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Episcopal School of Acadiana Middle School Course of Study

2014-2015


Middle School Course of Study

Table of Contents

Graduation Requirements TOPS Core Curriculum - Class of 2014 and beyond Awarding of Credit Grading System Computing Grade Point Average Academic Recognitions Academic Ranking Headmaster’s List Honor Roll Athletic Eligibility Course Selection Process English Courses Mathematics Courses History Courses Science Courses World Language Courses French Spanish Computer Science Courses Introduction to Religion Health & Physical Education Courses Interpersonal Communication Visual Arts Courses Performing Arts Courses Theatre Music

2 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 12 13 14 14 15 15 16 17 17 18

Contacts Mrs. Hernandez, Head of Middle School Mr. Chrysler, Academic Dean/College Counselor Mrs. Broussard, MS Counselor Mr. Bourgeois, Athletic Director

adhernandez@esacadiana.com schrysler@esacadiana.com jbroussard@esacadiana.com mbourgeois@esacadiana.com


Middle School Course of Study

Middle School Course of Study and Planning Guide Each ESA student should select a program of study that is both challenging and rewarding. While requirements for graduation will determine much of the course of study, there are options for each student to consider in planning his or her middle school experience. As students plan for the upcoming school year, they should review their present transcripts. Students and parents may see a student’s progress towards meeting ESA diploma requirements as well as a current transcript through NetClassroom via the <student name>’s Grades menu. Students should consider their academic and co-curricular interests as well as college and future plans in choosing their courses. Extracurricular activities should be chosen carefully to achieve a balance between academics and extras.

Each spring students will make course selections for the following year and should keep in mind the following: ● Seek the counsel of their faculty advisor, individual teachers, or Head of Middle School as to what courses and levels are most appropriate. ● All requests for honors level courses must be approved by a student’s current teacher in that discipline. ● LHSAA rules require the following for academic eligibility in any upper school sport: Fall semester - Pass 6 units the previous academic year with a C average Spring semester - Pass 6 subjects in the fall semester (no grade stipulation); a seniors who has accumulated 20 or more units may take five subjects/units for the fall semester and must pass all five. Questions regarding specific eligibility requirements should be addressed to the Athletic Director.

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Middle School Course of Study

Academics Grades 9-12 Graduation Requirements To comply with the Core 4 Curriculum adopted by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education in the Fall of 2008, Episcopal School of Acadiana requires that a student earns a minimum of 24 units or credits to receive a diploma. Of these 24 units, 21 units are in specifically required courses and 3 may be in courses of a student’s choice while adhering to the required distribution of units among the disciplines.

Discipline

Required Units Required Courses

English

4.0 units

English I, II, III, and IV in sequential order

Mathematics

4.0 units

Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus

History

4.0 units

World History, Western Civilization, U.S. History, Civics

Science

4.0 units

Physics I (required of ninth graders at ESA), Biology, Chemistry, 1 additional unit in a science course of choice

World Language

3.0 units

3 units in one language

Health & Physical Education

2.0 units

Health & Physical Education I & II

Visual and/or Performing Arts

1.5 units

Additional Units in course of choice

1.5 units

Notes on Required Units: ● Upper school units earned in any course beyond those fulfilling a discipline’s graduation requirement can count as an elective unit. ● Eighth Grade Algebra I - Successful completion of this course, at the recommendation of the Mathematics Department, fulfills 1 required unit of mathematics for graduation. ● Middle School World Languages - Successful completion of the Middle School World Language sequence, at the recommendation of the World Language Department, fulfills 1 required unit of world language for graduation equivalent to French I or Spanish I. ● Eighth Grade Visual or Performing Art - Successful completion fulfills 0.5 unit toward the 1.5 unit requirement for graduation ● Enrollment in Health & Physical Education is required of all middle school students

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Middle School Course of Study

TOPS Core Curriculum For Opportunity, Performance, and Honors Awards For High School graduates of 2014 and thereafter Units

Courses1

ENGLISH = 4 Units 4 units

English I, II, III, & IV

MATH = 4 Units 1 unit

Algebra I, or Integrated Mathematics I, or Applied Algebra I or Algebra Iâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Parts 1 & 2 (two units) or Applied Mathematics I & II (two units) or Applied Algebra 1A and 1B (two units)

1 unit

Algebra II or Integrated Mathematics II

2 units

Geometry, Applied Geometry, Pre-Calculus, Advanced Math - Pre-Calculus, Calculus, AP Calculus AB, Advanced Math - Functions and Statistics, Probability and Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, Applied Mathematics III, Integrated Mathematics III, or Algebra III

SCIENCE = 4 Units 1 unit

Biology I or II

1 unit

Chemistry I or II, or Chemistry Com

2 units

Earth Science, Physical Science, Environmental Science, Integrated Science, Biology II, Chemistry II, Physics, Physics II, Physics for Technology I or II, AP Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism, AP Physics C: Mechanics, or Anatomy and Physiology or both Agriscience I & II (both for 1 unit)

SOCIAL STUDIES = 4 Units 1 unit

American History

1 unit

Civics and Free Enterprise (1 unit combined), Civics (1 year), or AP Government and Politics: United States

2 units

World History, Western Civilization, World Geography, European History or History of Religion

FOREIGN LANGUAGE = 2 Units 2 units

Foreign Language (2 units in the same language)

FINE ARTS = 1 Unit 1 unit

Fine Arts Survey or 1 unit of a performance course in music, or dance, or theatre or 1 unit of studio art or 1 unit of visual art or both Speech III & IV (both for 1 unit)

TOTAL = 19 Units 1

Advanced Placement (AP) courses with the same name as a course listed in the TOPS Core Curriculum may be substituted. (800) 259-5626, Ext. 1012 custserv@osfa.la.gov www.osfa.la.gov P.O. Box 91202 Baton Rouge, LA 70821-9202

This core curriculum is accurate as of the date of publication and includes courses listed in TOPS statute and those determined to be equivalent by the La. Board of Regents and BESE. Updated : 08/23/2011

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Middle School Course of Study

Awarding of Credit ● To receive credit in a course, a student must earn a final grade of at least D-; however, ESA reserves the

right to require that any student earning a final grade of D+, D, or D- have tutorial summer work. ● Failing a course for the year in the Middle School will result in the student having to make up the work

for the year (as directed by the teacher, department chair, and Head of Middle School) or repeat the course. Any course taken at another academic institution must be pre-approved by the Head of Middle School if ESA credit is desired.  Summer Program Credit All summer programs taken as a credit course must be pre-approved by the Head

of the Upper School and the appropriate department chair prior to the student's enrollment in the program. Grades earned at institutions other than ESA are not included in a student’s GPA, though will be listed on the transcript noting the appropriate awarded credit if proper documentation is received by ESA at the conclusion of the program.

Grading System ESA uses a standard letter scale (A,B,C, D, and F) with pluses and minuses. A (90-100)

Indicates superior achievement and outstanding performance in all aspects of a course

B (80-89)

Very good to excellent achievement

C (70-79)

Satisfactory completion of course requirements

D (60-69)

Course requirements completed at minimal level for awarding of credit Unsatisfactory performance with no credit awarded

F (≤ 59)

Computing Grade Point Average ESA computes grade point averages using only grades earned at ESA. In computing GPA, ESA adds 0.67 quality points to grade points earned in Advanced Placement courses and 0.33 to grade points earned in Honors courses. These additional points do not change the grade earned in a course but give it an additional weight when GPA is calculated. The following formula should be used when determining quality points awarded: Quality points awarded for course = (Grade in course + Weight) x Number of credits earned. No weight will be given to a grade of F. ESA calculates a GPA including pluses and minuses. Letter grades correspond to the following numerical values and grade point equivalent on a student's transcript. A+ = 4.33 A = 4.00 A- = 3.67

B+ = 3.33 B = 3.00 B- = 2.67

C+ = 2.33 C = 2.00 C- = 1.67 F = 0.0

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D+ = 1.33 D = 1.00 D- = 0.67


Middle School Course of Study

Academic Recognitions Academic Ranking ESA does not academically rank students.

Headmasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List To receive Headmasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List recognition, a student must earn at least 3.67 ESA grade point average and receive no grade below a B-. This recognition is calculated at the conclusion of each quarter, each semester, and the year.

Honor Roll A student will receive Honor Roll recognition provided he or she earn no grade below a B-. This recognition is calculated at the conclusion of each quarter, each semester, and the year.

Athletic Eligibility LHSAA rules require the following for academic eligibility: Fall semester - Pass 6 units the previous academic year with a C average Spring semester - Pass 6 subjects in the fall semester (no grade stipulation); a seniors who has accumulated 20 or more units may take five subjects/units for the fall semester and must pass all five. Questions regarding specific eligibility requirements should be addressed to the Athletic Director.

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Middle School Course of Study

Course Selection Process Grades 6-8 Parent Approval During second semester, each student will select certain options for the following year. Before sixth grade, students choose French or Spanish as their world language. They also decide whether to pursue honors math. Finally, before eighth grade students choose which fine or performing art to pursue. Parents should discuss course choices with their child, confirm that the requests continue to appropriately progress the student through the curriculum and towards an ESA diploma, and finally sign the form indicating their approval of the student’s course selection. Course requests cannot be accepted without a parent’s signature. Minimum/Maximum Course Load & Selection of Courses All students are required to schedule a minimum of five courses each semester. Students planning to compete on an interscholastic team should know current LHSAA eligibility requirements to be sure LHSAA rules are met. LHSAA rules require the following for academic eligibility: Fall semester - Pass 6 units the previous academic year with a C average Spring semester - Pass 6 subjects in the fall semester (no grade stipulation); a seniors who has accumulated 20 or more units may take five subjects/units for the fall semester and must pass all five. Questions regarding specific eligibility requirements should be addressed to the Athletic Director. Submitting Course Requests Eighth grade students will enter their course requests into NetClassroom with their faculty advisor. Once completed, the advisor will collect the signed forms and return them to the Head of Middle School for use during the scheduling process. Scheduling Process Scheduling of courses is done on a priority basis by descending grade level with seniors having first priority. A student’s need to take a course to fulfill a mandatory course requirement for a diploma will supersede seniority. Change of Schedule All changes to a student’s course schedule must be approved by the Head of Middle School and a parent. The student should obtain a Change of Schedule form from the Head of Middle School only after fully discussing the proposed change with his or her teacher and parents. No schedule change will take effect until the completed form with all signatures has been returned to and approved by the Head of Middle School.

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Middle School Course of Study

English Middle school requirement: Reading and Writing Workshop, English 7, and English 8 Department Philosophy: The motto of the Episcopal School of Acadiana is “Excellence from Within.” We believe that excellence has two components: intellectual and ethical. Intellectual excellence is impossible without the ability to formulate ideas in a clear and logical manner. Students gain this ability through extensive reading and writing. We try to foster ethical excellence by exposing our students to the thoughts and judgments of both characters and authors. Reading, writing and various discussions challenge students to formulate judgments based on strong, consistent ethical values. We believe that through reading thoughtfully chosen works and discussing and writing about these works, our students will become better people, growing in their appreciation of individuality, community, and intellectual freedom. Note: Because ESA English teachers select their own readings within the defined scope of the course description, books read in English classes can vary slightly from teacher to teacher and from year to year. 005 Reading & Writing Workshop Reading & Writing Workshop is designed to build students’ fluency in both reading and writing, to acquaint them with a wide range of appropriate literature and accomplished authors, and to help them become independent in their use of the writing process from choosing topics through publishing polished final drafts in a variety of genre. The curriculum is student-centered. That is, students are allowed to choose, with guidance, what books they will read and what writing topics they will pursue. It lays the foundation for students’ success in their future English classes at ESA, and it is designed to foster positive attitudes toward reading and writing as lifelong activities. 007 English 7 English 7 focuses on literature and composition with emphasis on literary analysis, reading comprehension, and writing fluency. Students learn to identify literary devices and elements while studying a variety of both classic and contemporary fiction and nonfiction works. Daily writing promotes fluency and fosters quick thinking; more formal writing tasks introduce the basic skills necessary for quality expository writing. 008 English 8 Writing is a process, not a single event. This is the central theme of English 8. Nowhere is this idea more evident than in the individual novels created by each student. Every year, students deconstruct the elements of a novel, participate in National Novel Writing Month, and revise and edit their efforts. Other emphases throughout the year include reading, grammar, vocabulary, speech, and other forms of writing, with writing assignments for personal narratives, stories, poems, and impromptu pieces. Readings include The Outsiders, Of Mice and Men, Animal Farm, Fahrenheit 451, and a variety of poems, short stories, and creative nonfiction.

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Middle School Course of Study

Mathematics Middle School requirement: Math 6 or Math 6 Honors, Math 7 or Math 7 Honors, and either Pre-Algebra, Algebra I, or Algebra I Honors. *Credit toward graduation is awarded to 8th grade students who successfully complete Algebra I or Algebra I Honors. Department Philosophy: The conviction of the Mathematics Department is that one learns mathematics best through understanding and practice. There must be a proper balance between theory, practice and application. The student must be actively involved in learning. An environment that allows the student maximum participation in discovery is essential. It is important that the student be significantly challenged according to his intellectual ability and maturity. Graphing calculators and computers are learning tools used throughout the mathematics curriculum. 106 Math 6 Sixth grade is the year when students begin to apply the basic skills they learned in elementary school to mathematical concepts. This course focuses on understanding math as a concept rather than as a set of numbers and formulae to be memorized. Sixth grade focuses on the rational numbers, diving heavily into fractions and decimals at the beginning and ending with the equation and graphing skills they will need in seventh grade. Other topics that will be covered are geometry, percentages and the ability to manipulate numbers back and forth between decimals, fractions and percentages. The format of the class includes lectures, class discussions, class activities and group work. 106H Math 6 Honors Sixth grade is the year when students begin to apply the basic skills they learned in elementary school to mathematical concepts. This course focuses on understanding math as a concept rather than as set of numbers and formulae to be memorized. The honors level goes a step deeper in revealing the significance of each mathematical process. Students are challenged by moving through the curriculum at a faster pace and covering topics that the sixth grade math class does not cover. Students are expected to take part in extracurricular math activities such as the Math Counts program where students practice once a week throughout the school year for the competition held in February. Sixth grade honors math covers the same concepts as sixth grade math, focusing on fractions, decimals, percents and the ability to manipulate between the three different representations. The class also covers geometry, graphing, and equation skills such as solving both one and two step equations. 107 Math 7 The seventh grade math course focuses heavily on proportional reasoning. Students start the year by gaining a deep understanding of directly proportional relationships through hands-on activities and applying those concepts to percentages. As the year progresses, students use this proportional reasoning background to solve other types of mathematical problems. The goal is to have students understand how to solve problems rather than memorizing formulae. Students will apply this proportional reasoning to topics such as percentages, geometry and early algebra skills. The format of the class includes lectures, class discussions, class activities and group work.

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Middle School Course of Study

107H Math 7 Honors This course is a more accelerated mathematics program than regular seventh grade mathematics. The pace is fast, and students are expected to work more independently. Problem solving, proportional reasoning, variable expressions, graph analysis, probability, and geometry are studied in depth to increase the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basic number sense and their ability to do abstract thinking. Emphasis is placed on the development of more sophisticated problem-solving and analytical skills. 108 Introduction to Algebra This course is designed to prepare students for Algebra I. Special attention is given to graphs and graph analysis, an essential component of understanding algebra. Statistics, probability, and geometry are all covered to increase the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basic number sense and their ability to do abstract thinking. There will be a focus on problem solving in the real number system using algebraic expressions and simple expressions, enabling students to view the bigger picture and preparing them for future success in Algebra I. 110MS Algebra I Credit: 1* The Algebra I curriculum places an emphasis on conceptual understanding and algebra as a means of representation as a tool for problem solving. Manipulative skills, while essential, are a means, not an end. Topics in Algebra I include linear equations and inequalities, systems of open sentences, absolute value equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, linear, quadratic and exponential functions, polynomials and rational expressions, irrational numbers and radicals. * One upper school credit is awarded with the successful completion of Algebra I and the approval of the Math faculty. 109H Algebra I Honors Credit: 1* The Algebra I curriculum places an emphasis on conceptual understanding and algebra as a means of representation as a tool for problem solving. Manipulative skills, while essential, are a means, not an end. Topics in Algebra I include linear equations and inequalities, systems of open sentences, absolute value equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, linear, quadratic and exponential functions, polynomials and rational expressions, irrational numbers and radicals. Since this is an honors course, there will be times when enrichment topics will be included. If time allows, some introduction to Geometry and Algebra II topics will be integrated. * Eighth Grade Algebra I - Successful completion of this course, at the recommendation of the Mathematics Department, fulfills 1 required unit of mathematics for graduation.

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Middle School Course of Study

History Middle School requirement: Ancient Civilizations, Cultural Geography, and United States History Department Philosophy: The History Department at ESA wishes to prepare its students to become adults with a profound understanding of their society and their own place in it, while also providing as broad a historical perspective as possible. This is best achieved by teaching students to view society as a whole by understanding how human beliefs and activities are interrelated. Students will focus on the relationships between events, causes, and field of activity, rather than seeing them as independent of each other. These relationships are taught by specific examples, cases, and situations from the past. The goal in teaching history is not for students to merely learn events from the past, but to also develop the critical and analytical thinking skills that will allow them to succeed at the next level of their education. 206 Ancient Civilizations How do sixth graders know what happen in history? How do they come to know and understand the stories of people and their development over time all around the world, starting with the Stone Age and progressing through 500 A.D. and the fall of Rome? In this course, sixth grade students learn to use the tools of historians, archaeologists, geographers and artists to answer these questions. They study primary and secondary sources. They gather information to understand links across time and how history has affected us today. The textbook, World History Journey Across Time: The Early Ages, provides a guide by introducing vocabulary, main ideas and supporting facts. Additional books, internet sites and activities are used for deeper investigation of the topics. Studies can be extended through one-on-one work with the teacher as students identify a passionate for a topic. Experts in the fields of history, archaeology and the arts visit classes to make real world connections for the students. This introductory humanities course provides content knowledge and skills required to help students understand the world around them and their place in it. 207 Geography Throughout the World Geography course students will be using the text Geography Alive!: Regions and People. This textbook provides a thorough introduction to geography and a case-study approach to exploring the world. All continents except Antarctica are examined for their physical features, history, and culture. (Though this may vary from year to year) Ultimately, the students will learn about people, places and cultures around the world while developing a strong understanding and appreciation of the basic principles of geography. The course also develops reading, writing, research, and presentation skills through a variety of assessments. 208 United States History The eighth grade history course covers the United States from Columbusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; arrival to Hurricane Katrina, with special emphasis on the Constitution and on economics. The students complete two research papers and multiple other essays, with the goal of developing writing and research skills necessary for upper school courses. The course also introduces students to primary documents and fosters analytical skills through close readings of these documents. The chief goal of the course is to introduce and develop the skills that students will need in upper school history courses.

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Middle School Course of Study

Science Middle School requirement: General Science, Life Science, and Earth Science Department Philosophy: In the science courses at ESA, science is taught not only as a body of useful knowledge, but also as a method by which we find answers. Students learn science most effectively through discovery-based lessons in which they interact with each other and with teachers to solve problems and to answer questions. Teachers at ESA use the Socratic method in laboratory experiences, field exercises, and in class to encourage student interest and participation. By engaging students one-on-one and in small groups, teachers can address each student's ideas and questions. This method of teaching not only encourages each student to be actively involved in his or her education, but it also fosters academic self-confidence and maturity. 306 General Science The purpose of this course is to help students develop an intuitive understanding of physical processes that occur all around us. Students will develop their ability to think critically by applying the scientific method to challenges presented in class. Students will also continue to develop research skills to support their investigations. Major skills to be covered will include but are not limited to: using the Scientific Method, measuring in SI Units, reading and understanding science-related articles, researching using internet and library resources, writing lab reports, presenting information to the class, and graphing. 307 Life Science In this class, students explore and critically question what defines something as living. In pursuit of this, students learn about and examine the structures that make up living things. The course focuses on viruses, bacteria, protozoa, cells, plants, animal groups, human organ systems, and sex education. Throughout the year students participate in discussions based on short readings that deal with some of the most fundamental topics in science. Students develop their observation, communication, and critical research skills through laboratory work, research projects, and group assignments. 308 Earth Science In Earth Science our emphasis is on studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mastery of basic academic, laboratory, and science skills which include: close observation, record keeping, data collecting, data processing and analysis, problem-solving, laboratory protocol, questioning, effective written and oral communication, group skills, and laboratory safety. Our instruction follows the 8+1 pedagogy developed at Michigan State University. Our main topics of Earth materials, soil, landforms, climate and weather, Earth in space, and energy in Earth processes are taught through the 8+1 lens. Experience is the highest authority, and students learn by doing through study of written and oral explanations of the concept, direct examination and experimentation, and analysis and evaluation of the idea based on observations and data.

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Middle School Course of Study

World Languages Middle School requirement: French 6, French 7, and French I or Spanish 6, Spanish 7, and Spanish I Department Philosophy: The World Language Department at ESA is structured around the intensive study of French or Spanish. Instruction within the department includes not only the usual skills of reading, writing, and listening, but introduces an entirely new way of speaking. Proper use of intonation, appropriate facial expressions, and gestures inherent to native speakers are emphasized along with the obvious use of new sets of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Instruction is through the immersion method; limited English is spoken in the class after the first few weeks. Grammatical structure is taught orally throughout the curriculum, as required by given situations, rather than in a structured series of exercises. The ultimate goal of the study of world language at ESA is to demonstrate that a world language can become a natural means of communication and an integral part of life. *One high school credit is awarded with the successful completion of French 7 and French 8 and the approval of the French faculty. *One high school credit is awarded with the successful completion of Spanish 7 and Spanish 8 and the approval of the Spanish faculty.

French 406 French 6 Sixth grade French works to continue the growth of vocabulary and grammar that students have acquired from the Lower School while allowing new students to ESA the ability to join in the study of the language. Students focus on building a foundation in all aspects of the language, including speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Special attention is given to the ability to communicate orally. Students participate in the National French Contest Exam in the Spring. Students earning a 90% or higher who also have an A- in French class have the opportunity to accelerate to 8th grade French the following school year. 407 French 7 Seventh grade French is a continuation of the sixth grade French curriculum. The three years of Middle School cover the vocabulary and grammar of the Upper School French I class. Students continue to grow their vocabulary base and understanding of grammar rules. Oral communication continues to be an area of special emphasis. Students take the National French Contest Exam in the spring. Students who earn a 90% or higher on that exam and have an A- or higher in French class are given the opportunity to accelerate to Upper School French II in 8th grade. This allows the student to earn two of the required three World Language ESA graduation credits in Middle School.

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Middle School Course of Study

408 French I Credit: 1* Eighth grade French completes the coursework for earning credit for French I. The grade for this course will appear on the upper school transcript. Those students who earn an A or higher in seventh grade French and earn a 90% or higher on the Level 1 National French Contest exam may take French II as eighth graders. The objective of this course is to fine tune all of the fundamental work done in sixth and seventh grade French. Students will continue to expand their vocabulary with oral presentations, class discussions, and roleplaying activities. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate in the past, present, and future tenses. They will have a solid understanding of the present, near future and the passé composé tenses. They will be able to function in a francophone setting, i.e. ask directions, order from a menu, or hold a conversation. These activities will be supported by continued review of everyday expressions and prepositions while learning new vocabulary.

Spanish 456 Spanish 6 Spanish in sixth grade emphasizes the importance of learning a second language. We cover vocabulary, pronunciation, writing and oral skills. Students will also learn about Hispanic Heritage in the United States and about Spanish-speaking countries. The goals is to provide activities for students with no previous knowledge of the Spanish language and to increase students’ motivation and desire to learn more about the language, cultures, and traditions. Students will develop skills of pronunciation, grammar, and sentence structure. 457 Spanish 7 Spanish in seventh grade is the first half of Spanish I credit. Students will be able demonstrate some basic structure of the language and will learn about Hispanic heritage and Spanish-speaking countries. They will learn to read and write on a basic level. Using this basic level they will be able to communicate in the present tense. The general goals of the course are to acquaint students with everyday Spanish language and Hispanic cultures as well as to provide opportunities for language practice and cultural awareness. Students will be expected to develop the four language skills of speaking, listening, basic reading, and writing, as well as an appreciation of the culture. In the Spring, students take the National Spanish Exam. If a student earns a 90% opr higher and maintained at least an A– in the Spanish class, the student may have the options to be accelerated to the Spanish II class in the Upper School. 458 Spanish I Credit: 1* This course is the continuation of Spanish in seventh grade for Spanish I credit. By the end of eighth grade year students will be able demonstrate some mastery of the basic structure of the language and will better understand Hispanic heritage and Spanish-speaking countries. They will learn to read and write on a basic level. Using this basic level they will be able to communicate in the present tense, present progressive, and simple past tense. As students progress the class will taught in Spanish.

 Middle School World Languages - Successful completion of the Middle School World Language sequence, at the recommendation of the World Language Department, fulfills 1 required unit of world language for graduation equivalent to French I or Spanish I.

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Middle School Course of Study

Computer Science Middle school requirement: Computer Science 6 606 Computer Science 6 ESA Middle School Computer Science curriculum strives for awareness, understanding, and independent use of technology. The course introduces students to problem solving using technology as a tool and a resource for thinking, studying, and working. The sixth grade students take the course during the first quarter to ensure quick emergence into our network and all the technology and software ESA has to offer. Computer skills are acquired through hands-on projects. Sixth grade students at ESA grow into independent computer learners striving to using technology to gather, organize, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information and ideas.

Middle school requirement: Computer Science 7 607 Computer Science 7 This quarter-long course is an introduction to computer programming. In this course students will learn basic computer science concepts by writing programs using the Python programming language. Students will learn how computer programs work and how they can be used to solve problems. The skills covered include how to write algorithms, run programs, and debug code that is not working correctly. Students will leave the course with a good understanding of programming fundamentals which can be built upon via either future selfdirected learning or further computer science coursework.

Introduction to Religion Middle School requirement: Introduction to Religion 733 Introduction to Religion This course is taught in the eighth grade. It is an introduction to spirituality as expressed in many traditions, but beginning in the Christian perspective as expressed in the Episcopal tradition. We will explore various faith traditions from around the world, investigating the things we have in common and the things that distinguish us in scripture and liturgy, belief, practice, and worship. We will look at our own personal beliefs while engaging Christian scriptures, coming to an individual understanding of the divine and how we may be called to participate in it. The goal is not to make Episcopalians out of our students, but rather to use the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identity as the common starting point for the discussion of each studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own beliefs.

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Middle School Course of Study

Health & Physical Education Middle School requirement: Physical Education 6, 7, and 8 506 Physical Education 6 Physical Education is required of all sixth grade students. Fitness components of the course include instruction in both team and individual sports. Instructional emphasis is given to teamwork, sportsmanship and healthy lifestyles. Basic body weight exercises and cardio are introduced. 507 Physical Education 7 Physical Education is required of all seventh grade students. Fitness components of the course include instruction in both team and individual sports. Instructional emphasis is given to teamwork, sportsmanship and healthy lifestyles. Cardio, body weight, strength, and resistance training are introduced. 508 Physical Education 8 Physical Education is required of all eighth grade students. Fitness components of the course include instruction in both team and individual sports. Instructional emphasis is given to teamwork, sportsmanship and healthy lifestyles. Cardio, body weight, strength and resistance training form and technique is introduced in the eighth grade P.E. class.

Interpersonal Communication Middle School requirement: Life Skills 716 Life Skills Life Skills is one of four quarter-long courses sixth graders take. Taught by the school counselor, the course offers students an opportunity to discuss, in a safe and supportive environment, issues and concerns that characterize this stage of development. The specific content of the course may vary with the needs and interests of each particular group of students, but common topics include: decision-making, teamwork and leadership, dealing with peer pressure, study habits, and communication skills.

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Middle School Course of Study

Visual Arts Middle School requirement: Art 6 and Art 7 Department Philosophy: The ESA visual arts program provides a learning environment that stimulates and maximizes the creative and artistic potential of each student. The learning experience emphasizes creative problem solving and critical thinking which develops self-expression. The completed works often require and involve teamwork, cooperation, and trust in others. Through artistic expression, the students see the world from a greater perspective. They are provided with a variety of media to express and to connect with feelings, to express the joy and the beauty found in their world. 906 Art 6 The foundation of Art 6 is artistic thinking. Artistic thinking reaches beyond the art classroom. In art, students will be challenged to problem solve, make choices, and take risks. There will be opportunities for students to continue to build confidence through the practice of different aspects of the creative process. Art benefits students by cultivating self esteem by introducing them to different kinds of literacy. They develop unique forms of expression reflecting reasoning, imagination and dexterity. They will explore technology and media working in conjunction with the technology department in the creation of art work to learn to adapt to the future and change. 907 Art 7 Art 7 builds on the foundations of Art 6 where the focus is artistic thinking. Artistic thinking reaches beyond the art classroom. In art, students will be challenged to problem solve, make choices and take risks. There will be opportunities for students to continue to build confidence through the practice of different aspects of the creative process. Art benefits students by cultivating self esteem by introducing them to different kinds of literacy. Students add a year to the experiences of sixth grade and develop unique forms of expression reflecting reasoning, imagination and dexterity based on these experiences Through a connection with the technology department, they will explore new technology and media in the creation of art to learn to adapt to the future and change. 908 Design Foundations Credit: 0.5* Lab Fee $50 Prerequisite for all upper school visual art courses. This course offers students a foundation in the visual arts. By tailoring projects to the understanding and manipulation of elements and principles of design, the goal is that students exit the class fluent in the language of visual arts. Students will explore a variety of media to create works in 2D and 3D, and they will develop their ability to critically analyze, discuss and evaluate work made by themselves and others. Design Foundations will also offer students some insight into the skills, knowledge and technical applications necessary for the upper level art courses offered at ESA. * One half of an upper school credit is awarded with the successful completion of Design Foundations and the approval of the Visual Arts faculty.

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Middle School Course of Study

Performing Arts

Theatre Middle School requirement: Theatre 7 Department Philosophy: The Upper School Performing Arts Department will offer a wide variety of creative outlets, each with performing opportunities. It is a goal of the department to help students develop their theatrical talents and musical creativity. Students may perform both at school and in the surrounding communities. Each ensemble and drama class will expose the students to a wide variety of artistic genres, ultimately creating a life-long enjoyment of the performing arts.  Theatre I must be completed before a student may take advanced courses in theatre. 731 Theatre 7 There are a variety of goals in Drama 7. This quarter –long elective provides exposure to basic theatre terminology and the application of it, draws out creative skill building through improvisational exercises, creates an introduction to scripts, adaptation, and to playwrighting, and promotes increased confidence through performance opportunities, public or in class. Both Theatre 7 and Theatre I seek to cultivate and strengthen talent through extra-curricular activities, such as a middle school student's participation in the spring musical and field trips in the Lafayette community. 979 Theatre I Credit: 0.5* Theatre I builds upon the fundamentals and opportunities introduced in the 7th grade class and serves as a formal introduction to theatre. Class also involves the following components: more building upon basic terminology and creative skills, a more sophisticated look into playwrights and scene work, a study of the history of theatre in various cultures, and an introduction to Shakespeare from a theatrical standpoint. The three quarterlong class culminates in a small, public performance. Both Theatre 7 and Theatre I seek to cultivate and strengthen talent through extra-curricular activities, such as a middle school student's participation in the spring musical and field trips in the Lafayette community. * One half of an upper school credit is awarded with the successful completion of Theatre I and the approval of the Performing Arts faculty.

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Middle School Course of Study

Performing Arts

Music 706 Music 6 Music 6 is a quarter-long sixth grade music class that focuses on establishing good vocal technique, learning the sol fa system of singing and developing rhythmic skills. In addition to vocal study, we spend time learning music on Orff (xylophones, glockenspiels) and other rhythmic instruments. We also study the different families of instruments from the orchestra. Each class will participate in at least one performance depending on the time of year in which they are enrolled in the class (Eucharist services, Lessons and Carols, Graduation). 707 Music 7 Music 7 is a quarter-long seventh grade music class that focuses on continued development of good vocal technique, rhythmic skills and singing using the sol fa system. We continue learning music on Orff (xylophones, glockenspiels) and other rhythmic instruments. We also study the different periods of music history (Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic). Each class will participate in at least one performance depending on the time of year in which they are enrolled in the class (Eucharist services, Lessons and Carols, Graduation). 993 Music I Credit: 0.5* Music I is a three quarter-long music course that students may elect to take in the eighth grade. Both vocal and instrumental techniques are taught to serve as a feeder course into the Upper School Chorus, Rock Band, and Jazz Ensemble. The vocal aspect of the course focuses on mastering the skills of the sol fa system of singing while implementing good vocal technique. The instrumental aspect of the course is centered on the instruments that each student already plays (guitar, bass, piano, drums, percussion, brass, woodwinds) and focuses on developing those basic skills into intermediate to advanced technique. This class will participate in multiple performances throughout the semester including Eucharist services and Lessons & Carols. * One half of an upper school credit is awarded with the successful completion of Music I and the approval of the Performing Arts faculty.

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MS Course of Study 2014-2015  

Middle School course of study for 2014-2015 academic year

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