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Fulfilling the Promise A Campaign for Schreiner University

1 Kerrville, Texas

A Campaign for Schreiner University


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n the midst of rapid cultural and technological change, Schreiner understands that a twenty-first century learning environment must prepare graduates for success in a fluid

world. At the same time, Schreiner’s core strength since 1923 has been building and sustaining relationships. Nurturing a community of teachers and learners who encourage each other to fulfill their potential by claiming bold goals is more important now than ever. That’s what this campaign—Fulfilling the Promise—is about: reaching our potential, as individuals and as a community.

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— Tim Summerlin, President


goals

Our goals are ambitious and far-reaching.

Schreiner University’s reputation as a premier place of learning will be widely known through the strengths of our faculty and the achievements of our graduates. Schreiner’s facilities, services and campus ambience will reflect our commitment to “Learning by Heart.” Schreiner will begin its second century from a position of evergrowing financial strength.

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“ If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”

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– Isaac Newton

hen Hill Country rancher Charles Schreiner and Presbyterian leaders in our region fashioned a vision for Schreiner Institute, they undoubtedly recognized that their joint venture could transform the cultural and educational landscape of this favored region forever. Nearly a century since those first conversations, we—their successors—deeply honor the legacies of service and generosity we have inherited. We give thanks for these “giants”—thousands of generous friends and committed employees who have enabled this amazing journey from a tenacious military prep school and junior college to a distinctive baccalaureate university that faces the future with confidence and creativity.

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Celebrating Progress, Welcoming Change During the last decade and a half, Schreiner has: enhanced our distinctive undergraduate curriculum with an interdisciplinary core; identified innovative signature programs; launched 13 new undergraduate degrees, most recently the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and the graduate Master of Business Administration (MBA); grown enrollment by 67 percent, to 1100 students; more than doubled facilities to support enrollment growth, with a physical plant now valued at $54 million; and more than tripled endowment to $57,142,688 million.

Anticipating our centennial in 2023, we accept the privilege of charting a new course for Schreiner’s second century— claiming a reputation as a premier liberal arts, church-related learning community. Thoughtful study and discussion have convinced us that now is the time to carry the promise forward, building on current momentum. We are energized by the response of our supporters in the first year of our comprehensive campaign, with gifts of more than $20 million toward our goal. In year two, we focus on completing fundraising for three essential facilities that you will find described in the following pages.

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Our promise, Learning by Heart, is... an invitation to embrace a way of living that is more than intellectual. Engaging heart, mind and spirit in their quest for knowledge, students and mentors achieve a deeper understanding of the world around them and their place in it. a conviction that learning embraces challenge and transforms students into citizens imbued with discernment, compassion, and concern for the common good. a belief that where students have been matters much less than where they are going; it’s a commitment to engage with students in attaining the knowledge, skills, and values essential to a successful and satisfying life. This philosophy permeates all our decisions.

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Learning by Heart Experience: Trekking the North Woods When I was a senior, Dr. Fred Stevens pushed me to prepare for the MCAT (medical school entrance exam), and his confidence proved valid. When I was accepted, I wanted to celebrate before interviews began. A few of us decided to take Professor Stevens up on his offer to join him on his annual pilgrimage to Quetico Provincial Park in Canada. We did not really know what to expect, but prior canoe trips with Fred were a highlight of our time at Schreiner. We experienced exhilaration as we touched large ice deposits, bathed in ice-cold water, saw eagles and loons nesting, observed osprey diving for fish, and admired the Northern Lights. Having a naturalist like Fred plan and guide the trip was the icing on the cake. Truly it was a priceless adventure. Fifteen years, medical school, two residencies, and a master’s degree program have passed and I now get to join Fred and his wife, Pat Chastain, again for the fourth time in the summer of 2012. Lucky me! I get to re-join my mentor.

– Jason Aaron ’97, MD, MPH

Dr. Fred Stevens (center right) unveiled nature’s North Woods treasures for Schreiner students Lorie Lafon, Jason Aaron and Jason’s friend, Fabian Fonseca. Fred retired in May 2013 but stays connected to his many young friends.

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Learning by Heart Experience: Claiming a Vocation Schreiner University was the birthplace of my medical career as it molded me into the person I always hoped to become. I wanted a school that would challenge me and force me to become stronger and this is exactly what Schreiner did. I was given multiple chances that most people in college don’t get to excel and take command of projects. I absolutely loved every second of my time on campus and I so often think back to the incredible professors who taught me so much and all the happy times I had.

– Kathy Calhoun ’10

Kathy Calhoun (second from right), a second-year medical student at the Texas A&M Health Science Center, experienced a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity last year at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She actually observed the first-ever full face transplant, led by Dr. Elof Eriksson and a 35-member surgery team. When she completes her medical training, Calhoun hopes to perform reconstructive surgery, helping others with disfigurements.

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goal

Schreiner University’s reputation as a premier place of learning will be widely known through the strengths of our faculty and the achievements of our graduates.

We will increase student access and success. Providing a Schreiner education to qualified students regardless of their financial status and attracting meritorious students currently requires almost $9 million per year in Schreiner scholarships and grants. In addition to financial aid, we will continue to provide and strengthen academic support and enrichment initiatives which enable students to discover their strengths and thrive in social, academic and professional settings. A variety of gifts will help keep open this door of hope. Schreiner seeks gifts from $5,000 to $100,000 to provide a wide range of scholarships. Annual giving will support Presbyterian Heritage Grants, Hill Country Tuition Grants, Presidential and Trustees Scholarships, talent awards, campus jobs and other forms of student aid to more than 96% of our student body. Endowed scholarships from $25,000 to $1,000,000 will provide permanent support by distributing an annual amount to worthy students while preserving the corpus for growth and safety, thus reducing dependence upon yearly gifts.

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We will enrich academic and co-curricular offerings. Our signature academic programs—strong, in demand, distinctive—and those identified as priority programs, both academic and co-curricular, will deepen students’ experiences and help Schreiner carve out a more recognized niche. Current and endowed funding will sustain and expand these offerings.

Signature Programs

Distinctive Offerings

Communication Design

Learning Support Services

Integrity Ambassadors in Business

Honors Program

Life Sciences

Interdisciplinary Studies/Lifelong Learning Campus Ministry/Discerning Vocation Global Studies & Study Abroad Undergraduate Research Living & Learning Communities

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We will attract, retain and equip excellent teachers.

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he heart of any university—and, perhaps, especially a small liberal arts school—is its faculty. Schreiner has always been blessed with faculty known for their love of teaching and commitment to their students’ individual success. Attracting and retaining an excellent faculty depend upon current and endowed funding that enables: professional growth opportunities, including participation in national higher education dialogue through symposia and conferences; support for engaging with students in undergraduate research; use of teaching and research tools specific for each discipline, including technological advances; and recognition and encouragement of outstanding professionalism through endowed funding, such as fellowships, lectureships, professorships and chairs.

One way to refresh the curriculum is by equipping the faculty with new teaching tools and connecting them to colleagues across the nation. In the summer of 2011, a special gift enabled Schreiner to send 16 teachers to an intensive seminar at New York City’s Barnard College. There they learned “Reacting to the Past,” an interactive teaching technique that engages students in recreating pivotal moments in history. Upon returning, the faculty fine-tuned their version of “Setting Minds on Fire: The Birth of Democracy.” Ancient Athens in 403 BC became the “hands on” learning lab for every freshman student and will continue in years to come.

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goal

Schreiner’s facilities, services and campus ambience will reflect our commitment to “Learning by Heart.”

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s our programs mature and enrollment grows, Schreiner must provide facilities that keep up with our progress and reflect Schreiner’s commitment to holistic education—linking development of the mind, body and spirit. Such facilities not only encourage learning beyond the classroom and create places of fellowship and recreation; they also offer additional venues to the supportive Hill Country community that surrounds us.

Mountaineer spirit makes competitive athletics a chance for all to have fun.

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First Capital Priority: The Schreiner Event Center

will reflect SU’s commitment to our new conference, relieve a shortage of facilities and nurture scholar athletes.

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chreiner’s first construction priority is the Athletic and Event Center. When completed, this $11.1 million project will address shortages that affect competitive athletics, intramural recreation and all-campus gatherings— such as commencement ceremonies. In addition, a modern and attractive arena will offer a large venue for community events, further promoting Schreiner’s name and reputation. Equally important, the new facilities will enable SU to have full standing in the prestigious Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) that we joined in 2013. While we are pleased to be included, SU cannot host tournament play until we have a new gym and locker rooms. Schreiner is

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the only school excluded. (SCAC includes Trinity and Southwestern Universities, the University of Dallas, Austin College, Colorado College and Centenary College.) The J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation of Tulsa has issued a challenge to help Schreiner secure the remaining gifts needed for construction. To earn a $1 million grant, Schreiner must raise the remaining construction funds before July 9, 2014. Shortly after the challenge was issued, a generous family pledged $1,000,000 toward the $2.7 million detailed in the grant request. Thus, we seek gifts totaling $1.7 million to earn the Mabee grant and $2.5 to complete nonconstruction components, as well.


Construction has begun!

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ratitude permeated the campus at the close of the first semester when the final gifts arrived to complete funding for the Athletic and Event Center. Just before Christmas, President Tim Summerlin joyfully notified the J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation of Tulsa that its $1 million challenge did its work and inspired the remaining gifts and pledges needed before Huser Construction of Kerrville could break ground for the Athletic and Event Center. Gifts from 52 families and organizations— from staff members’ payroll deductions to two large campaign gifts of $1,000,000 each—completed the $11.1 million needed to build and endow the athletic complex that meets the expectations of SU’s new conference: the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC).

Student athletes who will be seniors next year will be able to play some of their final games in the new arena, according to the construction timeline. The pad will be cured in early April with steel erection to follow. When students return for the fall semester, they will see a roofed-in building and masonry going up. As the fall semester ends, the longed-for Athletic and Event Center will be open for business. And, as the 2014-15 school year comes to a close, the beautiful new arena will welcome baccalaureate and commencement ceremonies. All the community who wishes to attend will find a seat! All! Thanks, parents, employees, alumni, trustees, Hill Country neighbors, charitable foundations and the City of Kerrville.

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Campus Ministry and Worship Center Will Reflect Schreiner’s Values.

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chreiner is proud of Presbyterian heritage, as well as its vibrant, ecumenical campus ministry program. After years of study and discussion, we have concluded that Schreiner does not need a 600-seat “chapel.” Instead, we need more intimate spaces for daily activity—study and prayer groups, informal worship, counseling, fellowship and reflection. Architects have just completed drawings that transform the existing Dietert Chapel/Auditorium (built in the ’60s) into flexible spaces for much smaller groups. From fellowship and office spaces to a 100-seat recital hall and a 208-seat chapel, the “new” complex will likely be one of the most popular spaces on campus. The Campus Ministry and Worship Center will also offer places for peer counseling and community service initiatives, as well as settings for discovery of vocation. In addition, a quiet meditation area outside—a garden or labyrinth, perhaps— will provide a handsome setting for solitude and reflection.

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Fundraising Challenge for 2014 Dietert Worship Center Renovations

Building Equipment & Furnishings Professional fees Building maintenance endowment Total Project Cost

Estimated Cost $2,512,828 $218,260 $247,798 $502,566 $3,481,451

Amount Yet-to-Raise

_____________


UP

12 14 14 16

Repurposing for Lively Use: Campus Ministry & Worship Center

15 UP -1'-10"

14

OFFICE 9' 7" x 11' 4" DN

0'-0"

12

-3'-7" 11

12 14

ADDITIONS & RENOVATIONS TO

GROOMS ROOM

14

CAMPUS MINISTRY CENTER

48

-9'-6"

-6'-0"

WOMEN

16

14

OFFICE STOR.

DN

49

111

STAGE

112

STAGE

30

CIRCULATION

RECITAL

DN

FILE

STOR.

JAN

-3'-7"

35

ENTRY

102

108 SEATS

DN

4' 3" x 5' 7" DN -6'-0"

CHAPEL / Chapel/ AUDITORIUM AudiTorium

STAGE

116

STOR.

16

16

115

BRIDE'S ROOM -6'-0"

22

14 -9'-6"

16

24 18 20

117

OFFICE

118

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BRIDE'S ROOM

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DN

20 22

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122

119

18 DN

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OFFICE

9' 9" x 12' 5"

120

9' 9" x 12' 5"

STOR

55 STOR

129

128

OFFICE

9' 9" x 12' 5"

.DW

FOOD PREP. 127

PRAYER 130

0'-0"

60

STOR

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FOO

REF

61

-3'-7"

STOR

58

ELECT.

123

11' 10" xOFFICE 8' 1" -1'-9"

37

11' 10" x 8' 1" -1'-9"

DN

20

-1'-10" ELECT.

OFFICE

57

18 20

41

CONFERENCE

-3'-7"

18

STOR.

0'-0"

DN ENTRY

101

DN

-9'-6"

-6'-0"

CIRCULATION

0'-0" DN

14

114

-3'-7"

-1'-9"

208 SEATS

110

52

STOR.

0'-0"

-1'-9"

9' 7" x 11' 2"

BACKSTAGE

113

SMALLDN CONF.

WOMEN

CHAPEL / 208 AUDITORIUMSEATS

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51

STOR.

FILE

JAN 4' 3" x 5' 7"

-9'-6"

-6'-0"

STOR.

MEN

-8'-4"

-6'-0"

STOR.

9' 7" x 11' 2"

11

-3'-7"

DN

Recital Hall

12

-3'-7"

GROOM'S ROOM

50

0'-0"

9' 7" x 11' 4"

SMALL CONFERENCE

15

Schreiner University Kerrville, MEN Texas

9' 9" x 12' 5"

0'-0"

OFFICE

59

9' 9" x 12' 5"

0'-0"

OFFICE

STOR 5' 9" x 5' 0"

FELLOWSHIP

20

0'-0"

121

fellowship FELLOWSHIP

9' 9" x 12' 5" 5' 9" x 5' 0"

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Department Legend

DEPARTMENT LEGEND ANCILLIARYRECITAL

ANCILLIARY

CIRCULATION STORAGE CIRCULATION

RECITAL & Chapel STORAGE

FELLOWSHIP FELLOWSHIP OFFICE

OFFICE 30'

60'

DEVELOPMENT FLOOR PLAN University 19 A DESIGN Campaign for Schreiner 1

90'

1/8" = 1'-0"

30'

60'

90'

1 SCHEMATIC DESIGN FLOOR 1/8" = 1'-0"


“Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and life to everything.” – Plato

A landscaped plaza will connect the Hanszen Fine Arts Building and the Music Education Hall, creating an outdoor performing arts zone just awaiting creative uses.

PRACTICE MODULES

MECH.

LIBRARY

STORAGE

OFFICE LOADING

LOCKERS

JAN

OFFICE

OFFICE

OFFICE

LOCKERS UP

DN

UP

DN

STOR.

ELEV

RECORDING STUDIO

CLASSROOM LOCKERS

levation

OFFICE

ENSEMBLE

WOMEN

ELEV

M u s i c Ed u c a t i o n Ha l l

REHEARSAL STORAGE

MECHANICAL

CHASE

Clerestory

CLASSROOM

OPEN TO BELOW

COFFEE STORAGE

LOBBY

OPEN TO BELOW

MEN

ENTRY PORCH

First Floor

Second Floor Second Floor

r

M u s i c Ed u c a t i o n Ha l l

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M u s i c Ed u c a t i o n Ha l l

UP


Music Education Hall will provide much-needed teaching and practice spaces

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chreiner believes that the arts are central to our academic mission, providing a timeless, universal language that ties us together as humankind. Schreiner’s performing arts program has multiplied dramatically in the last decade, including frequent theatrical and musical productions that delight and entertain the campus and the community around us. Majors and nonmajors alike can now participate in theatrical productions, three vocal ensembles, a concert band, a string ensemble and a chamber group. While the visual arts occupy attractive, modern space in the Cailloux Professional Studies Building, performing and theater arts students and faculty endure substandard facilities scattered in awkward locations throughout the campus. Now is the time to provide quality spaces for these faculty and students. To do so, Schreiner intends to repurpose an older structure for an exciting new use. An open-air building next to the Hanzsen Fine Arts Center, the existing Rex Kelly Pavilion will become a two-story instructional and rehearsal hall, a central “headquarters” for learning and rehearsing. With 11,000 sq.ft. of space, the Music Education Hall will provide an orchestral sized practice space, an ensemble studio, individual practice rooms, classrooms, a recording studio, a music library, climate controlled storage areas and faculty offices. Hanszen will benefit from upgraded plumbing and electrical systems, enhanced instructional technology capabilities, new black box theater seating and improved storage spaces.

Music Education Hall & Hanzsen Upgrade

Estimated Cost Rex Kelly & Hanzsen Renovations (Includes Site Work and Fixed Equipment) $1,978,275 Furniture and movable equipment $50,000 Professional fees $143,155 Landscaping $95,000 Contingency $94,000 Maintenance Endowment $354,065 Total Project Cost $2,714,495 Funds in-hand $875,655 Amount Yet-to-Raise $1,838,840

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Creating a Long-Term Technology Road Map

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hile Schreiner’s strength as a community relies on its historic commitment to face-to-face relationships, using technology wisely is an essential contributor to creating a premier place of learning. After all, almost 1500 individuals communicate each day—from students learning Mandarin in a distance learning lab to checking out what’s for lunch in the dining hall. Continuous enhancement of technological infrastructure is a 24/7 effort, and a costly one. Before students even arrive, they can set up their internet services through Apogee, the largest provider of university residential networks in the nation. Using the Schreiner One portal, students can email friends, download course handouts, make online payments, participate in threaded discussions with other college students around the country and participate in public forums.

University Business Magazine (www.universitybusiness.com) paid tribute to Schreiner’s recent achievements in technology in its June 2013 online edition. Since partnering with Apogee, SU has been able to: •Q  uintuple bandwidth available to students; •E  xpand campus-wide wireless coverage to more than 90 percent; •E  xtend instructional services to virtual labs, giving students access to production and analytic software programs that might otherwise be too expensive; and •P  rovide network access anywhere, any time on any mobile device.

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Projects on the roadmap, considerably assisted by designated gifts, include: • Electronic access controls for campus facilities – $80,000  Replacing mechanical keys, digital identification cards will access all exterior doors on campus, except apartments. Significantly increasing security, the centralized system will record the time and identity of each entry and will reduce maintenance and operating costs. • Campus Emergency Notification System – $75,000 A gift of $75,000 will increase comprehensive campus coverage and instant emergency notification by providing 10 additional digital monitors and three external message boards with loudspeakers for strategic locations across campus.

•S  mart Classrooms, each $20,000 While SU has made considerable progress in upgrading teaching spaces, each classroom conversion requires expensive high-definition monitors and/or projectors, movable desks and additional access points and electrical outlets. •L  ynda.com training (per year) – $18,000 An online virtual knowledge library, this innovative company provides faculty, staff and students professional development opportunities to train online in thousands of skill and competency area—from software basics to time management to leadership principles. Whether a student is using an I-Pad from his dorm room or an administrator is taking a lunch hour to improve her technical skills in Excel, this service provides almost instant training for software updates and literally thousands of state-of-the-art tutorials on creative techniques, business strategies, and more.

For sports fans far and near: Student employee Cody Bates (right), a senior from Bandera, landed the interesting assignment of setting up SU’s very first live sports statistics of Schreiner athletic events. Here, he and Matt Dean (left), a junior from Amarillo, do a test run the day before SU’s first home soccer game using a wireless bridge and a laptop computer. Both students are majoring in Information Systems. Now, even parents who live far away can keep track of the games and in the future watch their sons and daughters play soccer, softball, baseball, basketball and volleyball, thanks to the newly activated mobile units. Fans can watch live feeds and see real-time scores—just like ESPN!

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Beautifying Campus

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reating a premier place of learning is deeply involved with place. Respect for place is expressed in equipping classrooms and labs, athletic fields and library spaces. It also ensures that these quality facilities compose an inviting campus scape. The fact that nearly two out of three prospective students base their decision on a college’s physical appeal cannot be ignored. In Schreiner’s early years, dozens of majestic oak and pecan trees, architectural harmony and an uncluttered layout created the totality of the campus ambience. Schreiner’s budget and our region’s semi-arid conditions made landscaping a continuing challenge. Prudent management, collaborative campus planning, and a determination to ensure that our campus conveys the spirit of excellence have changed that fact. Trees planted along the peripheral campus implemented our first extended use of underground irrigation over a decade ago, and those trees are now maturing well. In areas like the newly renovated quadrangle and the soccer field, underground irrigation drip systems and xeriscaping have been employed. Now the old “Bull Ring” in the center of campus provides attractive pedestrian transit and natural gathering places. Schreiner’s annual planning process includes enhancement of campus visual appeal and functionality, always with an eye to both sustainability and consistency. Generous gifts have supported this transformation of campus wayfinding and atmosphere, guided by a master plan developed in 2010-11 with input from students, faculty, staff, trustees, alumni and community. Ongoing campus improvement remains a priority and excites great enthusiasm from those who use the campus. For as little as $500 to plant and irrigate a tree to $500,000 to create a harmonious zone, Schreiner’s friends can make a difference in improving the campus ambience. Schreiner will be pleased to work with a family who would like to dedicate a newly-landscaped area as a tribute or memorial gift.

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goal W

Schreiner will begin its second century from a position of ever-growing financial strength.

e are grateful that Schreiner’s endowment has tripled since 1997 and now surpasses $57 million. At the same time, the size of one’s endowment is more than a safeguard against turbulent economic times; it is one of the most visible and lasting markers of a strong university. Endowment funds are never spent; however, a portion of their annual income provides predictable and steady support and enables the administration to plan realistically for the future.

As the endowment grows, Schreiner will be better able to: support academic excellence through abundant scholarships and grants; maintain and improve existing and new buildings envisioned that serve athletic competition, campus events, spiritual development, the performing arts and community needs; enhance our library operations and collections; offer professional growth opportunities for faculty and staff; enrich curricular and co-curricular programs; sustain innovative technology throughout campus; and respond to new opportunities for more thoughtful and thorough services.

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How Schreiner’s Endowment Compares to Peer* and Aspirant** Universities University Name/Location

Total Total Enrollment Endowment Fall 2012

Endowment per Student

Abilene Christian University, Abilene

4367

$307,124,825

$70,329

Southwestern University, Georgetown

1394

$250,622,946

$179,787

St. Mary’s University, San Antonio

3941

$136,369,498

$34,603

Hardin-Simmons University, Abilene

2301

$120,425,708

$52,336

Austin College, Sherman

1260

$119,456,571

$94,807

Texas Lutheran University, Seguin

1315

$76,822,947

$58,420

McMurry University, Abilene

1368

$59,920,763

$43,802

St. Edward’s University, Austin

5095

$58,402,356

$11,463

Schreiner University, Kerrville

1126

$50,972,683

$45,269

Howard Payne University, Brownwood

1130

$45,704,748

$40,447

Texas Wesleyan University, Fort Worth

3204

$33,795,421

$10,548

Schreiner ranks 9th of 11 in total endowment but ranks 6th in endowment per student. Schreiner’s unpublished endowment total in August of the 2013 fiscal year is $57,428,549. Peer Institutions* are defined as higher educational units that are comparable with one another in terms of size, enrollment, program offerings and—sometimes—locales. Aspirant Institutions** are those that have achieved higher measures of academic reputation, financial resources, and/or greater selectivity. These are the institutions that serve in diverse ways as models we “aspire” to emulate.

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chreiner recognizes that most major gifts for the endowment will come through estate provisions that may take many years to realize. In the meantime, increasing permanent funds to the equivalent of $100,000 per student will effectively double our current endowment to more than $110 million. Increased financial strength in the past decade has supported Schreiner’s aggressive growth and will undergird future progress.

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The Future Beckons

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e know Schreiner is a place on the move—strengthening its academic programs, gaining in recognition and respect, meeting educational needs important to state and nation. As from the beginning in 1923, Schreiner is persistent in making its own path—as evidenced by Schreiner’s signature programs and distinctive offerings. All of us recognize that a destination rarely remains a destination very long. Indeed, organizations that thrive are continually renewing and revising their goals and strategies and then claiming even larger visions. And so it will be with Schreiner. We give thanks that our trustees, faculty and administration do not see a resting place on the horizon. We have the vision, confidence, strategies and plans to achieve them.

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Make a difference where we’re making a difference!

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riends who support Schreiner are backing a success story that has unfolded amidst challenging odds. As Schreiner moves into its second century of service, we intend our reputation as the most student-centered institution in Texas will be well known and well documented. When one asks, “Where can one find a premier place of learning, where a student can experience a life-changing undergraduate education?” the answer will be, “Schreiner University in the Texas Hill Country, of course!”

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Just as every student matters at Schreiner University, so does every gift. Supporting the “Fulfilling the Promise” Campaign is a way to make a difference because each contribution at a small university makes a real difference….is noticed…is appreciated. To accomplish these goals, Schreiner respectfully asks you to consider: Gifts to the annual fund underwrite student aid to cover the gap between tuition and the cost of providing a high-quality educational experience and enhance program funding. Gifts to the capital projects and other important initiatives will provide superior learning opportunities. Current construction priorities include the Athletic & Event Center, the Music Education Hall and the Campus Ministry and Worship Center. Gifts to endowment , including through bequests and other planned gifts will secure Schreiner University’s long-term health and legacy. We give thanks for the generous current and planned gifts our friends have pledged during this first year of the Fulfilling the Promise Campaign. Raised-to-date: ___________________________________________

We invite your friendship and support for the journey.

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2013-2014

Board of Trustees

Officers of the Board Chair: Mr. Mike Pate

Vice Chair: Ms. Susan Brooks

Secretary: Mr. Weir Labatt

Term Expiring 2014

Advisory Trustees

Mr. James Alsup (3) Midland Ms. Nancy Anguish (1) Midland Mr. Tom Baldwin (1) San Antonio Ms. Susan Stephens Brooks (3) San Angelo Mr. Mark Clements (1) Spicewood Dr. Gary Allen Crozier (3) Kerrville Mr. Bill Harrison (2) San Antonio Mr. Thomas Weir Labatt, III (3) San Antonio Ms. Janet McKinney (1) Kerrville Ms. Lea Nye (1) San Antonio Mr. Robert Parker (1) Houston Mr. Israel Pena (2) Boerne Rev. Dean Pogue (1) Katy

Ms. Anne Compton (2014) Dallas Mr. J. B. (Bubba) Coskey* (2016) Houston Ms. Sue Cummings (2015) Kerrville Rev. Dr. David Evans (2015) Austin Mr. Steve Daniels (2015) Kerrville Mr. Stuart Sliva (2014) El Paso Mr. Bill Wilson* (2016) Kerrville Mr. Walter Workman (2016) Kerrville

Term Expiring 2015

University Officers

Mr. John Brantley (1) Houston Mr. Rick Cree (1) Dallas Mr. Page Foshee (1) Austin Dr. Demmie Mayfield (2) San Antonio Mr. Michael Pate (2) Alexandria, VA Ms. Nancy Paup (2) Fort Worth Ms. Jane Ragsdale (3) Hunt Mr. Karl Ransleben (1) Fredericksburg Dr. William Reid (3) Horseshoe Bay Mr. Robert Scott (3) Falfurrias Mr. Max Sherman (2) Austin Mr. Ron Tefteller (1) San Antonio

Dr. Tim Summerlin President

Term Expiring 2016 Rev. Dr. Stuart Baskin (3) Tyler Mr. Bud Benning (1) El Paso Dr. Carlos Campos (1) New Braunfels Mr. Phillip Hering (3) Waco Mr. Frank Maresh (2) Hunt Mr. Granger MacDonald (1) Kerrville Mr. Dan Ostos (1) Kerrville Mr. Nicholas Serafy (2) Brownsville Mr. Brian Sullivan (2) Austin (1), (2), or (3) indicates which three-year term is being served.

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Trustees Emeriti Mr. James Avery Mr. Peter Baldwin

Kerrville Dallas

* denotes inactive status

Mr. Larry Cantu VP for Enrollment Services Dr. Charlie McCormick Provost and VP for Academic Affairs Mr. Bill Muse VP for Administration and Finance Dr. Candice Scott Associate VP for Academic Affairs and Student Success; Logan Library Director Ms. Lane Tait Assistant VP for Marketing Mr. Mark Tuschak VP for Advancement

Deans Dr. Diana Comuzzie Trull School of Sciences & Mathematics Dr. David Smith Cailloux School of Professional Studies Dr. William Woods School of Liberal Arts Ms. Karen Davis Kilgore Director of Development


Financials: Total Assets Surpass $119,000,000 2012-2013 Financial Statistics Assets Cash and cash equivalent $2,728,330 Accounts and pledges receivable 2,735,777 Other assets 2,379,526 Investments 57,428,579 Land, buildings and equipment, net 54,313,604 Total assets $119,585,816 Liabilities Accounts payable Deposits and deferred revenue Notes payable Total liabilities

$1,620,976 847,123 14,954,768 $17,422,867

Net Assets Unrestricted $57,142,688 Temporarily restricted 8,442,140 Permanently restricted 36,578,121 Total net assets $102,162,949

Total liabilities and net assets

$119,585,816

Revenues

2013

Investments 8%

Auxiliary 32%

Gifts and grants 9%

Net tuition and fees 51%

Expenses

2013

Instruction 30%

Auxiliary 20%

Academic Institutional support support 7% Student services 25% 18%

The above numbers are unaudited. Fiscal year concludes May 31.

Historical Values of Endowment $55,589,874

60,000,000 50,000,000 40,000,000

$33,589,623

30,000,000

$39,284,195

$46,625,602 $46,604,965

$28,900,677

20,000,000 10,000,000 0

FY98

FY01

FY04

FY07

FY10

FY13

A Campaign for Schreiner University

33


Campaign Steering Committee Richard Cree, Chair Royce Faulkner, Honorary Chair Susan & Randy Brooks Janet & Kent McKinney Viveca & Nick Serafy Laura & Weir Labatt III Anne & Rick Cree Rebecca & Bill Harrison Jerry & Mark Clements Nancy Paup Nancy Anguish Barbara & Mike Pate Judy &Warren Ferguson Sandy & Jim Alsup

San Angelo Kerrville Brownsville San Antonio Dallas San Antonio Spicewood Ft. Worth Midland Arlington, VA Kerrville Midland

Liaisons to the Steering Committee Dr. Tim Summerlin President 830-792-7345 Mr. Mark Tuschak VP for University Advancement 830-792-7215 Ms. Karen Davis Kilgore Director of Development 830-792-7205

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34 Fulfilling the Promise


A Campaign for Schreiner University

35

1


“For all that is past, thanks. For all that is to come, YES!”

M

— Dag Hammarskjold

any services of worship end with a “benediction,” understood to be a “blessing” as we depart. A literal translation of that word, however, is “the good word.”

Faithful were all who taught, who coached, who swept the floors, who refused to give up on reluctant learners, who prayed faithfully, who worked beyond assigned tasks.

As I look back over Schreiner’s 89 years, a double handful of “good words” come to mind:

Generous were those who built the current learning environment, who established the endowment, who denied themselves for the good of the human community, who believed that the future was worth personal sacrifice.

Visionary jumps out as I think of the old Captain and some worthy church folks who dreamed a dream and then set themselves to dig a school out of a corn field. Persistent were those who would not give up during the Great Depression— or when most of the young men went off to war. Flexible were those who maintained Schreiner’s basic academic integrity while tuning its programs to fit the needs of a changing society.

May those and other such “good words” become the benedictions of those in the next generations who reflect on how we played our assigned roles as Schreiner stands on tip-toes to embrace the future.

— T  he Rev. Dr. Sam Junkin President Emeritus

Mark C. Tuschak Vice President for Advancement & Public Affairs mctuschak@schreiner.edu 830.792.7215 CMB 6229 • 2100 Memorial Blvd. Kerrville, TX 78028-5697 36 Fulfilling the Promise

Karen Kilgore Director of Development & Planned Giving Advisor kkilgore@schreiner.edu 830.792.7205

Fulfilling the Promise  

A Campaign for Schreiner University