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2012 APS Annual Meeting

PRELIMINARY SCIENTIFIC

Photo by Marianne Lee

PROGRAM

The American Phytopathological Society


2012 Annual Meeting Why Is This Year’s Meeting Important? The idea for the theme for the 2012 APS Annual Meeting came to me during an APS Public Policy Board meeting last year. We were discussing the society’s agenda for its annual public policy meeting in Washington, DC, when it dawned on me that many of the challenges facing members of APS are connected to communication. The pressure to produce more and better food for the world’s growing population has never been greater. How can it be then, given this unprecedented challenge, that public support for plant pathology has steadily declined since the 1980s? I believe APS has a role to play in providing leadership and grassroots efforts aimed at delivering clear messages about what we do, why we do it, and why it’s important to society. I’m very excited to announce that the theme for the 2012 meeting will be “Communicating Science”. It’s going to be a fantastic meeting, filled with great science, loads of networking opportunities, and of course, time for catching up with friends and colleagues. I’m looking forward to seeing you in Providence, RI, and learning about what you’ve been doing! —Carol Ishimaru, President, APS

Snap Shot of the Meeting

Join The American Phytopathological Society (APS) in Providence, RI, U.S.A., August 4–8, 2012. Nestled into seven quaint New England hills, Providence is one of the oldest and most charming cities on the Eastern Seaboard. In this historic city, APS will provide attendees with field trips, workshops, scientific sessions, and networking events that highlight the latest research and technological advances in our field.

Who is APS? For more than a century, The American Phytopathological Society has been dedicated to high-quality, innovative plant pathology research. The APS Annual Meeting is the premier venue for plant pathologists from around the world to share and disseminate research.

Call for Papers: Put Your Best Science Forward: Submit an abstract and gain critical exposure for your research with top experts in the field. The APS Annual Meeting is world renowned as the premier location of superior plant pathology research. Each year more than 1,500 of the world’s top plant scientists and researchers attend this meeting in order to share their own exciting and new science and to explore that of their colleagues. Submit your highest quality research in order to share this prestigious scientific stage.

Online Submission of Oral Technical and Poster Presentation Abstracts: February 1–March 15, 2012

PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE – subject to change SATURDAY, AUGUST 4 Times TBA 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. 8:00 – 9:30 p.m.

Premeeting Field Trips and Workshops Committee Meetings Committee Meetings

SUNDAY, AUGUST 5 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. 4:00 – 4:45 p.m. 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 4:30 – 8:00 p.m. Open Evening

Committee Meetings Opening General Session and Awards & Honors Ceremony Special & Technical Sessions University Alumni Socials Welcome Reception with Exhibition and Posters Extended Time! Poster Viewing Industry & Extension Social

MONDAY, AUGUST 6 7:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. 3:15 – 4:30 p.m. Open Evening

Poster Viewing Special & Technical Sessions Plenary Session NEW Time! Technical Sessions Poster Viewing

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7 7:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. Open Evening

Poster Viewing Special & Technical Sessions Poster Viewing with Authors Poster Viewing

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8 (note: extended session time and final night party) 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. Special & Technical Sessions 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. Special & Technical Sessions Extended Program! 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Final Night Celebration NEW Day!

Visit www.apsnet.org/meet for more information, including guidelines, criteria for acceptance, a sample abstract, and more.

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➤NEW Extended Time!

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SPECIAL SESSIONS Listed alphabetically. Sessions are preliminary and subject to change.

12th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: Host Plant Resistance and Disease Management: Current Status and Future Outlook Organizers: Shaker Kousik, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.; Pradeep Kachroo, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.; Patrick Wechter, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.; Alemu Mengistu, USDA, ARS, Jackson, TN, U.S.A. Section: Disease Control and Pest Management Sponsor: Host Resistance The APS Host Resistance Committee, in conjunction with support from APS Foundation, is sponsoring the 12th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium. The symposium will feature four graduate student presentations highlighting research that leads to a better understanding of host plant resistance, resistance breeding, and disease management. Applications will be sought to cover a diverse array of basic and applied issues on host resistance and disease management.

Advances in Detection Technologies: Application in Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection Organizer: Mysore Sudarshana, USDA-ARS, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Section: Diseases of Plants Sponsors: Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection; Diagnostics The national concern for plant biosecurity has driven the development and adoption of technologies from fields outside of plant pathology. It is important to keep track of these technologies and their applicability under different settings, i.e., laboratory, ports, and field. This session aims to present the progress of some of the promising technologies and those that are on the horizon.

Bioenergy Crops and Disease Organizers: Richard Nelson, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.; Bright Agindotan, Energy Biosciences Institute/University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; Steve Marek, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Section: Diseases of Plants Sponsors: Virology; Mycology; Bacteriology; Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens Financial Sponsors: USDA; Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc. With increased monoculture in lignocellulosic biofuel crops (e.g., switchgrass, miscanthus) comes the potential for novel and/or debilitating diseases. We currently have the ability to proactively, rather than reactively, discuss this topic. Speakers will give an overview of current and proposed biofuel crops, review known and potential disease agents (e.g., BYDV on switchgrass), and assess the possibility of disease outbreaks. Microbe influence on wall recalcitrance, biomass production, and land use will be presented. ■■ Bioenergy crops and disease agents: Research and industry status. R. NELSON, Samuel Roberts Noble ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. The impact of disease on biofuel production. D. HAEFELE, Pioneer Hi-Bred, A DuPont Business, Johnston, IA, U.S.A. Viruses of bioenergy crops. B. AGINDOTAN, Energy Biosciences Institute/University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. The potential of increased virus susceptibility in grasses modified for biofuel production. C. MALMSTROM, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. Hunt for sources of rust resistance in the bioenergy crop switchgrass. K. MYSORE, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. Response of sorghum modified for bioenergy to grain and stalk fungal pathogens. D. FUNNELLHARRIS, USDA-ARS, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.

■■ Next-generation diagnostics: Eliminating the excessive sequence processing associated with next-

generation sequencing using EDNA. W. SCHNEIDER, USDA-ARS, Ft. Detrick, MD, U.S.A. ■■ All plant virus chip: Shifting from proof to use. B. BAGEWADI, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St.

Louis, MO, U.S.A. ■■ Barcoding: Cataloguing plant pathogen DNA fingerprints around the world. P. BONANTS, Plant

Research International, Wageningen, Netherlands ■■ CANARY: Serological detection sees a new dawn. Z. LIU, USDA-APHIS, CPHST, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. ■■ Pathogen signatures—Beyond nucleic acids & proteins. L. LEVY, USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CPHST, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. ■■ Isothermal amplification: So many names, are there differences? M. SUDARSHANA, USDA-ARS, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 4

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Do Regulatory Agencies Really Make the Rules in Crop Protection? Organizers: Charles Schiller, SCHILLER Ag Research and Consulting, Alamo, CA, U.S.A.; Jim Spadafora, Arysta LifeScience, Cary, NC, U.S.A. Section: Disease Control and Pest Management Sponsoring Committees: Chemical Control; Office of Industry Relations Many buyers, packers, and shippers of agricultural commodities impose their own rules on what crop production practices and pesticide residues are allowed in the commodities they handle. These secondary standards play a critical role in dictating crop protection practices. An understanding and appreciation for how these standards are established and implemented and their impact on crop protection practices and stakeholders will be the topic of this session. ■■ Retailer perspective—What function do secondary standards serve for large food retailers. To Be

Announced ■■ Wholesaler, packer/shipper/buyer perspective—Working with growers and buyers to establish and

enforce secondary standards. To Be Announced ■■ Grower perspective—Complying with federal-, state-, and retailer-imposed standards in pest

management. To Be Announced ■■ Registrant perspective—Challenges created by secondary standards in developing new products and product uses. To Be Announced ■■ Regulatory perspective—How secondary standards affect the regulatory environment. To Be Announced

Emerging Tools and Regulations Impacting the Enhancement of Disease Resistance Using Biotechnology Organizers: Dennis Halterman, USDA/ARS, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Scott Soby, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, U.S.A. Section: Disease Control and Pest Management Sponsor: Biotechnology Financial Sponsors: Monsanto; Pioneer Hi-Bred, A DuPont Business; Simplot

■■ Virus-meditated protection of maize from Ustilago maydis. T. SMITH, Donald Danforth Center, St. Louis,

MO, U.S.A. ■■ Historical perspective of biotech crop deregulation. S. TOLIN, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. ■■ Genetic methodologies for evaluating and decreasing ecological risks posed by genetically modified crops. R. MERKER, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC, U.S.A. ■■ Current processes involved in biotech crop deregulation. J. CORDTS, USDA/APHIS/BRS, Riverdale, MD, U.S.A.

Everything a Scientist Should Know About Politics, Funding, and Public Opinion Organizers: Jan Leach, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; Angela Records, Eversole Associates, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A. Section: Professionalism/Outreach Sponsors: Public Policy Board; Office of International Programs You can have an impact on decisions made in Washington! Join us for an optimistic look at politics and learn a few things that every scientist should know about the U.S. government, science funding, and public opinion. The session will offer an overview of government structure and operation and a crash course in advocacy. Attendees will learn about the distribution of science funding in the United States and abroad, as well as public perceptions of science and the importance of scientific research. ■■ Policy 101: A not-so-boring look at how government works. K. EVERSOLE, Eversole Associates,

Bethesda, MD, U.S.A. ■■ The truth about science funding. To Be Announced ■■ International funding cooperations. D. BECK, Office of International Science and Engineering, National

Science Foundation, Washington, DC, U.S.A. ■■ Getting engaged is easy. M. IVEY, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. ■■ Scientists: Almost as prestigious as firefighters. A. RECORDS, Eversole Associates, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A.

Using biotechnology to improve disease resistance will continue to be an important tool in the struggle to keep up with rapid pathogen evolution. The session is a continuation of a 2011 session, which discussed the history, ethics, and strategies involved in biotech crop deployment. This session will provide an overview of the regulatory processes involved in deregulation and will address emerging technologies for enhanced disease resistance. ■■ Using TAL effectors for directed genetic modification. A. BOGDANOVE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA,

U.S.A. ■■ Reintroduction of genetically engineered potatoes into the U.S. market. C. ROMMENS, Simplot, Boise,

ID, U.S.A. 6

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Exploring the Micropolis: Sampling, Identifying, and Analyzing the Diversity of Microbial Communities Organizers: Jerry Weiland, USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; Teresa Hughes, USDA-ARS, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; Kirk Broders, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, U.S.A. Section: Ecology and Epidemiology Sponsors: Soil Microbiology and Root Diseases; Phyllosphere Microbiology Financial Sponsors: Illumina Inc.; Roche; Applied Biosystems We now have the ability to identify entire soil microbial communities instead of focusing exclusively on populations of one or a few pathogenic species. However, metagenomic community analyses often yield extremely large and complex data sets. This session will address issues surrounding the abundance and complexity of data and include information regarding the identification of key microbial species, assessment of new or undescribed species, and limitations of current metagenomic techniques. Additional guidance will be provided regarding community sampling and statistical methods. ■■ Metagenomics for complex microbial communities. S. TRINGE, Joint Genomics Institute, Walnut Creek,

CA, U.S.A. ■■ From metagenomics to metabolomics: Communication in the rhizosphere. J. HANDELSMAN, Yale

University, New Haven, CT, U.S.A. ■■ Metagenomics in fungal community ecology. M. SMITH, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. ■■ New frameworks in disease ecology that address the micropolis. K. GARRETT, Kansas State University,

Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. ■■ Welcome to the micropolis: How metagenomics can enhance plant pathology research. K. BRODERS,

University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, U.S.A.

Fungicides to Promote Plant Physiological Benefits in Crops Organizers: Courtney Gallup, Dow AgroSciences, Davenport, IA, U.S.A.; Jim Mueller, Dow AgroSciences, Brentwood, CA, U.S.A. Section: Disease Control and Pest Management Sponsors: Industry; Public Policy Board; Office of Industry Relations; Pathogen Resistance; Chemical Control Financial Sponsors: Syngenta; BASF Corporation; Bayer CropScience

■■ Introduction to the forum “Fungicides to Promote Plant Physiological Benefits in Crops”. J. MUELLER, ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Dow AgroSciences, Brentwood, CA, U.S.A. Influence of ethylene inhibitors on plant physiology, biomass, and yield. F. BELOW, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. Overview of field testing in corn and soybeans since 2009. K. WISE, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. Review of large-scale field trials in potatoes. T. ZITTER, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. A regulatory perspective. A. JONES, EPA OPP BEAD, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Discussion forum.

Genetics, Genomics, and Proteomics Approaches to Elucidate ArthropodVector Specificity Organizer: Judith Brown, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Sponsors: Virology; Vector-Pathogen Complexes; Bacteriology Financial Sponsors: Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc.; USDA; Monsanto Invasive arthropod vectors of plant pathogens and nematodes may emerge in response to various environmental changes or altered agronomic practices. The focus of this session will be to highlight what is known about the interactions between arthropod vectors and the pathogens they transmit at the genetic, genomic, and cellular levels and to expose the gaps in knowledge, that if better understood, could benefit the development of new approaches to interfere with vector-mediated transmission. ■■ Psyllid genomics, RNAi, and vector management. W. HUNTER, USDA-ARS, U.S. Horticultural Research ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Lab, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A. Host switching in the vector-borne plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa. R. ALMEIDA, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A. Functional transcriptomics of Begomovirus-whitefly transmission. J. BROWN, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. Proteomics and mass spectrometry to explore the dynamic interface between Luteovirus-aphid vector complexes. M. CILIA, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. Comparative functional genomics of salivary gland and alimentary canal-Liberibacter spp. interactions. M. VYAS, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.

The dramatic increase in fungicide applications to corn and soybeans is a controversial topic of interest to various stakeholders, including state and federal regulators. Much additional research has been conducted since the 2009 “Hot Topic” session. This will build on a recent APSnet feature article, entitled “Are fungicides no longer just for fungi? An analysis of foliar fungicide use in corn.” The program will be balanced and objective, with university, industry, and regulatory presenting.

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Grafting as an Alternative to Soil Fumigation for Disease Management in Vegetable Production

Issues and Opportunities in Regulatory Sciences at EPA

Organizers: Shaker Kousik, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.; Mathews Paret, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, U.S.A.; Pingsheng Ji, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. Section: Disease Control and Pest Management Sponsor: Integrated Plant Disease Management

Organizers: Courtney Gallup, Dow AgroSciences, Davenport, IA, U.S.A.; Jim Mueller, Dow AgroSciences, Brentwood, CA, U.S.A. Section: Disease Control and Pest Management Sponsors: Office of Industry Relations; Public Policy Board; Industry; Pathogen Resistance; Chemical Control

The ban on using methyl bromide has led vegetable producers to seek alternatives for managing soilborne diseases. Grafting tomatoes, peppers, and various cucurbits on resistant rootstocks has been practiced for decades (since the 1960s) in Asia to manage soilborne diseases. However, it is relatively new in the United States. This session will address the basic techniques, economics, potential commercialization, and pros and cons of grafting and its effectiveness in disease management in vegetable crops.

This session addresses the need to involve more regulatory scientists in APS activities and gives APS members a better understanding of regulatory processes, research opportunities, and the diverse challenges faced by regulatory scientists. This forum also provides regulatory scientists with an opportunity for increased interaction with plant pathologists working in a variety of roles within academia, consulting, extension, and industry.

■■ The pros and cons of cucurbit grafting in the United States. R. HASSELL, Clemson University, CREC,

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Charleston, SC, U.S.A. ■■ IPM diversification: Advancing the science and practice of grafting tomatoes to manage soilborne

pathogens. F. LOUWS, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. ■■ Grafting on hybrid squash and bottle gourd rootstocks to manage Fusarium wilt of watermelon. A.

KEINATH, Clemson University, Charleston, SC, U.S.A. ■■ Grafting as a production system component for nematode management in Florida vegetables. N.

BURELLE, U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A. ■■ Grafting eggplants to manage soilborne diseases: An international perspective. S. MILLER, Ohio State

University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.

International Perspective on Fusarium Head Blight Organizer: Paul Nicholson, John Innnes Center, Norwich, United Kingdom Section: Biology of Pathogens Sponsor: By invitation—British Society of Plant Pathology Financial Sponsor: British Society of Plant Pathology Fusarium head blight has been the focus of attention on both sides of the Atlantic for several years. Recent legislation limits DON mycotoxin and use of fungicides, leaving host resistance as the most promising tool for maintaining toxin-free grain. It is timely to bring together researchers to present findings on both sides of the story from the genetics perspective (virulence and host resistance) as well as findings relating to the host-pathogen interaction (transcriptomics/metabolomics). Presenters to be announced at a later date.

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Science-based risk and benefit assessment. A. JONES, EPA OPP BEAD, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Reviewing biopesticides. G. TOMIMATSU, EPA OPP BPPD, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Biotechnology for disease management. C. WOZNIAK, EPA OPP BPPD, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Regulating for fungicide resistance management. B. CHISM, EPA OPP BEAD, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Endocrine disruptor testing: Implications for plant disease. To Be Announced Discussion forum.

It’s a Mixed Up World: Hybridization and Horizontal Gene Transfer in Plant Pathogens and Endophytes Organizers: Erica Goss, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; Steve Klosterman, USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; Maria Jimenez-Gasco, Penn State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. Section: Ecology and Epidemiology Sponsors: Genetics; Mycology; Bacteriology Sequencing of genes and genomes is uncovering more hybridization and introgression in plant pathogens and endophytes than previously recognized. This session will discuss the large role that hybridization and horizontal gene transfer appears to be playing in the evolution of fungi, oomycetes, and bacteria that infect plants. ■■ Verticillium longisporum—A hybrid pathogen with an expanded host range. P. INDERBITZEN and K.

Subbarao, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, U.S.A. ■■ Emergence of Phytophthora pathogens by hybridization. E. GOSS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. ■■ The role of horizontal gene transfer in bacterial crop pathogen emergence. B. VINATZER, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. ■■ Hybrids hybrids everywhere: The role of hybridization in the evolution of Neotyphodium grass endophytes. K. CRAVEN, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. 11

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■■ Genomic characterization of the conditionally dispensable chromosome in Alternaria arborescens

provides evidence for horizontal gene transfer. T. MITCHELL, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.

“Left of Boom!” Information: Form, Content, and Use in Epidemic Prediction Organizers: Neil McRoberts and Carla Thomas, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Section: Ecology and Epidemiology Sponsors: Epidemiology; Regulatory Plant Pathology; Diagnostics; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Forest Pathology; Crop Loss Assessment and Evaluation When considering epidemic timelines, events prior to an outbreak are considered to be to the left of the event (the Boom!). New approaches often use textual, qualitative information from informal nonreviewed sources and have potential to be used for prediction in similar ways to quantitative data. This session will examine new approaches and relate them to traditional approaches to disease detection and prediction and highlight common information across these methods using case studies. ■■ Information in novel, multiscale epidemiological models. P. SKELSEY, Kansas State University,

Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. ■■ Transportation grids as early indicators and warning. T. GOTTWALD, USDA ARS, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A. ■■ Emergence of unified concepts of disease in textual diagnostic data. C. THOMAS, University of California,

Davis, CA, U.S.A. ■■ Emergence of signals from open-source data: Disease surveillance. N. NELSON, Georgetown University

Medical Center, Washington, DC, U.S.A. ■■ Putting information to use: Decisions at different scales. S. SAVARY, Centre INRA de Toulouse Midi-

Pyrénées, Castanet Tolosan, Cedex, France

The National Clean Plant Network: Ensuring Disease-Free, Vegetatively Propagated Fruit Tree Planting Stock Organizer: Nancy Osterbauer, Oregon Dept. of Agriculture, Salem, OR, U.S.A. Section: Disease Control and Pest Management Sponsors: Regulatory Plant Pathology; Public Policy Board Financial Sponsor: USDA APHIS The session introduces APS members to the National Clean Plant Network (NCPN). The NCPN is an association of specialty crop networks that promote the use of pathogen-tested, healthy plant material for clonally grown food crops in the United States. The NCPN-Fruit Tree commodity group will be presenting. Speakers will present a case study on Plum pox virus, introduce new threats to the fruit tree industry, describe how NCPN would address such threats, and discuss the economic and other benefits to industry of the NCPN. 12

■■ The National Clean Plant Network. E. RUDYJ, USDA APHIS, Riverdale, MD, U.S.A. ■■ Plum pox virus case study: The eradication road is paved in gold. R. WELLIVER, Pennsylvania Dept. of

Agriculture, Harrisburg, PA, U.S.A. ■■ New threats on the horizon for the fruit tree industry. M. FUCHS, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. ■■ Diagnosing and cleaning up viruses in imported fruit tree nursery stock. K. EASTWELL, Washington

State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. ■■ Quantifying the economic benefit of a clean plant network. C. SEAVERT, Oregon State University,

Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. ■■ The industry’s perspective on the National Clean Plant Network. W. GALE, Summit Tree Sales, Lawrence, MI, U.S.A.

New Insights into the Virulence Mechanism of Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria Organizers: Nian Wang, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; Jong Hyun Ham, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. Section: Biology of Pathogens Sponsor: Bacteriology Understanding the mechanisms for virulence may lead to the design of improved disease control strategies. This session will present the latest advances in selected important areas that made significant progress in understanding the virulence mechanism and new approaches used to further promote the study in this area. This has broad impact in research areas far beyond bacteriology and promotes the research in understanding the host defense and suppressing the bacterial virulence. ■■ The role of the type III secretion system in necrotic pathogens. A. CHARKOWSKI, University of

Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. ■■ Insights into the virulence mechanism of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. N. WANG, University of Florida,

Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. ■■ Ooze and rots: How enteric plant pathogens utilize cyclic di-GMP, small RNAs, and quorum sensing to

regulate major virulence genes. G. SUNDIN, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. ■■ The role of the cell surface lipopolysaccharide molecule in Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation and

virulence in the grapevine host. C. ROPER, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. ■■ Global regulatory network for the virulence of Burkholderia glumae, the major causal agent of

bacterial panicle blight of rice. J. H. HAM, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. ■■ How high-throughput sequencing technology helps our understanding of plant-pathogenic bacteria

(overview). J. JONES, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.

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New Products and Services Organizer: Dair McDuffee, Valent USA Corporation, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A. Section: Disease Control and Pest Management Sponsor: Industry This session provides a forum for highlighting new products and technologies available to those in the fields of agriculture and plant disease management. Presenters to be announced at a later date.

Pathogen Effectors and Host Targets

Organizer: Nicole Donofrio, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, U.S.A.; Rao Uppalapati, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Sponsor: Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology Recent research has shown great progress in identifying and characterizing pathogen effectors from important plant pathogens, including oomycetes, fungi, bacteria, nematodes, and viruses. These results are now prompting the isolation of host targets in order to better understand how pathogens co-opt host machinery to cause disease. This session will highlight interactions between pathogen effectors and their host targets from a wide array of pathogens and researchers in the United States and internationally. ■■ Host targets of viral si and miRNAs in maize. V. VANCE, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC,

U.S.A. ■■ Magnaporthe oryzae effector AvrPiz-t suppresses host innate immunity by targeting RING-type E3

ligases in rice. C. H. PARK, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A. ■■ Fungal effector localization and targets. C. H. KHANG, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. ■■ Bacterial effectors and host targets. M. LINDEBERG, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. ■■ Functional characterization of the conserved modular domains in the RXLR superfamily. S. KALE,

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. ■■ Nematode effectors. T. BAUM, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.

Potato virus Y—An Old Virus and a New Problem in Potato Organizers: Alexander Karasev, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, U.S.A.; Stewart Gray, USDA-ARS, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. Section: Biology of Pathogens Sponsor: Virology

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Potato virus Y (PVY) has emerged as a significant concern for the U.S. potato industry with the introduction of new, recombinant strains, some of which induce destructive potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease in susceptible potato cultivars. Detection, differentiation, and control of PVY are difficult due to its high variability and symptomless cultivars. Current knowledge of PVY biology and mitigation of PVY effects on potato seed production and international potato trade will be discussed. ■■ PVY as an emerging potato problem in North America. S. GRAY, USDA-ARS, Cornell University, Ithaca,

NY, U.S.A. Breeding potato for PVY resistance. S. JANSKY, USDA-ARS, Madison, WI, U.S.A. PVY vector biology and control. R. GROVES, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. PVY and Canadian experience. M. SINGH, POTATOES NB, Centreville, NB, Canada Classification of PVY strains and new recombinants. A. KARASEV, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, U.S.A. ■■ Potato seed certification and PVY. P. NOLTE, University of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID, U.S.A. ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Practice and Management of Microbial and Plant Germplasm Collections Organizers: Shuxian Li, USDA-ARS, Crop Genetics Research Unit, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; Rick Bennett, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; Kimberly Webb, USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; Kevin McCluskey, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, U.S.A. Section: Professionalism/Outreach Sponsors: Collections and Germplasm; Public Policy Board The session will focus on analogies of plant germplasm and pathogen germplasm collections for management, proper storage, handling, distribution, and database management. The well-established USDA National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) will be examined as a model for pathogen collections in a proposed National Plant Microbial Germplasm System (NPMGS). Speakers will examine curation of plant materials versus microbes and how microbial collections may be integrated into the established system for plant germplasm, including backing up collections, genotyping, and modification of databases in the Genetic Resources Information Network (GRIN). ■■ Introduction: National Plant Microbial Germplasm System overview. R. BENNETT, University of

Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. ■■ The National Plant Germplasm System. C. GARDNER, USDA-ARS, Ames, IA, U.S.A. ■■ Database management, plants versus microbes. S. KANG, Penn State University, State College, PA,

U.S.A. ■■ Plant germplasm curation—Best practices. D. ELLIS, USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A. ■■ NSF research coordination network and microbial germplasm curation—Best practices. K.

MCCLUSKEY, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, U.S.A. ■■ Culture collections practices: Dutch national cultural collections system, Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS). P. CROUS, Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Utrecht, Netherlands ■■ Confirmation and identity—Genotyping. K. HUMMER, USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 15

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Resolving the Species-Population Interface in Asexual Fungi: New Tools to Address an Old Problem

regulatory agency decision-making to the right of the Boom! (after an outbreak). It combines views from practitioners, researchers, and analysts on future directions for better regulatory plant pathology.

Organizers: Barry Pryor, University of Arizona, Plant Sciences, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.; Kirk Broders, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, U.S.A. Section: Ecology and Epidemiology Sponsors: Mycology; Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection; Diagnostics; Seed Pathology; Soil Microbiology and Root Diseases; Widely Prevalent Fungi List Project

■■ Even when data are fluid a decision must be made. P. H. BERGER, USDA APHIS PPQ CPHST, Raleigh, NC,

The development of species concepts for asexual fungi is taxonomically challenging due to their clonal population structure, and most contemporary efforts have been unsuccessful in understanding and resolving the species-population interface. Modern sequencing technology and more powerful analytical methods are quickly advancing this area of research as the availability of entire genomes from multiple individuals permits new insights on genetic variation and evolutionary history across multiple loci and at varying taxonomic levels. This session provides a focused review of asexual fungi and highlights some of the taxonomic challenges and advancements in species delimitation in exemplar fungal lineages. The successful development of species concepts for these taxa will have broad and significant impact in comparative biology, as well as in pathogen detection and disease management. ■■ Asexuality across the kingdom Fungi and the taxonomic challenges of species delineation. P. CROUS, ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Utrecht, Netherlands Populations vs. species among small-spored Alternaria. B. PRYOR, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, U.S.A. Genomic contributions to developing species concepts in the genus Fusarium. D. GEISER, Penn State, University Park, PA, U.S.A. Cladosporium: Current concepts, diversity, and taxonomy. F. DUGAN. USDA-ARS, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. Comparative genomics and bioinformatic tools for studying evolution and speciation in fungi. J. STAJICH, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.

Right of the Boom: Deciding to Act, React, or Let Go in a Fluid Data Environment

U.S.A. ■■ Use of law enforcement indicators and warning to prevent and respond to a crime. L. LEE, FBI,

Washington, DC, U.S.A. ■■ The role of epidemiology research in shaping regulatory plant pathology. J. MAROIS, University of

Florida, Quincy, FL, U.S.A. ■■ Biology is not enough: An economics perspective on human behavior in the management of plant pathogens. L. PEARSON, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom ■■ Making and implementing program decisions in quarantine and regulatory plant pathology. T. S. SCHUBERT, Florida Dept. of Agric. & Consumer Service, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. ■■ A case-based analysis of information sources, sinks and loops in regulatory plant pathology programs. N. MCROBERTS, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.

Schroth Faces of the Future—New Frontiers in Plant Bacteriology Organizers: Teresa Hughes, USDA-ARS, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; Christopher Wallis, USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. Section: Diseases of Plants Sponsors: Early Career Professionals; Bacteriology This session is designed to acknowledge the new faces shaping the future of plant bacteriology. We encourage nominations of scientists in the early stages of their careers (within 10 years of graduation, including post-docs) who are forward thinkers and perceived to be the future leaders in the field of plant bacteriology. Speakers must be APS members.

Thousand Cankers Disease: A Threat to Eastern Black Walnut Throughout Its Native Range and Beyond

Organizers: Lawrence Brown, USDA\APHIS\PPQ, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; Neil McRoberts, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Section: Ecology and Epidemiology Sponsors: Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation; Epidemiology; Regulatory Plant Pathology; Diagnostics; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Forest Pathology

Organizers: Inga Meadows, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, U.S.A.; Matt Kasson, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. Section: Diseases of Plants Sponsors: Forest Pathology; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Vector-Pathogen Complexes; Epidemiology Financial Sponsors: Walnut Council; USDA-FS Forest Health Protection

The complimentary session “Left of the Boom!” considers prospects for improved disease forecasting and detection. However, the future will involve outbreaks of quarantine pests that impose biological and economic losses on agriculture. This session explores frameworks and measures for decision support in

Decline and mortality of walnut trees (Juglans spp.) have been observed in the last decade throughout the western United States and, more recently, in the eastern United States. The disease complex, thousand cankers disease (TCD), is caused by the fungus Geosmithia morbida and vectored by the walnut twig beetle,

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Pityophthorus juglandis. TCD has increased concerns of the health of black walnut and its viability as a commercial product. This session will emphasize current knowledge of TCD and highlight research gaps. ■■ Impacts of thousand cankers disease on Juglans spp. throughout the western United States. N. TISSERAT,

Dept. of Bioagricultural Sciences & Pest Management, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A. ■■ From discovery to regulation: A pathologist’s perspective of thousand cankers disease in eastern United

States. M. WINDHAM, Dept. of Entomology & Plant Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A. ■■ Evolution, diversity, and ecology of the genus Geosmithia and the unique position of Geosmithia morbida. M. KOLARIK, Institute of Microbiology, Czech Academy of Sciences, Botany Dept., Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic ■■ Host colonization behavior and population genetics of Pityophthorus juglandis: The vector of Geosmithia morbida, causal agent of thousand cankers disease. S. SEYBOLD, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Davis, CA, U.S.A. ■■ Thousand cankers disease: A recently emerging disease of eastern black walnut in the eastern United States. G. GRIFFIN, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.

APS is proud to announce that the Annual Meeting will be returning to New England and that for the first time Providence will be the host city. Attendees will experience the lovely city of Providence, known for its thriving arts community, vibrant and diverse neighborhoods, and renowned restaurant scene. Full of landmarks and historic sights, August is the perfect time of year to explore this big city with the friendly feel of a small town, the capital city of the “Ocean State”! Photo courtesy Newport County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Unifying Concepts in Plant and Animal Vector Biology Organizers: Diane Ullman, Dept. of Entomology, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; Thomas German, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Section: Biology of Pathogens Sponsors: Vector-Pathogen Complexes; Virology Financial Sponsors: GATES Foundation; Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc.

Photo courtesy Marianne Lee

Photo courtesy Robert Wesley Rollend

Photo courtesy PWCVB

Presentations by two-member teams consisting of partnering plant and animal/human vector biologists that will examine shared features to achieve a comparative synthesis of points of intersection between plant and animal/human vector study systems. The session will cover 1) behavioral modification of vectors; 2) molecular basis of vector competence; and 3) pathogen modification of host to ensure vector transmission. ■■ A virus at the helm: Even plant-infecting viruses modify vector behavior! C. STAFFORD, University of

California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. ■■ La Crosse virus modifies the behavior of its mosquito vector. B. BEATY, Colorado State University,

Photo courtesy PWCVB

Aurora, CO, U.S.A. ■■ What makes a vector a vector: The molecular basis of vector competence in leafhoppers and thrips. A.

WHITFIELD, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. ■■ Vector competence in mosquitoes. L. BARTHOLOMAY, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. ■■ Virus manipulation of plant hosts: Deceptive chemical signals induced by a plant virus attract insect vectors to inferior hosts. M. MESCHER, Dept. of Entomology, Pennsylvania State University, Ithaca, PA, U.S.A. ■■ Strategies employed by animal parasites to enhance vector transmission. H. HURD, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom 18

Registration Opens In March Visit www.apsnet.org/meet for more information, including a printable registration form and links to register online.

Hotel Information APS will be negotiating discount rates at Providence hotels for annual member attendees. Visit www.apsnet.org/meet for more details. 19


The American Phytopathological Society 3340 Pilot Knob Road St. Paul, MN 55121 United States of Ameria

Photo courtesy PWCVB

Registration opens in March! Abstract submission: February 1–March 15, 2012 www.apsnet.org/meeting

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