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Open the Door to Christ S C M I N I S T RY F O U N D AT I O N 2 0 1 1 A nnua l R e p ort


”Behold, I stand at the door and knock; if anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will enter and we will eat together” (R evelat ion 3:30)

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hy was Christ knocking? According to scripture scholar Raymond Brown, it was because of complacency in early Christian society. The people of the Church of Laodicea, dating back between A.D. 92 and 96, were “conforming in an unprincipled way to the surrounding society,” Brown explains. They had become lukewarm, and in Revelation we read they claimed to be rich and affluent, with no need of anything. They did not realize that they were “wretched, pitiable, poor, blind, and naked” (Revelation 3:17). Christ, the true witness, is the one knocking, reproving, and chastising those Christ loves, calling them to be earnest and repent. Christ advises them, “buy from me gold refined by fire, that you may become rich; and white garments, that you may clothe yourself, and that the shame of your nakedness may not be revealed; and eye salve to anoint your eyes, that you may see.” Complacency is self satisfaction or gratification accompanied by an unawareness of dangers and deficiencies. In political debate this year, The Path to Prosperity cautioned that our nation’s safety net “should never become a hammock, lulling able-bodied citizens into lives of complacency and dependency.” Could it be that we often see in others what we cannot see in ourselves?

Doors enable our complacency by keeping people invisible, silent, and locked out of civil and respectful engagement. Distractions keep us from hearing the knock that leads us to inclusion at our Eucharistic table, from being earnest and receptive to a love that opens loneliness to aloneness and complacency to passion for the common good. Christ’s knocking invites us to decisions and choices that renew our minds, hearts and the face of the earth! Is Christ knocking at the door of our organization, our religious community, our Church, our society, our political beliefs, our minds and hearts? How are we responding – are we empowering those we serve, recognizing their assets, human dignity and shared membership in our society, or have we begun to


Our 2011 Annual Report reveals people and organizations who are willing to “open the door” to Christ calling us. Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) unlocks fear and judgment and clothes it in a zealous fight for immigrants’ and migrants’ shared membership in society and comprehensive immigration reform. The Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) sustains the knocking of Christ in minds and hearts to love as we have been loved. Will we, too, abandon rugged individualism and self-sufficiently and open the door to ethical imperatives and eternal happiness? By opening their doors for 30,312 elementary students in 2011, the Archdiocese of Cincinnati and the Catholic Inner-City Education Fund (CISE) opened human flourishing through Catholic education that seeks to maximize potential and moral formation of each child. St. James School and Parish in Bay City, Mich. share this mission and open the door to solidarity by ensuring resources for their community, which suffers a nearly ten percent unemployment rate, above the national average. Will we recognize that the unemployed want to work, the underemployed want to be challenged and the wealthy must share the sacrifice? DePaul Cristo Rey High School, a new Catholic school for students below a certain income, is opening doors to careers and college preparatory education. Will we join in opening these doors, like the corporations that are providing jobs to DePaul Cristo Rey students? conform to society, seeing people as commodities, markets or burdens? Are we opening the door to Christ’s richness and vision for community and total reliance on God, or are our daily choices focused on greed, smugness and self-sufficiency? Are we opening the door to a discipleship that calls us beyond charity to justice?

Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton tells us, “How we will laugh when we look behind, at the troubles we have endured and which will then appear in their true light. And that bright and glorious cross which we now drag through the mud and dirt, how beautiful and lovely it will appear when we find it opens the door of our eternal happiness to us.”

During the 25 years after World War II, the wealthy paid taxes well over 50 percent of earnings, enabling middle class expansion and economic growth.

We pray that our Annual Report will provide stories and reflections that help us take up and endure our cross together and remain vigilant in opening the door to our eternal happiness!

In our society, Church and organizations today, who is winning and losing, who is deciding and are we complacently colluding? Do we hear Christ knocking and are we willing to open the door?

Sister Sally Duffy, SC President and Executive Director SC Ministry Foundation 3


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God, we pray that the doors that are locked tight by fear and

judgment are opened. Give us the courage to walk through the doors, to meet and share a meal with an immigrant and experience Christ and give thanks to God at our shared Eucharistic table. Lord, push open the doors that are barriers to comprehensive immigration reform. As you penetrated the locked door of the disciples after the Resurrection, penetrate the doors of our hearts so we can see the God-given dignity of every person and cherish the gift of citizenship that can exemplify Your way, truth, and life. Amen.


Strengthening Diocesan Response to Immigration

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) Washington, DC

www.cliniclegal.org

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hile media attention has focused on the 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, nearly eight million immigrants are legal permanent residents eligible to naturalize, and an unknown number are eligible for immigration relief because they are victims of crime. Often, these immigrants seek legal assistance from unauthorized practitioners of immigration law (notarios), usually with disastrous consequences. These factors, combined with an increase in local and state anti-immigration actions, make it critical to build or expand competent charitable legal services. That is why Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) is increasing the number of certified professionals and organizations that offer legal services to low-income and vulnerable immigrants. With over 200 affiliated immigration programs across the country, CLINIC is the nation’s leader in providing assistance to charitable legal service organizations. CLINIC helps existing programs enhance service delivery and ensures start-up programs develop best practices. In recent years, CLINIC worked intensely with Catholic Charities of Tennessee, Colorado Springs, Las Cruces, N.M. and Southwestern

Ohio. Each achieved BIA (Board of Immigration Appeals) recognition and staff accreditation, developed wide-ranging business plans and built stronger programs.

“The BIA recognition and staff accreditation allows us to finish what we start,” says Rod Huber with the Refugee Resettlement Program of Catholic Charities of Southwestern Ohio.

CLINIC’s latest project, Strengthening Diocesan Response to Immigration, will be in four states that combined have 1.16 million legal permanent residents eligible for naturalization. The organizations in the project include Catholic Charities of Indianapolis, Syracuse, Toledo, and Worcester. Maria Odom, executive director of CLINC, says the project will result in legal services that enable immigrants to better support their families, reunite with loved ones and secure their legal status, helping refugees and immigrant communities become more fully integrated members of their communities. “We expect immigrants to be not only defended and represented,” says Odom, “but also blended as contributing members of their chosen communities.” 5


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Lord, we ask that You never stop knocking at the door of our minds and hearts. We

pray in gratitude for the leaders of women religious communities and all leaders. May we, too, open the door to our leadership potential and growth and shed our complacency to become persons in community who not only speak but act. May our actions become the knocking on the mind and hearts of others to open the door for the common good. Amen.

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omen religious life is in the midst of enormous transformation. Some of the elements of this transformation include an aging demographic, fewer younger sisters, and fewer financial resources.

The questions facing women religious include: How do we use the great wisdom of our older members?, How do we make decisions that best utilize our young members’ energy?, and What is the world calling us to be today?

The Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR), an association of the leaders of congregations of Catholic women religious in the United States, has developed the Leadership Development Project to help elected leaders proactively find meaningful ways into the future. It is a new endeavor that, based in sound theology with guidance from Washington Theological Union, will give elected leaders skills to envision and manage change, all while mentoring future leaders.


Leadership Development of Women Religious

Leadership Conference of Women Religious Silver Spring, MD www.lcwr.org

LCWR has more than 1500 members who represent more than 90 percent of the 59,000 women religious in the United States. It is LCWR’s mission is to assist its members to carry out their leadership service and further the Gospel mission in today’s world. Sr. Annmarie Sanders, IHM, Director of Communications for LCWR, explains that while uncertainty about women religious’ future is difficult, it is also an opportunity for sisters to keep other people’s vision and hope alive. “Some of the changes facing women religious are similar to the changes the whole world is dealing with, including the experience of ‘downsizing’ and economic hardships. The question is how can we, women religious, live in a way that helps others going through serious and similar struggles?”

Women & Spirit: Catholic Sisters in America Throughout history, women religious have helped the world through serious struggles. As Cokie Roberts, senior news analyst for National Public Radio, puts it, “Over the centuries these courageous women overcame many obstacles—both physical and cultural—to bring their civilizing and caring influence to every corner of the country.” Roberts’ comments are part of the traveling history exhibit Women & Spirit: Catholic Sisters in

The DVD Women & Spirit: Catholic Sisters in America, which has a film study guide, is now available for order from the Women & Spirit website by going to www.womenandspirit.org/dvd

America, a major project sponsored by LCWR that has provided the public the opportunity to explore the rich heritage and influence of Catholic women religious in the United States.

Women & Spirit: Catholic Sisters in America will be at the Center for History in association with the University of Notre Dame and St. Mary’s College from Sept. 2, 2011 to Dec. 31, 2011. To find out more about the Women & Spirit Exhibit, visit www.womenandspirit.org.

For the past two and a half years, Women & Spirit has traveled to museums across the country, including the Smithsonian and Ellis Island Immigration Museum, illustrating to nearly one million visitors how sisters have participated in nearly every important event in American history. The exhibit tells the story of sisters arriving in the United States; journeying to the west; opening schools, orphanages and hospitals; and giving “quiet courage” through dramatic moments in U.S. history, including the Civil War, the Civil Rights Movement and Hurricane Katrina. In summer 2011, LCWR completed Women & Spirit: Catholic Sisters in America the DVD, a documentary based on the exhibit and narrated by Roberts. 7


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elp us to recognize the doors that block our willingness to make better choices

about how we use our time, energy, talents, and treasures. Am I willing to turn off the television and help a child to read or forego a latte and give a child tuition assistance? Am I willing to support vouchers so children can receive a better education and moral development in a Catholic school? Am I willing to pray for the children of a particular school every day for a year? Lord, show me the door I need to open. Amen.

Archdiocese of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH www.catholiccincinnati.org

Coordinator of Latino Outreach for Catholic Schools

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erving Latino families in Catholic schools presents both opportunities and challenges: the opportunity to serve a growing and vibrant Latino population and the challenge to assist school pastors, administrators and teachers in creating a welcoming environment. The new position of Coordinator of Latino Outreach for Catholic Schools for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati will reach out to Latino families and bridge this gap between Catholic schools and their Latino neighbors and help schools that have the desire to recruit and teach Latino students, but have concerns related to language and cultural barriers.

The newly hired coordinator, Mayra Alza, will provide central support for administrative and teaching staff, focusing exclusively on assisting schools with recruiting and supporting Latino families.


Catholic Education: Educating the Whole Student

Catholic Inner-city Schools Education Fund (CISE)

Cincinnati, OH www.catholiccincinnati.org/ministries-offices/cise-catholic-inter-city-schools-education-fund

Summer School

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ach summer, St. Joseph School principal Dionne Thompson welcomes more than 80 local students from the Catholic Inner-city Schools Education Fund (CISE) schools to St. Joseph. Her goal: to have 90 percent of all students reading and performing math skills at or above grade level by summer’s end and to have 60 percent of students promoted to the next grade level at the end of next school year. With the help of Archdiocese of Cincinnati and CISE staff, Thompson organizes a comprehensive

reading and math program and collaborates with other CISE school teachers, the College of Mount St. Joseph, and Whole Again International, which provides meals for students. In the future, Thompson wants to make room not just for students needing remediation, but enrichment. “Every day when I greet parents and guardians in the drive, I see other kids in their back seat. I want to open up Summer School to them, too,” Thompson says. “We need to celebrate all of them, and build on our strengths.”

Cincinnati Museum Center www.cincymuseum.org

Field Trips and Outreach Programs for CISE Schools

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useum experiences have a positive, potentially major, impact on students. Research shows that museums elicit powerful emotions in children, create memorable learning experiences, reinforce existing knowledge, and encourage positive attitudes toward science. Some students may never experience out-of-classroom learning due to tight school budgets, something teachers at the CISE schools contend with every year. Through a partnership with the Cincinnati Museum Center and with the support of SC Ministry Foundation, CISE students participate in high quality, interactive and dynamic enrichment programs at the Museum and through the Museum’s Programs-on-Wheels.

The field trips and outreach programs reach 900 CISE school students each year, and teachers consistently report on how well the students understand the material presented, especially for those with different learning styles. Teachers also indicate that students perform better in school following museum visits and programs. 9


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e walk through many doors in our

life. Lord, help us to become more aware and sensitive to the needs of others, and lead us to open doors of giving and receiving. Help us to receive Your grace to transform our lives of self-sufficiency and independence to complete reliance on You and the gifts of mutuality and interdependence. May our families and

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he Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati arrived in Bay City, Mich. 138 years ago to serve at St. James Elementary School and Parish. In the last two years, the school and parish have seen significant change as the economy in Michigan plummeted and at one point reached 15 percent unemployment. Sr. Maureen Donovan, SC has served St. James since 1967 as principal, teacher, religious education director, and now as pastoral assistant. A few years ago when Sr. Maureen noticed more people coming to the parish for food and gas cards, she was deeply affected and after praying about it, began an emergency assistance program.

communities provide a safe and peaceful environment for all children to maximize their potential, opening the doors of their hearts so that they, too, may experience Christ’s love and share it with others. Amen.

Sr. Maureen Donovan, SC helps parishioners at St. James in Bay City through emergency assistance.


Sharing God’s Gifts Emergency Assistance for the Poor

St. James Elementary School St. James Parish Bay City, MI www.bacschools.org/stjames www.stjamesofbaycity.com Sr. Maureen gives vouchers for hotels, food, gas, and sometimes tuition for parents who are tempted to take their kids out of St. James School. “The economy has caused people to fall through the crack,” says Sr. Maureen. “This support is not always available to people who do not have a food card or a social worker. These are people who have a need during a period of time.” Two other Sisters of Charity, Julie Gatza and Pat Wlock, minister at St. James School. The poverty at St. James School has increased from 30 percent to 80 percent in the last six years because of the job market. Sr. Julie, principal of St. James School, started Sharing God’s Gifts, an assistance program that relieves families of economic hardships. “It keeps homes healthy places, not filled with tension,” Sr. Julie says. “It encourages families to help other people, and solidifies our Christian values … We spread Christ that way, and that’s so important.”

“As Sisters of Charity, I think we demonstrate to the less fortunate that God is mindful of them. Through our actions, God’s love becomes real to them. I have always been concerned that the blessings of my life will blind me to lives that have such high needs. I pray that I always be available to God and what he wants me to do.”

The Sisters absorbed examples of giving and receiving when they were younger. Sr. Maureen recalls, “One superior we had was giving things away out of our back door, while people in the neighborhood were ringing the front door to bring more things to give away. This is how we became aware and sensitive to the needs of others.”

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15 Celebrating 15 Years

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his year SC Ministry Foundation celebrates fifteen years as a public grant making organization. As Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton wrote, “Devotion must carry the torch and open the door to all our actions.” Many doors have been opened

through a total of $121,214,225 in grantmaking since the Foundation’s beginning. We thank SC Ministry Foundation’s Board and Board Committees for “turning the knob” to the many doors that have been opened and the difference it has made.

A Look at the Past 5 Years

Doors to Careers and Education DePaul Cristo Rey High School www.depaulcristorey.org

DePaul Cristo Rey is a new high school in Cincinnati sponsored by the Sisters of Charity. It is the first Catholic high school in Cincinnati to use the national best practice Cristo Rey model, which is uniquely designed for families who could not otherwise afford a Catholic education. By sending students to work at local Corporate Partners one day a week in entry level positions, DePaul Cristo Rey’s students earn tuition and gain exposure and experience. DePaul Cristo Rey opened June 2011 with training sessions to prepare students for their first day of school and work. With 26 Corporate Partners and 90 students, DePaul Cristo Rey opened with the highest numbers of any new school in Cristo Rey network’s history!

Doors to Recovery and Healing New Orleans Recovery Project

Earlier this year, St. Mary’s Academy, the first Catholic elementary school for African American girls in New Orleans and founded by the Sisters of the Holy Family of New Orleans, celebrated the opening of its new state-of-the-art building on its original campus, where St. Mary’s will continue its co-ed elementary and a middle and high school for young women. “With the vision, hope and courage derived from the events following Hurricane Katrina, we found ourselves able to face the monumental tasks that were ahead and which brought us here today,” said the school’s president, Sr. Clare of Assisi Pierre, SFF at the school’s dedication. In addition to funding the coordinator’s salary of the New Orleans Recovery Project of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) and Foundations and Donors Interested in

Catholic Activities (FADICA), which raised over seven million dollars to help restore ministries of women religious after Hurricane Katrina, SC Ministry Foundation also gave focused support to eight congregations of women religious in New Orleans. The Foundation also supported a little over 40 other organizations. Given the significant impact and damages of Hurricane Katrina and the flooding, a few organizations continue to receive funding, such as: Catholic Charities’ Operation Helping Hands and Providence Community Housing, Daughters of Charity Services of New Orleans and St. Mary’s Academy.


of SC Ministry Foundation Doors to Human Flourishing Catholic Schools in Price Hill

For many students, a Catholic education is the only opportunity to receive a quality education that develops the whole person. Price Hill’s Catholic schools are places where students know they are safe, loved and can maximize their potential, thanks to initiatives like the counselor and social worker programs at Holy Family, Resurrection, St. Lawrence, and St. William schools and the Summer Learning Camp. With the help of the College of Mount St. Joseph, Seton High School, Whole Again International, and other partners, the Summer Learning Camp during the last five years has closed the academic achievement gap created during summers and has given students a life-long love of learning.

Doors to Christ’s Vision for Community Price Hill

Price Hill is a neighborhood positioned for transformative change as a result of the last five year’s comprehensive community development efforts led by Price Hill Will (PHW), Santa Maria Community Services and many other organizations that have empowered the community to change its future. PHW rehabilitated and sold dozens of single family homes and improved major neighborhood and business corridors. PHW engages residents and addresses the systemic problems, such as becoming the first community development corporation in the nation, with the help of Legal Aid Society of Greater Cincinnati, to sue banks for failure to maintain foreclosed properties.

Santa Maria and PHW are among lead partners of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program in Price Hill, returning 2.1 million dollars in tax credits to working families. Last year, a network of community agencies including Santa Maria and Good Samaritan Hospital piloted a medical home for uninsured and non-Medicaid/Medicare eligible adults called the Good Samaritan Free Health Center of Price Hill.

Doors beyond Charity to Justice Leadership and Influence

With Christian leaders from around the country, Sr. Sally Duffy, SC attended the Easter Prayer Breakfast hosted by President Barack Obama at The White House this year. After the prayer service, Sr. Sally attended briefings on issues of concern to the religious community, including immigration. Immigration is one of several areas in which SC Ministry Foundation strives to lead and influence in ways that can have significant societal impact and allow flexible responses to emerging unmet needs, wherever they are. 13


S C M inistry F oundation fiscal Y ear 2 0 1 1 G rants

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od, when we look back on the past 15 years, the cross of Christ did not stand helpless beyond locked doors. The

love that is revealed in Jesus’ suffering and death is a love that hears and is haunted by the stories of those whose basic human needs were breached by natural and human disasters. You call us to transform our experience of descending into hell into new doorways of compassion, and a love that grounds us in You and the peace Jesus offered at the doors of the disciples after the Resurrection. We thank You for the doors of opportunity and the ways Your grace has unlocked our fears and called us to share our resources for justice, loving relationships, and care for all creation. Amen. Archdiocese of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH Coordinator of Latino Outreach for Catholic Schools Bayley Cincinnati, OH Economic Recovery Grant; Program Support Bethesda Foundation, Inc. Cincinnati, OH Program Support BoardSource Washington, DC Capacity Building Education Programs Campbell Lodge Boys’ Home Cold Spring, KY Program Support Caring Response Madagascar Foundation Cincinnati, OH Support of Native Craftsmen, Literacy, Education and Health Care in Madagascar Catholic Charities Archdiocese New Orleans New Orleans, LA Support for Family Stabilization Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Pueblo, Inc. Pueblo, CO Immigration Services

Catholic Charities SouthWestern Ohio Cincinnati, OH Emergency Assistance for Families; Program Support Catholic Charities USA Alexandria, VA Emergency Efforts after Tornadoes, Severe Storms and Flooding in Midwestern/Eastern U.S. and North Dakota Catholic Health Association St. Louis, MO Program Support Catholic Inner-City Schools Education Fund Cincinnati, OH 2011 Summer Intervention Program Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. Washington, DC Strengthening Diocesan Response to Immigration; Program Support Catholic Medical Mission Board New York, NY Donation to Assist with Cholera Outbreak in Haiti; Haiti Disability Program Challenge

Catholic Relief Services Baltimore, MD Assist with Natural Disasters in Haiti, Japan, Pakistan, and Indonesia Children’s Hunger Alliance Columbus, OH Fortified by Food Cincinnati Habitat for Humanity Cincinnati, OH Westfed 2011 Build Cincinnati Museum Center Cincinnati, OH Field Trips and Outreach Programs for CISE Schools Clarke University Dubuque, IA Program Support College of Mount St. Joseph Cincinnati, OH Student Summer Employment Initiative 2011; Faculty Development Assessment Planning Project; Economic Recovery Grant; Program Support Colorado Vincentian Volunteers Denver, CO Volunteer Support Community Land Cooperative of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH Program Support Crossroad Health Center Cincinnati, OH Program Support Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate Washington, DC Web-based Ministry Formation Directory; Program Support DePaul Cristo Rey High School Cincinnati, OH Economic Recovery Grant; Program Support


Diocese of Roseau Roseau, Commonwealth of Dominica Catechetical & Religious Education Program Diocese of Saginaw Saginaw, MI Catholic Education Program Support Doctors Without Borders USA, Inc. New York, NY Assistance with Crises in Haiti, Africa and Sahelian Region of Africa East End Adult Education Center Cincinnati, OH Literacy/GED Instruction Elder High School Cincinnati, OH tech-reach 2011 Programs; El Salvador Mission Fund; Program Support English Language Learning Foundation Cincinnati, OH Program Support FADICA Washington, DC Faith Shaping the Future Campaign; Leadership Venture Summer Institute; Program Support Fonkoze USA Washington, DC Little Sisters of St. Therese of The Child Jesus in Haiti for Rebuilding - Emergency Funding; Road to a Better Life and Little Credit Foundation Fighting Blindness Libertyville, IL Program Support FreeStore/FoodBank Cincinnati, OH Support for Families and Individuals in Crisis Emergency Needs

Friars Club, Inc. Cincinnati, OH Support Kids in Community Service & Youth Programs

InterAct for Change Cincinnati, OH Co-sponsorship of Specific 2011 Capacity Building Programs

Good Samaritan Hospital Foundation Cincinnati, OH Robotic Assisted Training Center; Student Summer Employment Initiative 2011; Program Support

Interfaith Worker Justice Chicago IL Wage Theft Campaign

Good Shepherd Center Albuquerque, NM Emergency Food Assistance Greccio Housing Unlimited, Inc. Colorado Springs, CO Leadership Transition Assistance HealthSET Denver, CO Health Promotion Clinics Hispanics Avanzando Hispanics Cincinnati, OH Support for “Cincinnati: A City of Immigrants� Holy Family School Cincinnati, OH 2011 Preschool Start-up; Supporting Student School Success Holy Name Catholic Church Cincinnati, OH Open Door Ministry Hospice of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH Program Support Ignatian Lay Volunteer Corps Baltimore, MD Program Support

Journey The Ed Colina Foundation Inc. Burlington, KY Program Support Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) Silver Spring, MD Leadership Development Learning Tree Farm Dayton, OH Program Support Legal Aid Society of Greater Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH Cover the Uninsured Week 2011; Program Support Light of Hearts Villa Bedford, OH Economic Recovery Grant; Program Support Little Brothers Friends of the Elderly Cincinnati, OH Program Support Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Cincinnati, OH Price Hill Financial Opportunity Center Madisonville Education/ Assistance Center Cincinnati, OH Program Support

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S C M inistry F oundation fiscal Y ear 2 0 1 1 G rants Manchester-Bidwell Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Program Support March Of Dimes Foundation White Plains, NY Improving Premature Birth Rates Mercy Housing, Inc. Denver, CO Emergency Assistance for Residents of Mercy Village in Joplin, MO Mount Carmel Academy New Orleans, LA Recognition of Top 50 Catholic High Schools in the U.S. Award; Religion Department Computers National Farm Worker Ministry St. Louis, MO Strategic Focus and Planning NETWORK Washington, DC Campaign on Wealth Disparity in the U.S. (Mind the Gap); Program Support New Ways Ministry Mt. Rainier, MD Next Steps: Developing Catholic Lesbian/Gay Ministry

Our Daily Bread Cincinnati, OH Program Support

Salvation Army Cincinnati, OH Program Support

Passionist Earth & Spirit Center, Inc. Louisville, KY Professional Development

Samaritan Health Foundation Dayton, OH Support for Samaritan Homeless Clinic

Peaslee Neighborhood Center Cincinnati, OH Piano Program; Program Support

Santa Maria Community Services Cincinnati, OH Elder High School EITC Project; Program Support

People Working Cooperatively, Inc. Cincinnati, OH Price Hill Improvement Program; Price Hill Prepare Affair Power Inspires Progress Cincinnati, OH Program Support Price Hill Will Cincinnati, OH Celebration of Price Hill; Program Support Project WISE Denver, CO Program Support ProKids Cincinnati, OH Building Blocks

North Brevard Charities Sharing Center, Inc. Titusville, FL Program Support

Providence Community Housing New Orleans, LA Operation Helping Hands

Notre Dame High School St. Louis, MO Program Support

Purcell Marian High School Cincinnati, OH Program Support

Ohio Dominican University Columbus, OH Program Support

Resurrection School Cincinnati, OH School Counseling; Program Support

Ohio Grantmakers Forum Columbus, OH Program Support Ohio Justice & Policy Center Cincinnati, OH Program Support

S.E.T. of Colorado Springs Colorado Springs, CO Program Support Saint Joseph Home Cincinnati, OH Economic Recovery Grant; Program Support

Seton Family Center Cincinnati, OH Feasibility Study for Growth & Sustainability; Program Support Seton High School Cincinnati, OH Tuition Assistance & Scholarship; Economic Recovery Grant; Capacity Building; Program Support Seven Hills Neighborhood Houses Cincinnati, OH Program Support Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati Mount St. Joseph, OH Biannual Leadership Council Project Funding; DePaul Cristo Rey High School Start-up; Economic Recovery Grant; Program Support Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Nazareth, KY Nazareth Kunj, Delhi, India Sisters of Mercy Health System Chesterfield, MO St. John’s Hospital - Emergency Assistance Following Tornado Sisters of the Companions of Jesus Port au Prince Recovery Efforts Following Earthquake in Haiti - Emergency Funds


The National Conference for Community and Justice of Greater Dayton Dayton, OH Anytown Youth Leadership Institute

Sisters of the Humility of Mary Villa Maria, PA Support for Sisters of St. Anthony of Fondwa in Haiti Society of St. Vincent de Paul Cincinnati, OH Emergency Assistance

The Sisters of St. Francis Sylvania, OH Hope and Resilience: The Catholic Sisters of New Orleans Documentary

Special Olympics Ohio Columbus, OH Program Support

The Springer School and Center Cincinnati, OH Program Support

St. Bernard Project, Inc. Chalmette, LA Support for Nuns Build Week St. Dominic School Cincinnati, OH Program Support St. Frances Xavier Cabrini Church Spring Hill, FL Daughters of God Celebrate 2011 St. James Elementary School Bay City , MI Emergency Assistance for the Poor at St. James School St. James Parish Bay City, MI Sharing God’s Gifts

St. Teresa of Avila School Cincinnati, OH Spanish Instruction for 8th Graders St. William School Cincinnati, OH Strengthening Families and Children of the St. William Community; Price Hill Shared Summer Learning Camp

St. Joseph Orphanage Cincinnati, OH Program Support

Stepping Stones Center Cincinnati, OH Support for Summer Camp Program

St. Lawrence School Cincinnati, OH Counselor/Social Worker Program; Learning for Life Class

Support our Aging Religious, Inc. Washington, DC Program Support

St. Martha School Okemos, MI Olweus Bully Prevention Program

Talbert House Cincinnati, OH Second Chance Act Prisoner Re-entry Initiative Match; Program Support

St. Mary School Cincinnati, OH Program Support St. Mary’s Academy New Orleans, LA Support for Rebuilding of St. Mary’s Academy St. Rita School for the Deaf Cincinnati, OH Program Support

The Athenaeum of Ohio Cincinnati, OH Lay Pastoral Ministry Program Continuing Education Initiatives The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Cincinnati, OH Program Support

The Women’s Connection Cincinnati, OH Capacity Building; Program and Outcome Evaluation; Program Support United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH Program Support United Way of Greater Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH Social Innovation Fund Match Villa Therese Catholic Clinic Santa Fe, NM Childhood Immunizations Whole Again International Cincinnati, OH Summer Food and Enrichment Women Partnering Colorado Springs, CO Moving Toward Holistic Economic Sustainability With Special Emphasis on Mental Health Working in Neighborhoods, Inc. Cincinnati, OH South Cumminsville Borden Street Corridor Revitalization; Program Support YWCA of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH Program Support 17


SC Ministry Foundation Board

SC Ministry Foundation Mission

SC Ministry Foundation is a public grant-making organization. The Foundation promotes the mission and ministry of the Sisters of Charity. Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati Mission

Urged by the love of Christ and in the spirit of our founder, Elizabeth Ann Seton, we Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati strive to live Gospel values. We choose to act justly, to build loving relationships, to share our resources with those in need, and to care for all creation.

Jerome R. Judd, Chair Margaret Buchanan Sally Duffy, SC Barbara Hagedorn, SC Maureen Heverin, SC Karen Bennett Hoeb Katherine Hoelscher, SC Robert Killins, Jr. Michael S. McGraw Timothy S. Moller John J. O’Connor Patrick Ann O’Connor, SC Simón Sotelo

SC Ministry Foundation Staff Sr. Sally Duffy, SC President and Executive Director Loretta Dees Director of Communications and Program Officer M. Maureen Maxfield Director of Education and Program Officer Marybeth Schroer Systems Application Support and Administrative Assistant

Credits

Photography taken on location at Mount St. Joseph Motherhouse grounds by Don Denney, www.denneyphoto.com. All other photography submitted by grantee organizations and individuals is printed with permission. Photos published in this report may not be reproduced or copied without the express permission of SC Ministry Foundation, the contributing organizations or individuals. Design by Amelia Riedel, www.riedelcreativegroup.com. © 2011 SC Ministry Foundation. Printed on recycled paper.

Donna Jo Smiley Executive Assistant Sarah Schatzman Co-op Student Amanda Varnam Co-op Student


fiscal Year 2011 Financial Report Healthy Communities..................$ 1,019,456 Social Justice..................................$ 296,200 Poor and Underserved..................$ 2,670,620 Education . .....................................$ 3,719,622 International..................................$

176,500

Total Grants Awarded............... $ 7,882,398


“The front door, the back door, the side door that leads to the chapel, the windows upstairs and down all open at your coming.” –Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton

345 Neeb Road | Cincinnati, OH 45233 | Phone: 513-347-1122 | www.scministryfdn.org

2011 Annual Report  

SC Ministry Foundation's Annual Report for 2011

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