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The American Phytopathological Society

Registration Brochure

Register today

for the best show in Nashville this summer!

Creating Possibilities

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS These leaders are recognized and acknowledged for their time and expertise in the development of the program: APS Annual Meeting Program Chair.......................................... John Sherwood, University of Georgia, U.S.A. APS Annual Meeting Program Vice Chair ................................. Carol Ishimaru, University of Minnesota, U.S.A. APS Scientific Program Board • Director...................................................................................... Scott Adkins, USDA ARS USHRL, U.S.A. • Workshop Chair.......................................................................... James Buck, University of Georgia, U.S.A. • APS Section Chairs .................................................................... Janna Beckerman, Purdue University, U.S.A. Amy Charkowski, University of Wisconsin, U.S.A. Christina Cowger, USDA ARS, North Carolina State University, U.S.A. Martin Dickman, Texas A&M University, U.S.A. Paul Esker, University of Wisconsin, U.S.A. Aaron Hert, Syngenta Crop Protection, U.S.A. • Members ................................................................................... Antonius Baudoin, Virginia Tech, U.S.A. Michael Boehm, Ohio State University, U.S.A.

TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgments..............................................................................2 Message from the APS President.........................................................3 Plenary Session...................................................................................4 Scientific Program.............................................................................15 Technical, Orals, and Posters.............................................................27 Exhibits and Services.........................................................................28 General Information.........................................................................29 Housing Information.........................................................................30 Meeting Registration........................................................................31 Nashville Information........................................................................31

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT As plant pathologists, it is important that we embrace societal changes and create new opportunities for growth in our field wherever possible, whenever possible. It is equally important that we work together, share our research, and learn from each other. The APS Annual Meeting provides a unique opportunity for plant pathologists from around the world to come together, meet face to face, and make personal connections that will last throughout your career. The Scientific Planning Board, along with program committee chair John Sherwood, has put together an exciting program featuring sessions, Barb Christ networking opportunities, and special events that focus on the future. The plenary session will explore the 2010 Annual Meeting theme, Creating Possibilities, by featuring speakers focused on issues facing agriculture and feeding a growing population. Speakers from outside plant pathology and agriculture will help us examine the issues of social media and the impact on our science, as well as the importance of global linkages. As the 2010 APS President, it is my privilege to invite to you join us in Nashville, Tennesee, this August 7-11 at the 2010 APS Annual Meeting. I’m looking forward to a great meeting and to seeing you in Nashville this summer. Barb Christ 2010 President, The American Phytopathological Society

THE 2010 APS ANNUAL MEETING

APS’s Big Gig Is Headed to Nashville! Plant pathology’s most talented players and rising stars will come together August 7–11, 2010, to cover hot topics in a variety of formats including special sessions, technical sessions and posters.

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PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE FRIDAY, AUGUST 6 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 1:00 – 6:00 p.m.

APS Council Meeting APS Leadership Forum, by invitation

SATURDAY, AUGUST 7 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. 1:00 – 5:30 p.m. 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. 3:30 – 6:00 p.m. 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. 4:00 – 4:30 p.m. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. 5:00 – 6:30 p.m. 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Workshop: DNA-Based Pathogen Detection Methods: Ralstonia solanacearum — A Case Study, check #2 on the registration form Leadership Training: APS Leadership Institute, check #3 on the registration form Field Trip: Turfgrass, check #4 on the registration form Field Trip: Ornamental & Forestry Nursery, check #5 on the registration form APS Councilors Forum Meeting APS PRESS Board Meeting Workshop: Scientific Writing for APS Journals, check #6 on the registration form Workshop: Meet the Geek: Creating Podcasts and Using Syndicated Content, check #7 on the registration form Leadership Training: Enhance Your Team Performance—Understand Your MBTI, check #8 on the registration form Workshop: Mixed Models for Data Analysis in Plant Pathology, check #9 on the registration form APS Advisory Committee on Plant Biosecurity Meeting Office of International Programs (OIP) Board Meeting Registration Committee Chair/Vice Chair Orientation Scientific Program Board (SPB)/Section Chairs Meeting Publications Board Meeting Program Planning Orientation PDMR Editors’ Meeting First Timers’ Orientation, check #10 on the registration form Awards and Honors Committee Meeting, by invitation New time! Committee Meetings • Biotechnology Committee • Collections and Germplasm Committee • Committee for Diversity and Equality • Diagnostics Committee • Emerging Diseases and Pathogens Special Committee, by invitation Committee meetings now take • Integrated Plant Disease Management Committee place on Saturday and sunday. • Pathogen Resistance Committee Check carefully­—don’t miss • Phyllosphere Microbiology Committee • Postharvest Pathology Committee your meeting! • Regulatory Plant Pathology Committee • Tropical Plant Pathology Committee

New times and scheduled days!

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8:00 – 9:30 p.m.

New time! Committee Meetings • Biological Control Committee • Epidemiology Committee • Extension Committee • Host Resistance Committee • Industry Committee • Mycotoxicology Committee • Nematology Committee • Seed Pathology Committee • Soil Microbiology and Root Diseases Committee • Turfgrass Pathology Committee • Virology Committee Committee meetings continued on Sunday

SATURDAY HIGHLIGHTS Field Trips and Workshops Workshop: DNA-Based Pathogen Detection Methods: Ralstonia solanacearum—A Case Study 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Patrice Champoiseau, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; Jeffrey Jones, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; Anne Alvarez, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.; Timothy Denny, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; Caitilyn Allen, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Mark Schell, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection; Bacteriology Fee: $40 Advances in detection and identification technology for Ralstonia solanacearum will be described and demonstrated. Participants will perform immunocapture and DNA-based assays. Application and suitability for laboratory and field testing for R. solanacearum and other bacterial pathogens will be discussed. Check #2 on the registration form. Sensitivity and limitations of current detection methods for Ralstonia solanacearum. CAITILYN ALLEN, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Immunocapture-PCR (real-time) for fast, sensitive, and specific detection and identification of Ralstonia solanacearum. PATRICE CHAMPOISEAU, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. Magnetic capture hybridization-PCR (real-time) for fast, sensitive, and specific detection and identification of Ralstonia solanacearum. YOUNGSIL HA, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. Identification of Ralstonia solanacearum strains with loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP). RYO KUBOTA, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. Field Trip: Turfgrass 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Section: Diseases of Plants Organizers: Brandon Horvath, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.; Damon Smith, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Turfgrass Pathology Financial Sponsors: Syngenta, Bayer CropScience Fee: $40 On this tour, participants will visit various turfgrass stands in the Nashville area to learn about management challenges unique to the region. We will also observe biotic and abiotic stresses of these stands, particularly since the meeting is held during the summer which presents many challenges because of the transition zone climate in which Nashville is located.  Stops will include various golf and sport turf including the Gaylord Springs Golf Links and the Vanderbilt Legends Club, home of Golf House Tennessee and the Little Course.  Check #4 on the registration form. continued on next page

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Field Trip: Ornamental & Forestry Nursery 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Cristi Palmer, IR-4 Project, Rutgers University, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A.; Margaret Mmbaga, Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Diseases of Ornamental Plants; Forest Pathology Fee: $40 The Tennessee ornamental horticulture and forestry industries face unique pathogen challenges. Visit with longstanding operations and up-and-coming growers to hear how they’ve grown quality plant materials under foliar and root disease pressure during this difficult economic time. Greenhouse and nursery growers will showcase their operations and talk about their disease management programs and how they are integrating cultural, biological, and chemical controls. Check #5 on the registration form. Workshop: Scientific Writing for APS Journals 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Section: Professionalism/Outreach Organizers: Niklaus Grunwald, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; Anthony Keinath, Clemson University, Charleston, SC, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Publications Board; Editorial Boards Fee: $25 This workshop on publishing in APS journals will cover important aspects of preparing and submitting manuscripts to Plant Disease, Phytopathology, and MPMI. The workshop will provide an overview of the review and publication process and provide guidelines for successful publishing. Participants will gain an understanding of the roles of editors-in-chief, senior editors, associate editors, and anonymous peer reviewers. Emphasis will be put on practical tips for scientific writing that will facilitate publication in APS journals. Topics such as proper formatting, authorship, plagiarism, reviewing, and appropriate subject matter for each journal will be addressed. The organizers and speakers are editors-in-chief with extensive experience in reviewing and publishing in APS journals. This workshop is geared toward graduate students and early career scientists. Check #6 on the registration form. Publishing in APS journals. ANTHONY KEINATH, Former Editor-in-Chief Plant Disease, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.; NIKLAUS GRUNWALD, Editor-in-Chief Phytopathology, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; MICHAEL DAVIS, incoming Editor-in-Chief Plant Disease, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; GARY STACEY, Editor-in-Chief MPMI, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. Workshop: Meet the Geek: Creating Podcasts and Using Syndicated Content 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. Section: Professionalism/Outreach Organizer: Joseph LaForest, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Extension Fee: $25 This hands-on workshop will help attendees develop skills for specific internet tools used in the dissemination of information. The focus will be on creating podcasts and using syndicated content. Participants will learn to make a short (30 seconds – 1 minute) podcast using syndication services to deliver it to a variety of audiences. The session will support both Mac and PC users. Individuals are encouraged to bring laptops. Check #7 on the registration form.

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Workshop: Mixed Models for Data Analysis in Plant Pathology 1:00 – 5:30 p.m. Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizer: Larry Madden, Ohio State University, OARDC/OSU, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Epidemiology; Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE) Fee: $30 It is now common to use linear mixed models (LMMs) instead of traditional ANOVA to analyze data from designed experiments. LMMs formally handle experiments with both fixed (e.g., fungicide treatment) and random (e.g., block, location) effects and properly estimate test statistics and standard errors for all the effects of interest under a wide range of circumstances. Registrants will learn to use the MIXED and new GLIMMIX procedures of SAS to analyze data from common experimental designs in plant pathology. Material covered for the first time will include introductions on generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs), for analyzing discrete data; new graphical methods for assessing model fits; and multiple comparisons of means in the context of mixed models. This workshop will follow the tradition of the Epidemiology Committee’s workshops on “bringing statistical analysis to the masses.” All registrants must bring a laptop computer with version 9.2 of SAS installed. The workshop enrollment is limited to 60 participants; previous attendees can repeat the workshop. Check #9 on the registration form.

New! Leadership Training Opportunities Early Career Professionals and Regular Members APS Leadership Institute 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Fee: $75 This first-of-its-kind APS Leadership Institute is designed to help individuals discover their unique leadership skills and begin to apply those skills to their professional, personal, and societal lives. This highly engaging workshop, facilitated by Teri Balser, University of Wisconsin-Madison, will cover the following areas—what and who are leaders, why leadership is critical to your career and profession, types of leaders, leadership and personalities, developing effective leaders, leaders and change, and leaders in professional organizations. Development of future leaders is critical to the success of any organization and is essential for the long term viability of volunteer-led nonprofit societies. While there is no expected service commitment following this program, a long-term goal is to develop future leaders within APS for those who are interested in such a role. The workshop is intended for a broad spectrum of participants including early, mid-, and senior career professionals as well as the volunteer leadership of APS. Attendance is limited to 50 participants. The cost of the ticket includes lunch, two breaks, and workshop materials. Check #3 on the registration form. Students and Post-Docs Enhance Your Team Performance—Understand Your MBTI 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Facilitator/Sponsor: Monsanto Registration is required by July 15 Teamwork is critical to the success of organizations and companies, but as a young scientist you might not be aware of all of the dynamics at play in a team environment. This unique professional development opportunity will allow you to increase your self understanding and enhance your team performance. You’ll take the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) online prior to the training. Then during this highly interactive session, an expert in talent development from Monsanto will provide you with your results and explain your personality type and those of your colleagues. Team-building exercises throughout the session will focus on team communication, culture, leadership, change, problem solving/conflict resolution, and stress. You’ll leave the training with a fresh perspective as well as the tools to positively impact your team experiences. The workshop is open to a mix of graduate students and post-docs and is offered at no cost, thanks to the generous sponsorship provided by Monsanto. Attendance is limited to 40 participants. All personal information will be kept confidential and participants will receive the only copy of the MBTI results available. Check #8 on the registration form to participate. Registration is required by July 15 to allow for MBTI processing. Attendees will be invited to a special reception immediately following the training session. continued on next page

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Orientation Sessions APS Committee Chair/Vice Chair Orientation 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. This important orientation session is a must-attend event for updates on current APS initiatives and committee procedures. APS Immediate Past President Jim Moyer, Senior Councilor-at-Large Mike Boehm, and Intermediate Councilor-at-Large Carolee Bull will lead discussions highlighting recent APS initiatives, processes for taking action on committee issues, and procedural logistics for chairs and vice chairs. Packets with committee rosters and the Committee Annual Report Form will be provided for each chair. APS committee chairs not able to attend should have a replacement participate. APS Program Planning Orientation 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Join the Annual Meeting Program Planning Committee to learn what steps are needed to host a special session in 2011 and beyond. This session will cover how to submit a session proposal and how the planning process works. For more information, contact Scott Adkins at Scott.Adkins@ars.usda.gov or Carol Ishimaru at cishimar@umn.edu First Timers’ Orientation 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. As a first-time attendee, the array of scientific sessions and various networking opportunities may seem daunting. Plan to attend this special orientation session where APS leaders and seasoned meeting attendees will provide helpful hints and suggestions to help you make the most of your first meeting experience. Check #10 on the registration form.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 8 7:00 – 8:30 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. 8:00 – 8:30 a.m. 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. 8:30 – 10:00 a.m.

9:30 – 10:00 a.m. 9:30 – 10:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. 12:00 – 2:00 p.m. 8

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APS Auxiliary Meetings Board Breakfast APSnet Education Center Editorial Board Meeting Vegetable Extension & Research Plant Pathologists’ Breakfast, by invitation Registration Moderator Orientation Exhibit Set-Up APS Phytopathology Senior Editors’ Meeting APS Plant Disease Senior Editors’ Meeting New Day! Committee Meetings (continued from Saturday) • Bacteriology Committee • Chemical Control Committee • Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE) Committee • Diseases of Ornamental Plants Committee • Early Career Professionals Committee • Forest Pathology Committee • Genetics Committee • Graduate Student Committee • Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology Committee • Mycology Committee • Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection Committee • Teaching Committee APS Phytopathology Editorial Board Meeting APS Plant Disease Editorial Board Meeting New! Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony Lunch Break Journals Senior Editors’ Luncheon, by invitation Division Officers’ Luncheon continued on next page


12:00 – 3:00 p.m. 12:00 – 6:00 p.m. 12:15 – 3:00 p.m. 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

2:00 – 4:00 p.m. 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. 4:00 – 4:45 p.m. 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 4:30 – 10:00 p.m. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. 6:30 – 10:00 p.m.

Poster Set-Up APS-OIP Silent Auction PMN Strategic Planning Meeting, by invitation Office of Electronic Communication (OEC) Board Meeting Oral Technical Sessions (titles to be announced) Special Sessions • The 2009 Tomato and Potato Late Blight Crisis: The Interaction of the Urban Home Garden and Commercial Agriculture—What Went Wrong and What We Learned • Advances in Plant Virus Evolution • Induced Resistance: Where Does This Fit in IPM Programs? • Kasugamycin: The Risks and Benefits of Introducing a New Antibiotic • Scratching the Cuticle of Nematode Diagnostics: Where Do We Need to Go? Divisional Forum Plant Health Progress Editorial Board Meeting, by invitation New Time and Format! University Alumni Socials APS PRESS Bookstore Welcome Reception with Exhibition and Posters Extended Time! Poster Viewing New! Leadership Opportunity: Committee for Diversity and Equality Social with Mentoring Strategizing Session, check #11 on the registration form Industry & Extension Social: Honky Tonk at Nashville Palace, check #12 on the registration form

SUNDAY HIGHLIGHTS Vegetable Extension & Research Plant Pathologists’ Breakfast 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. Sponsored by the vegetable seed industry, this annual event promotes the sharing of information and ideas on seed health and diseases of interest to the vegetable industry. For information, contact Craig Sandlin at +1.530.406.3057 or e-mail craig.sandlin@syngenta.com. This event is by invitation only. Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. This is your official welcome to Nashville! Get together with your friends and fellow scientists from around the world and help us recognize our colleagues with awards and honors for their important work throughout the year. Learn about the accomplishments and goals of our society straight from our leaders, honor those who have left our ranks in the past year, and learn more about what to see and do during your time at the APS Annual Meeting. More information to follow. 6th Annual APS-OIP Silent Auction: Connecting Knowledge with a Growing World 12:00 – 6:00 p.m. The Office of International Program’s Silent Auction invites you to bid on unique items and to join your colleagues in building international relationships by supporting OIP’s “Global Experience.” Support the sixth year of this event by helping OIP gather fun and unique items from around the world to be part of the auction. To donate, visit www.apsnet.org/members/oip/silentauction.asp, download the donation form, and submit to APS by July 9. If you are unable to attend the meeting, you can still donate by shipping your item in advance to APS Headquarters. Help this effort continue to grow… in the first five years more than $17,000 has been raised!

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New Time and Format! University Alumni Socials 4:00 – 4:45 p.m. Reunite with fellow colleagues and network with other alumni! Each participating university will have a designated area to congregate and mingle. The alumni socials will be located adjacent to the Exhibit Hall so that you can easily continue to mingle with your colleagues at the Welcome Reception! Participating universities will be listed in the program book. Welcome Reception with Exhibition and Posters 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Kick off your 2010 APS Annual Meeting experience by attending the Welcome Reception! Network, visit the exhibits, and bid on APS-OIP Silent Auction items while enjoying light snacks and drinks. This reception is included in the registration fee. New Name! Committee for Diversity and Equality Social with Mentoring Strategizing Session 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $25/regular; $20 student/post-doc The Committee for Diversity and Equality has more than just a new name! This year our social is designed to help you meet colleagues from every point on the career ladder and walk away with a new bag of mentoring tricks. We will still have drinks, snacks and social time, but we are also planning to brainstorm successful strategies in 1) creating your own “old boys club”; 2) mentoring a diverse workforce; and 3) mentoring your supervisor to provide what you need to do your job. We want your success stories to be included. Join us and feel free to dress in traditional clothing from your home or your favorite country. Check #11 on the registration form. Mentoring in the modern work environment. CAROLEE BULL, USDA, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. Create your own “old boys club” (breakout session). DAVID SERRANO, Broward College, Davie, FL, U.S.A. Diverse strategies for mentoring a diverse workforce (breakout session). DAN COLLINS, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. The Tao of mentoring: How to mentor your supervisor (breakout session). SARAH WARE, Ball Horticultural, West Chicago, IL, U.S.A. Industry & Extension Social: Honky Tonk at Nashville Palace 6:30 – 10:00 p.m. Fee: $30 Enjoy a traditional BBQ dinner, drinks, and live entertainment at one of Nashville’s most well-known honky tonks— Nashville Palace. Get to know your peers and industry representatives at the very same tables where the stars hang and learn new dance moves from professional instructors while enjoying live music. The venue is a short walk from the hotel, so attendees will be able to call it a night at their leisure. Tickets are limited, so be sure to sign up today! Check #12 on the registration form.

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MONDAY, AUGUST 9 6:30 – 8:00 a.m. 7:00 – 11:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. 3:30 – 6:00 p.m. 3:30 – 10:00 p.m. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Extension Plant Pathologists Breakfast, check #13 on the registration form Public Policy Board Meeting Registration Oral Technical Sessions (titles to be announced) Special Sessions • 10th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: Seed Pathology— Epidemiology, Management, and Phytosanitary Concerns • The APS Public Policy Board: New Challenges for Phytopathologists • Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms: Diversity, Commercial Production, and Disease Management in High-Volume Production Facilities • More than Just Antibiotics: The Multiple Mechanisms Leading to Biological Control and Plant Growth Promotion • New Products and Services • Plant Pathogen Population Genetics: An Essential Tool for Crop Biosecurity • Small Molecules in Phytopathology: From Determinants of Disease to Modulators of Defense Affiliates’ Meeting APS PRESS Bookstore Exhibits Open APS Leadership Institute Ad-Hoc Committee Meeting Lunch Break Past Presidents’ Luncheon, by invitation Graduate Student & Industry Lunch, check #14 on the registration form New Time! Plenary Session Office of Industry Relations (OIR) Board Meeting Extended Time! Poster Viewing Early Career Professionals’ Social with New Employer Networking Opportunity, check #15 on the registration form Graduate Student Social, check #16 on the registration form

MONDAY HIGHLIGHTS

Extension Plant Pathologists’ Breakfast 6:30 – 8:00 a.m. Fee: $30 This is your unique opportunity to visit with colleagues and industry representatives from a variety of companies. Ticket purchase required. Check #13 on the registration form. Graduate Student & Industry Lunch 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Fee: $5 Calling all students! Connect with industry representatives from a variety of companies by attending the APS Industry Committee-sponsored luncheon. Network and learn about job opportunities available in the industry. Both graduate students and industry members should register for the event. Check #14 on the registration form. Plenary Session 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. The plenary session will focus on the 2010 Annual Meeting theme, Creating Possibilities, by featuring speakers focused on issues facing agriculture and feeding a growing population. Speakers from outside plant pathology and agriculture will help us examine the issues of social media and the impact on our science, as well as the importance of continued on next page

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global linkages. This session will focus primarily on the future of plant pathology and help us form ideas and realize possibilities for the future. More information to follow. Early Career Professionals Social (with NEW Employer Networking Opportunity) 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $10 Connections are critical for the growth of your career. This social provides the unique opportunity for early career professionals to meet other plant pathologists at a similar career stage. The APS Early Career Professionals Committee will kick off the social, providing an opportunity to learn about the committee initiatives and suggest ideas for future consideration. New Opportunity! For the first time, academic, government and industry employers are also invited to join the social to network one-on-one with prospective employees. This relaxed setting will provide the perfect opportunity for recent graduates, post-docs, and those just starting in their career to mingle and hear firsthand from employers what skills and knowledge they are looking for in their current job openings. Refreshments and appetizers are included. This unique, first-of-its-kind event is one you won’t want to miss. Check #15 on the registration form. Graduate Student Social 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $5 Graduate students – Make plans to meet with your plant pathology colleagues in an informal and relaxed environment. Light snacks and beverages will be served. This event is limited to students only. Preregistration is required. Check #16 on the registration form.

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 10 7:00 – 8:30 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 8:30 - 11:30 a.m. 8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. 1:00 – 3:30 p.m.

1:30 – 4:00 p.m. 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. 5:30 – 10:00 p.m. 6:30 – 10:30 p.m.

Sustaining Associates’ Breakfast, by invitation Department Heads’ Breakfast, check #17 on the registration form Scientific Programs Board (SPB) Meeting APS Foundation Board Meeting, by invitation Registration Small Fruit Diseases Workers Discussion, check #18 on the registration form APS PRESS Bookstore Exhibits Open Oral Technical Sessions (titles to be announced) Special Sessions • Identifying Quantitative Resistance Using Modern Technologies—Challenges for Plant Breeding • Nature’s Molecular Biologist: Xanthomonas and TAL Effector Function, Structure, and Diversity • Plant Disease Epidemics and Food Security in Globally Changing Agricultures and Environments • Prepare for Your Future: Career Opportunities After Graduate School: Part 2—Extension • Refining Systematics (Taxonomy, Nomenclature, Phylogenetics) for Better Resolution in the Population Biology and Evolution of the Oomycetes Phytopathology News Advisory Committee Meeting Lunch Break Oral Technical Sessions (titles to be announced) Special Sessions • Assuring the Safety of Fresh Produce: Issues and Strategies • Biology and Management of Rhizoctonia Diseases in Turfgrass Systems • Broad-Spectrum Resistance: Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Pathogen Reception and Resistance Signaling • Creating Possibilities for Sustainable Postharvest Disease Control Through Integrated Approaches to Both Pre- and Postharvest Fungicide Resistance Management • Restoring Forest Ecosystems Impacted by Invasive Pathogens • Schroth Faces of the Future in Virology Office of Public Relations & Outreach (OPRO) Board Meeting New Time! Flash-and-Dash Poster Presentations with Author Time Poster Viewing Exhibit Take-Down Final Night Celebration

TUESDAY HIGHLIGHTS Department Heads’ Breakfast 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. Fee: $27 Heads of plant pathology or related departments are invited to get together and discuss issues affecting universities around the country. Check #17 on the registration form. New Time! Flash-and-Dash Poster Presentations 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Flash-and-dash poster authors who submit an abstract for their contributed presentation as a poster have the opportunity to present their individual poster in the form of a five-minute, three-slide talk. Poster viewing and author time will take place immediately following the session. continued on next page

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Final Night Celebration 6:30 – 10:30 p.m. Mingle with new contacts and old colleagues while enjoying food, beverages, and entertainment. Don’t miss out on this one last networking event! New this year, the official APS passing of the gavel will kick off the celebration with President Barb Christ thanking Past President James Moyer for his four years of service and welcoming John Sherwood as APS President for 2010-2011. Ticket is included with full registration.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 – 10:00 a.m. 7:00 – 11:00 a.m. 8:00 – 10:00 a.m. 8:00 – 11:00 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m. 12:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Exhibit Take-Down APS Council Meeting Registration Office of International Programs (OIP) Board Meeting APS PRESS Bookstore Oral Technical Sessions (titles to be announced) Special Sessions • Biocontrol Beyond the Bench: Large-Scale, Successful Biocontrol • Cryptic Foes: Gathering the Latest Advances on Pythium • Integrated Microbial Bioinformatics • The Sophistication of Host-Pathogen Interactions Involving Necrotrophic Fungi • Virus Fishing with Chips: Plant Virus Microarrays and Next Generation Sequencing Poster Take-Down Workshop: An Introduction to Statistics Using R (“R for Dummies”), check #19 on the registration form

WEDNESDAY HIGHLIGHTS Workshop: An Introduction to Statistics Using R (“R for Dummies”) 12:30 – 4:30 p.m. Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizers: Karen Garrett, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Paul Esker, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Epidemiology; Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE) Fee: $35 Have you been avoiding attending one of the statistical workshops over the years because you felt that the topic was over your head? Do you feel you need to shake off that dust when it comes to statistics? If so, this is the statistical workshop for you! R (www.r-project.org) is a programming package for statistical computing and graphics and has become extremely popular, especially since it is free. In this workshop, we will introduce R and illustrate some of the tools that are available for using R, including graphical and statistical. The focus of this workshop will be at an INTRODUCTORY LEVEL and should be understandable to all who are interested in learning more about statistics and statistical computing. This session will follow the tradition of the epidemiology committee’s workshops on “bringing statistical analysis to the masses.” All registrants will need to have a laptop with R installed. The workshop is limited to 60 participants. Check #19 on the registration form.

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SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Listed in alphabetical order. Sessions are preliminary. Check http://meeting.apsnet.org for updates.

Advances in Plant Virus Evolution Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers: Rodolfo Acosta-Leal, Texas AgriLife Research (Texas A&M University), Amarillo, TX, U.S.A.; William Schneider, USDA ARS Foreign Disease Weed Science Research Unit, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Virology Financial Sponsors: American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists; Beet Sugar Development Foundation; Samuel Robert Noble Foundation As obligate parasites, viruses have evolved mechanisms to infect plants and undergo mutations and recombinations to adapt to new circumstances. A wide range of techniques and technologies have been used for developing an understanding of mechanisms of evolution in viruses with different genome organizations and replication strategies. A review of the current knowledge on processes associated with virus evolution and the influence of host plant, cropping methods, etc. on virus diversity and evolution is essential for sustainable crop improvement. The evolution of plant virus evolution: A historical overview. WILLIAM SCHNEIDER, USDA ARS Foreign Disease Weed Science Research Unit, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. Population processes and plant virus evolution. ROY FRENCH, USDA ARS, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. Evolutionary and systems biology of plant RNA virus emergence. SANTIAGO ELENA, Instituto de BiologĂ­a Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Valencia, Spain Evolution of natural populations of BNYVV to overcome host resistance: Breakdown of Rzl-gene. CHARLES RUSH, Texas AgriLife Research (Texas A&M University), Bushland, TX, U.S.A. How do geminiviruses evolve as quickly as RNA viruses? SIOBAIN DUFFY, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, U.S.A. Advances in the understanding of viroid evolution. ROSEMARIE HAMMOND, USDA-ARS, Molecular Plant Pathology Lab, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. The APS Public Policy Board: New Challenges for Phytopathologists Section: Professionalism/Outreach Organizer: Jacque Fletcher, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Public Policy Board This session will provide updates and opportunities for APS member input on high-priority APS public policy initiatives. These include strategies for the establishment of a National Plant Microbial Germplasm System, progress on the APS effort to shape the future of education in plant pathology, issues related to plant pathogen regulatory issues and permitting, and future initiatives in the genomics of plant-associated microbes. The session will finish with presentations by the APS-OSTP fellow and the Public Policy Board early career intern, both of whom will speak about their experiences and accomplishments working on public policy issues. A final discussion period will allow APS members to ask questions, provide input on the Public Policy Board activities, and volunteer to work on ongoing projects. The policy climate in Washington, DC. KELLYE EVERSOLE, Eversole Associates, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A. The National Plant Microbial Germplasm Collection. RICK BENNETT, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. Looking ahead in genomics of plant-associated microbes. SCOT HULBERT, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. Microbial-plant interactions: Human pathogens on plants. JERI BARAK, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Policy making up close: Reflections of the APS Office of Science & Technology Policy Fellow. MARY PALMHERNANDEZ, USDA APHIS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. EPA from the inside: Report from the APS-EPA Fellow. FRANK WONG, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.

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Assuring the Safety of Fresh Produce: Issues and Strategies Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizers: Jeri Barak, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Jacque Fletcher, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: APS Food Safety Interest Group; Public Policy Board Building upon a 2007 APS Symposium on Human Pathogens on Plants, this session will address a breadth of practical issues to assist plant pathologists embarking on the study of human pathogens in fresh produce and to inform APS members on the progress of the APS Public Policy Board (PPB) on their work to establish a national, interagency initiative to target new funding streams for research. Speakers from FDA and from USDA food safety programs will identify agency priorities and opportunities. Other presentations will focus on navigating the regulatory requirements for human pathogen research, safe and responsible handling of human pathogens, and growers’ perceptions and practices with respect to assuring the safety of their products. A final speaker will provide an update on the PPB food safety initiative. Human pathogens on plants—Issues for plant pathologists. JERI BARAK, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Ecology of human pathogens on plants. MARIA BRANDL, USDA-ARS, Albany, CA, U.S.A. Growers beliefs about food safety and effects of GAP-based management on vegetable microbial quality. MELANIE IVEY, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. Seed industry challenges. RIC DUNKLE, ASTA, Alexandria, VA, U.S.A. Ground zero: Food safety research and extension in California’s Salinas Valley. STEVE KOIKE, University of California Extension, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. Collaboration, cooperation, and engagement across agencies. LEANNE SKELTON, USDA-AMS, Washington, DC, U.S.A. The APS produce safety interagency initiative. JACQUE FLETCHER, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Biocontrol Beyond the Bench: Large-Scale, Successful Biocontrol Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer: Mark Weaver, USDA ARS, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Biological Control; Biotechnology This session will bring together researchers who have successfully translated research findings into applications with a positive impact for society through the biocontrol of plant diseases and invasive weeds. Together, we hope to compile some of the lessons learned and to direct ongoing research around some of the pitfalls on the path between bench science and successful, applied biological control. Registering biopesticides and safeguarding public safety. MICHAEL BRAVERMAN, Biopesticide and Organic Support Program IR-4 Project, Rutgers University, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A. Bringing a broad-spectrum biohebicide to market. ALAN WATSON, McGill University, St. Anne De Bellevue, QC, Canada Understanding your customer and delivering a quality product. BILL FOSTER, BioWorks Inc., Victor, NY, U.S.A. Lockdown: Collego bioherbicide gets a second act. KELLY CARTWRIGHT, ARA Inc., Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. Working together: Partnering with grower organizations from development through distribution. PETER COTTY, USDA ARS, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. Reduction of aflatoxin by biocontrol in Africa. RANAJIT BANDYOPADHYAY, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Oyo, Nigeria

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Biology and Management of Rhizoctonia Diseases in Turfgrass Systems Section: Diseases of Plants Organizer: James Kerns, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Turfgrass Pathology Rhizoctonia diseases have a long history in the culture of turfgrasses. Recently, our understanding of the known Rhizoctonia species as well as of the new, emerging Rhizoctonia-like diseases has necessitated research to develop an organizational concept that remains faithful to the older taxonomic categories while recognizing newer developments in molecular systematics. This session will include an overview of past and current Rhizoctonia systematics and research updates on new and diverse Rhizoctonia diseases on cool- and warm-season turfgrasses. New Rhizoctonia-like pathogens associated with diseases of warm-season turfgrasses. PHILLIP HARMON, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. Biology of brown ring patch disease on cool-season turfgrasses. FRANCIS WONG, University of California Riverside, CA, U.S.A. Management of leaf and sheath spot of ultradwarf bermudagrasses. SAMUEL MARTIN, Clemson University, Florence, SC, U.S.A. Rhizoctonia species causing turfgrass disease in the transition zone: Identifying the pathogens and potential for resistance. BRANDON HORVATH, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A. Broad-Spectrum Resistance: Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Pathogen Reception and Resistance Signaling Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Organizers: Dennis Halterman, USDA ARS, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Roger Wise, USDA ARS, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology; Host Resistance Financial Sponsor: Syngenta Relatively recent advances have been made in determining the molecular basis of broad-spectrum disease resistance in plants. Multiple levels of host responses to pathogen-derived molecules provide distinct sources and mechanisms of broad-spectrum resistance. Pathogen recognition receptors perceive conserved microbial molecular patterns to elicit basal defense responses, while resistance genes recognize the presence of pathogen effectors that may be essential for virulence. In this session, we will explore the molecular interface between hosts and pathogens and specifically focus on traits that result in host resistance to a broad spectrum of pathogen strains or types. Pathogen recognition receptors in plant innate immunity. CHRIS RIDOUT, John Innes Centre, Norwich, United Kingdom Dissecting QTL: The genes that contribute to disease resistance revealed. JAN LEACH, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A. Genetical genomics of Ug99 stem rust infection identifies master regulators of defense in barley. ROGER WISE, USDA ARS, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Conserved pathogen effectors as targets for R genes—Molecular basis of effector function. BRETT TYLER, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. The molecular basis of broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance. RALPH PANSTRUGA, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany Creating Possibilities for Sustainable Postharvest Disease Control Through Integrated Approaches to Both Preand Postharvest Fungicide Resistance Management Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer: Chang-Lin Xiao, Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Postharvest Pathology; Pathogen Resistance Financial Sponsors: PACE Intl.; Janssen PMP; Syngenta Crop Protection Several new pre- and postharvest fungicides have recently entered the market. This session will focus on the key drivers for the development of fungicide resistance in the pre- and postharvest crop production systems and establish the views continued on next page

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on pre- and postharvest integrated approaches to the sustainable management of fungicide resistance in postharvest pathogens as seen by the fungicide-resistance research community and the companies that are developing these new products. A dynamic panel of speakers has been identified to address this exciting topic. The collaborative output from this session is anticipated to help establish a standard foundation for resistance management recommendations for newly introduced pre- and postharvest fungicides that are used for postharvest disease control. Resistance mechanisms to postharvest fungicides. ULRICH GISI, University of Basel and Syngenta Crop Protection, Basel, Switzerland Resistance management: An integration of strategies from fungicide development to systematic usage based on epidemiological and chemical information. JIM ADASKAVEG, University California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. Management of fungicide resistance in postharvest pathogens of pome fruits: Integrated approaches from orchard to storage. CHANG-LIN XIAO, Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. Resistance management strategies for new postharvest fungicides—Pace International perspective. PETER SANDERSON, Pace International, Yakima, WA, U.S.A. Resistance management strategies for new postharvest fungicides—Syngenta perspective. ALEX COCHRAN, Syngenta Crop Protection, Granite Bay, CA, U.S.A. Cryptic Foes: Gathering the Latest Advances on Pythium Section: Diseases of Plants Organizers: Carla Garzon, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; Jerry Weiland, USDA-ARSHorticultural Crops Research Lab, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Soil Microbiology and Root Diseases; Diagnostics; Chemical Control; Mycology This session will provide updates on the current knowledge about Pythium phylogenetics, population genetics and diversity, sampling, diagnostics, disease management, and economic impact. Ecology and biology of Pythium spp. and their impact on crop production. FRANK MARTIN, USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. Sampling and processing of samples for Pythium. GARY MOORMAN, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. Assessment of Pythium diversity in forest nurseries. JERRY WEILAND, USDA-ARS-Horticultural Crops Research Lab, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Role of Pythium spp. in the seedling disease complex on cotton: Results from the National Cottonseed Treatment Trials. CRAIG ROTHROCK, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. Pythium species associated to plants: The aggressive vs. the moderately low and nonaggressive. Z. GLORIA ABAD, USDA-APHIS-PPQ-PHP-RIPPS-Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. DNA barcode, genomics, and phylogenetics of Pythium species. C. ANDRE LEVESQUE, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada Population genetics and interspecies boundaries within the Pythium irregulare complex. CARLA GARZON, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms: Diversity, Commercial Production, and Disease Management in HighVolume Production Facilities Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Mo-Mei Chen, University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.; Barry Pryor, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Mycology; Forest Pathology; Extension This special session will provide an overview on the diversity of edible and medicinal mushrooms and on the stateof-the-art in the commercial production of gourmet and specialty fungi, highlighting the economic impact of this emerging agricultural product. Additional emphasis will be on modern disease management strategies employed in large-scale production facilities.

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Global expansion in gourmet and medicinal mushroom cultivation and use. Global expansion in gourmet and medicinal mushroom cultivation and use. MARK WACH, Sylvan Inc., Saxonburg, PA, U.S.A. Disease management in commercial mushroom facilities: Controlling the fungus’ fungus. DAVID BEYER, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, U.S.A. Genetic improvement of commercial mushroom strains. CHRISTINA SMITH, Lambert Spawn Company, Coatesville, PA, U.S.A. Developing curricula in mushroom cultivation at the university. MIKE DAVIS, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Challenges and future prospects for organic mushroom production. TINA ELLOR, Phillips Mushroom Farms, Kennett Square, PA, U.S.A. Identifying Quantitative Resistance Using Modern Technologies—Challenges for Plant Breeding Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Kimberly Webb, USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; Alemu Mengistu, USDA-ARS, Jackson, TN, U.S.A.; Zhi-Yuan Chen, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Host Resistance; Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology This session will apply current technologies for identification of multi-trait, broad-spectrum resistance for use in today’s public and private breeding programs. Discussion on how effective the use of quanitative trait loci (QTL), DNA expression profiles, and proteomics have been in devolving new public and private breeding programs and their utility in incorporating novel sources of disease resistance into traditional breeding programs. Bioinformatic strategies for predicting candidate genes under disease resistance QTL. REBECCA DAVIDSON, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. QTL use for development of host resistance and putting it to use—Industry perspective. GIRMA TABOR, Pioneer Hi-Bred, Johnston, IA, U.S.A. Proteomics in identifying potential markers for developing broad-spectrum resistance. ZHI-YUAN CHEN, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. Using network biology to identify quantitative genetic variation altering signaling in both plant host and generalist pathogens. DAN KLIEBENSTEIN, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Induced Resistance: Where Does This Fit in IPM Programs? Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer: Barry Jacobsen, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Biological Control; IPM This session will focus on host plant resistance induced by bacteria, fungi, and chemicals. Induced resistance: Overview and definitions. PETER BAKKER, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands Seed- or soil-applied bacteria that induce resistance—Use in IPM programs. JOSEPH KLOEPPER, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. Foliar-applied Bacillus that induce resistance—Use in IPM programs. BARRY JACOBSEN, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, U.S.A. Trichoderma-induced resistance—Use in IPM programs. GARY HARMAN, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. Chemical compounds that induce resistance—Use in IPM programs. ALLISON TALLY, Syngenta, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.

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Integrated Microbial Bioinformatics Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizer: Scot Hulbert, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Public Policy Board This session will cover the outcomes of a Public Policy Board-sponsored workshop in the Washington, DC area in February. The speed in which microbial genome sequences are becoming available has created a need for better and more integrated databases and bioinformatic support for microbial researchers. The topic of the session will be the feasibility and mechanics of creating an integrated network for databases, analysis tools, and training in sequence analysis and utilization. Presentations and speakers to be announced. Kasugamycin: The Risks and Benefits of Introducing a New Antibiotic Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer: Alex Cochran, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A Sponsoring Committees: Chemical Control; Public Policy Board; Pathogen Resistance; Bacteriology Financial Sponsor: ArystaLifeScience Effective bactericides are a critical tool in the management of plant diseases. Kasugamycin is a new and unique antibiotic being developed for use in U.S. agriculture. Benefits of this new antibiotic will be discussed. In addition, general concerns over potential risks of the use of all antibiotics in agriculture to human medicine will be reviewed. Topics to be discussed will be efficacy, impacts for food safety, EPA/FDA concerns, global regulatory concerns/hurdles, and reviewing current needs after a lengthy drought of antibiotic registrations. Concerns about lateral transfer of genes for antibiotic resistance. PATTY MCMANIS, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Rediscovery of the antibiotic kasugamycin for managing fire blight and other baceterial diseases of plants in the United States. JIM ADASKAVEG, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. Kasugamycin: A novel antibiotic for U.S. agriculture. JAMES SPADAFORA, Arysta LifeScience North America LLC, Cary, NC, U.S.A. EPA/FDA view regarding new antibiotic registrations and resistance potential. LOIS ROSSI, EPA, Crystal City, VA, U.S.A. Kasumin: Field results for fire blight management and evaluation of the potential for resistance development in Erwinia amylovora. GEORGE SUNDIN, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. Resistance management strategies for bacterial pathogens: What works? KEN JOHNSON, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. More than Just Antibiotics: The Multiple Mechanisms Leading to Biological Control and Plant Growth Promotion Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Organizer: Brian McSpadden Gardener, The Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Biological Control; Soil Microbiology Much early work went into the discovery of key mechanisms of biocontrol by bacteria, particularly antibiotics. However, it has become increasingly clear that multiple chemical signals produced by bacteria impact plant health. Also, genomic and ecological studies have shown that some of the most effective individual strains express multiple traits that lead to a robust plant-health-promoting phenotype. This session will cover recent research on the diverse mechanisms by which biocontrol bacteria are now known to promote crop health and suppress plant diseases. After discussing the individual mechanisms under study, the panel of speakers will convene to discuss how and why such mechanisms might be coordinated or integrated in natural systems.

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The multiple roles of auxin production and turnover in bacteria: Impact on plant health. JOHAN LEVEAU, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Bacterial determinants of induced systemic resistance and drought tolerance. SONG HEE HAN, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Republic of Korea Differential roles of lipopeptides in plant host defenses and pathogen suppression. MARC ONGENA, University of Agricultural Sciences, Gembloux, Belgium Mutlifunctional acylhomoserine lactones: Mixed community signals. LELAND PIERSON III, Texas A&M, College Station, TX, U.S.A. Redefining the paradigm of biocontrol. BRIAN MCSPADDEN GARDENER, The Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. Nature’s Molecular Biologist: Xanthomonas and TAL Effector Function, Structure, and Diversity Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Organizers: Frank White, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Adam Bogdanove, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Bacteriology This session will discuss the structure, function, and diversity of TAL effector proteins of Xanthomonas. Targets of these type III-secreted transcription factors in a wide range of host species will also be presented with a focus on the biological consequences of TAL effector-mediated host transcriptional reprogramming for disease and disease resistance. Insights into TAL effector specificity and applications of TAL effectors in research and biotechnology will be presented and discussed. Nature’s molecular biologist: Xanthomonas and the AvrBs3-related family of transcription activation-like (TAL) type III effectors. FRANK WHITE, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Diversity of S and R genes in rice targeted by the TAL effector genes of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. BING YANG, Department of Genetics Development and Cell Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. TAL effector-driven host gene expression changes shape Xanthomonas interactions with crop plants. ADAM BOGDANOVE, Department of Plant Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Exploiting TAL effector diversity for biotechnology. THOMAS LAHAYE, Institute of Genetics, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich, Munich, Germany New Products and Services Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Courtney Gallup, Dow AgroSciences, Davenport, IA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Industry This session will provide a forum for highlighting new products and services that are in the pipeline or are now offered to growers and researchers to aid in managing or understanding plant diseases. Presentations and speakers to be announced. Plant Disease Epidemics and Food Security in Globally Changing Agricultures and Environments Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizer: Serge Savary, IRRI, Manila, Philippines Sponsoring Committees: Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation; Epidemiology The past few months have seen extraordinary constraints and pressures on global food markets, with dramatic regional and local consequences on food security and societal stability. Although the situation has eased some, the primary causes for such instability remain unresolved. This special session will focus on research that is underway or should be undertaken to address food security in major human food staples, such as rice, wheat, maize, potato, sorghum, and cassava. Presentations will be given that provide timely information on (i) the importance of plant diseases on global crop productivity; (ii) approaches to prioritizing research efforts; (iii) assessments of constraints and opportunities for new technologies; and (iv) research progress that is contributing to greater food security. Global change due to climate, continued on next page

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credit availability, and diminishing natural resources will be presented in context of their measured or predicted impact on food security. Speakers will include experts from world agricultural organizations in the eastern and western hemispheres, and a specialized FAO economist also will be sought. Food security and plant disease epidemics. SERGE SAVARY, IRRI, Manila, Philippines Estimates of global crop losses. ERICH-CHRISTIAN OERKE, Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation (INRES) – Phytomedicine, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany Seeking impact on food security of the poor through phytopathological science. REBECCA J. NELSON, Cornell University, Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. The role of pest risk analysis and quarantine measures in food security. PHIL BERGER, USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Center for Health Science and Technology, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. Plant Pathogen Population Genetics: An Essential Tool for Crop Biosecurity Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizers: Niklaus Grunwald, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; Erica Goss, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Genetics Plant pathogens have been recognized as threats to U.S. biosecurity in regard to agricultural crops and natural resources. Population genetics has played an important role in recent years in the detection and monitoring of emerging or reemerging pathogens, elucidating the source of global migrations of pathogens, and in the assessment of future risk from pathogens. This session will highlight the contributions of population genetics to plant pathogen biosecurity. How can population genetics inform crop biosecurity efforts? NIKLAUS GRUNWALD, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Comparative genomic approaches for monitoring movement of the highly virulent Puccinia graminis Ug99 lineage. JO ANNE CROUCH, USDA ARS, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. Inference of Phytophthora ramorum migration pathways. ERICA GOSS, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Population processes influence aflatoxigenicity in Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. IGNAZIO CARBONE, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. A population genetics framework for understanding aggressiveness and toxigenicity of Fusarium head blight pathogens. TODD WARD, USDA ARS, Peoria, IL, U.S.A. Prepare for Your Future: Career Opportunities After Graduate School: Part 2—Extension Section: Professionalism/Outreach Organizers: Heather Olson, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; Kestrel Lannon, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; Alan Chambers, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; Patricia Wallace, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Graduate Student; Extension This session will be the second in the series started during the 2009 APS Annual Meeting exploring career opportunities in various sectors of plant pathology. This year, the session will inform graduate students about career possibilities in extension plant pathology. The session will explore the spectrum of careers available at both the masters and doctorate levels of education. Invited speakers will share personal experiences, as well as provide insight on how to obtain and develop a successful career in extension services. Is extension right for you? JANNA BECKERMAN, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. Extension jobs from MS to PhD: Acquiring the skills and developing the resume to get the job you want. BARRY JACOBSEN, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, U.S.A. A year in the life of a diagnostician. GAIL RUHL, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. A year in the life of a county extension agent. TOM STEBBINS, University of Tennessee Extension Service, Chattanooga, TN, U.S.A. Starting an extension specialist career from the ground up. LINDSEY DU TOIT, Washington State University, Mount Vernon, WA, U.S.A. Discussion: Speaker panel Q&A 22

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Refining Systematics (Taxonomy, Nomenclature, Phylogenetics) for Better Resolution in the Population Biology and Evolution of the Oomycetes Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers: Z. Gloria Abad, USDA-APHIS-PPQ-PHP-RIPPS-Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; Kelly Ivors, North Carolina State University, Mills River, NC, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Mycology; Forest Pathology Financial Sponsor: Widely Prevalent Plant Pathogenic Fungi List Project Although Phytophthora, Pythium, and the downy mildews are among the most studied organisms in systematics, there is still a great deal of confusion in recognizing valid species and new genera. Poorly annotated sequences exist in GenBank, making it impossible to identify some of the clusters for extypes or neotypes and consequently, the proper identity of an isolate. Examples of these complexes include Phytophthora capsici, Phytophthora citricola, Phytophthora drechsleri, Phytophthora megasperma, Pythium irregulare, prov. genus name Phytopythium vexans, and Pythium helicoides. Although morphological and molecular characterization is used for describing new species, some have recently been found invalid. Establishing proper nomenclature provides a solid foundation for research tied to the species and for associated regulatory and disease control decisions. Experts in systematics, evolution, and population genetics will participate in this session, hopefully stimulating collaboration for addressing these major challenges in oomycete systematics. Pythium, Pythiogeton, and prov. name Phytopythium: The current status for the species in the genera. ARTHUR DE COCK, CBS, Utrecht, Netherlands How to avoid misidentifying your isolates: The value of the morphological/phylogenetic key of Phytophthora extypes and neotypes. Z. GLORIA ABAD, USDA-APHIS-PPQ-PHP-RIPPS-Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. The Phytophthora database: Current status and future direction. SEOGCHAN KANG, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. The Oomycetes database: The initiative for an international web-based informatics platform. FRANK MARTIN, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. Mitochondrial genomics of Oomycetes, tools for phylogenetics, and development of molecular markers. FRANK MARTIN. USDA Agricultural Research Service, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. Emergence of Oomycete pathogens and population genetics. NIKLAUS GRUNWALD, Oregon State University, USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Aquatic habitats: A reservoir for population diversity in the genus Phytophthora. JAESOON HWANG, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, U.S.A. Ecological adaptations in Phytophthora: Understanding their role in forest ecosystems. YILMAZ BALCI, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A. Restoring Forest Ecosystems Impacted by Invasive Pathogens Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: William L. MacDonald, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, U.S.A.; Pauline O. Spaine, USDA Forest Service, Athens, GA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Forest Pathology Numerous North American forest ecosystems have been severely impacted by nonnative invasive pathogens. Although the long-term damage that has resulted is recalcitrant to recovery, progress is being made to restore some impacted ecosystems. Several examples of restorations that are ongoing will be presented. Can whitebark pine be saved? ELLEN MICHAELS GOHEEN, USDA Forest Service, FHP, R-6, Central Point, OR, U.S.A. Rescuing Port Orford cedar. RICHARD SNIEZKO, USDA Forest Service, Cottage Grove, OR, U.S.A. Restoring a fallen giant—The American chestnut. WILLLIAM L. MACDONALD, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, U.S.A. The future of California and Oregon coastal forests. DAVID RIZZO, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. continued on next page

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Schroth Faces of the Future in Virology Section: Diseases of Plants Organizer: Lyndon Porter, USDA-ARS, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Early Career Professionals; Virology This session is designed to acknowledge the “up-and-comers� in the virology discipline of plant pathology. The speakers will present their current research and speculate on the future direction of their discipline in this special session. Presentations and speakers to be announced. Scratching the Cuticle of Nematode Diagnostics: Where Do We Need to Go? Section: Diseases of Plants Organizer: Amy Ziems, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Nematology; Diagnostics Identification of nematodes is a growing challenge throughout the country, especially when species identification is required. The types of resources currently available and the challenges that arise with these types of methods for diagnosticians will be discussed. Where will nematode diagnostics go in the future especially when species identification is critical? How do the traditional nematology labs and the National Plant Diagnostic Network labs associate with each other in regard to national plant biosecurity and communication with state plant regulatory officials? The taxonomic world of nematode identification. ERNEST BERNARD, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A. Explore the use of molecular markers in nematode identification for nematodes of regulatory concern. THOMAS POWERS, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. National Plant Diagnostic Network Laboratory perspective on nematode identification and reports. AMY ZIEMS, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. Morphometric approaches in species identification. JOHN EISENBACK, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. International concern on accurate nematode identification from a Canadian or Mexican perspective. To be announced U.S. perspective on identification of nematodes for national and intrastate regulation concerns. To be announced Small Molecules in Phytopathology: From Determinants of Disease to Modulators of Defense Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Organizers: Srinivasa Rao Uppalapati, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.; Tom Mitchell, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology This session will focus on host- and pathogen-derived small molecules that regulate microbial pathogenesis, disease development processes, and signaling networks involved in plant responses to a wide range of pathogens. The session will also address emerging paradigms, newly identified small molecules that could provide novel ways to control diseases by either priming plant immunity or interfering with effector secretion systems. Unraveling the site- and mode-of-action of protein host-selective toxins. LYNDA CIUFFETTI, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Hijacking and manipulation of host responses by pathogen-derived hormone mimics. SRINIVASA RAO UPPALAPATI, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. Oxalic acid creates a reducing environment in the host which is required for pathogenic success. MARTIN DICKMAN, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. Azelaic acid: A new player in priming plant defense. JEAN GREENBERG, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, U.S.A.

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Networking by small-molecule hormones in plant immunity triggered by beneficial microbes. ANTONIO LEON-REYES, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands Small molecule type III secretion system inhibitors. HEATHER FELISE, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, U.S.A. The Sophistication of Host-Pathogen Interactions Involving Necrotrophic Fungi Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers: Timothy Friesen, Northern Crop Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; Shaobin Zhong, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Genetics Necrotrophic plant pathogens have long been thought to be less sophisticated than the well-studied biotrophs in their interactions with their corresponding hosts. Recent exciting research in the area of necrotrophic plant pathogen interactions has shown that the necrotrophic pathogen interactions may be just as sophisticated in their attack on their respective hosts. Speakers in this session will present research in the area of necrotrophic plant pathogen interactions from both the host and pathogen perspectives. This session will look specifically at virulence/pathogenicity of necrotrophic plant pathogens as well as at the host response to effectors involved in this interaction. Live and let die: The smart lifestyle of Botrytis cinerea. JAN VAN KAN, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands Necrotrophy in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum: To oxalate and beyond. JEFFREY ROLLINS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. Systematic characterization of the kinome in the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum. JIN-RONG XU, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. Pathogen hijacking of disease resistance mechanisms in wheat. JUSTIN FARIS, Northern Crop Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. Dissection of effector-induced host susceptibility pathways in Stagonospora nodorum blotch of wheat. SHUNWEN LU, Northern Crop Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 10th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: Seed Pathology—Epidemiology, Management, and Phytosanitary Concerns Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University, Mount Vernon, WA, U.S.A.; Gary Munkvold, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Seed Pathology Financial Sponsors: ROGERS Brand Vegetable Seeds (Syngenta); BASF Corporation; Casiana (Nollie) M. Vera Cruz of International Rice Research Institute (personal donation); Eurofins STA Laboratories; Lindsey J. du Toit of Washington State University (personal donation) This 10th symposium will feature presentations by graduate students on their thesis work highlighting research aimed at providing a better understanding of the epidemiology, management, and/or phytosanitary issues of plant diseases caused by seedborne pathogens. Student applications cover any area of seed pathology research including seed infection, seed transmission, genetics of host-pathogen interactions of seedborne pathogens, management of seedborne pathogens (seed treatments and other practices), epidemiology of seedborne pathogens, phytosanitary and regulatory issues, and other basic and applied aspects of seedborne pathogens. Presentations and speakers to be announced.

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The 2009 Tomato and Potato Late Blight Crisis: The Interaction of the Urban Home Garden and Commercial Agriculture—What Went Wrong and What We Learned Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Brian Olson, Dow AgroSciences, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; Roger Kaiser, Valent BioSciences Corp., Libertyville, IL, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Industry; Extension In early July 2009, tomato plants infected with late blight were being sold by the “big box” stores up and down the East Coast, creating a late blight epidemic. This session will examine how the crisis began; the impact on commercial tomato growers; how regulators from different states reacted to the situation; how the nursery industry production system works with the “big box” retail stores; the science of the epidemic; and the APS Extension Committee’s task force report and recommendations on the crisis. Overview and economic impact—Extension and grower response. MEG MCGRATH, Cornell University, Riverhead, NY, U.S.A. Overview of the nursery industry production system for the retail business, i.e. big box stores. BRIAN OLSON, Dow AgroSciences, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. Perspective of the crisis from the state regulatory inspection service. SEONG-HWAN KIM, Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, PA, U.S.A. Science of the epidemic. KENNETH DEAHL, USDA ARS, Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A. Extension Committee task force—Report and recommendations. MARTY DRAPER, USDA CSREES, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Discussion Virus Fishing with Chips: Plant Virus Microarrays and Next Generation Sequencing Section: Diseases of Plants Organizers: John Hammond, USDA-ARS, Molecular Plant Pathology Lab, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; William Schneider, USDA ARS, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, U.S.A.; Maher Alrwahnih, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Virology Financial Sponsors: APS-APHIS Virus Working Group; Noble Foundation The list of viruses infecting plants is growing. There are many viruses that are not identified and characterized. Use of microarrays and next generation sequencing techniques are offering unprecedented opportunities to identify viruses, find new viruses, and examine virus populations. This session will bring experts together to share current knowledge on these topics and on how the new technologies are revolutionizing plant virology. Universal plant virus microarray development and validation. CLAUDE FAUQUET, Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. High throughput sequencing—Next wave diagnostics. NEIL BOONHAM, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, Yorkshire, United Kingdom Viral population analysis by genome sequencing. ZHONGGUO XIONG, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. Next generation sequencing as a tool for studying virus ecology. ULRICH MELCHER, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Bioinformatic analysis of microarray and next generation sequencing data. KAEL FISCHER, University of Utah, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT, U.S.A.

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TECHNICAL ORALS AND POSTERS Poster Viewing Hours— Extended Time! Sunday, August 8 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. 4:30 – 10:00 p.m.

Poster Set-up Poster Viewing

Monday, August 9 3:30 – 10:00 p.m. 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Poster Viewings Poster Authors Present— odd-numbered posters Poster Authors Present— even-numbered posters

Tuesday, August 10 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. Poster Viewing Wednesday, August 11 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Poster Take-Down

Oral presentations and more than 600 poster presentations feature the latest scientific research in: Biology of Pathogens • Bacteria—Systematics/Evolution/Ecology • Fungi—Systematics/Evolution/Ecology • Nematodes—Systematics/Evolution/Ecology • Postharvest Pathology and Mycotoxicology • Phytoplasmas/Spiroplasmas/Fastidious Prokaryotes • Viruses—Systematics/Evolution/Ecology Diseases of Plants • Crop Loss Assessment • Disease Detection and Diagnosis • Diseases—Cereals, Field, and Fiber Crops • Diseases—Fruits and Nuts • Diseases—Ornamentals • Diseases—Turfgrasses • Diseases—Vegetables • Forest Pathology • Seed Pathology • Tropical Plant Pathology Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology • Biology • Pathogen—Vector Interactions • Phyllosphere/Rhizosphere Microbiology and Ecology • Population Genetics Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions • Bacteria—Genetics/Molecular Biology/Cell Biology • Fungi—Genetics/Molecular Biology/Cell Biology • Nematodes—Genetics/Molecular Biology/Cell Biology • Viruses—Genetics/Molecular Biology/Cell Biology Plant Disease Management • Biological Control • Chemical Control • Host Resistance • Integrated Pest Management • Regulatory Plant Pathology Professionalism/Outreach

Flash-and-Dash Poster Presentations Flash-and-dash poster presentations consist of selected oral talks/posters that highlight the science presented in posters. These special flash-and-dash sessions offer a brief oral presentation (5 minute – 3 slides maximum) followed by poster time with the presenters. See program schedule on Tuesday for flash-and-dash poster presentations and corresponding poster viewing times.

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EXHIBITS AND SERVICES 2010 Meeting Proceedings This fully searchable CD provides a record of the proceedings at the annual meeting, including citable abstracts of all presentations. This CD is available to meeting attendees at the discounted rate of $55.00 each, including shipping, when ordered with your registration. Presentations are presented in PDF format. CDs will be shipped approximately 6-8 weeks after the meeting. CDs may also be purchased after the meeting for $75 each through the APS PRESS bookstore.

Exhibits Representatives from more than 30 leading industry suppliers will be available in the Exhibit Hall to answer questions and share information on products and services. The exhibition features the latest products and services that advance the work of plant pathology.

Exhibition Hours Sunday, August 8 Monday, August 9 Tuesday, August 10

4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

2010 APS Annual Meeting Exhibitors Current as of March 15, 2010. Visit http://meeting.apsnet.org as exhibitors are added.

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AC Diagnostics, Inc. Academia Book Exhibits Agdia, Inc. American Peat Technology LLC APS Office of International Programs (OIP) APS Office of Public Relations and Outreach (OPRO) BASF Corporation Berthold Technologies BigC Bio Chambers Incorporated British Society for Plant Pathology Burkard Manufacturing Co. Ltd. Conviron DuPont Crop Protection EnviroLogix Inc. Environmental Growth Chambers Eurofins STA Laboratories/BIOREBA AG Gylling Data Management, Inc. Marrone Bio Innovations National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN) Natural Industries Spectrum Technologies, Inc. Springer USDA/APHIS/PPQ/PHP


GENERAL INFORMATION 2010 Abstracts – Available Online Only Abstracts will be printed as a supplement to Phytopathology but will not appear in printed form at the meeting. Searchable abstracts will be made available at http:// meeting.apsnet.org before the meeting and abstract printing stations will be available at the meeting. International Attendees If you are from a country outside the United States, you will need a valid passport or visa to attend the meeting. Plan accordingly since visas can take up to 3 months to obtain. Note: U.S. legislation requires foreign nationals to provide to air carriers a valid U.S. address during their stay prior to departure of their U.S.-bound flight. Most airlines require a passport number, as well as a valid U.S. address for the passenger’s stay, at the time of booking. Visit http://meeting.apsnet.org/citytravel/intlAttendees. cfm for more information and relevant links. APS Foundation Student Travel Awards APS student members giving oral or poster presentations are eligible to apply to receive $500 to support their travel to the 2010 APS Annual Meeting. However, students who received an award in 2009 will not be eligible for an award until 2011. The APS Foundation accepts applications through March 23, 2010. Visit http://www. scientificsocieties.org/aps/foundation/travel/ for full details. APS Foundation International Travel Awards Applications are not being accepted for 2010, but plans are in place to offer this again in 2011. No other programs are available at this time for international attendees. Emergency Information If you have a medical condition that APS should be made aware of during the meeting, fax your information to APS Meetings Coordinator at +1.651.454.0766 or email to rwilkie@scisoc.org by July 1, 2010. This information will not be shared with anyone, except in case of an emergency with emergency personnel. A paramedic will be onsite during the meeting registration hours. Dress The official dress of the APS Annual Meeting is business casual.

APS Job Services Available year-round at www.apsnet.org, the APS Job Center provides access to the most recent jobs and candidates in the field. Prior to the meeting, make sure to indicate your availability at the meeting on your job or candidate posting or bring copies of your job/ candidate postings to include on the Job Board available in the registration area. Those interested in connecting one-on-one should make sure to check out the Early Career Professionals Social, which includes a NEW Employer Networking Opportunity on Monday, August 9. See page 13 for details. A ticket is required for this event. See What’s New at the APS PRESS Bookstore! Visit the bookstore and browse the new compendia and teaching resources, as well as new bacteriology, virology, and mycology titles. Be sure to come early to get the new 2010 meeting t-shirt—limited quantities are available. Present your book idea to the APS PRESS Editorial Board and learn more about how you can publish your passion with APS PRESS. Create a Custom Research Alert in APS Journals Online and Receive a Special Gift Set up your profile and customize the online content from Plant Disease, Phytopathology, and MPMI to match your interests. Learn more during the meeting —APS staff will be on hand to help you create or update your profile in APS Journals Online. Media Members of the media are extended complimentary registration to the annual meeting. New releases related to the research being presented at the meeting will be sent prior to the event and onsite interviews can also be arranged. To register, add your name to the media contact list, or make additional arrangements, please contact Susan Schoepke at +1.651.994.3813 or sschoepke@ scisoc.org. Photo Release Photographs will be taken at the 2010 APS Annual Meeting. By registering for this meeting, you agree to allow APS to use your photo in any of their publications or websites.

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HOUSING INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS The Best Deal in Town! APS has negotiated a discounted hotel rate and amenities package that is available only to APS Annual Meeting attendees. Staying onsite in Nashville is an easy, convenient, and affordable way to support APS and make the most of your time at the meeting. The Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center will serve as the headquarters hotel, as well as the meeting venue, for the 2010 APS Annual Meeting. The hotel is conveniently located 15–20 minutes from the airport. Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center 2802 Opryland Drive, Nashville, TN 37214 Negotiated Rates: • Standard Single/Double: $146.00 USD/night • Premium Garden View Single/Double: $206.00 USD/ night Hotel rates are subject to 15.25% tax and a $2.50 per night city tax. Quoted rates are good for two guests per room. Additional guests will be charged $20/per person. Check-In: 3:00 p.m.; Check-Out: 11:00 p.m. Parking: $18.00 per day/self, $25.00 per day/valet

APS Amenities Package: • Wired and wireless high-speed Internet access in sleeping rooms • Wireless Internet access in public space of hotel (atriums, restaurants, and lobbies) • Toll-free calls and local calls up to 20 minutes • Access to fitness center • Daily newspaper delivered to guest room • Bottled water (two bottles provided daily) • Scheduled complex transportation to attractions such as Grand Ole Opry, General Jackson, Gaylord Springs Golf Links, and Opry Mills

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HOTEL RESERVATIONS Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center Mention APS or the group code N-PHYTO. Phone: +1.615.889.1000 Toll Free Phone: 1.888.777.6779 Online: http://meeting.apsnet.org/reghotel Deadline Reservations must be made by July 8, 2010, to guarantee convention rates. After that date, the room block will be released and rooms and rates will be based on availability. All housing changes, cancellations, and inquiries should be made directly with the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center Nashville. Special Accommodations  Indicate any special needs you may have when making reservations either online or by telephone. Confirmations Confirmations will be e-mailed to attendees making reservations using the Internet if an e-mail address is provided. Confirmation numbers will be given to attendees making reservations by phone. Room Deposit, Payment Methods, and Tax All rates are per room per night and are subject to 15.25% tax (subject to change), as well as a $2.50/ night city tax. Reservations will not be accepted without a valid credit card guarantee of one night’s room rate plus tax for each room reserved. Cancellations After July 8, 2010, rates are subject to availability. Cancellations within 72 hours of the day of arrival will forfeit the entire deposit. Early departures are subject to penalties set by the hotel. Credit cards will only be charged if cancelled within the penalty period. A charge of the first night’s room and tax will be applied and/or forfeited if you do not cancel or do not arrive (no show).


MEETING REGISTRATION Registration may be made in the following ways: Internet: http://meeting.apsnet.org/reghotel Fax or mail: Complete the attached registration form Fax: +1.651.454.0766 Mail: 2010 APS Annual Meeting Registration 3340 Pilot Knob Road St. Paul, MN 55121 U.S.A. Take advantage of the advanced registration deadline of May 3, 2010 and SAVE MORE! Full registration entitles you to attend all sessions, posters, exhibits, Welcome Reception, and Final Night Celebration. Save With Meeting Plus Membership If you are not a member of APS, there has never been a better time to join! A special “Meeting Plus Membership” option is being offered on the registration form, which provides a significant discount on the registration fee compared with nonmember rates. This offer is valid for nonmembers and those whose membership has lapsed for more than 12 months. All the benefits of membership are included in this offer, and a follow-up e-mail will be sent to those who join regarding the journal options and other membership selections. Simply select the “Meeting Plus Membership” registration rate and join today! Registration Desk Registration will be located in the Ryman Exhibit Hall B. Guests Guests do not pay for registration. However, guests wishing to attend any of the receptions or other ticketed food functions must purchase tickets in advance or onsite. Guests must have a name badge and ticket to attend ticketed functions. Cancellations/Refund Policy Meeting cancellations MUST be made in writing and received by APS headquarters no later than July 1, 2010. Cancellations received by this date are subject to a $75 processing fee; ticketed events will be fully refunded. Ticketed events and meeting registration cancellations received after July 1, 2010, are not subject to a refund.

Photo Courtesy of Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center

CITY INFORMATION Opryland The Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center is located 15–20 minutes outside of the downtown of Nashville, Tennessee, and has many dining, shopping, and entertainment options available within the complex. Live music is presented nightly at venues throughout the center. Dining options within the complex range from fine dining to casual to quick eats such as burgers, pizza, and ice cream. Opryland also has 25 unique boutiques and fine retail shops onsite where you can shop for gifts, clothing, home décor, jewelry, golf equipment, books, and more. Finally, the center holds a full service spa, Relâche Spa, as well as a fitness center and beautiful outdoor pool and patio. Nashville Downtown Nashville has over 35 live music venues featuring country, bluegrass, and jazz and more than 145 restaurants. Other attractions include the Frist Center for Visual Arts, the historic Ryman Auditorium (formerly home to the Grand Ole Opry), the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Arcade, the Shelby Street Pedestrian Bridge, the Tennessee State Capitol, and the Lower Broadway entertainment district. For more information on what to see and do in Nashville, visit http://www.visitmusiccity.com or http://meeting.apsnet. org/citytravel. Photos Courtesy of Nashville Convention & Visitors Bureau

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2010 APS Annual Meeting August 7-11, 2010 • Opryland • Nashville, TN Register online at http://meeting.apsnet.org

Complete the following. Please print clearly to ensure correct spelling on name badge. Member ID#: ____________________________ Located on mailing label

Registrant is o Male o Female

o Mr. o Mrs.

o Ms.

o Dr.

First Name _____________________________________ Middle Initial __________ Name Preferred on Badge (first name only) ___________________________________

Last/Surname ___________________________________________________________ Job Title _______________________________________________________________ Date of Birth (new members only) ___________________________________________

Month

Information below is o New Address

Day

Year

Professional Area (check only one): 100 o Academia 101 o Government 102 o Industry 103 o Other Please check if you: 200 o Test chemicals 201 o Test other products 202 o Make recommendations to the grower Product(s) you are involved in purchasing: 300 o Biotech services 301 o Diagnostic services/materials 302 o Field supplies 303 o Lab equipment (chromatographic, centrifuges, ultracentrifuges, plant growth chambers, etc.) 304 o Lab supplies 305 o Microscopes 306 o Software

o Alternate Address

Employer/Company/Institution _____________________________________________ Company Address _______________________________________________________

Street

_______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________

City

State/Province

_______________________________________________________________________

Zip/Postal Code

Cancellation/Refund Policy Registration cancellations must be made in writing and received no later than July 1, 2010 and are subject to a $75 processing fee; ticketed events will be fully refunded. Registration and ticketed event cancellations received after July 1, 2010, are NOT subject to a refund.

Country

Daytime Telephone ______________________________________________________ Facsimile ______________________________________________________________ E-mail _________________________________________________________________

Emergency Contact: Name _________________________________________________________________ Telephone (August 7-11, 2010) ______________________________________________

Mail or fax form and payment to: APS Annual Meeting Registration 3340 Pilot Knob Road St. Paul, MN 55121 U.S.A. Phone: +1.651.454.7250 Fax: +1.651.454.0766 Faxed forms must include credit card information to be processed. Stay at the APS designated hotel.

Housing Reservations Visit http://meeting.apsnet.org

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Register by May 3 to receive the best rates! Register online at http://meeting.apsnet.org 2010 Registration Fees

Ticketed Functions

Registrations postmarked or faxed by date listed will be charged appropriate fee.

Registration † Advance Regular Late/Onsite Total by May 3 by July 8 starting July 9 Member $445 $495 $515 Nonmember $505 $555 $575 Student Member $260 $310 $330 Post-Doc Member $345 $395 $415 Emeritus Member $155 $165 $175 Exhibitor* $395 $395 $395 Single Day (select one) $270 $320 $340 o Sunday o Monday o Tuesday o Wednesday Emeritus Single Day (select one) $40 $45 $50 o Sunday o Monday o Tuesday o Wednesday Meeting Plus Membership** o I would like to become a member of APS Registration+APS Regular Membership $500 $550 Registration+APS Post-Doc Membership*** $398 $448 Registration+Student Membership*** $290 $340

________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________

$570

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$468

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$360

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Total Registration Fees ________

 Check here if you require special meals or accommodations to fully

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participate in this meeting. Please specify. † Full registration includes access to sessions, posters, exhibits, the Welcome Reception, Alumni Socials, and Final Night Celebration. * Each exhibiting company (single booths) receives one complimentary registration. Double booths receive two complimentary registrations. The fee for each additional exhibitor is $395. ** Excludes those who are currently a member and those whose membership lapsed within the past 12 months. *** Student and post-docs registering with the meeting plus membership option must have a faculty member sign here to qualify. _______________________________________________________ Faculty signature

Guests—Guests must purchase tickets to attend any of the receptions and luncheons. Guests do not have access to the sessions. Co-workers and business associates must pay registration fees. _______________________________________________________ First and Last Name of Registrant's Guest

Payment Information o Check enclosed, payable to APS (U.S. funds only drawn from a U.S. bank) o Charge: o VISA o American Express o MasterCard

Card No. __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ 1

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Expiration Date: __ __ / __ __ Security Code: ___________________

(3 or 4 digit code on back of card)

Cardholder Name (please print)_____________________________________________ Cardholder Signature (required):_ _______________________________________

Quantity Cost Total 1. 2010 APS Meeting Posters on CD _____ $55 _______ Saturday, August 7 2. Workshop: DNA-Based Pathogen Detection Methods: _____ $40 _______ Ralstonia solanacearum, a Case Study 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 3. Leadership Training: APS Leadership Institute _____ $75 _______ 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. 4. Field Trip: Turfgrass _____ $40 _______ 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 5. Field Trip: Ornamental & Forestry Nursery 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. _____ $40 _______ 6. Workshop: Scientific Writing for APS Journals _____ $25 _______ 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. 7. Workshop: Meet the Geek: _____ $25 _______ Creating Podcasts and Using Syndicated Content 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. 8. Leadership Training: No charge Check if attending o Enhance your Team Performance – Understand your MBTI 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. 9. Workshop: Mixed Models for Data _____ $30 _______ Analysis in Plant Pathology 1:00 – 5:30 p.m. 10. First Timers’ Orientation No charge Check if attending o 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. Sunday, August 8 11. Leadership Opportunity: Committee for Diversity and Equality Social with Mentoring Strategizing Session 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Regular _____ $25 _______ Student/Post doc _____ $20 _______ 12. Industry and Extension Social _____ $30 _______ 6:30 – 10:00 p.m. Monday, August 9 13. Extension Plant Pathologists Breakfast 6:30 – 8:00 a.m. 14. Graduate Student & Industry Lunch (student & industry registrants only) 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. 15. Early Career Professional Social includes New Employer Networking Opportunity 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Select from one of the options o Early Career Attendee o Employer Attendee 16. Graduate Student Social (student registrants only) 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

_____ $30 _______ _____

$5 _______

_____ $10 _______

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$5 _______

Tuesday, August 10 17. Department Heads Breakfast _____ $27 _______ 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 18. Small Fruit Disease Workers Discussion No charge Check if attending o 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, August 11 19. Workshop: An Introduction to Statistics Using R (“R for Dummies”) 12:30 – 4:30 p.m.

______ $35 _______

Extra Tickets Only 20. Opening Reception Ticket, Sunday, August 8† _____ $10 _______ 21. Final Night Ticket, Tuesday, August 10† _____ $45 _______ Total Ticketed Event Fees $___________

Grand Total (Registration and Ticket Fees) $___________

2010 APS Annual Meeting Registration Brochure  

2010 APS Annual Meeting Registration Brochure