempt under the statute. In addition, BPL is accepting applications for a waiver of the electronic prescribing requirements.

6. I do not intend to prescribe, but I wish to maintain my license. Do I need to do anything to maintain my license under this new law?

A prescriber who does not plan to prescribe is not required to take any further action under the electronic prescribing law in order to maintain their license. The law will only apply when writing prescriptions.

7. What is involved in the rulemaking process for the electronic prescribing rules?

After the filing of a Request for Rulemaking, the rule set is considered to be open. During the rule promulgation process, BPL hosts rules committee work group meetings where the public is invited to participate in the creation of the revised draft. Further, as part of the promulgation process, rules sets are sent to a public hearing where the public is encouraged to make specific comments about the

14 The Bulletin | December 2022 continued from page 13 Page
2 of 3
continued on page 15

draft before it is sent to the legislature for review and final promulgation Both the Pharmacy General rules and the Controlled Substance rules have completed the promulgation process.

8. I am unable to meet the electronic prescribing requirements. How do I obtain a waiver?

BPL has created a form that can be used by prescribers who may fall into one of the narrow categories in the law and wish to apply for a waiver of the electronic prescribing requirements of MCL 333.17754a. The form can be found on our website. If you would like to apply for a waiver, complete the form and email it to bpldata@michigan.gov or mail it to PO Box 30670, Lansing, MI 48909. Please note that requests sent by postal mail will take longer to process than requests sent by email.

9. I already have an electronic prescribing system. Do I need to get a new system?

If you are already electronically prescribing, and your current system complies with the requirements in MCL 333.17754a(1) and (2), you do not need to change systems

10. How does this affect veterinary prescriptions?

The electronic prescribing requirements do not apply to veterinarians.

11. Is a faxed prescription considered an electronic prescription?

No, a faxed prescription is not considered an electronic prescription. Electronic prescriptions must comply with the requirements in MCL 333.17754a(1) and (2).

12. Do I need to apply for a waiver if I qualify for an exemption under the law?

If you qualify for an exemption under MCL 333.17754a, you do not need to apply for a waiver. If you do make use of an exemption under the law, it is important to clearly document that information in the medical record.

13. Does a pharmacist need to verify that a prescriber has a waiver or qualifies under an exemption prior to filling a prescription that has not been electronically transmitted?

No. A pharmacist who receives a prescription that was not transmitted electronically to the pharmacy may dispense the prescription without determining whether an exception under MCL 333.17754a(5) applies.

If you have any additional questions, please contact BPL at 517-241-0199 or BPLHELP@michigan.gov.

The Bulletin | December 2022 15 continued from page 14 Page

How to Write a Resolution to the MSMS House of Delegates

Saginaw County Medical Society | Michigan State Medical Society

https://www.msms.org/About-MSMS/House-of-Delegates

How to Write a Resolution to the MSMS House of Delegates

Introduction

The House of Delegates (HOD) is the official policymaking body of the Michigan State Medical Society (MSMS). Resolutions and Board Action Reports are the vehicles used to debate and determine the policies, priorities and direction of MSMS during the ensuing 12 months and beyond. Therefore, a well-crafted resolution is essential in order to present the most effective case for those issues that are of importance and concern to you.

All resolutions for which the “Resolved” state either MSMS or AMA existing policy will be placed on a "Reaffirmation Calendar" and voted upon at Sunday's session. A delegate can ask the Committee on Rules and Order of Business to extract a resolution from the Reaffirmation Calendar for referral to a reference committee. The Committee on Rules and Order of Business meets on Saturday morning prior to the opening of the House.

Please note, pursuant to adopted HOD Resolution 65-14, any resolutions "submitted to the MSMS HOD that require action by the AMA may only be submitted by MSMS members that are also members of the AMA."

The reference committees are responsible for listening to testimony on the rationale and merits of the submitted resolutions, discussing the issues raised for and against resolutions, and making recommendations to the HOD on the fate of the resolutions.

Process

All resolutions are to be submitted online at http://www. msms.org/hod.

To complete the online resolution form, simply fill out the required fields and hit the "submit" button. Persons completing the form will need to include the following information:

• Name, email, telephone number, affiliated organization, and county of the original author

• Resolution title

• The name of the person introducing the resolution and for whom the resolution is being introduced

• Resolution text

Resolutions are presented to the MSMS HOD by voting delegates on behalf of their county delegation, specialty society, ethnic medical society, MSMS membership section, or as individual delegates. In order to be considered as regular business of the HOD, resolutions must be submitted to MSMS by 5 p.m. on either March 1 or the next business day if March 1 falls on a Saturday or Sunday. Once received, resolutions are reviewed by MSMS staff for comparison to existing MSMS and AMA policy, legal considerations, and appropriate editing. They are then assigned numbers and referred to one of the six House reference committees or placed on the "Reaffirmation Calendar."

• Fiscal information (if applicable)

• Footnotes/Endnotes (if applicable)

Deadline

5 p.m. on March 1 (or the next business day if March 1 falls on a Saturday or Sunday)

Late Resolutions

Resolutions received after the deadline will be considered late resolutions and will be referred to the Committee on Rules and Order of Business which meets on Saturday morning.

16 The Bulletin | December 2022
continued on page 17 1

The Committee reviews any late resolutions on the following criteria:

• Could the resolution have been submitted before the deadline?

• Did new developments after the deadline justify the acceptance of the resolution?

• Were there any extenuating circumstances?

• Are there any other resolutions that cover the same logic?

If the Committee on Rules and Order of Business agrees to accept a late resolution, the resolution will be immediately referred to one of the six reference committees for testimony and consideration later that morning. The final recommendation as to the resolution’s fate will be submitted to the House as part of the respective committee's report on Sunday.

If the Committee on Rules and Order of Business does not accept a late resolution, a delegate may ask to have the resolution extracted from the Report of the Committee on Rules and Order of Business on Sunday morning and present his or her arguments before the Committee of the Whole. If the House concurs with the Committee on Rules and Order of Business's recommendation to not accept the late resolution, there is no further recourse and the resolution will not be considered.

Structure of a Resolution

Title:

• Select a title that is brief and accurately reflects the action for which the resolution calls.

Body:

• Begin with the inclusion of one or more "whereas" statements.

• "Whereas" statements explain why the resolution is needed, provide documentation in support of the resolution (i.e., data, statistics, references), and contribute to the general understanding of the subject matter.

• "Whereas" statements lead into one or more "resolved" sections.

• "Resolved" sections define the "ask" or intent of the resolution (e.g., the author’s desired action).

• Because the HOD only adopts the "resolved" sections, each "resolved" section must be able to stand independent of the "whereas" statements.

o Example of an improperly written "resolved" statement, as the reader cannot readily identify the targeted issue(s), specific action requested, or to whom responsibility for acting upon the issue(s) is directed:

RESOLVED: That physicians need to know about the process and extent of diversion in the community and need to act as described above.

o Example of a properly written "resolved" statement in which the issue and "ask" are clearly stated:

RESOLVED: That MSMS actively educate physicians about the process and extent of prescribed opiate medication diversion in the community and urge the health care providers prescribing daily opiates in chronic pain patients to monitor those patients at a minimum with yearly quantitative urine drug screens.

Tips

Paying particular attention to the following will enhance your chances of drafting a successful resolution:

• Ensure the accuracy of information presented in the resolution.

• Determine whether the topic of the resolution is existing MSMS and/or AMA policy prior to submission.

o MSMS policy can be searched and accessed by clicking HERE

• MSMS policy manual addenda can be accessed by clicking HERE

o AMA policy can be searched and accessed by clicking HERE

• If the Resolved statement is already existing policy, the resolution will be placed on the "Reaffirmation Calendar."

• If the Resolved statement is consistent with existing policy, specifically state the amendment you want to that policy.

• If the Resolved statement is not consistent with existing policy, indicate that you want to replace the existing policy.

• Ensure that the desired intent or "ask" is clear.

• Consider whether the requested action is feasible (i.e., is it relevant to medicine and to what MSMS can reasonably affect).

The Bulletin | December 2022 17 continued on page 18 continued
from page 16

• Determine whether there are cost implications to the proposed policy, program, or action and if so, select an estimated cost range.

• Contact Joan Cramer at the Saginaw County Medical Society jmcramer@sbcglobal.net with your resolution idea. The proposed resolution will be placed on the agenda for the next SCMS board meeting, where it will be reviewed for relevance, content and support.

Contacts

MSMS staff is available to answer additional questions you may have. Please direct questions to Stacey Hettiger at 517-336-5766 or shettiger@msms.org

Thank you for your interest in helping to establish the business of the MSMS HOD. Please remember, only online resolutions will be accepted and they must be received by 5 p.m. on March 1 (or the next business day if March 1 falls on a Saturday or Sunday).

To search for resolutions submitted to the HOD by year, keyword, author, county, etc., click HERE

Now accepting referrals!

Adult Outpatient Psychiatry

Medicaid welcome!

GLBHC priority is to serve the underserved, uninsured, and underinsured. We offer transportation along with multiple other integrated services to address your patients’ needs like dental, laboratory and on-site pharmacy, and community health workers to address social disparities. This is our priority population and we do well serving them!

Who: Adults with mild to moderate mental health conditions

What: Outpatient psychiatry services When: Now!

Where: Davenport Location Bay City South Location 3023 Davenport Ave 690 S Trumbull St Saginaw, MI 48602 Bay City, 48708

How: To learn more about our new referral process, please contact Amra Bader, Behavioral Health Supervisor at (989) 9072765 or abader@glbhealth.org

Of Special Note: GLBHC is not a crisis intervention program. If patient is currently suicidal/homicidal/danger to self or others, please seek emergency intervention for them by contacting your local Community Mental Health or sending to the Emergency Room

*Saginaw Community Health Mental Health Authority (800) 233-0022

*Bay Arenac Behavioral Health (800) 327-4693

APPLICATIONS FOR MEMBERSHIP

FIRST READING: Applications for membership for first reading at the January 17, 2023, Board Meeting:

Houman Nourkeyhani, MD (Covenant Cancer Care Center)

Specialty:

Internal Medicine – Board Certified 2014 Medical Oncology – Board Certified 2017 Hematology – Board Certified 2018

Medical School: Ross University School of Medicine, Dominica, West Indies, 2010

Internship: Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, 2010-11

Residency: Albany Medical College, Internal Medicine, 2011-14

Fellowship: Roswell Park Cancer Institute/University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, Hematology and Medical Oncology, 2014-17

Sponsors: Doctors Syed Hassan and Binu Malhotra

Michael J. Opperman, MD (CMU Health – Psychiatry) Specialty: Psychiatry – Board Eligible Medical School: Michigan State University – College of Human Medicine, 2018 Residency: Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 2018-22

Sponsors: Doctors Kai Anderson and Furhut Janssen

Nishtha Sareen, MD (Ascension St. Mary’s Riverfront Cardiology/MCVI) Specialty: Cardiology – Board Certified 2015 Interventional Cardiology – Board Certified 2016 Medical School: Rabindra Nath Tagore Medical College, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India, 2007 Residency: North Shore LI Health System, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, Internal Medicine, 2012-15

Fellowship: St. Joseph Mercy Oakland Hospital, Pontiac, MI, General Cardiology, 2015 Fellowship: Mount Sinai Medical College, Icahn School of Medicine, New York, NY, Interventional Cardiology, 2016 Master’s in Public Health: University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV, 2020 Sponsors: Doctors Sarosh Anwar and Vipin Khetarpal

18 The Bulletin | December 2022 continued from page 17

Annual CMU CME SURVEY

It’s that time of year – would you please take two minutes to respond to our CME Survey and let us know, one way or the other, how we are doing in meeting your needs for lifelong learning? Your comments and suggestions are very welcome. Click HERE to take the survey or click on the QR code. Thank you! Survey closes 12/31/22

Tele-Mental Health Symposium Series 2023

Annual Report Now Available

The CMU College of Medicine produces an annual report to update external community partners and stakeholders, current and prospective students, and CMU employees on our progress during the prior academic year.

This year’s Annual Report for FY2122 celebrates the College of Medicine’s milestone of graduating more than 500 physicians, highlights the College’s outstanding education and research activities, and showcases the many ways the College continues to fulfill its mission.

Hard copies are available by contacting CMU College of Medicine communication team at cmedmarcom@cmich.edu.

The Bulletin | December 2022 19
Information courtesy of CMU College of Medicine and CMU Health
CMU Health Welcomes Drs. Rene and Wang to Saginaw CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly and actively strives to increase diversity and provide equal opportunity for all individual irrespective of gender identity or sexual orientation and including but not limited minorities, females, veterans and individuals with disabiliti MGX 20082 (3/21) Central Michigan University Tele-mental Health Symposium Series 2023 • Gain knowledge and expert insights on timely telemental health topics. Build capacity and connections for improving community access to mental health services. • Hear perspectives on the future of tele -health after COVID-19 and outlook for public health emergency flexibilities for 2023. • Learn about CMU tele-health initiatives including: • Preventing Suicide in Michigan Men (PRISMM). Broadband Rural Capacity Assessment. • Rural Tele-behavioral Health Outreach. S AVE THE DATE FREE VIRTUAL EVENT Registration Coming Soon Friday, Februar y 24, 2023 Noon-2 p m For more information contact ICCHW@cmich.edu Hosted by the CMU Interdisciplinary Center for Community Health and Wellness in collaboration with the Mid Central Area Health Education Center
All statements or comments in The Bulletin
of the writer, and not
the opinion of
THANK YOU, ADVERTISERS! The SCMS would like to thank our dedicated advertisers, old and new, for continuing to support publication of The Bulletin. When you have a need for a service, please consider our advertisers first! All Seasons Skin and Surgery Center Andersen Eye Associates Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital Barb Smith Suicide Resource & Response Network Covenant HealthCare Covenant Wound Healing Center Jan Hauck – Century 21 Healthway Compounding Pharmacy Lori Krygier Graphic Designer Melissa Morse - Bricks Real Estate Shields Chiropractic Wellspring Lutheran Services Home Health & Hospice
are those
necessarily
the Saginaw County Medical Society.

28th Annual Ascension St. Mary’s Foundation Cornette Ball Was a Huge Success!

Following a two-year hiatus, nearly 400 people attended the 28th Annual Ascension St. Mary’s Foundation Cornette Ball and honored neurosurgeon, Joseph Adel, MD, FAANS, as the recipient of the 2022 Spirit of St. Vincent Award.

An evening of celebration, friendship, food and entertainment was enjoyed by physicians, community leaders and associates. Stephanie J. Duggan, MD, Regional President & CEO, Mid/North Region, Ascension Michigan, bestowed the award to Dr. Adel at the gala. She also gave special recognition to the 2020 and 2021 Spirit of St. Vincent honorees, Medley A. Larkin, DO, and Steven T. McLean, MD, since an in-person event was not possible due to the pandemic.

Following an exquisite cocktail reception and dinner, Dr. Duggan highlighted the legacy of Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital as a center of excellence for stroke and neuroscience care which began under E. Malcolm Field, MD. She recognized Dr. Adel for his steadfast commitment to the ongoing advancement of neurosciences and dedication to continuous quality improvement in patient safety and quality of care. Under his leadership, Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital achieved comprehensive stroke center (CSC) accreditation from The Joint Commission - the highest recognition of its kind which distinguishes hospitals that have specific abilities to receive and treat the most complex stroke cases. Ascension St. Mary’s is the only hospital north of Flint, and one of only 13 hospitals in Michigan, to earn this designation.

“Dr. Adel is very deserving of the Spirit of St. Vincent Award. The dedication and compassion he has for people at a time when they are sick, injured and most vulnerable is nothing short of exceptional,” said Duggan. “He focuses on what is best for the patient and achieving the best outcomes. I am so proud to call him a colleague, friend and member of the Ascension St. Mary’s family.”

The Ascension St. Mary’s Foundation Cornette Ball has raised more than $3.2 million since its inaugural gala 28 years ago, according to Karen Stiffler, Chief Development Officer, Ascension Michigan Mid/North Foundations. Those funds

have supported the purchase of advanced technology and equipment, hospital renovations and the growth of programs and services. To see more photos, check out our Facebook page and be sure to like and share.

Two New Leaders Named Clark J. Headrick, DO, has been selected to serve as Interim Regional Chief Medical Officer of Ascension Michigan’s Mid/North Region, which includes Ascension Genesys Hospital, Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital, Ascension St. Joseph Hospital and Ascension Standish Hospital.

Dr. Headrick began his career with Ascension Michigan in 1995 as a pulmonary care and sleep medicine physician at Genesys Health System (now Ascension Genesys Hospital). He has held various leadership positions over the last 27 years including Medical Director of Reverence Home Health and Hospice Care, Ascension Genesys Hospital Medical Director of Clinical Informatics, Chief Medical Information Officer for Ascension Michigan’s Mid-Michigan Region, and most recently, Chief Medical Officer for Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital, Ascension St. Joseph Hospital and Ascension Standish Hospital.

Steven T. McLean, MD, has been selected to serve as Interim Chief Medical Officer of Ascension Michigan’s Northern Ministries including Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital, Ascension St. Joseph Hospital and Ascension Standish Hospital. Dr. McLean will report to Dr. Headrick.

Dr. McLean has been a member of the Ascension Michigan family for 24 years. He began his career at Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital as an emergency department physician, and has most recently served as Emergency Medicine Department Chairman, as well as, a member of the hospital’s Medical Executive Committee. Dr. McLean is also a member of the Emergency Medicine Residency Core Faculty at Central Michigan University, a position he has held since 2015.

Ascension Michigan Hosted Lung Cancer Screenings

November was Lung Cancer Awareness Month and several Ascension Michigan health centers held no-cost, low dose CT screening events. Ascension St. Mary’s Towne Centre, Ascension Standish Hospital, Ascension St. Joseph and Ascension Genesys Hospital held events in which 73 screenings were performed at the four locations, with more than 20 follow-up referrals made.

20 The Bulletin | December 2022 continued on page 22

Stroke care can’t wait

Get advanced care at Ascension St. Mary’s ERs and stroke center

When you experience signs of a stroke, it’s important to call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Ascension St. Mary’s emergency rooms provide early stroke intervention, and all of our ERs are connected to specialists at our Comprehensive Stroke Center, recognized for excellence in the care of stroke patients.

Through the latest technology, our team of stroke specialists collaborate on diagnosing your stroke in as little as seconds and deliver the care that’s right for you. We’re beside you from the ER through recovery and rehabilitation.

Find your closest ER location at ascension.org

If you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency or difficulty breathing, go directly to the ER or dial 911.

© Ascension 2022. All rights reserved.

According to the American Lung Association, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among men and women over the age of 55, exceeding colon, breast and prostate cancers combined. Most cases occur with no symptoms. If detected early, over 80% of lung cancer deaths could be prevented. A low-dose CT of the chest is one of the simplest screening exams that helps providers see abnormalities within the lungs before individuals may even notice symptoms, catching the cancer in the early stages when it is treatable.

Ascension Michigan Announces Director of Women’s Heart Program

Nishtha Sareen, MD, MPH, FACC, FSCAI, has been named Director of the Women’s Heart Program for Ascension Michigan. In her new statewide role, Dr. Sareen will extend her leadership responsibilities to the planning and program development of women’s cardiovascular services across our Michigan health ministries. Dr. Sareen is a practicing interventional cardiologist at Ascension St. Mary's Hospital, is an associate of the Ascension Medical Group Cardiovascular Institute, and currently directs the Women's Heart Clinic at Ascension Providence Hospital, Novi Campus.

22 The Bulletin | December 2022 continued from page 20
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The Michigan State Medical Society recently began a new chapter with the announcement that Tom George, MD, took on the role of Interim CEO of MSMS effective November 18, 2022.

As a long-time MSMS member, former state legislator, and practicing physician, Dr. George has the kind of unique expertise and experience that will make him an immediate and invaluable asset to MSMS and its member physicians across the state. Poised to provide leadership and direction from day one of his tenure, Dr. George intends to focus a great deal of his efforts on ensuring the association is meeting the needs of its members.

“I’ve been a practicing physician and member of MSMS for 37 years now,” said Dr. George. “And over the years, there’s been no question that MSMS has made a significant and positive difference in shaping our state’s health care landscape through its advocacy efforts on behalf of Michigan’s physicians and the patients they serve. I intend to see that this society continues to provide that same kind of value and service to its members. That effort will be rooted in building strong peer-to-peer, doctor-to-doctor relationships with current, prospective and former MSMS members throughout the state.”

His leadership comes at a fortuitous time for the society. With sweeping changes coming to Lansing’s political landscape, Dr. George’s decade of experience serving as an elected member of Michigan’s legislature will prove invaluable as MSMS works to position itself to best advocate for its members and promote the public health of Michigan’s citizens.

“Changing leadership in Lansing presents new challenges, but also new opportunities for this society to make a real difference in the ongoing efforts to implement policies that will positively impact Michigan physicians and patients,” said Dr. George. “And while the political landscape may be shifting, our fundamental goal of working to promote the health of citizens of Michigan remains unchanged.”

In addition to being a practicing physician at Kalamazoo Anesthesiology P.C., Dr. George also serves as Co-Chairman of the Department of Anesthesiology at the Western Michigan University Homer Stryker School of Medicine. He has previously served as president of the Kalamazoo County Medical Society, the Michigan Society of Anesthesiologists, and the Historical Society of Michigan. While serving as Interim CEO of MSMS, Dr. George will continue practicing on a limited, part-time basis.

MSMS Legislative Advocacy Alert

Tell Congress to Protect America’s Medicare Patients!

Physicians are facing another round of Medicare payment cuts by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Unless Congress acts by the end of the year, physician Medicare payments are planned to be cut by 8.42 percent in 2023 which would severely impede patient access to care due to the forced closure of physician practices and put further strain on those that remained open during the pandemic.

These scheduled cuts will come in the form of:

1. CMS has proposed a 4.42 percent cut for all physician services in 2023 to offset payment policy improvements in office and facility-based visits.

2. No inflationary update. Physicians are the only providers whose Medicare payments do not automatically receive an annual inflationary update; during this time of record inflation on the heels of a highly disruptive pandemic, this statutory flaw amplifies the impact of proposed payment cuts.

When adjusted for inflation, Medicare physician payments have dropped by 22 percent from 2001 to 2021. Physicians simply cannot afford to operate under the current payment system. Congress must reform the Medicare physician payment system to make it simpler, more reflective of realworld physician practice costs and more predictable for both physicians and CMS before it's too late!

Recently, Representatives Ami Bera, MD (D-CA) and Larry Bucshon, MD (R-IN) introduced H.R. 8800 the "Supporting Medicare Providers Act" to help address the flawed payment system and provide relief from the devastating cuts.

Click HERE to send a pre-written, editable letter to your lawmakers now!

Michigan for Advancing Collaborative Care Teams (MiACCT)

In 2021, MSMS founded Michigan for Advancing Collaborative Care Teams (MiACCT) . The growing coalition of health care providers and patient advocacy organizations are both united and committed to growing, strengthening and preserving the physician-led health care team. MiACCT was created to be proactive instead of reactive. We want a proven, time-tested and patient-centered health care model that is led by physicians and supported by the best trained and most qualified care team members. The Saginaw County Medical Society is proud to be a member of MiACCT.

The Bulletin | December 2022 23 continued on page 24
Kalamazoo Physician Tom George, MD, Named MSMS Interim CEO

MiACCT has drafted the Team Based Health Care Act legislation. Following is a proposed summary of the legislation expected to be introduced in early 2023:

• Requires that an APRN/PA shall only practice as part of a physician-led patient care team with specific responsibilities within the scope of their usual professional activities.

• Requires that an APRN/PA must maintain appropriate collaboration and consultation, as evidenced in a written or electronic practice agreement, with at least one patient care team physician. The practice agreement must include:

o A process between the APRN/PA and patient care team physician for communication, availability, and decision making when providing medical treatment to a patient. The process must utilize the knowledge and skills of the APRN/PA and patient care team physician based on their education, training and experience.

o The duties and responsibilities of the APRN/PA and patient care team physician. The APRN/PA and patient care team physician may not perform an act, task, or function that the APRN/PA or patient care team physician is not qualified to perform by education, training, or experience and that is not within the scope of the license held by the APRN/PA or patient care team physician.

o A provision for appropriate physician input wherever needed, such as in complex clinical cases and patient emergencies and for referrals.

o The practice agreement may require an APRN/PA to carry malpractice insurance.

• Requires an APRN/PA to disclose to the patient at the initial encounter that he or she is a licensed certified nursemidwife, clinical nurse specialist or certified nurse practitioner.

• An APRN/PA may prescribe a controlled substance; however, the practice agreement shall clearly state the controlled substances prescriptive practices of the APRN/ PA, including the controlled substances the APRN/PA is or is not authorized to prescribe.

MSMS Legislative Advocacy Alert

AMA Downcoding Resources

Effective January 1, 2021, major changes were made to the evaluation and management (E/M) services Current Procedural Terminology CPT® code set and reporting guidelines to reduce documentation burdens, simplify coding, and allow physicians to spend more time with patients. Unfortunately, some health plans are disputing E/M levels for submitted claims and implementing E/M downcoding programs that inappropriately—and often automatically, through claim editing algorithms—reduce payment for provided services.

The AMA has created a new resource to support physician practices in navigating such payer E/M downcoding programs. The document offers examples of downcoding scenarios, sample plan communications, guidance on reviewing remittance advice to identify downcoding, and documentation tips to support successful appeals. Also included are sample downcoding appeal letters, which are available in an editable format on the AMA website.

24 The Bulletin | December 2022 continued from page 23
Read previous issues of The Bulletin at www.SaginawCountyMS.com under the Bulletin tab

New Telehealth Suicide Prevention Toolkit Resource!

Preview the telehealth toolkit, developed by Central Michigan University. Your input will enhance and benefit the resources for service providers in Michigan!

Preventing Suicide in Michigan Men is a five-year, Centers for Disease Control grantfunded program aimed at reducing suicide in men ages 25 and older. To achieve this goal, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has implemented a comprehensive, multi-sector partnership and action plan that targets the male population in the state.

The Michigan PRiSMM project is being led by the MDHHS. By 2024, the statewide PRiSMM initiative will work to reduce the number of suicide deaths and attempts among men ages 25 and older by at least 10 percent. From 2014–2018, more than 6,700 Michiganders lost their lives to suicide. Two-thirds of the suicide deaths in Michigan are adult men.

CMU’s partnership with the PRiSMM initiative is to create and disseminate the toolkit and, in the process, cultivate a statewide training network for suicide prevention and telehealth.

For more information, sign up for an overview, or to give us feedback on the toolkit, please contact the CMU Interdisciplinary Center for Community Health and Wellness at icchw@cmich.edu.

CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly and actively strives to increase diversity and provide equal opportunity within its community. CMU does not discriminate against persons based on age, color, disability, ethnicity, familial status, gender, gender expression, gender identity, genetic information, height, marital status, national origin, political persuasion, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, race, religion, sex, sex-based stereotypes, sexual orientation, transgender status, veteran status, or weight (see http://www.cmich.edu/ocrie). 20237 MGX 100 qty (10/21)

The Bulletin | December 2022 25
Preview the PRiSMM Telehealth SP Toolkit: med.cmich.edu/prismmtoolkit or Scan QR Code

Covenant Takes It Up a Notch in Re-Accreditation as a Senior-Friendly ED

In 2019, Covenant received the Level III Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation (GEDA) from the American College of Emergency Physicians. In fall of 2022, the Covenant Emergency Care Center earned a Level II GEDA, a three-year accreditation at the next highest level.

“Covenant is one of only two hospitals in the State to be accredited as a Level II Geriatric Emergency Department,” says Risty T. Kalivas, DO, physician administrator for the Senior Emergency Care initiative at Covenant. “I am incredibly proud of our team for their constant pursuit of high-quality medical care for this vulnerable population; going to the next level for our patients and the community is so important.”

As an Accredited Geriatric Emergency Department, Covenant adheres to a protocol-driven approach to geriatric care to provide superior, tailored care. Seniors who visit the emergency department can be assured that the facility has the necessary expertise, equipment and personnel in place to provide optimal care.

Jill Toporski, Director of the Covenant Emergency Care Center, says, “We’re excited that our dedication to this population has been recognized and look forward to many more years of building the best geriatric emergency department. This accreditation really speaks to our mission of extraordinary care for every generation.”

The population of seniors in the United States has been growing steadily since 2011, which is the year the first Baby Boomers turned 65. Today individuals 65 and older represent 18.1 percent of Michigan’s population. By 2030 experts estimate that number will swell.

Approximately 18 of the Covenant Emergency Care Center’s 65 beds have been designated for elderly patients. In designing an emergency center to meet the distinct needs of older patients, physicians, nurses, and hospital leaders included best practices such as:

• Board-certified emergency doctors, nurses and residents with specialized training in the care of senior patients. Seniors not only feel comfortable, but also understood.

• Senior-friendly rooms keep patients comfortable while social work support, assessments and goals maximize independence.

• All medications are closely monitored to avoid interactions, and more.

In addition to the Senior Emergency Care Center, Covenant also has the region’s only specialized Pediatric Emergency Care Center. Learn more at www.CovenantHealthCare.

Covenant Earns 9th Straight 'A' for Patient Safety!

Covenant HealthCare has once again received an “A” Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade for fall 2022 — its NINTH consecutive "A." This national distinction recognizes the Covenant team’s achievements in protecting patients from preventable harm and error in the hospital.

“Nine straight A’s for patient safety and quality is a big deal,” says Michael W. Sullivan, MD, Vice President of Quality Improvement/Chief Medical Officer. “This showcases the dedication of every member on the Covenant Team, not just once or twice every few years, but consistently over time.”

The Leapfrog Group, an independent national watchdog organization, assigns an “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” or “F” grade to general hospitals across the country based on over thirty national performance measures reflecting errors, accidents, injuries and infections, as well as, systems hospitals have in place to prevent harm.

The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade is the only hospital ratings program based exclusively on hospital prevention of medical errors and harms to patients. The grading system is peer-reviewed, fully transparent and free to the public. Grades are updated twice annually, in the fall and spring.

To see full grade details for Covenant HealthCare and to access patient tips for staying safe in the hospital, visit HospitalSafetyGrade.org.

Covenant Medical Group Welcomes Dr. Mohammed Alkhateeb Joins Covenant Cardiology

Covenant HealthCare welcomes Mohammed Alkhateeb, MD, as a member of the Covenant Medical Group. Dr. Alkhateeb joins the Covenant Cardiology team as a Cardiologist. The office is located at 2750 Main Street, Suite 3, Marlette, MI 48453 and he can be reached at 989.635.4023.

Dr. Houman Nourkeyhani Joins Covenant Oncology

Covenant HealthCare welcomes Houman Nourkeyhani, MD, as a member of the Covenant Medical Group. Dr. Nourkeyhani joins the Covenant Oncology team specializing in Medical Oncology and Hematology. The office is located at 5400 Mackinaw, 5th Floor, Saginaw, MI 48604 and the team can be reached at 989.583.5060.

26 The Bulletin | December 2022 continued on page 27

from page 26

Dr. Susanna Zurecka Joins Covenant Hospital Medicine

Covenant HealthCare welcomes Susanna M. Zurecka, MD, as a member of the Covenant Medical Group. Dr. Zurecka joins the Covenant Hospitalist team. The office is located at 1447 North Harrison, Saginaw, MI 48602 and the team can be reached at 989.583.4220.

Thank You for Another Year of Caring for the Community

As we continue moving through post-pandemic years, Covenant HealthCare would like to thank all the local healthcare providers for your support and collaboration. Caring for the community in times like this is a true reminder of the importance of the oath we took, and we take seriously the responsibility of caring for critically ill patients from across more than 20 Michigan counties.

On behalf of the Covenant staff, administration, nursing leadership, support services, clinical teams, and most importantly, our patients, thank you for helping us and continue our mission of extraordinary care for every generation in the Great Lakes Bay Region and beyond.

From all of us at Covenant HealthCare, we wish you safe and happy holidays, followed by a joyous and healthy new year.

Please remember the family, friends and colleagues of those who passed away this year:

Ernie P. Balcueva, MD 2/14/22

Roy J. Gerard, MD 4/17/22

Sean Hoban, MD 3/25/22

Neil W. Love, MD 3/22/22

Padma Raju 5/7/22

Wife of Dr. Ramesh Raju

J. Eugene Rank, MD 8/27/22

Shiraz H. Shariff, MD 12/31/21

LaTonya J. Thomas-Robinson, MD 2/23/22

Jason M. White, MD 7/10/22

WE LEAD IN HEALING CHRONIC WOUNDS

What is Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy?

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is the administration of 100% oxygen in a pressurized environment. Diffusing oxygen throughout the body promotes angiogenesis, allowing a chronic wound to get the nutrient and oxygen rich blood it needs to heal. Specialized wound care, including HBOT, is often necessary for optimal treatment of chronic wounds. HBOT is an effective adjunctive therapy used in conjunction with advanced wound care. Along with proper attention to nutrition and other underlying medical problems, we achieve greater healing results. HBOT is a proven treatment for:

• Chronic Refractory Osteomyelitis

• Lower Extremity Diabetic Ulcers

• Radiation Cystitis/Proctitis or Radiation Necrosis

Covenant Wound Healing Center

“There are approximately 6.5 million patients in the U.S. suffering from chronic wounds (e.g. diabetic foot ulcers and pressure ulcers) and approximately 140,000 patients are hospitalized every year with new wounds. Currently, over 23 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes.”*

Covenant Wound Healing & Hyperbaric Medicine Center has a team of experts trained to evaluate your patient’s wound and develop a treatment plan. Using the most advanced technology and research, our wound care team can work with you and your patients to heal wounds quickly.

The Bulletin | December 2022 27 continued
*https://WWW.NCBI.NLM.NIH.GOV, article PMC6161627 • © 2021 Covenant HealthCare. All rights reserved. PK 5/21 13958 COVENANT WOUND HEALING & HYPERBARIC MEDICINE CENTER 900 Cooper, Saginaw, Michigan 989.583.4401 • covenanthealthcare.com
ONLY ACCREDITION IN MICHIGAN; SECOND IN THE U.S.
David Gustavison, DO Medical Director Anthony de Bari, MD, CWSP Mark Bullock, DPM Khalid Malik, MD Scott Byron, DPM, FAAPSM
IN
MEMORY - 2022

SVSU Dean Marcia Ditmyer to Lead Michigan Health Improvement Alliance Board

Dr. Catherine Baase becomes chair emerita, continues focus on population health

Marcia Ditmyer, dean of the Crystal M. Lange College of Health & Human Services at Saginaw Valley State University, is set to become chair of the board of the Michigan Health Improvement Alliance (MiHIA). Starting January 1, 2023, she will succeed Dr. Catherine Baase, who helped found MiHIA in 2007. Though stepping down as chair, Dr. Baase will remain involved as chair emerita and a board member.

MiHIA has a 29-member board composed of leaders in healthcare, public health, higher education, business, state, regional and community entities, faith-based organizations and nonprofits. The organization brings community partners together and helps secure funding to positively impact the culture of health and wellness, and as a result, economic sustainability. MiHIA serves 14 counties in central and eastern Michigan.

MiHIA supports community partner initiatives such as those that educate older adults on the safety of using multiple medications and teach pregnant women to monitor fetal health. Other efforts support medical professionals working to alleviate life-threatening mistakes in care, and efforts to improve access to healthy food.

Ditmyer has more than 40 years of experience as a healthcare professional. At SVSU, she leads a college that offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in programs such as nursing; social work; kinesiology; health sciences, including health administration and leadership; and occupational therapy.

Caduceus Meeting for Recovering Health Care Professionals

Third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m.

Zion Lutheran Church

545 7th Street, Freeland, Michigan

(Behind Pat’s Grocery Store on Midland Road in Freeland)

Caduceus meetings are available to health care industry professionals, and have adopted many of the principles of 12-Step programs.

Caduceus meetings are “closed” meetings for recovering health care professionals including, but not limited to, nurses, doctors, dentists and pharmacists.

We engage in group discussions where members may want to speak up, ask questions or share thoughts with fellow members.

Dr. Baase’s quest to transform health began in family medicine and led to a 32-year career at Dow where, for 20 years, she served as their chief health officer with broad-based leadership worldwide. “I’ve always looked at how we can improve the health and well-being of people in the greatest number, to the greatest extent possible,” she said. “I have been honored to participate with and learn from some of the greatest leaders in the country across the landscape of health, including healthcare delivery, public health, health promotion and health policy. It has been extraordinary to be part of the national thought leadership, planning, research and case making, while also being grounded in real work at the grassroots level.”

In addition to Ditmyer and Baase’s new roles, the Rev. Craig Tatum, pastor of New Life Missionary Baptist Church Ministries, will become secretary of the board. Tatum succeeds Sandra Lindsey, chief executive officer of the Saginaw County Community Mental Health Authority, who has served in the secretary role for many years.

“Dr. Baase had the foresight to establish MiHIA as a backbone organization and will always be a powerful advocate for the health and well-being of entire populations,” said Dr. George Kikano, vice chair of the MiHIA board and Central Michigan University vice president for health affairs and dean of the CMU College of Medicine. “I’m glad she will continue to be involved as a board member. She, Marcia Ditmyer and Rev. Tatum are champions for residents across the 14-county region and know that by advancing health, we advance communities,” Kikano said.

GUEST WRITERS

WELCOME!

If you would like to write an article of interest to your colleagues for publication in a future issue of The Bulletin, please contact Joan Cramer at jmcramer@sbcglobal.net for further information.

Articles are not designed for self-promotion, but rather as information for members.

28 The Bulletin | December 2022

Health care professionals are not immune to substance abuse or mental health disorders. Many otherwise highly qualified professionals may develop these problems due to stress, long hours, a genetic predisposition, or a tendency to self-medicate.

To assist health care professionals impaired by these disorders, consider the care monitoring services of the Health Professional Recovery Program (HPRP).

The Michigan HPRP was established by legislation in 1993 to assist impaired professionals before their actions harm a patient or damage their careers through disciplinary action. Any licensed or registered health care professional in the State of Michigan is eligible to participate in the program.

To maintain participant confidentiality, the HPRP is operated by a private-sector contractor under the authority of the Health Professional Recovery Committee (HPRC), a committee comprised of a representative from each of the health professional licensing boards. The

Michigan Department of Community Health, Bureau of Health Professions provides administrative services to the HPRC.

Participation in the HPRP is confidential. If a licensee/ registrant is referred to the program, has a qualifying diagnosis and complies with the HPRP requirements, his/her name will not be disclosed to state regulatory authorities or the public. Provided there is no readmission, records of HPRP participants are destroyed five years after successful completion.

Referrals to the HPRP may come in the form of a selfreferral from a licensee/registrant or from colleagues, partners, employers, patients, family members or the State. Any of the 20 health professional licensing boards may also refer licensees/registrants to the HPRP for monitoring as a condition to regain or retain their license to practice. The names of individuals reporting a licensee/registrant suspected of impairment are also kept confidential.

For more information on the HPRP, call 1-800-453-3784 or visit www.HPRP.org. Informational presentations on the HPRP are available to employers and health professional groups at no charge. Call the toll-free number to arrange a presentation at your facility.

The Bulletin | December 2022 29
TO MAKE A REFERRAL OR SELF REPORT, CALL 1-800-453-3784
Jan HauckASSOCIATE BROKER Mary Knoll REALTOR R 5580 State St, #4, Saginaw, MI 48603 HAPPY HOLIDAYS 30 The Bulletin | December 2022 ADVERTISER INDEX When you have a need for a service, please consider our dedicated advertisers first! All Seasons Skin and Surgery Center 24 Andersen Eye Associates 12 Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital 21 Barb Smith Suicide Resource & Response Network 22 Covenant Health Care 2 Covenant Wound Healing Center 27 Jan Hauck – Century 21 30 Healthway Compounding Pharmacy 22 Lori Krygier Graphic Designer 12 Melissa Morse – Bricks Real Estate 15 Shields Chiropractic 29 Wellspring Lutheran Services Home Health 10 & Hospice The SCMS would like to thank our dedicated Key Providers, old and new, for continuing to provide support for SCMS Membership Meetings. When you have a need for a service, please consider our Key Providers! Thank You Key Providers!

10 FACTS ABOUT PHYSICIAN SUICIDE AND MENTAL HEALTH

1. Suicide generally is caused by the convergence of multiple risk factors — the most common being untreated or inadequately managed mental health conditions.

2. An estimated 300 physicians die by suicide in the U.S. per year.1

3. Physicians who took their lives were less likely to be receiving mental health treatment compared with nonphysicians who took their lives even though depression was found to be a significant risk factor at approximately the same rate in both groups.2

4. The suicide rate among male physicians is 1.41 times higher than the general male population. And among female physicians, the relative risk is even more pronounced — 2.27 times greater than the general female population.3

5. Suicide is the second-leading cause of death in the 24–34 age range (Accidents are the first).4

6. Twenty-eight percent of residents experience a major depressive episode during training versus 7–8 percent of similarly aged individuals in the U.S. general population.5

7. Among physicians, risk for suicide increases when mental health conditions go unaddressed, and self-medication occurs as a way to address anxiety, insomnia or other distressing symptoms. Although self-medicating, mainly with prescription medications, may reduce some symptoms, the underlying health problem is not effectively treated. This can lead to a tragic outcome.

8. In one study, 23 percent of interns had suicidal thoughts. However, among those interns who completed four sessions of web-based cognitive behavior therapy, suicidal ideation decreased by nearly 50 percent.6

9. Drivers of burnout include workload, work inefficiency, lack of autonomy and meaning in work, and work-home conflict.

10. Unaddressed mental health conditions, in the long run, are more likely to have a negative impact on a physician’s professional reputation and practice than reaching out for help early.

SOURCES

1. Center, C., Davis, M., Detre, T., Ford, D. E., Hansbrough, W., Hendin, H., Laszlo, J., Litts, D.A., Mann, J., Mansky, P.A., Michels, R., Miles, S.H., Proujansky, R., Reynolds, C.F. 3rd, Silverman, M. M. (2003). Confronting Depression and Suicide in Physicians. JAMA, 289(23), 3161. doi:10.1001/jama.289.23.3161

2. Gold, K. J., Sen, A., & Schwenk, T. L. (2013). Details on suicide among US physicians: Data from the National Violent Death Reporting System. General Hospital Psychiatry, 35(1), 45-49. doi:10.1016/j. genhosppsych.2012.08.005

3. Schernhammer, E. S., & Colditz, G. A. (2004). Suicide Rates Among Physicians: A Quantitative and Gender Assessment (Meta-Analysis). American Journal of Psychiatry AJP, 161(12), 2295-2302. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.161.12.2295

4. CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. (2015). 10 Leading Causes of Death by Age Group, United States - 2014 Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/injury/images/lc-charts/ leading_causes_of_death_age_group_2014_1050w760h.gif

5. Mata, D. A., Ramos, M. A., Bansal, N., Khan, R., Guille, C., Angelantonio, E. D., & Sen, S. (2015). Prevalence of Depression and Depressive Symptoms among Resident Physicians. JAMA, 314(22), 2373. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.15845

6. Guille, C., Zhao, Z., Krystal, J., Nichols, B., Brady, K., & Sen, S. (2015). Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention for the Prevention of Suicidal Ideation in Medical Interns. JAMA Psychiatry, 72(12), 1192. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.1880

afsp.org

2022 KEY PROVIDERS

CALENDAR OF MEETINGS AND EVENTS FOR 2023*

REGISTER NOW!

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - Horizons Conference Center, 6200 State Street, Saginaw Board Meeting - 5:30 p.m. Membership Meeting Joint with the Saginaw County Dental Society - Social (cash bar) at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner, meeting and program at 7 p.m. Speakers - Monica Lamble DDS, Nishtha Sareen MD and Claudia C. Zacharek MD

Topic - "The Link Between Oral, Cardiac and Systemic Health” Online reservations are required

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A RESERVATION or scan the QR Code

IN CASE OF EXTREME WEATHER THAT WOULD NECESSITATE CANCELLATION OF THE MEETING, PLEASE CHECK YOUR EMAIL/TEXT MESSAGES FOR NOTICE

FROM THE SCMS AFTER 2 P.M. ON THE DAY OF THE SCHEDULED MEETING

Tuesday, February 21, 2023 - CMU College of Medicine, 1632 Stone Street, Saginaw Board Meeting - 5:30 p.m. There is no Membership Meeting in February.

Tuesday, March 21, 2023 - Via Zoom Board Meeting - 6:30 p.m. (Note time change) There is no Membership Meeting in March.

Tuesday, April 18, 2023 - Horizons Conference Center, 6200 State Street, Saginaw Board Meeting - 5:30 p.m.

Membership Meeting - Social (cash bar) at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner, meeting and program at 7 p.m.

Topic - Inspirational TED Talks

Email meeting notices will be sent in early April. Online reservations are required.

Saturday-Sunday, April 22-23, 2023 - The Henry in Dearborn - 158th Annual MSMS House of Delegates

Tuesday, May 16, 2023 - Horizons Conference Center, 6200 State Street, Saginaw Board Meeting - 5:30 p.m.

Annual SCMS and SCMS Foundation Membership Meetings Social (cash bar) at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner, meetings and program at 7 p.m. Email meeting notices will be sent in early May.

Online reservations are required

12th Annual SCMS Foundation Golf Outing – date TBD

All statements or comments in The Bulletin are those of the writer, and not necessarily the opinion of the Saginaw County Medical Society.

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID Saginaw, MI 48605 PERMIT #52 350 ST. ANDREWS ROAD | SUITE 242 SAGINAW, MI 48638-5988
These Area Businesses Support Saginaw County Medical Society Membership Meetings. When you have a need for a service, please consider our Key Providers.
ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED Joan Cramer/SCMS | Office 790-3590 | Fax 331-6720 | Cell 284-8884 | jmcramer@sbcglobal net | www.SaginawCountyMS.com
*subject to change