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Events

May | June | July August | September 2018 Public Commemoration and Women’s History Living Literature: Frankenstein The City: Myth and Materiality Surrealism and Music in France, 1924–52 Burckhardt at 200: The Civilization of the Renaissance Reconsidered Plus hundreds of other events highlighting the latest research across the humanities

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The School of Advanced Study, University of London (SAS) is the UK’s national centre for the support and promotion of research in the humanities. Its nine institutes offer an extensive programme of seminars, workshops, lectures and conferences. Each year around 1,800 events are organised on humanities topics, attracting more than 68,000 participants from around the world. Senate House Library is the central library of the University of London. With more than two million books and 1,200 archival collections, it is one of the UK’s largest academic libraries focused on the arts, humanities and social sciences. Several of SAS’s collections are housed within the Library, which holds a wealth of primary source material from the medieval period to the modern age. The Library organises a number of events and exhibitions throughout the year. The majority of SAS and Senate House Library events and exhibitions are free and open to the public. All are welcome and encouraged to take advantage of the unique access to current research in the humanities and social sciences that these events provide. For a complete list of upcoming events and exhibitions, please visit sas.ac.uk and senatehouselibrary.ac.uk.

School of Advanced Study sas.ac.uk Institute of Advanced Legal Studies ials.sas.ac.uk Institute of Classical Studies ics.sas.ac.uk Institute of Commonwealth Studies commonwealth.sas.ac.uk Institute of English Studies ies.sas.ac.uk Institute of Historical Research history.ac.uk Institute of Latin American Studies ilas.sas.ac.uk Institute of Modern Languages Research modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk Institute of Philosophy philosophy.sas.ac.uk The Warburg Institute warburg.sas.ac.uk

Senate House Library senatehouselibrary.ac.uk


Contents

Contents Leading Women

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Booking

Highlights

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Most of our events are free and open to the public. Some events have limited capacity and advance booking is advised. The event information in this guide was correct at the time of going to press, but may be subject to change. Please check our websites for the latest information or email SAS at sas.events@sas.ac.uk or Senate House Library at senatehouselibrary@london.ac.uk.

Exhibitions 32 Events calendar – listings

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Seminar series

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Research training

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Calls for papers

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How to find us

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On the cover

Surrealism and Music in France, 1924–52: Interdisciplinary and International Contexts 8 June Paris was the principal centre of surrealist activity and the focus of connections between surrealist literature, ethnology, sociology, visual arts, and music. The links between surrealism and the emerging disciplines of ethnology and ethnomusicology redefined the concept of exoticism in France and were the subject of a good deal of polemical debate. Organised by the Institute of Modern Languages Research, this conference will situate music at the heart of these debates. The event will end with a piano recital of relevant French repertoire by the outstanding young pianist Alexander Soares, including works by Boulez, Messiaen, and Jolivet. See pages 77 and 78 for information Image: xsense/Shutterstock

How to use this guide Events are listed in date and time order. On the left we list the department responsible for organising the event, the time, type of event or series and the venue. On the right we list the event title, speaker(s) and a short description if available. There is further information about highlighted events at the start of the guide, and about research training events and calls for papers at the end. School of Advanced Study

Mailing lists Sign up to our mailing lists to receive information on events of interest to you by emailing SAS at sas.events@sas.ac.uk or Senate House Library at senatehouselibrary@london.ac.uk. To add, amend or remove your details from our postal mailing list, email sas.events@sas.ac.uk. We will be reviewing our mailing list in the coming weeks and may contact you to find out if you wish to continue receiving this publication.

Event recordings Selected events are recorded and available to view, listen to, or download online at sas.ac.uk/events, on iTunes U, and on YouTube.

Blog The School’s flagship blog, Talking Humanities, is written by academics from around the world and provides a range of thought-provoking articles on subjects that matter to humanities researchers. Talking Humanities can be found at talkinghumanities.blogs.sas.ac.uk. We invite short articles from humanities researchers. Contact us at sas.info@sas.ac.uk with your proposal.

Survey We are asking our readers to let us know how they use this events brochure. Please take our online survey to be in with a chance of winning one of three £50 Amazon vouchers: www.sas.ac.uk/events/events-brochure. To be eligible, your response must be received by 17:00 on Friday, 8 June 2018. Winners will be notified the week of 18 June. 1


Leading Women

Leading Leading Women Women In 1868, nine women were admitted to the University of London and permitted to enrol for a ‘special examination’ course. This was the first time in Britain that women had gained access to university education and, though it was to be another ten years before they were admitted on equal terms with men to read for the same degree programmes, this modest event was an immensely significant moment for the University, for women, and for society as a whole. Celebrating 150 years since women first accessed university education in Britain, the Leading Women campaign celebrates exceptional women by sharing stories of women leading both by being the first, and by leading through their inspirational educational and professional achievements. Throughout 2018, a number of events and resources—including pop-up exhibitions and talks, panel debates, a student art contest, a new student scholarship, and an online gallery of 150 leading women associated with the University—will mark this ‘foot in the door’ moment for women in higher education. The events listed here are those that have been organised by the School of Advanced Study. For more information about our Leading Women campaign, please visit london.ac.uk/women.

Institute of Historical Research Suffrage Series, 1918–2018 Public Commemoration and Women’s History 1 May | Senate House How are women remembered, commemorated, and celebrated in public? How is this different from historical commemorations of men? What forms do these commemorations take? Why do public commemorations of women provoke such debate, and what are the legacies of these public memorials in their different forms? This panel discussion chaired by IHR Director Professor Jo Fox will feature Caroline Criado Perez, activist and campaigner; Rebekah Higgitt, University of Kent and member of the English Heritage Blue Plaques Panel; Sarah Jackson, founder of the East End Women’s Museum; and Rebecca Surender, Oxford University, Pro-Vice Chancellor for Diversity and head of Oxford’s ‘Diversifying Portraiture’. The event is part of the IHR’s ‘Suffrage Series, 1918-2018’, a programme of talks, debates, lectures, walks, and concerts marking the centenary and legacies of the Representation of the People Act (1918). See page 41 for event information

After the Vote: Activism and History, 1918–2018 12 June | Senate House See page 52 for event information

Suffrage Bloomsbury Walking Tour 22 September See page 100 for event information

Sounds of Suffrage: a Concert of Women’s Music and Voices, 1900–1918 1 November | Senate House

2018 Kehoe Lecture on Irish History: Suffrage and Citizenship in Ireland, 1912–1918 15 November | Senate House

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May Poetry reading: All Under One Roof and Shrines of Upper Austria 1 May | Senate House See page 41 for event information

Liberty, Irreverence, and the Place of Women in Early-Modern Italian Culture 11 May | Senate House See page 50 for event information

Stage Rights!: The Actresses’  Franchise League, Activism and Politics, 1908–58 14 May | Senate House See page 52 for event information

Women’s Writing and Science 18 May | Room 243, Senate House See page 58 for event information

Ireland’s Forgotten Women: Exploring the Experience of Widows in 1960s’ Women’s Magazines 22 May | Senate House See page 60 for event information

Living Literature: Frankenstein 23 May | Senate House Dare to join us for the third in our Living Literature series, an epic thriller brought to life through immersive performances, talks, workshops, and activities. Listen to chilling ghost stories by candlelight as our experts set the scene of that night in the ‘year without a summer’ at the Villa Diodati, where the first version of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was created. Tread carefully through Victor Frankenstein’s rooms in Ingolstadt, relive the birth of the monster, and learn about the scientific and medical innovations of the period that provided inspiration for Shelley. Listen to talks and join in with activities led by expects in the Gothic, learn how Shelley’s Frankenstein has inspired popular culture since its publication in 1818, and more! See page 62 for event information School of Advanced Study

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Leading Women May Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation – Kerstin Hensel and Jen Calleja 23 May | Senate House See page 62 for event information

Roman Matrons and their Political Influence through Social Networks during the Late Republic 25 May | Senate House See page 64 for event information

June The Discovery of Pleasure: Female Sexuality in Italy and West Germany in the Long 1970s 12 June | Senate House See page 79 for event information

Writing Workshop: The Craft of Georgette Heyer 18 June | Senate House Kim Wilkins (Queensland) Georgette Heyer is much loved by readers for her characterisation, her humour, and her rollicking good pace. What can writers learn from Heyer by analysing her creative choices? This workshop will cover structural issues such as plot, pacing, and subplot as well as characterisation issues such as internalisation and supporting cast, to help participants develop their own writing toolkits, no matter what genre they write in. Please read Venetia before attending, as it will serve as the guide book for examples. £50 | £30 See page 85 for event information

The Nonesuch? Georgette Heyer and Her Historical Fiction Contemporaries 19 June | Senate House This interdisciplinary conference is aimed primarily at exploring Heyer’s historical novels, but will also set her work in context with other contemporary female historical fiction writers, such as Norah Lofts, Margaret Irwin, Margaret Campbell Barnes, and Anya Seton, and with contemporary Regency romance. Topics to be explored include sources and influences; critical and popular reception; class, gender and sexuality; and publishing and marketing histories. The day will include both formal and informal sessions, and provide opportunities for Heyer readers to meet and discuss the impact of her work. See page 85 for event information

Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation – Doerte Hansen and Anne Stokes 21 June | Senate House See page 86 for event information

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Rights for Women: London’s Pioneers in their Own Words 16 July – 15 December 2018 | Senate House Library Senate House Library will offer an exhibition and programme of public events exploring historical and contemporary campaigns for equal rights. See page 36 for event information

September Motherhood, Loss and the First World War Conference and Public Lecture 5 September | IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/ NB02, Senate House See page 98 for event information

Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation – Julya Rabinowich and Tess Lewis 18 September | Gordon Room, G34 (Senate House) See page 99 for event information

Deeds Not Words: In Conversation with Helen Pankhurst 20 September | Chancellor’s Hall (Senate House) See page 99 for event information

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Institute of Historical Research: Women’s History Seminar Women’s History in the Curriculum 8 June, 17:15 | IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Opposition to Coeducation in British Universities, 1860–1935 Emily Rutherford (University of Columbia) 22 June, 17:15 | IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House) Historians have previously written about gender in British universities as a story of women’s fight for admission to previously all-male institutions. But this narrative has obscured the stories of those men and women at universities across the UK who fought equally hard to preserve singlesex institutions and forms of sociability. This talk describes a world of single-sex higher-education institutions and academic communities in earlytwentieth-century Britain, seeking to understand the political and identity categories actors themselves used and why they were ideologically and emotionally committed to single-sex higher education. It takes up three very different cases: the students at the late-Victorian, coeducational University of Manchester who consistently rejected suggestions that they combine their men’s and women’s student unions; the educational reformers who tried to bring the domestic science movement to the Edwardian University of London; and the male classicists at interwar Oxford and Cambridge for whom ideals of ancient pederasty were critical to their defense of singlesex education. Understanding why these actors were committed to gender segregation helps us to grasp why gender segregation has in fact proved such an enduring force in education in modern Britain—with consequences that persist to the present day.

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Highlights There’s More to Life: Work-Life Balance, the Value of the Arts, and Well-Being 3 May

Hacking Moby-Dick Starts 1 May This new seminar series offers participants a unique chance to read a classic of American literature while exploring new digital approaches to studying novels. It will feature weekly close readings and discussions of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851) in the context of quantitative and qualitative analyses as well as a digital archive of Melville’s marginalia. Participants will have the opportunity to use the Melville Electronic Library’s digital edition of Moby-Dick, which juxtaposes the American and British editions, in effect showing Melville’s revisions after he submitted the book to his American publisher––and how his British publisher changed parts of the book without his permission.

‘Work-life balance’ is a contested term with multiple meanings, from the need to find time for caring responsibilities to the ability to find time for leisure or to engage in cultural pursuits. There is increasing awareness of the difficulty of finding time and space for a whole range of activities beyond work and domestic responsibilities, whether those are hobbies, interests, cultural activities, or the nourishment of friendship. This one-day conference focuses on the notion of work-life balance (widely interpreted) in the context of universities, and in particular their law schools, where an increasing amount of audit (including the TEF, the REF, and now the KEF) increases the challenge of maintaining ‘balance’. It also seeks to explore the contribution of the arts to achieving the equilibrium implied by the term ‘work-life balance’.  See page 43 for event information

 See pages 41, 46, 53, 61, 65, 74, 101 for event information

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Highlights

The Commonwealth, Media, and Elections 3 May One of the modern Commonwealth’s great strengths has been its long experience of election observation, in support of the Commonwealth’s commitment to democracy and good governance in its member states. In these teams’ final reports, assessment of the media landscape and access to information have always featured. This panel discussion will consider the media landscapes of the two African ‘powerhouses’ in the Commonwealth, South Africa and Nigeria, in the run-up to their national elections in 2019. Pressure on the media has been described as ‘the canary in the gold mine’ for erosion of democracy and civic rights. Should early warning mechanisms be set in place long in advance of the arrival of Commonwealth observation teams? Is this possible in South Africa and Nigeria?  If so, what forms should these take?   See page 44 for event information

Dorothy Tarrant Lecture The Goddess and Damned Wrath: How a Linguist Reads the Iliad 8 May There is arguably no bit of text in the Western tradition more famous than the opening six words of the Iliad, which lay out the central theme of Homer’s great epic: Μῆνιν ἄειδε, θεά, Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆοϛ | οὐλομένην – ‘Of the wrath sing, o goddess — the baneful wrath of Achilles son of Peleus’. Despite intensive study since antiquity, there remain things to learn about this poem, and in this talk Joshua Katz of Princeton University will explain why a closer look at the words for ‘goddess’ and ‘baneful/ damned’ is desirable. Among his conclusions will be that the former tells us something remarkable about actual Homeric performance while the form and meaning of the latter have been repeatedly misunderstood.  See page 45 for event information

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Highlights The Jacobsen Lecture 2018 ‘Causation, Chance, and Dummett’s Dilemma’ 9 May

This year’s Jacobsen Lecture will be given by Huw Price, Bertrand Russell Professor in the Faculty of Philosophy, Cambridge. In the case of chance, most agree that chance constrains rational belief in normal circumstances. Normally, it is rational to be 50 percent confident that a coin will land Heads (and to bet accordingly) if and only if the coin has a 50 percent chance of doing so. ‘Subjectivists’ such as D H Mellor and David Lewis read this connection left-to-right, defining chance in terms of rational degrees of belief. ‘Objectivists’ read it right-to-left, and hence face the challenge of explaining why it should hold. In the case of causation, similarly, most agree that causality constrains rational action in normal circumstances. Normally, whether A is a rational means to achieve B depends on whether A causes B. Again, we have choice as to which way to read the connection. In this case, the objectivist reading is the orthodoxy. In this lecture (based on joint work with Yang Liu), Professor Price argues that the orthodoxy is mistaken. Causal objectivism faces a dilemma emerging from the work of Michael Dummett, read in the light of longstanding debates about Newcomb problems. The upshot is that the case for subjectivism is as strong for causation as for chance. In both cases, for very similar reasons, good metaphysics begins with rational decision.  See page 48 for event information

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Brits Abroad, Brits at Home: Travel Narratives from the Grand Tour to the End of Empire 9 May Travel narratives have long been the focus of critical, historical, and sociological analysis. The legacy of the Grand Tour, the growth of mass tourism in the nineteenth century, and the opportunities afforded by a vast empire to travel in ‘exotic’ regions have meant that British travellers, in particular, have been the object of a great deal of research. However, much of this research has focused on those travellers with the cultural capital to have their work School of Advanced Study

formally published, and this in turn has perhaps skewed the picture towards narratives from upper-middle and upper class tourists. This symposium will focus on British travellers, but with the intention of broadening the definition of travel writing to include unpublished texts written, for example, by ordinary tourists, subjects of Empire, or travellers whose purpose was medical research or social reform. Conversely it will also examine ‘unreliable’ narratives – for example, by elite colonial travellers, political or military agents, and others whose accounts are potentially compromised by official censorship or self-censorship.  See page 46 for event information 9


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What’s Happening in Black British History? VIII 10 May The eighth meeting of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies’ Black British History Workshop will take place in Huddersfield. The series promotes innovative new research into the history of people of African origin or descent in the UK and facilitates discussion of the latest developments in the dissemination of Black British history in a wide variety of settings, including the media, the classroom and lecture hall, and museums and galleries.  See page 49 for event information

Political Epistemology 10–11 May The term ‘political epistemology’ is fairly new, but it captures an important intersection between political philosophy and epistemology that has become especially important in the current political climate, where broad 10 

challenges to the notion of truth threaten the social fabric of our democracy. This conference will bring together scholars working at the intersection of political philosophy and epistemology. The conference theme, Political Epistemology, is deliberately broad because there many ways in which epistemologists can learn from political philosophers and vice versa. For example, political philosophers have long been interested in reasonable disagreements, or what Rawls called ‘the fact of reasonable pluralism’, while disagreement has only recently become widely discussed in epistemology. There are also many unexplored ways in which theorising about politics might benefit from the conceptual tools of epistemology; for instance, contemporary epistemology has focused on the social dimensions of knowledge, the epistemology of testimony, the norms governing assertion, and group belief. This event is supported by the Institute of Philosophy, the Mind Association, and the Aristotelian Society.   

 See page 48 for event information School of Advanced Study


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Literature under Constraint: Writing and Young Marginalised Muslim Men 11 May Join us for a roundtable discussion with sociologist Fabien Truong of his new book, Radicalized Loyalties: Becoming Muslim in the West, which takes us into the housing estates of suburban Paris. We get to know Adama, Radouane, Hassan, Tarik, Marley, and a shadowy figure whose name would become known to the world at the time of the Charlie Hebdo shootings in January 2015: Amédy Coulibaly. Seeing Amédy through the eyes of his close friends and these other young Muslim men in the neighbourhoods where they grew

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up, Professor Truong (Centre de Recherches Sociologiques et Politiques de Paris and Université de Paris 8) uncovers a dense network of competing social loyalties and maps the road these youths take to resolve the conflicts they face: becoming Muslim. The roundtable discussion will explore the challenges in ‘hearing’ the vital lessons that we have to learn from these young men finding their truths within the competing pressures of family and national histories, masculinity and economic opportunities, and loyalty to brotherhood and neighbourhoods. This event is supported by the AHRC project Literature under Constraint.

 See page 51 for event information

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Hobsbawm Memorial Lecture 2018 Luther, Death and Anti-Popery Lyndal Roper 16 May British Library Harley 2278 f. 10v)

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2018 John Coffin Memorial Annual Palaeography Lecture Tony Edwards 16 May Professor A.S.G. (Tony) Edwards is Honorary Professor of Medieval Manuscripts at the University of Kent and Honorary Visiting Professor at University College London. He is a manuscript and literary scholar, whose studies are largely, but not exclusively, based on Middle English and early modern verse and prose. His publications include editions of the works of George Cavendish, John Lydgate, and Thomas More, as well as many works on Middle English prose and verse, Tudor manuscripts, the history of the book, and scripts and transmission of English manuscripts between 1400 and 1700. This lecture will explore the function of palaeography in manuscript scholarship from the nineteenth century onwards. Focusing on Middle English texts, both prose and verse, it will examine various aspects of palaeographical research, including description and dating of manuscripts, the identification of hands, and the teaching of palaeography.   12 

 See page 56 for event information

In 1546, as Luther lay dying, he made one last sally against the Pope: ‘Living I was your plague, Dead I will be your death, O Pope!’ This imprecation was faithfully recorded in the published accounts of Luther’s death by his followers. Why did Luther curse the Pope at such a time? How could this outburst become part of Lutheran memorial culture? Starting with Karlstadt and Cranach’s Himmelwagen, the first visual propaganda for the Reformation, this lecture explores anti-papalism and antimonasticism in Lutheran art. In particular, it examines the images that circulated with Luther’s late pamphlet Wider das Papsttum zu Rom. Their iconography was closely tied to the text, and we know that Luther had a hand in their design. But they were sold separately. Such images are not straightforwardly propagandist because they are so extreme that they would hardly have converted adherents of the old church. They were not meant literally, and they are full of riotous invention as well as bitter attack. Why were such images produced, and what can they tell us about Lutheran visual culture? More broadly, how can historians contribute to the study of visual culture? Lyndal Roper is a Fellow and Regius Professor of History at Oriel College, Oxford. She is the author of Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet, a New Statesman, Spectator, History Today, Guardian and Sunday Times Book of the Year.

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Highlights

History Today at the IHR: Understanding the Past in the 21st Century

History Beyond Borders Daniel Beer, Edith Hall, and Katherine McDonald

In this series of discussions organised by the Institute of Historical Research and History Today, leading historians will look at the challenges posed by today’s world for our understanding of the past and explore how the past informs our contemporary understanding.

17 May ‘If you want to study anything more than the sewer system of nineteenth-century Manchester’, warns the historian Geoffrey Parker, ‘you need to learn languages.’ But language learning in the UK is in crisis. Historians examine the relationship between history, languages, and the appreciation of the past and consider ways to address the decline.

 See page 57 for event information

Historical Knowledge and Public History Helen Castor, David Olusoga, and Anna Whitelock The Muse: History, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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A panel of historians discuss how the opening up of history to a wider audience places special demands on those communicating the past. What are the factors that shape how history is presented in museums, in the media, and online, and who gets to write and present it?

 See page 87 for event information

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Highlights The UN’s Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework James C. Hathaway 21 May James C. Hathaway, the James E. and Sarah A. Degan Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School, is a leading authority on international refugee law. He is the founding director of Michigan Law’s Program in Refugee and Asylum Law and the Distinguished Visiting Professor of International Refugee Law at the University of Amsterdam. He regularly provides training  See page 60 on refugee law to academic, non-governmental, and official for event information audiences around the world. Professor Hathaway’s publications include The Law of Refugee Status (2014), with Michelle Foster; Human Rights and Refugee Law (2013); and The Rights of Refugees Under International Law (2005). He is founding patron and senior adviser to Asylum Access, a nonprofit organization committed to delivering innovative legal aid to refugees in the global South, and counsel on international protection to the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants.

John Coffin Memorial Annual Lecture ‘Placeless People: Writing, Rights and Refugees’ Lyndsey Stonebridge 22 May In 1944, the political philosopher and refugee Hannah Arendt wrote, ‘Everywhere the word “exile”, which once had an undertone of almost sacred awe, now provokes the idea of something simultaneously suspicious and unfortunate’. Exiles from other places have often caused trouble for ideas about sovereignty and the law and nationhood. But the meanings of exile changed dramatically in the twentieth century, often leaving human rights law struggling to catch up. This lecture discusses how writers such as Arendt, George Orwell, Simone Weil, Dorothy Thompson, and Samuel Beckett responded to the mass displacements of the last century. Sceptical about the ability of human rights to legislate for refugees,  See page 61 yet committed to universal justice, these writers challenge us to for event information imagine new terms for placelessness in modern times. Lyndsey Stonebridge is Professor of Modern Literature and History at the University of East Anglia. She is the author of The Judicial Imagination: Writing after Nuremberg (winner of the British Academy’s Rose Mary Crawshay Prize in 2016), The Writing of Anxiety (2007), and The Destructive Element (1998). Her new book, Placeless People: Writing, Rights, and Refugees, is due out later this year. 14 

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Highlights

The City: Myth and Materiality 29 May

This one-day symposium organized by the Association for Literary Urban Studies in collaboration with the Institute of Historical Research with the support of the Turku Institute for Advanced Studies will explore the intersection of literary studies and urban history, examining a range of historical periods and geographical areas. Â

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 See page 65 for event information

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Highlights Visualizing Blackness in Latin America and the Caribbean, 16th-19th Centuries 29–30 May Recent years have witnessed a rich wave of scholarship examining representations of Blackness in the visual cultures of the Atlantic world. This avenue of enquiry is particularly germane to Latin America and the Caribbean, home to the world’s largest African diasporic populations. Whilst the theme of black people’s invisibility is deeply inscribed in both the history and scholarship of the region, the study of visual and material culture presents new avenues for understanding both the complexities of the black experience, and the ways in which notions of Blackness and peoples of African descent have indelibly shaped the cultures and societies of Latin America and the Caribbean.

art history, cultural studies, and history to explore the multiplicity of meanings ascribed to Blackness across the region; from early modern, colonial conceptions rooted in lineage and bloodlines, to the pseudo-scientific construction of race as an immutable, material and biological ‘fact’ in the nineteenth century. The aim is to explore the myriad ways in which Blackness is configured and remade, through representations of Afro-descendants in the visual arts, and the production and use of material culture in black self-fashioning and collective identities. Sponsored by the Institute of Latin American Studies and the Cassal Trust.

 See page 65 for event information

This conference brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars working across the fields of visual and material culture,

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Burckhardt at 200: The Civilization of the Renaissance Reconsidered 31 May – 1 June British Academy, 10–11 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH The bicentenary of the birth of the Swiss scholar Jacob Burckhardt (1818–1897), author of The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (1860), seems an appropriate moment at which to take stock and consider whether or not the idea of an ‘Italian Renaissance’ is still a hermeneutically helpful one. This conference will task an interdisciplinary team of scholars of Renaissance studies as well as of Burckhardt himself to interrogate both the Swiss historian’s

own agenda and the contemporary validity and helpfulness of the label ‘Italian Renaissance’. Specific reference will be made to the themes treated in his classic account: the state as a work of art; development of the individual; revival of antiquity; discovery of the world and of man; society and festivals; morality and religion. The conference will open on Wednesday, 30 May, with a launch event at the Warburg Institute starting at 18:00: Burckhardt at 200: Interpreting the Italian Renaissance Past, Present, and Future. Speakers include Peter Burke (Cambridge), Jonathan Jones (art critic for The Guardian and former judge of the Turner Prize), and Martin Ruehl (Cambridge).

 See page 67 for event information

The Black Atlantic Footballer Conference 31 May This conference will bring together academics, sports engagement agencies, and groups involved in shaping the contemporary British sports landscape to discuss issues around the themes of representation and mobility in the football industry. Influenced by the work of Paul Gilroy, the event will explore research from across the ‘Black Atlantic’ to draw together conversations across Africa, Europe, and the Americas through a focus on a shared relationship to the Atlantic. Sponsored by the Society for Latin American Studies and the Coffin Trust. School of Advanced Study

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Highlights Layers of London: Add Your Voice to London’s History 31 May The Layers of London project is creating a ground-breaking interactive online map of the city through the contributions of individuals, community groups, and schools. The result will be a dynamic website allowing millions of users to explore and engage with London’s history. The project involves people of all kinds across London’s 32 boroughs and beyond adding information as well as helping to create historic map layers. On 31 May, we’re asking individuals to turn up with a memory, a photograph, or a piece of research (for example, a short history of a building, a street, or an event) that you think should be part of the project. Participants can also try their hand at creating a layer of London’s history made up of aerial photos taken by the RAF in the 1940s.

 See page 68 for event information

Iberian Sound Cultures 1 June Recent years have seen a growing interest in ‘sound studies’, a field that addresses the role of the auditory in culture and society. This oneday symposium seeks to establish a dialogue between sound studies and Iberian cultural studies. It intends to examine the place of sound both across a range of Iberian contexts (architecture, geography, acoustic environments) and media (sound technologies and sound art, music and film, for instance). Using the auditory as a starting point, the workshop will address the following questions: How does sound inform our understanding of Spanish and Portuguese history and, in particular, these countries’ long and fraught road towards modernization? How 18 

might the categories of noise and silence, for instance, enable us to illuminate more fully historical junctures of crisis and contradiction within the Iberian peninsula? How might attendant changes in technology and culture be understood, or indeed rethought, through sound?

 See page 72 for event information

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J.P. Barron Memorial Lecture Socrates, Eros, and Magic Angie Hobbs 6 June Angie Hobbs gained a degree in Classics and a PhD in Ancient Philosophy at the University of Cambridge. After a research fellowship at Christ’s College, Cambridge, she moved to the Philosophy Department at the University of Warwick; in 2012 she was appointed Professor of the Public Understanding of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield, a position created for her. Her chief interests are in ancient philosophy and literature, ethics, and political theory. She has published widely in these areas, including Plato and the Hero: Courage, Manliness and the Impersonal Good (2000). She contributes regularly to radio and TV programmes and to other media. She has spoken at the World Economic Forum at Davos, the Houses of Parliament, the Scottish Parliament, and Westminster Abbey and been a guest on Desert Island Discs, Private Passions, and Test Match Special.  

 See page 75 for event information

Surrealism and Music in France, 1924–52: Interdisciplinary and International Contexts 8 June Paris was the principal centre of surrealist activity and the focus of connections between surrealist literature, ethnology, sociology, visual arts, and music. The links between surrealism and the emerging disciplines of ethnology and ethnomusicology redefined the concept of exoticism in France and were the subject of a good deal of polemical debate. However, connections between surrealism and music have been little explored, although it is clear the movement had a decisive influence on major French composers such as Pierre Boulez, Olivier Messiaen, and André Jolivet. This conference initiates a transdisciplinary and international dialogue and will situate music at the heart of these debates. The event will end with a piano recital of relevant French repertoire by the outstanding young pianist Alexander Soares, including works by Boulez, Messiaen, and Jolivet. This event is organised by the Institute of Modern Languages Research and the Open World Research Initiative (OWRI) Cross-Language Dynamics translingual strand, with support from the Cassal Trust Fund.

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 See pages 77 and78 for event information 19


Highlights

Highlights New Films, Old Drama: An Evening with Barefaced Greek Bill of Rights, Durban South Africa. Image: bistandsaktuelt/Flickr

12 June

W G Hart Legal Workshop 2018: Building a Twenty-First Century Bill of Rights 11–12 June Almost all states have some form of a bill of rights. While their specific content varies, most cover many of the same issues, including the procedure for amendment, links with international law and institutions, and the status of the bill of rights in relation to other laws. The purpose of this workshop is to fill a significant gap in practice and scholarship and make an original contribution to current debates by bringing together scholars to discuss the construction of an effective twenty-first century bill of rights. Sessions will cover design and implementation, links with international and comparative laws and institutions, populism and the backlash against rights, the protected rights, the bill of rights in the national constitutional order, claimants and respondents, remedies, and rights and civil society.

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Barefaced Greek celebrate classical Greek drama in performance by making accessible short films using texts from Greek comedy and tragedy. These fresh new films (in the original language, with subtitles) produced for online broadcast, aim to reach new audiences internationally, and to inspire a love of Greek language and drama in the twenty-first century. This unique public event will feature a showing of three of Barefaced Greek’s films (Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, ‘The Watchman’ from Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, and ‘Athena and Poseidon’ from Euripides’ Trojan Women) introduced by the company. Cast and creatives will then participate in a Q&A chaired by James Robson of the Open University. The event is generously supported by the John Coffin Memorial Fund.

 See page 81 for event information

 See page 78 for event information School of Advanced Study


Highlights

The Art of the Poor in the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance 14–15 June The art history of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance has generally been written as a story of elites: bankers, noblemen, kings, and popes and their artistic interests and commissions. Recent decades have seen attempts to recast the story in terms of material culture and include a wider range of objects than are discussed in the traditional surveys of painting, sculpture, and architecture. There are, however, countless modest images, decorated objects, and buildings across Europe that belie this notion, from lead and tin pilgrims’ badges in the Museum of London to frescoed churches commissioned by village communities during the Venetian period on Crete. These works of art were made for the more than 95% of the population who were economically less privileged: peasants, unskilled and skilled workers in the building and manufacturing industries, small-time artisans. They are works that tend not to enter the major art museums and exhibitions of the western world, or feature prominently in tourist guide books; they can be found in museums of urban history and archaeology and the closest they come to mingling with ‘real’ art is in shows with an anthropological approach, such as ‘the art School of Advanced Study

of devotion.’ If they are discussed in artistic terms at all, these are often negative: ‘coarse’, ‘crude’, ‘primitive’, or ‘provincial’. This two-day conference at the Warburg Institute will challenge these perceptions. Through a variety of case studies, objects, their functions, and manufacturing traditions will be re-evaluated and established aesthetic judgements and tacit assumptions in scholarship re-examined. This event is supported by the University of London Coffin Trust.

 See page 82 for event information

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Highlights

Highlights Heresy and Borders Conference 15–16 June

Brazil and Latin America Leslie Bethell 15 June In 2010 Leslie Bethell’s provocative article ‘Brazil and Latin America’ was published in The Journal of Latin America Studies. In raising the question ‘Is Brazil part of Latin America?’ the article generated, and continues to generate, considerable debate. This event will explore Brazil’s relationship with the rest of Latin America, past and present, and marks the publication of Professor Bethell’s new book of essays on modern Brazilian history and politics. Professor Bethell is Emeritus Professor of Latin American History and former Director of the Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London (1987–92) and founding Director of the Centre for Brazilian Studies, University of Oxford (1997– 2007). He is the author of numerous books and articles on the political, social, and cultural history of Latin America, especially Brazil, including The Abolition of the Brazilian Slave Trade (1970) and, most recently, Joaquim Nabuco no mundo: abolionista, jornalista, diplomata (2016). 22 

The third biennial conference of the International Society for Heresy Studies will focus on how borders between heresy and orthodoxy are created, maintained, and imagined. The study of borders feels even more urgent in a time of rising nationalism and political promises to ban immigration and erect walls based on imagined boundaries. Borders are, of course, more than lines drawn across maps and between religions: they are blurry spaces of ambiguity and reversibility where identities are constructed and deconstructed. Concepts of separation, threshold, and border have occupied theologians, philosophers, historians, and artists since ancient times and remain dynamic elements in the work of many theorists and creative artists today. The re-examination of borders can demonstrate not only how we have constructed the heretical other, but also can reveal the fragility and arbitrary nature of our own orthodoxies.

 See page 83 for event information

 See page 83 for event information School of Advanced Study


Highlights

The Invention and Reinvention of Decolonization: Rethinking the ‘Waves’ Narrative 21 June Was ‘decolonization’ a European invention designed to ease the ‘White Man’s Burden’ and pave the way for a neo-colonial system of extraction and dependency? Was it a Latin American invention intended to undo ‘the colonial system?’ Or was it an Indian, French Algerian, or Caribbean invention? All the above? None of the above? This one-day conference will consider the received ‘wave’ narrative (first, second, third, fourth waves) currently used to tell the global history of decolonization. Is it still adequate to the task, or would notions such as ‘invention’ and ‘reinvention’ be more useful? This event is jointly organised with the Institute of Latin American Studies.  

 See page 86 for event information

Final Report Launch: The Human Mind Project 26 June The Human Mind Project was launched in 2013 with the aim of providing an interdisciplinary research hub to facilitate innovative approaches to the study of the mind. The Project highlighted the importance of developing a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to understanding the life and activity of mind and brain, integrating science and the humanities. This event launches the Project’s final report. Speakers will include the Project’s leader, Colin Blakemore, and its manager, Mattia Gallotti (LSE). This event is for all those with an interest in the future of research into the human mind.

 See page 88 for event information

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Architecture without Architects. Early Cinquecento Veneto Literati as ‘Directors’ of the Refashioning of their own Houses Guido Beltramini 28 June Guido Beltramini has been director of the Centro internazionale di studi di architettura Andrea Palladio in Vicenza since 1991. His interests centre on Renaissance architectural history, with a particular emphasis on Venetian architecture and on the culture of the Antique in the Renaissance. He has been Craig Hugh Smyth Visiting Fellow at Villa I Tatti, Florence; Kress Foundation Fellow at the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies at Columbia University; and Mellon Senior Fellow at the Canadian Center for Architecture. He has taught at the Universities of Ferrara and Milan, and in 2017 was Andrew W. Mellon Inaugural Visiting Professor at the V&A Research Institute. His most recent book is The Elusive Face of Andrea Palladio (2017). His curated exhibitions include ‘Pietro Bembo e l’invenzione del Rinascimento’ (Padua, 2013), ‘Aldo Manuzio’ (Venice, 2016) and ‘Orlando Furioso 500 Anni’ (Ferrara, 2016–17).

 See page 89 for event information 23


Highlights

Highlights Post-Legislative Scrutiny 10 July Parliament has a responsibility to monitor the extent to which the laws it has passed are implemented as intended and have the expected impact. Such post-legislative scrutiny is an essential tool for increasing government accountability and is part of its oversight role. Outside the UK, and despite its importance, it is not uncommon for this process to be overlooked: in some countries, laws may be passed but not applied, secondary legislation may not adopted, or insufficient information may be available to assess the actual state of a law’s implementation and its effects. Implementation is a complex matter depending on the mobilisation of mechanisms, funds, and different actors. Implementation does not happen automatically, and several factors can affect its course, including changes in facts on the ground, diversion of resources, deflection of goals, resistance from stakeholders, and changes in the legal framework of related policy fields. This one-day conference, cosponsored by the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and the Westminster Foundation for Democracy, will explore post-legislative scrutiny and related issues.  

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 See page 93 for event information

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Highlights

Refugee Protection in a Hostile World? 18–19 July The theme of the 3rd Annual Conference of the Refugee Law Initiative, ‘Refugee Protection in a Hostile World?’ reflects on the apparent strengthening of long-standing currents of anti-refugee feeling and other forms of instability in the world. This trend raises urgent questions about refugee protection globally, as well as the interaction between global politics and refugee law. The conference provides a dedicated annual international forum to share and debate the latest research and cuttingedge developments in refugee protection. This year’s event will build on the success of previous conferences that united academics, practitioners, policy-makers, and students in considering pressing challenges to refugee law. An optional one-day workshop on issues relating to internal displacement follows the conference.  

 See page 94 for event information

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Revitalising IDP Research: 20 Years of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement 20 July The 20th anniversary of the adoption of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement offers a unique opportunity to reflect not only on their influence on internal displacement globally but also on the global state of research and practice on internally displaced persons. This workshop will provide a forum for researchers, practitioners, policy-makers, and students to come together to present, debate, and reflect on this field and its future. It offers the chance to begin developing new research and policy agendas and collaborations. The workshop follows the Refugee Law Initiative’s annual conference, which takes place 18–19 July.  

 See page 94 for event information

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Highlights

Highlights Motherhood, Loss, and the First World War 5–6 September The extraordinary death tolls suffered on the fighting fronts of the First World War gave rise to devastating and unprecedented levels of loss for individuals and communities across Europe and the wider world. Indeed, bereavement became so widespread during the conflict that it can rightly be regarded as one of the defining experiences of the war. Historians have had relatively little to say about wartime loss, however, and the bereaved have not been widely acknowledged or remembered during the centenary commemorations of the conflict. This two-day conference will bring historians and community groups together to explore maternal bereavement as a result of the war, an experience that was understood to be particularly painful and difficult to come to terms with. The conference will be staged as part of an ongoing community project on motherhood, loss, and the First World War funded by the Ministry of Housing, Communities, and Local Government and organised by the Big Ideas Company, the London Centre for Public History, and the Institute for Historical Research.

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 See page 98 for event information

Drawing on the Past: The Pre-Modern World in Comics 10–11 September This two-day conference on comics and the pre-modern world is aimed at academics, teachers, and artists. It will range widely in its chronological and geographical scope, from the Bronze Age onwards, through Classical Antiquity, the Near East, Mesoamerica, and beyond. The concept of comics itself is similarly broadly interpreted, covering different traditions including (among others) the American graphic novel, the Franco-Belgian tradition, and Japanese manga, and comics as a medium through which to conduct as well as express academic research.   

 See page 98 for event information

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Summer Schools ies.sas.ac.uk/study-training/study-weeks

The London International Palaeography Summer School 2018 11–15 June The London International Palaeography Summer School is a series of intensive courses in palaeography and manuscript studies. Courses range from one-half to two days in length and are led by experts in their respective fields from a wide range of institutions. Subject areas include Latin, AngloSaxon, Middle English, Early Modern English, German, and Greek palaeography, as well as illumination, illuminated manuscripts, codicology, diplomatic, manuscript editing, and liturgical and devotional manuscripts. For details, please visit ies.sas.ac.uk/studytraining/study-weeks/londoninternational-palaeographysummer-school.

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The London Rare Books School 18 June–6 July The London Rare Books School (LRBS) is a series of three weeklong intensive courses on a variety of book-related subjects taught in and around Senate House, and — for the first time — at the University of Reading. The courses cover a broad range of topics, from the book in the ancient world to modern scholarly editing practices. Courses are taught by internationally renowned scholars using the unrivalled library and museum resources of London. Timetabled ‘library time’ allows students to explore the rich resources of the University’s Senate House Library, one of the UK’s major research libraries. There is also an evening programme with an opening reception and talk, a book-related guided walking tour, and a reception hosted by a major London antiquarian bookseller. For details, please visit ies.sas.ac.uk/studytraining/study-weeks/londonrare-books-school.

The T.S. Eliot International Summer School 7–15 July The T.S. Eliot International Summer School welcomes everyone with an interest in the life and work of this Bloomsburybased poet, dramatist, and man of letters. The Summer School brings together some of the most distinguished scholars of T.S. Eliot and modern literature. This year’s programme features an opening address by award-winning Irish novelist Colm Tóibín, a poetry reading by Dame Carol Ann Duffy, and lectures and seminars by John Xiros Cooper, Anthony Cuda, Frances Dickey, Mark Ford, Lyndall Gordon, John Haffenden, Dame Hermione Lee, William Marx, Seamus Perry, Jahan Ramazani, Ronald Schuchard, and Hannah Sullivan. Highlights include excursions to Burnt Norton and Little Gidding as well as walking tour of Eliot’s London. For details, please visit ies.sas.ac.uk/studytraining/study-weeks/ts-eliotinternational-summer-school. 27


Highlights

Neoplatonic Highlights Studies Seminar Series Now in its fourth year, the Neoplatonic Studies Seminar invites you to a series of readings of seminal texts by Damascius, Olympiodorus, Porphyry, and Proclus and an ongoing exchange that includes Harold Tarrant, Dilwyn Knox, and Peter Singer among many other regular and occasional contributors. The seminar meets on Thursdays from 17:30 to 19:30 in Classroom 1 of the Warburg Institute. All are welcome. For more information, please contact the convener Georgios Tsagdis at georgiostsagdis@outlook.com.

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2018 Programme Proclus, On Alcibiades I (Page numbers refer to the 1954 Westernink edition) 3 May      

ix. 179–201

10 May    

x. 202–234

17 May    

xi. 235–260

24 May    

xii. 261–282

31 May    

xiii. 283–311

7 June     

xiv. 312–339

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Highlights

Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern Lecture series Workshop and workshop practices represent a core and dynamic research strand in the history of art. This strand encompasses the study of canonical artists but equally of the anonymous producers whose activities can be deduced from the surviving art objects, thanks to ever-developing research questions and methodologies. This topic helps us to think about the agents and their networks (artists, patrons, and other market consumers), objects and socioeconomic factors (making, buying, and trading) as well as the broader cultural issues of the transmission of skills and ideas (the movement of artists, objects, and imagery). The lecture series brings together leading experts in medieval and early modern historical periods in and beyond Europe, those researching particular high points in workshop practice, and those researching workshop continuities and change in later centuries, including digital mediation. Re-opening the Workshop is supported by the University of London Coffin Trust Fund.

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Admission is free and open to the public but advance registration is required. For more information, please email warburg@sas.ac.uk 9 May Mediation and Transformation | Alchemy and New Technology: Factum Arte’s Workshop Practice in an Age of 3D Recording and Printing Adam Lowe (Factum Arte, Madrid) 16 May Goldsmiths, Ivory Carvers, Embroiderers: Identity in the Medieval Workshop Glyn Davis (Museum of London) 6 June Botticelli, his Assistants and the Business of the Workshop Michelle O’Malley, Warburg Institute 20 June The Bernini Workshop (Re)visited Joris van Gastel, Bibliotheca Hertziana, Rome 27 June Re-opening the Treasury: Meaning in Materials at San Isidoro de León Therese Martin (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid) 29


Highlights

Highlights From Devilry to Divinity: Readings in the Divina Commedia A weekly series of free public readings of Dante’s work hosted by the Warburg Institute and led by Alessandro Scafi (Warburg) and John Took (UCL). Readings begin at 18:00 and end by 19:30 and are held at the Warburg Institute, Woburn Square. Admission is free and open to the public but advance registration is required. For more information, please email warburg@sas.ac.uk

14 May Purgatorio, Canto XXXIII. Beatrice’s prophesies. The final ritual of Dante’s spiritual cleansing. https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15357 21 May Paradiso, Canto I. Ascent to the heaven of fire. https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15358 4 June Paradiso, Canto III. Heaven of the moon. Piccarda Donati. https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15359 11 June Paradiso, Canto XI. Thomas Aquinas. Francis of Assisi. https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15360 18 June Paradiso, Canto XVII. Heaven of Mars. Cacciaguida. https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15361 25 June Paradiso, Canto XXXIII. The Empyrean. The vision of the Trinity. https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15362

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Highlights School of Advanced Study

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highlights

Image courtesy of Fourth Choir

Exhibition highlights

Exhibition

Queer Between the Covers Senate House Library 15 January – 16 June Free The Queer Between the Covers exhibition and event season at Senate House Library explores more than 250 years of queer literature. The exhibition displays 50 carefully selected works from the Library’s collection, showcasing works of satire, autographed manuscripts, illustrated novels, and pulp fiction book designs, as well as rare editions of works by famous authors such as Oscar Wilde, WH Auden, and Virginia Woolf. The event series opened with an evening of poetry reading and music with Carol Ann Duffy, the UK’s first female and openly LGBT Poet Laureate. It also features BFI film screenings in the library and walking tours in partnership with Queer Tours of London. 32 

Related events An Evening with the Fourth Choir: A Concert of Queer Music and Poetry Love is Love 19 May, 19:30–21:30 Crush Hall, Senate House The Fourth Choir was founded in 2013 in order to give both professional and non-professional LGBT+ singers and their allies the opportunity to sing a cappella choral music to the highest standard possible. Since then, the Choir has given 50 concerts across four countries, receiving standing ovations at the International LGBT+ Choir Festival in Amsterdam, at the Antwerp Queer Arts Festival and at a benefit concert for the Hackney and Harringay Migrant Support Centres. Love is Love is a celebration of nine centuries of same-sex love. With one exception, every work in the programme was composed by an LGBT+ composer or is a choral setting of words by an LGBT+ poet. Specially commissioned by Senate House Library and premiering at the concert, the song I Am Like School of Advanced Study


Exhibitions

Many comprises quotations from a 1958 debate when the UK Parliament discussed if homosexuality should be decriminalised. The programme, which includes works by Michelangelo, Shakespeare, Tchaikovsky, Camille Saint-Saëns, Francis Poulenc, Aaron Copland, Michael Tippett, Benjamin Britten, Jennifer Higdon, and Meredith Monk bears testament to the contribution that LGBT+ artists have made to global culture. £14 | £9. Book online: https://www. senatehouselibrary.ac.uk/exhibitions-and-events/ events/evening-fourth-choir-concert-queer-musicand-poetry

Saving Gay’s the Word and Being Gay in the 80s 14 June, 18:00–20:30 Macmillan Hall (Senate House) Hear Jim MacSweeney, manager of London’s leading LGBT bookshop, Gay’s the Word, in discussion with Graham McKerrow on the raid on the shop by H. M. Customs in 1984—which saw all of its foreignpublished stock impounded—and the wider experience of being gay in 80s London. This event will also launch the Library’s audience response project, inviting all participants who identify as LGBTQ+ to talk about a work of literature that has had meaning in their lives. Free. Book online: http://www.senatehouselibrary. ac.uk/exhibitions-and-events/events/saving-gaysword-and-being-gay-80s

Film Screenings at Senate House Library To start at 13:15 Free, including light refreshments

Tangerine (2015), 88 mins 16 May

Moonlight (2016), 111 mins 6 June

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All rights reserved by Lita Cerqueira

Exhibitions

Exhibitions

Labour of Freedom: The Photography of Lita Cerqueira Celebrating the 130th Anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery in Brazil 1–20 May Venue: Second floor lobby, Senate House Free The Institute of Latin American Studies, in partnership with social-cultural organisation Braziliarty, presents an exhibition of images by acclaimed photographer Lita Cerqueira in celebration of the 130th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Brazil. The black and white images of Brazilian women in their living and working environments were taken between 1976 and 2010. 34 

Brazil was the last country in the Western world to abolish slavery. Before 1888, an estimated four million slaves were imported from Africa to Brazil, 40 percent of the total number brought to the Americas. Racism is still a social and economic issue for the country. Cerqueira, born in Salvador in 1952, has focused on the condition of the African population there. She held her first solo exhibition in 1976 and has since documented the lives of some of Brazil’s most outstanding artists and musicians. Her work has been widely published and exhibited in Brazil, France, Italy, Germany, and the United States. This special Senate House exhibition has been curated by Alicia Bastos and produced by Braziliarity.

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4–31 May Exhibition hours: 10:00–18:00 (weekdays) Breakfast seminar: 18 May Venue: Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London Marco Delogu chose to work on the deserted island of Asinara, off the northwest coast of Sardinia, because of its bleak rocky geography and its history as a prisoner-of-war camp and high security prison during the 20th century. ‘When I was a child the island was described to me as a sort of hell, and I was struck by the stories of a family friend, a lawyer who defended Brigate Rosse leader Renato Curcio and Camorra boss Rafaele Cutolo’, he says. ‘Later, beginning in 1997, when I was working at Rebibbia penitentiary on the portraits for my “Captivity” series, I met a number of prisoners who had been on Asinara, and heard stories of prison riots from their mouths. I had not been to Sardinia for many years, and for my

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photographic “return” I chose an island I didn’t know, so full of painful memories that contrast with the enormous sense of beauty and freedom perceived there now.’ Mr Delugo was born in Rome in 1960. His photographs have been shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions in Italy and abroad. In the autumn of 2008 a major solo exhibition of his work was held at the French Academy in Rome, Villa Medici. In 2002 he created FOTOGRAFIA – International Festival of Rome, now in its fourteenth season. In 2003 he founded Punctum, a publishing house focused on contemporary photography. From 2012 to 2013 he was curator of photography at the contemporary museum MACRO in Rome. In March 2015 he was appointed director of the Italian Cultural Institute in London. He has published more than twenty books, including Suspended Light (Punctum, 2015) a study on the reverse polarity of the light of Rome, accompanied by essays by Éric de Chassey and Bartolomeo Pietromarchi and short tales by Edoardo Albinati and Jhumpa Lahiri.

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Exhibition highlights

Asinara: An Exhibition of Photographs by Marco Delogu


Suffragette pickets talking to men outside the House of Commons, c. 1910, Papers of Molly De Morgan relating to Women’s Suffrage, MS 913E/3/4.

Exhibitions

Exhibitions

Rights for Women: London’s Pioneers in their Own Words Senate House Library 16 July – 15 December 2018 Venue: Senate House Library As part of the University of London’s celebration of the 150th anniversary of women being admitted to its courses through ‘special examinations’, Senate House Library will offer an exhibition and programme of public events exploring the lives of more than 50 of London’s female pioneers who broke barriers to drive change and establish rights for women. Taking the right to education and more specifically higher education as the starting point in the long road towards gender equality, the season will also explore other significant women’s rights campaigns, including those related to: „„

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The right to vote (2018 is also the 100th anniversary of the Representation of the People Act, which extended the franchise

to most men and some women for the first time) and to hold public office „„

Employment rights, including the struggle to end discrimination in the work place and equal pay

„„

Reproductive rights, touching on controversial and important issues around birth control and contraception, abortion, voluntary motherhood, and sexual health

The exhibition will tell the story of women’s fight for equal rights through the University archive and the unique and rich collections of archives, manuscripts, and printed books held at Senate House Library. It will also provide an opportunity to reflect on the current state of women’s equality at a time when some of the long-fought civil and human rights achieved are at stake. The exhibition will be complemented by a programme of events including lectures, workshops, a conference and a concert by the Berkeley Ensemble. For details, please visit senatehouselibrary.ac.uk. School of Advanced Study


THE SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDY PRESENTS Exhibitions

LIVING

NG THRILLER I L L I H C A

AN IMMERSIVE, RESEARCH-LED RECREATION OF MARY SHELLEY’S FRANKENSTEIN FRANKENSTEIN SPECIALISTS, BEATBOXING, SILENT FILMS, LIVE SCORE, A GOTHIC VORTEX, TALKS, WORKSHOPS, GHOST STORIES BY CANDLELIGHT AND MORE...

23 MAY, SENATE HOUSE, LONDON 6:30PM – 9:45PM

LIVINGLITERATURE.ORG.UK School of Advanced Study

Supported by the Convocation Fund, Hilda Hulme Fund and the University of London’s Leading Women Campaign 37


HUMAN

15 – 24 NOVEMBER 2018

A FESTIVAL OF THE HUMANITIES

ORIGINS &

ENDINGS BEINGHUMANFESTIVAL.ORG

38

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May

May

Events calendar


May

Events calendar May

Tuesday 01 Institute of Modern Languages Research Lecture and AGM 16:00–18:00

Friends of Germanic Studies at the IMLR Annual Lecture and AGM By invitation only. Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15625

Bloomsbury Room, G35 (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:00 Room 243 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Past and Present Room, N202 (Senate House) Institute of English Studies | Institute of Historical Research | The Warburg Institute Seminar 17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute

Objects, Islands, Empire: Collecting in the Western Indian Ocean, 1860–1930 Sarah Longair (Lincoln) This event is part of the London Group of Historical Geographers Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15038

What Happened at Westminster? Men, Women and the Representation of the People Act 1918 Mari Takayanagi (Parliamentary Archives) This event is part of the Parliaments, Politics and People Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15846

Book Fastenings and Furnishings: An Archaeology of Late Medieval Books Charlotte Howsam (Archaeology South-East/UCL) Throughout the late medieval period, books were an integral part of religious monastic life, and yet such objects have received little attention from an analytical archaeological perspective despite the significant quantity of metal book fittings recovered from English monastic sites. This talk will demonstrate how the archaeological and historical study of this form of material culture can enhance our understanding of the wider social and cultural contexts of late medieval books. This event is part of the History of Libraries Seminar Series, jointly sponsored by the Institute of English Studies, the Institute of Historical Research, the Warburg Institute, and the Library & Information History Group of CILIP. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15450

Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Judging Appearances: A Cultural Legal History of Consumer Capitalism, England 1860–1914

Seminar

Anat Rosenberg (Radzyner School of Law, Israel/IALS Visiting Fellow) Fee applicable https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13944

17:30–19:30 IALS, Charles Clore House

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May

Events calendar May

Institute of Modern Languages Research Poetry reading 18:00–20:00 Bloomsbury Room, G35 (Senate House)

Poetry reading: All Under One Roof and Shrines of Upper Austria Evelyn Schlag, one of Austria’s most distinguished poets, and acclaimed translator Karen Leeder will read from Schlag’s new collection of poetry, All Under One Roof, due to be published by Carcanet Press this spring. They will be joined by award-winning British poet Phoebe Power, who will read from her debut collection, Shrines of Upper Austria (Carcanet, February 2018). The readings will be introduced by Rüdiger Görner (QMUL). Sponsored by the Austrian Cultural Forum, London. Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/ events/event/15626

Institute of English Studies

Hacking Moby-Dick

Seminar

Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15617

18:00–20:00 Room 234 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research

Public Commemoration and Women’s History

Lecture

How are women remembered, commemorated, and celebrated in public? How is this different from historical commemorations of men? What forms do these commemorations take? Why do public commemorations of women provoke such debate, and what are the legacies of these public memorials in their different forms? This panel discussion chaired by IHR Director Professor Jo Fox will feature Caroline Criado Perez, activist and campaigner; Rebekah Higgitt, University of Kent and member of the English Heritage Blue Plaques Panel; Sarah Jackson, founder of the East End Women’s Museum; and Rebecca Surender, Oxford University, Pro-Vice Chancellor for Diversity and head of Oxford’s ‘Diversifying Portraiture’. The event is part of the IHR’s ‘Suffrage Series, 1918-2018’, a programme of talks, debates, lectures, walks, and concerts marking the centenary and legacies of the Representation of the People Act (1918). Free advance registration required http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/15697

18:00–20:30 IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02 (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 19:00–20:30 Room G7 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Domesticating the Devil: The Early Medieval Contexts of Aldhelm’s Cat Riddle Megan Cavell (Birmingham) This event is part of the London Society for Medieval Studies Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14673

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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May

Events calendar May

Wednesday 02 Institute of Historical Research

IHR/V&A Study Day for Early Career Researchers of the Home

Workshop

As a follow-up to ‘Home: New Histories of Living’, the IHR and V&A are hosting a ‘study day’ devised specifically for Early Career Researchers in the field. The morning session will bring together ECRs to discuss approaches to researching the home. We’ll be joined by two specialist historians, Vanessa Harding (Birkbeck) and Serena Dyer (Museum of Domestic Design and Architecture, Middlesex University), who’ll offer insights on the opportunities and challenges of the archive. This is an informal, collaborative session intended to provide a space for ECRs to exchange ideas and advice. The afternoon session will comprise a tour of the V&A’s new furniture gallery, led by its curator, Nick Humphrey. This event is free. Places on the IHR / V&A study day are limited to 24 people, reserved for Early Career Researchers of domestic life (MA and doctoral students, plus postdocs who received their PhD within the last three years). Free advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15033

10:30–16:30 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research

British Policy in Northern Ireland

Seminar

Tim Hurley (KCL) This event is part of the Contemporary British History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15160

17:00–19:00 IHR North American History Room (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 17:00–19:00 Room 349 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Professor Olga Crisp Room, N102 (Senate House) The Warburg Institute Lecture 17:30–18:30 Warburg Institute

42 

The Temple, Church and First Mosque at Damascus: New Perspectives Alain George (Oxford) This event is part of the Classical Archaeology Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15776

Democracies Ancient and Modern from Plato to Platonov: Some Post-Brexit Reflections Paul Cartledge (Cambridge) This event is part of the History of Political Ideas Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14311

‘The Number One Religious Bestseller’: John Robinson and Honest to God Hugh McLeod (Birmingham) This event is part of the Modern Religious History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15396

Bilderfahrzeuge in the Twittersphere: The Viking 'Allah' Saga and the Future of the Image Stephennie Mulder, University of Texas at Austin This event is part of the Bilderfahrzeuge Project Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15777

School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:30–19:30 IHR John S Cohen Room, N203 (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:30–19:30 IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House) Institute of Latin American Studies Seminar

Making Histories in No Man’s Land: Reflections on the First World War Commemorations of British and German Descendants Michael Roper (Essex), Rachel Duffett (Essex), David Savill (Age Exchange) In early 2016, the artistic director of the reminiscence organisation Age Exchange, David Savill, collaborated with Rachel Duffett and Michael Roper from the University of Essex in hosting a five-day event in Bavaria tha explored the family legacies of the First World War among British and German descendants. In this seminar, they talk about their experience of bringing together family stories from across the national boundaries of ‘no man’s land’ and reflect on their experience as practitioners working across the boundaries of heritage and history. This event is part of the Public History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15422

The Egg-Box: ‘Make Do’ Beds in the Working-Class Home, 1850–1914 Vicky Holmes (QMUL) This event is part of the Studies of Home Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14685

The Peruvian Invention of Decolonization Mark Thurner (ILAS) Free https://andeanstudiesseminarilas.blogs.sas.ac.uk

17:30–19:30 Room 234 (Senate House)

Thursday 03 Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

There’s More to Life…Work-Life Balance, the Value of the Arts, and Well-Being

One-day conference

Margaret Thornton (Australian National), Darren Henley OBE (Arts Council England) ‘Work-life balance’ is a contested term with multiple meanings, from the need to find time for caring responsibilities to the ability to find time for leisure or to engage in cultural pursuits. There is increasing awareness of the difficulty of finding time and space for a whole range of activities beyond work and domestic responsibilities, whether those are hobbies, interests, cultural activities, or the nourishment of friendship. This one-day conference focuses on the notion of work-life balance (widely interpreted) in the context of universities, and in particular their law schools, where an increasing amount of audit (including the TEF, the REF, and now the KEF) increases the challenge of maintaining ‘balance’. It also seeks to explore the contribution of the arts to achieving the equilibrium implied by the term ‘work-life balance’. £55 | £40 advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15730

09:30–17:30 IALS, Charles Clore House

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:30–19:30 IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

British Government Policy on the Teaching and Learning of Chinese Tinghe Jin (Durham) This event is part of the History of Education Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14520

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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May

Events calendar May

The Warburg Institute

Readings in Neoplatonic Scholarship

Seminar Warburg Institute

Part of a series of readings of seminal texts by Damascius, Olympiodorus, Porphyry, and Proclus and an ongoing exchange that includes Harold Tarrant, Dilwyn Knox, and Peter Singer, among many other regular and occasional contributors. For details, see page 28. This event is part of the Neoplatonic Studies Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13820

The Warburg Institute

Asinara Exhibition Launch Event

Exhibition launch event

Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15840

17:30–19:30

17:00–19:00 Warburg Institute Institute of Commonwealth Studies Seminar 18:00–20:00 The Court Room (Senate House)

Commonwealth, Media, and Elections Martin Plaut (Senior Research Fellow, ICWS and former BBC World Service Africa editor), Kayode Samuel (former government official in Nigeria and ICWS Visiting Fellow), and Martin Kasirye (Head, Election Support Section, Commonwealth Secretariat) One of the modern Commonwealth’s great strengths has been its long experience of election observation in support of the Commonwealth’s commitment to democracy and good governance in its member states. In these teams’ final reports, assessment of the media landscape and access to information have always featured. This panel discussion will consider the media landscapes of the two African ‘powerhouses’ in the Commonwealth, South Africa and Nigeria, in the run-up to their national elections in 2019. Pressure on the media has been described as ‘the canary in the gold mine’ for erosion of democracy and civic rights. Should early warning mechanisms be set in place long in advance of the arrival of Commonwealth observation teams? Is this possible in South Africa and Nigeria?  If so, what forms should these take?  Free https://commonwealth.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15111

Friday 04 Institute of Latin American Studies Two-day conference 10:00–13:00

Si Wi Yah: Sartorial Representations of the African Diaspora Organised by The Costume Institute of the African Diaspora Fee applicable advance registration required https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ si-wi-yah-sartorial-representations-of-the-african-diaspora-tickets-42709850312

London College of Fashion (4 May) / Senate House (5 May) Institute of Classical Studies

The ‘Lucanian’ Theology of Statius’ ‘Thebaid’

Seminar

Ludovico Pontiggia (Cambridge) This event is part of the Postgraduate Work-in-Progress Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15323

16:30–18:30 Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research

Chronological Devotions in the Fifteenth-Century Low Countries

Seminar

Matthew Champion (Cambridge) This event is part of the Low Countries History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14555

17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

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School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Institute of English Studies

Charles Peake Ulysses Seminar

Seminar

The Charles Peake Ulysses Seminar is devoted to the line-by-line reading and analysis of James Joyce’s Ulysses. It has acted as a focal point for academic researchers and postgraduate students with research interests in Joyce across London and the southeast and beyond for thirty years. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12518

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

Institute of English Studies | Institute of Historical Research Seminar 18:00–20:00 The Senate Room (Senate House)

Cognizing Media: Shifts, Ruptures, Transformations Katherine Hayles (Duke) This event is part of the Media History Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/14754

Saturday 05 Institute of English Studies Seminar 14:00–16:00 Room 246 (Senate House)

Curing Plagues and Collecting Ruins: Tracing a Forgotten Network of Knowledge in the Mediterranean Valentina Pugliano (Cambridge) This event is part of the Early Modern Philosophy and the Scientific Imagination Seminar (EMPHASIS) Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12550

Tuesday 08 Institute of Classical Studies Lecture 17:00–19:00 Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research Seminar

Dorothy Tarrant Lecture The Goddess and Damned Wrath: How a Linguist Reads the Iliad Joshua Katz (Princeton) There is arguably no bit of text in the Western tradition more famous than the opening six words of the Iliad, which lay out the central theme of Homer’s great epic: Μῆνιν ἄειδε, θεά, Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆοϛ | οὐλομένην – ‘Of the wrath sing, o goddess — the baneful wrath of Achilles son of Peleus’. Despite intensive study since antiquity, there remain things to learn about this poem, and in this talk Professor Katz will try to explain why a closer look at the words for ‘goddess’ and ‘baneful/damned’ is desirable. Among his conclusions will be that the former tells us something remarkable about actual Homeric performance while the form and meaning of the latter have been repeatedly misunderstood. Free advance registration required https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15469

'Mysteries' Demystified: The Making and Meaning of the Lambeth Articles (1595)

Lambeth Palace, Lambeth, London SE1 7JU

Nicholas Tyacke (UCL) This event is part of the Religious History of Britain 1500–1800 Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15769

Institute of Philosophy

Getting Rights out of Wrongs

Seminar

Kimberley Brownlee (Warwick) This event is part of The Practical, the Political and the Ethical Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14432

17:15–19:00

17:30–19:30 Room 246 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

45


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Historical Research Seminar

‘There is Far Too Much Mystery about Sex’: British Catholic Attitudes to Sex Education after the Second World War

IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House)

Alana Harris (KCL) This event is part of the Life-Cycles Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13975

Institute of Historical Research

Exploring Archive Exhibitions

Seminar

Peter Lester (Leicester) This event is part of the Archives and Society Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14341

17:30–19:30

17:45–19:45 IHR Seminar Room, N304 (Senate House) Institute of English Studies Seminar 18:00–20:00 Bloomsbury Room, G35 (Senate House)

Before the Collection: Two Perspectives on Forming and Working with Collections Kirsten MacLeod (Newcastle) and Anke Timmermann (antiquarian bookseller) This event is part of the Book Collecting Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12738

Institute of Historical Research

European Civil Integration

Seminar

Stef Pukallus (Sheffield) This event is part of the International History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13858

18:00–20:00 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House) Institute of English Studies

Hacking Moby-Dick

Seminar

Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15618

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

Wednesday 09 Institute of English Studies One-day conference 11:00–17:00 Room 246 (Senate House)

46 

Brits Abroad, Brits at Home: Travel Narratives from the Grand Tour to the End of Empire Travel narratives have long been the focus of critical, historical, and sociological analysis. The legacy of the Grand Tour, the growth of mass tourism in the nineteenth century, and the opportunities afforded by a vast empire to travel in ‘exotic’ regions have meant that British travellers, in particular, have been the object of a great deal of research. However, much of this research has focused on those travellers with the cultural capital to have their work formally published, and this in turn has perhaps skewed the picture towards narratives from upper-middle and upper class tourists. This symposium will focus on British travellers, but with the intention of broadening the definition of travel writing to include unpublished texts written, for example, by ordinary tourists, subjects of Empire, or travellers whose purpose was medical research or social reform. Conversely it will also examine ‘unreliable’ narratives – for example, by elite colonial travellers, political or military agents, and others whose accounts are potentially compromised by official censorship or self-censorship. Fee applicable advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15301

School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Historical Research Seminar

Merchants of War and Peace: British Knowledge of China in the Making of the Opium War

IHR Past and Present Room, N202 (Senate House)

Song-Chuan Chen (Warwick) This event is part of the Comparative Histories of Asia Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15774

Institute of Classical Studies

The Homeric Penelope: A Model 'Military Wife'?

Seminar

Emma Bridges (ICS) This event is part of the ICS Fellows' Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/16025

12:30–13:45

13:00–14:00 Room G21A (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 17:00–19:00 Room G7 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Conflict, Conversion, and Collaboration: Egypt’s Monastic Communities under Early Islamic Rule Louise Blanke (Oxford) This event is part of the Classical Archaeology Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15778

A Dragoon State? Soldiers and Riot-Control in England, c.1780– 1829 Joe Cozens (Essex) This event is part of the British History in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15718

Institute of Historical Research

Regulating Liberty: The State Versus the Man

Seminar

Steph Conway (RHUL) This event is part of the History of Political Ideas Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14395

17:15–19:15 IHR Seminar Room, N304 (Senate House) The Warburg Institute

Mediation and Transformation | Alchemy and New Technology

Lecture

Adam Lowe (Factum Arte, Madrid) Workshop and workshop practices represent a core and dynamic research strand in the history of art. This strand encompasses the study both of canonical artists and the anonymous producers whose activities can be deduced from the surviving art objects, thanks to ever-developing research questions and methodologies. This topic helps us to think about the agents and their networks (artists, patrons, and other market consumers), objects and socio-economic factors (making, buying, and trading) as well as the broader cultural issues of the transmission of skills and ideas (the movement of artists, objects, and imagery). This lecture series brings together leading experts in medieval and early modern historical periods in and beyond Europe, particular highpoints for the study of workshop practices, and also those researching workshop continuities and changes in later centuries, including digital mediation. This event is part of the Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern Lecture Series and is supported by the University of London Coffin Trust Fund. This event is part of the History of Art Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15144

17:30–18:30 Warburg Institute

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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May

Events calendar May

Institute of Philosophy

The Jacobsen Lecture 2018

Lecture

This year’s Jacobsen Lecture will be given by Huw Price, Bertrand Russell Professor in the Faculty of Philosophy, Cambridge. In the case of chance, most agree that chance constrains rational belief in normal circumstances. Normally, it is rational to be 50 percent confident that a coin will land Heads (and to bet accordingly) if and only if the coin has a 50 percent chance of doing so. ‘Subjectivists’ such as D H Mellor and David Lewis read this connection left-to-right, defining chance in terms of rational degrees of belief. ‘Objectivists’ read it right-to-left, and hence face the challenge of explaining why it should hold. In the case of causation, similarly, most agree that causality constrains rational action in normal circumstances. Normally, whether A is a rational means to achieve B depends on whether A causes B. Again, we have choice as to which way to read the connection. In this case, the objectivist reading is the orthodoxy. In this lecture (based on joint work with Yang Liu), Professor Price argues that the orthodoxy is mistaken. Causal objectivism faces a dilemma emerging from the work of Michael Dummett, read in the light of longstanding debates about Newcomb problems. The upshot is that the case for subjectivism is as strong for causation as for chance. In both cases, for very similar reasons, good metaphysics begins with rational decision. Free advance registration required https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/14266

18:00–19:30 The Senate Room (Senate House)

Institute of English Studies

Ezra Pound Cantos Reading Group: Canto 10

Seminar

Corin Depper (Kingston) The Ezra Pound Cantos Reading Group was formed in 2006. At each meeting, a speaker introduces a canto, followed by discussion. Speakers and members range from internationally established Pound critics to poets, postgraduates, independent scholars, and Pound enthusiasts. All are welcome. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12568

18:00–20:00 Room 246 (Senate House)

Thursday 10 Institute of Philosophy

Political Epistemology

Two-day conference

The term ‘political epistemology’ is fairly new, but it captures an important intersection between political philosophy and epistemology that has become especially important in the current political climate, where broad challenges to the notion of truth threaten the social fabric of our democracy. This conference will bring together scholars working at the intersection of political philosophy and epistemology. The conference theme, Political Epistemology, is deliberately broad because there many ways in which epistemologists can learn from political philosophers and vice versa. For example, political philosophers have long been interested in reasonable disagreements, or what Rawls called ‘the fact of reasonable pluralism’, while disagreement has only recently become widely discussed in epistemology. There are also many unexplored ways in which theorising about politics might benefit from the conceptual tools of epistemology; for instance, contemporary epistemology has focused on the social dimensions of knowledge, the epistemology of testimony, the norms governing assertion, and group belief. This event is supported by the Institute of Philosophy, the Mind Association, and the Aristotelian Society.  Free advance registration required https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15475

09:30–18:00 Senate House

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School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Commonwealth Studies

What’s Happening in Black British History? VIII

University of Huddersfield

The eighth meeting of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies’ Black British History Workshop will take place in Huddersfield. The series promotes innovative new research into the history of people of African origin or descent in the UK and facilitates discussion of the latest developments in the dissemination of Black British history in a wide variety of settings, including the media, the classroom and lecture hall, and museums and galleries. £20 | £10 advance registration required https://commonwealth.sas.ac.uk/ events/event/15639

Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Criminal Law’s Role in Sustaining Civil Peace and Liberal Democracy

Seminar

Darryl Brown (Virginia School of Law/IALS Visiting Fellow) Fee applicable https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13953

One-day workshop 10:00–17:30

12:30–13:30 IALS, Charles Clore House Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 349 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar

On the Edges of Roman Gaul. Society, Economy and Ritual along the North Sea Coast Wim de Clercq (Ghent) This event is part of the Ancient History Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15787

The Secret of Efficiency? Patronage, Innovation, and the British Army in the Era of the First World War Aimée Fox (KCL) This event is part of the Modern British History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15217

Race, Reconstruction, and the Invention of the ‘Superstitious Negro’

IHR North American History Room (Senate House)

David Cox (Southampton) This event is part of the North American History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14166

The Warburg Institute

Readings in Neoplatonic Scholarship

Seminar Warburg Institute

Part of a series of readings of seminal texts by Damascius, Olympiodorus, Porphyry, and Proclus and an ongoing exchange that includes Harold Tarrant, Dilwyn Knox, and Peter Singer, among many other regular and occasional contributors. For details, see page 28. This event is part of the Neoplatonic Studies Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13820

Institute of Latin American Studies

Young Lives at the Outskirts of Progress: A Child-Centred Study of Indigenous Exclusion and Marginalisation in Amazonian Peru

Seminar

Camilla Morelli (Bristol) This seminar series is jointly run by the Institute of Latin American Studies and the Anthropology departments of LSE, Goldsmiths, and UCL. Free https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15831

17:30–19:30

17:30–19:30

17:30–19:30 Room 234 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

49


May

Events calendar May

Friday 11 Institute of Modern Languages Research

Liberty, Irreverence, and the Place of Women in Early-Modern Italian Culture

One-day symposium

A one-day symposium in honour of Letizia Panizza. Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/ events/event/15855

09:30–19:00 Bloomsbury Room, G35 (Senate House)

The Warburg Institute

Images on the Move: Depots | Routes | Borders | Spaces

Two-day conference

Convened by the international research project ‘Bilderfahrzeuge. Aby Warburg’s Legacy and the Future of Iconology’. This event is part of the Bilderfahrzeuge Project Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15782

10:00–17:30 Warburg Institute Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 246 (Senate House)

Procopius of Caesarea in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century German Scholarship Albrecht Ziebuhr (Würzburg) This event is part of the Postgraduate Work-in-Progress Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15326

Institute of English Studies

Nineteenth-Century Opera

Seminar

‘The Passion, Power, and Politics of Nineteenth-Century Opera: Creating a V&A Exhibition’ Kate Bailey (Victoria and Albert Museum) ‘Nellie Melba and Global Opera in the 1890s’ Flora Willson (KCL) ‘Continental Opera in the Age of Reform: Thomas Monck Mason and the King’s Theatre, Haymarket,1832’ Kristan Tetens (SAS) This event is part of the London Nineteenth Century Studies Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12751

17:30–19:30 Gordon Room, G34 (Senate House)

Institute of English Studies

‘Delirium of Interpretation’: Beckett and Outsider Art

Seminar

Sinéad Mooney (De Montfort) This event is part of The London Aesthetics Forum Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12490

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

50 

School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Modern Languages Research

Literature under Constraint: Writing and Young Marginalised Muslim Men

Roundtable discussion and book launch

Join us for a roundtable discussion with sociologist Fabien Truong of his new book, Radicalized Loyalties: Becoming Muslim in the West, which takes us into the housing estates of suburban Paris. We get to know Adama, Radouane, Hassan, Tarik, Marley, and a shadowy figure whose name would become known to the world at the time of the Charlie Hebdo shootings in January 2015: Amédy Coulibaly. Seeing Amédy through the eyes of his close friends and these other young Muslim men in the neighbourhoods where they grew up, Professor Truong (Centre de Recherches Sociologiques et Politiques de Paris and Université de Paris 8) uncovers a dense network of competing social loyalties and maps the road these youths take to resolve the conflicts they face: becoming Muslim. The roundtable discussion will explore the challenges in ‘hearing’ the vital lessons that we have to learn from these young men finding their truths within the competing pressures of family and national histories, masculinity and economic opportunities, and loyalty to brotherhood and neighbourhoods. This event is supported by the AHRC project Literature under Constraint. Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15845

18:00–21:00 Room 349 (Senate House)

Saturday 12 Institute of English Studies

The New Modernist Editing and Literary Criticism

Seminar

Bryony Randall (Glasgow)

11:00–13:00

Why Re-edit Ulysses?

Room 349 (Senate House)

Luca Crispi (University College Dublin) This event is part of the Modernism Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12604

Institute of Classical Studies

Virgil Society Lecture

Lecture

John Hazel, Llewelyn Morgan (Oxford) 11:30 – Reading the Poet: ‘Aeneid’ 10 (Virgil Society members led by John Hazel) 15:00 – Death and and Redemption in ‘Aeneid’ 10 Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15337

11:00–17:00 Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House)

Monday 14 Institute of Commonwealth Studies Two-day conference 10:00–16:00

Opportunities and Risks in the Digital Environment Supported by an AHRC Networking Grant. By invitation only advance registration required https://commonwealth.sas. ac.uk/events/event/15609

The Senate Room (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies

Cosmology and Human Nature in the ‘Timaeus’

Seminar

Emily Fletcher (Wisconsin-Madison) This event is part of the Ancient Philosophy Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15304

16:30–18:30 Room 243 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

51


May

Events calendar May

SAS Central Book launch 17:00–20:00 The Court Room (Senate House)

Stage Rights!: The Actresses’ Franchise League, Activism and Politics, 1908–58 Naomi Paxton is an independent theatre researcher. Her new book, Stage Rights!, explores the work and legacy of the first feminist political theatre group of the twentieth century, the Actresses’ Franchise League. The book makes a unique contribution to the history of twentieth-century theatre, feminist theatre, and the suffrage movement by telling the story of the League, its members, and the creative interventions it made into national and international suffrage movements. This event is part of the University of London’s Leading Women campaign, commemorating the 150th anniversary of women gaining admission to university study in the UK. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15809

Institute of Historical Research

Rethinking Toussaint L’Ouverture

Seminar IHR Wolfson Room, NB02 (Senate House)

Sudhir Hazareesingh (Oxford) Joint session with the Early Modern History Seminar This event is part of the Modern French History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14407

The Warburg Institute

From Devilry to Divinity: Readings in the Divina Commedia

Seminar

Purgatorio, Canto XXXIII. Beatrice’s prophesies. The final ritual of Dante’s spiritual cleansing. A weekly series of public readings of Dante’s work hosted by the Warburg Institute. For details, see page 30. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15357

17:30–19:30

18:00–19:30 Warburg Institute

Tuesday 15 Institute of Historical Research

Museum, Magic, Memory: The Curating of Paul Montague

Seminar

Julie Adams (British Museum) This event is part of the London Group of Historical Geographers Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15039

17:15–19:00 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar

Ex-Servicemen and the Liberal Party: The Great War Generation and the Electoral and Parliamentary Politics of the 1920s

IHR Past and Present Room, N202 (Senate House)

Matthew Johnson (Durham) This event is part of the Parliaments, Politics and People Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15847

Institute of Historical Research

Purring Vaginas and Waggling Penises: Sexting World War One

Seminar

Nancy Christie (Western Ontario), Michael Gavereau (McMaster) This event is part of the History of Sexuality Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13888

17:15–19:15

17:15–19:15 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House)

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School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Institute of English Studies

The Book Collector Presents: Modern First Editions

Lecture

The Book Collector will host a podium discussion of Modern First editions. A panel of experts representing auction houses, antiquarian book dealers, and collectors will explore how the value of Modern Firsts has evolved over the last 66 years, how fashion has changed, and current trends. This is an opportunity for new and seasoned collectors alike to ask about dos and don’ts and how best to build a personal collection. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15768

17:30–19:30 The Court Room (Senate House)

Institute of Philosophy

Anscombe on 'I': A Reconstruction

Seminar

Robert Stainton (Western Ontario), Andrew Botterell (Western Ontario) This event is part of the Logic, Epistemology and Metaphysics Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14062

17:30–19:30 Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of Latin American Studies

Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin America: What Potential for New Global Trends in the Region?

Seminar

This joint event held by the Institute of Latin American Studies and Canning House will examine the current state of play on corporate social and environmental responsibility in Latin America. Bringing together an expert panel of corporate practitioners, NGO professionals, and academics with experience of local and transnational CSR projects in different Latin American states, we will facilitate an open discussion on the potential and problems surrounding CSR in the region. Discussion will also consider the emergence of new trends in this arena, such as social enterprise and impact investing, which are taking older debates on the purpose and social responsibility of the corporation in new directions in many Latin American countries. Exploring old and new models for CSR in this vein, panellists will also discuss the role of corporate social engagement in Latin America in the current landscape of economic and political unrest seen in many states across the region. Sponsored by Anglo American. Fee applicable https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15799

18:00–20:00 The Senate Room (Senate House)

Institute of English Studies

Hacking Moby-Dick

Seminar

Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15619

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies Lecture 18:00–20:00 Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 19:00–20:30 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

ICS and Friends of the British School at Athens: Cretomania — From Freudian Psychoanalysis to ‘Troy: Fall of a City’ Nicoletta Momigliano (Bristol) Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15793

'Structuring the Sacre': Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross Meg Boulton (York) This event is part of the London Society for Medieval Studies Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14674

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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May

Events calendar May

Wednesday 16 Institute of Classical Studies Seminar

Shaft Grave IV in Grave Circle A: New and Unexpected Light in a Very Old Story

Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House)

Kostas Paschalidis (National Archaeological Museum, Athens) This event is part of the Mycenaean Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15307

Institute of Philosophy

London Aesthetics Forum

Seminar

Petr Kotátko (Czech Academy of Sciences) This event is part of the The London Aesthetics Forum Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14080

15:30–17:30

16:00–18:00 Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research

The Role of HM’s Official Opposition

Seminar

Nigel Fletcher (KCL) This event is part of the Contemporary British History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15161

17:00–19:00 IHR North American History Room (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 17:00–19:00 The Court Room (Senate House)

Late Antique Arabia: New Insights from the Sasanian Fort of Fulayj, Oman Derek Kennet (Durham), Seth Priestman (British Museum) This event is part of the Classical Archaeology Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15779

Institute of Historical Research

Of Revolutions and the Problem of Choice

Seminar

Sophia Rosenfeld (Pennsylvania) This event is part of the History of Political Ideas Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14314

17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15

Peripheral Experience and Conflicting Discourse in the Channel Islands: An Oral History Case Study of the German Occupation of Sark, 1940-45

IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House)

Richard Guille (Kent) This event is part of the War, Society and Culture Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14637

Institute of Historical Research

Recent Evangelical Historians of Global Christianity

Seminar

David Bebbington (Stirling) This event is part of the Modern Religious History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15503

17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB02 (Senate House)

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School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

The Warburg Institute Lecture 17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute

Goldsmiths, Ivory Carvers, Embroiderers: Identity in the Medieval Workshop Glyn Davis (Museum of London) Workshop and workshop practices represent a core and dynamic research strand in the history of art. This strand encompasses the study both of canonical artists and the anonymous producers whose activities can be deduced from the surviving art objects, thanks to ever-developing research questions and methodologies. This topic helps us to think about the agents and their networks (artists, patrons, and other market consumers), objects and socio-economic factors (making, buying, and trading) as well as the broader cultural issues of the transmission of skills and ideas (the movement of artists, objects, and imagery). This lecture series brings together leading experts in medieval and early modern historical periods in and beyond Europe, particular highpoints for the study of workshop practices, and also those researching workshop continuities and changes in later centuries, including digital mediation. This event is part of the Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern Lecture Series and is supported by the University of London Coffin Trust Fund. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15145

Institute of Historical Research

Reading ‘Autobiography of a Generation’

Seminar

Matt Ffytche (Essex) This event is part of the Psychoanalysis and History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15168

17:30–19:30 IHR Past and Present Room, N202 (Senate House) Institute of Latin American Studies

Water, Knowledge and Autonomy: High Modernism Meets Community Organization in the Ecuadorian Andes

Seminar

Geoff Goodwin (LSE) Water’s capacity to unite and divide has been evident throughout Latin American history, but most clearly on show since the 1980s. Efforts to privatize water supplies and services during structural adjustment and neoliberal reform provoked intense political struggles. Mobilizations against privatization brought together a diverse range of social actors who demanded change in the management of water. Ecuador was one of the few Latin American countries that responded to this demand. Over the last decade a new water regime has emerged in the country that entrusts the management of water to the state and the community, with the private sector performing a minor role. While the regime partially responds to earlier demands to reduce the role of the private sector in the management of water, it has provoked resistance from community water organizations, which have attempted to protect their autonomy in the face of increased state interference and regulation. One dimension of this struggle has been over knowledge. Whereas state agencies have attempted to impose a high modernist project that fetishises scientific knowledge and standardises water management, community organizations have stressed the importance of local knowledge and the diversity of water systems. Drawing on fieldwork conducted in Ecuador since 2015, this talk will explore the tension between these two broad visions of water management, focusing on the intersection between knowledge and autonomy. Free https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15682

17:30–19:30 Bedford Room, G37 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

55


May

Events calendar May

Institute of English Studies

2018 John Coffin Memorial Annual Palaeography Lecture

Lecture

This lecture will explore the function of palaeography in manuscript scholarship from the nineteenth century onwards. Focusing on Middle English texts, both prose and verse, it will examine various aspects of palaeographical research, including description and dating of manuscripts, the identification of hands, and the teaching of palaeography. A.S.G. (Tony) Edwards is Honorary Professor of Medieval Manuscripts at the University of Kent and Honorary Visiting Professor at University College London. He is a manuscript and literary scholar, whose studies are largely, but not exclusively, based on Middle English and early modern verse and prose. His publications include editions of the works of George Cavendish, John Lydgate, and Thomas More, as well as many works on Middle English prose and verse, Tudor manuscripts, the history of the book, and scripts and transmission of English manuscripts between 1400 and 1700. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15605

18:00–20:00 Chancellor’s Hall (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research Lecture 18:00–20:30 Beveridge Hall (Senate House)

Institute of Commonwealth Studies Seminar 18:30–20:00

Hobsbawm Memorial Lecture 2018 Luther, Anti-Popery and Death Lyndal Roper (Oxford) Annual lecture in memory of Professor Eric Hobsbawm, hosted in collaboration with Birkbeck, University of London. The lecture will run from 18:00–19:30, followed by a reception. In 1546, as Luther lay dying, he made one last sally against the Pope: ‘Living I was your plague, Dead I will be your death, O Pope!’ This imprecation was faithfully recorded in the published accounts of Luther’s death by his followers. Why did Luther curse the Pope at such a time? How could this outburst become part of Lutheran memorial culture? Starting with Karlstadt and Cranach’s Himmelwagen, the first visual propaganda for the Reformation, this lecture explores anti-papalism and anti-monasticism in Lutheran art. In particular, it examines the images that circulated with Luther’s late pamphlet Wider das Papsttum zu Rom. Their iconography was closely tied to the text, and we know that Luther had a hand in their design. But they were sold separately. Such images are not straightforwardly propagandist because they are so extreme that they would hardly have converted adherents of the old church. They were not meant literally, and they are full of riotous invention as well as bitter attack. Why were such images produced, and what can they tell us about Lutheran visual culture? More broadly, how can historians contribute to the study of visual culture? Lyndal Roper is a Fellow and Regius Professor of History at Oriel College, Oxford. She is the author of Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet, a New Statesman, Spectator, History Today, Guardian and Sunday Times Book of the Year. Free advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15836

American Empire – Beyond the Myth of American Exceptionalism AG Hopkins (Cambridge), William Gervase Clarence-Smith (SOAS), John Darwin (Nuffield College, Oxford), Max Edling (KCL) Free https://commonwealth.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15797

The Senate Room (Senate House)

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May

Events calendar May

Thursday 17 Institute of Classical Studies

'Lover of Concordia': from Neo-Punic to Latin in Lepcis Magna

Seminar

Caroline Barron (CNRS/Aix-Marseille) This event is part of the Ancient History Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15788

16:30–18:30 The Court Room (Senate House) The Warburg Institute

Map Drawing in Nineteenth-Century Education

Lecture

Susan Schultern (Denver) This event is part of the Maps and Society Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/12464

17:00–19:00 Warburg Institute The Warburg Institute

Is Holden’s Warburg Institute a Good Building?

Public Debate

Public debate with keynote speakers Eitan Karol, Louis Karol (architecture and interiors). This event is part of the Director's Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15915

17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute The Warburg Institute

Readings in Neoplatonic Scholarship

Seminar

Part of a series of readings of seminal texts by Damascius, Olympiodorus, Porphyry, and Proclus and an ongoing exchange that includes Harold Tarrant, Dilwyn Knox, and Peter Singer, among many other regular and occasional contributors. For details, see page 28. This event is part of the Neoplatonic Studies Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13820

17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute

The Institute of Historical Research Panel discussion 18:30–20:00 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

History Beyond Borders Daniel Beer (RHUL), Edith Hall (KCL), and Katherine McDonald (Exeter) ‘If you want to study anything more than the sewer system of nineteenth-century Manchester’, warns the historian Geoffrey Parker, ‘you need to learn languages.’ But language learning in the UK, both modern and ancient, is in crisis. The panel will examine the relationship between history, languages and the appreciation of the past, and consider ways to address the decline. Part of the ‘History Today at the IHR: Understanding the Past in the 21st Century’ series of discussions in which leading historians will look at the challenges posed by today’s world for our understanding of the past and explore how the past informs our contemporary understanding. £15 | £10 http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/15602

Friday 18 The Warburg Institute

Asinara Exhibition Breakfast Seminar

Seminar

Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15841

09:00–10:30 Warburg Institute

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

57


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Modern Languages Research One-day symposium 14:00–18:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Women’s Writing and Science Benjamin Dalton (KCL), Sonja Stojanovic (Notre Dame), Aifric Campbell & Anita Chandran (Imperial College London), Jean E Conacher (Limerick/ CCWW), Emily Jeremiah (RHUL), Karen Leeder (Oxford) Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/ events/event/12712

Papyrologists’ Research Rractices: Analysis of the Use of Digital Rresources through Interviews and User Observations Lucia Vannini (ICS) This event is part of the Postgraduate Work-in-Progress Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15328

Urban History in the Low Countries: A Historiographic Evaluation, a Century After Henri Pirenne’s Early Democracies Marc Boone (Ghent) This event is part of the Low Countries History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14556

Institute of English Studies | Institute of Modern Languages Research

John Thelwall and the Uses of Oratory

Seminar

Sarah Zimmerman (Fordham) This event is part of the London–Paris Romanticism Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/13801

17:30–19:30 Room 349 (Senate House)

Judith Thompson (Dalhousie)

The Romantic Literary Lecture: A Short History

Saturday 19 Institute of Latin American Studies Workshop 10:00–17:00

South American Archaeology Seminar Organised by UCL Institute of Archaeology. £10 on the day advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/14920

UCL Institute of Archaeology, 31–34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY Institute of Latin American Studies | Institute of Musical Research Workshop

Latin American Music Seminar The Latin American Music Seminar is a British forum for Latin American music research that meets twice yearly. £8 advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15633

10:15–16:00 Room 349 (Senate House)

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School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 14:00–16:00 IHR Seminar Room, N304 (Senate House)

Eighteenth-Century Arts Education Research Network (EAERN): Using Historic Educational Works Brianna E Robertson-Kirkland (Royal Conservatoire of Scotland) The Eighteenth-Century Arts Education Research Network (funded by the Royal Society of Edinburgh) is a ground-breaking enterprise that brings together practitioners and scholars to investigate new approaches in using eighteenthcentury arts educational materials. Launched in January 2017, EAERN had its first colloquium in May 2017, where speakers in history, art, dance, and music came together to discuss common themes and disparities in methodological approaches and practices. Treatises and manuals have played a significant role in establishing music conservatories, art schools, dance academies, and higher education centres in literature and history. Though in the eighteenth century arts education was part of a broader disciplinary context, this is no longer necessarily the case, with many practitioners and scholars working in isolation with the hope of better understanding how to use these manuals for practical application, recreation, and restoration. By establishing a forum where scholars and practitioners from all arts disciplines can come together to examine and discuss the use of eighteenth-century materials, we can begin to create new methodologies, embracing the interdisciplinary nature of the arts and establish new areas of collaboration and research. This talk will provide an introduction and overview of the project, with further discussion on what it hopes to achieve. This event is part of the Education in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14894

Senate House Library

An Evening with the Fourth Choir

Performance

Free advance registration required http://www.senatehouselibrary.ac.uk/ exhibitions-and-events/events/evening-fourth-choir-concert-queer-music-andpoetry

20:00–22:00 Crush Hall (Senate House)

Monday 21 Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:00 IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House)

Roundtable Discussion: What Roles did Rubrics Play in Medieval Liturgy? This event is part of the History of Liturgy Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14204

The Warburg Institute

From Devilry to Divinity: Readings in the Divina Commedia

Seminar

Paradiso, Canto I. Ascent to the heaven of fire. A weekly series of public readings of Dante’s work hosted by the Warburg Institute. For details, see page 30. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15358

18:00–19:30 Warburg Institute

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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May

Events calendar May

Refugee Law Initiative Seminar 18:00–19:30 IALS Council Chamber, Charles Clore House

The UN’s ‘Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework’: Actually a ‘Contingent Refugee Assistance Project’ James Hathaway (Michigan) How ought we really to respond to the crisis in refugee protection? The reality today is a world of desperate refugees risking their lives in order to save them; of just ten — mostly poor — countries protecting more than half of the world’s refugees; and of more than 12 million refugees languishing in protracted refugee situations. Surely this is a scenario that calls for dramatic and decisive action. Yet the UNHCR’s draft 'Global Refugee Compact' and accompanying 'Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework' propose only a voluntarist framework for negotiating situation-specific relief. In this talk, Professor Hathaway offers a bold vision for a meaningful reform of refugee protection that speaks to the needs of refugees, and of the states that receive them. This event is part of the International Refugee Law Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://rli.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15191

Tuesday 22 Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:00 IHR Wolfson Room, NB02 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:30–19:30 IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House)

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‘Bad in Winter, Worse in Summer and at No Time Good’: Location and the Development of Protestantism on Romney Marsh 1558–1625 Anne Le Baigue (Kent) This event is part of the Religious History of Britain 1500–1800 Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15770

‘Cannibals’, ‘Savages’ and Pronouns: The Strange World of British Naval Encounter in Australia and the Torres Strait, 1842–50 Daniel Simpson (RHUL/The British Museum) This event is part of the British History in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14845

Ireland’s Forgotten Women: Exploring the Experience of Widows in 1960s’ Women’s Magazines Ciara Meehan (Hertfordshire) Spousal bereavement is considered to be one the most disruptive events of the life course. Although still entitled to use the prefix Mrs, these women became marginal figures in society. Woman’s Way described them in a 1968 cover story as ‘Ireland’s forgotten women’. Letters to Irish women’s magazines across the 1960s offer an insight into the challenges that bereaved women faced when understanding their new position in society. This talk draws on those letters to understand singleness and the widow. It is a status that is particularly complex, complicated by the stage in life at which widowhood occurs. While examining shared experiences, the talk will also reflect on inter-generational differences. Re-marriage, mother-child relationships, and the prospect of returning to work are among the topics explored through the pages of Woman’s Way, Woman’s Choice and Woman’s View magazines. This event is part of the Life-Cycles Seminar Series. Free http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/13986

School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Advanced Legal Studies Lecture 17:30–19:30 IALS, Charles Clore House

John Coffin Memorial Annual Lecture: Placeless People: Writing, Rights, and Refugees In 1944, the political philosopher and refugee Hannah Arendt wrote, ‘Everywhere the word “exile”, which once had an undertone of almost sacred awe, now provokes the idea of something simultaneously suspicious and unfortunate’. Exiles from other places have often caused trouble for ideas about sovereignty and the law and nationhood. But the meanings of exile changed dramatically in the twentieth century, often leaving human rights law struggling to catch up. This lecture discusses how writers such as Arendt, George Orwell, Simone Weil, Dorothy Thompson, and Samuel Beckett responded to the mass displacements of the last century. Sceptical about the ability of human rights to legislate for refugees, yet committed to universal justice, these writers challenge us to imagine new terms for placelessness in modern times. Lyndsey Stonebridge is Professor of Modern Literature and History at the University of East Anglia. She is the author of The Judicial Imagination: Writing after Nuremberg (winner of the British Academy’s Rose Mary Crawshay Prize in 2016), The Writing of Anxiety (2007), and The Destructive Element (1998). Her new book, Placeless People: Writing, Rights, and Refugees, is due out later this year. This event will be followed by a reception. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15731

Institute of Philosophy

The Practical, the Political and the Ethical

Seminar

This event is part of The Practical, the Political and the Ethical Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14433

17:30–19:30 Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research

African Cross-Border Issues

Seminar

Vincent Hiribarren (KCL) This event is part of the International History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13859

18:00–20:00 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House) Institute of English Studies

Hacking Moby-Dick

Seminar

Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15620

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

Wednesday 23 Institute of Historical Research Seminar 12:30–13:45 IHR Past and Present Room, N202 (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 17:00–19:00 Room 349 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Mass Immunization, Medical Diplomacy, and Global Health in Modern East Asia, 1945–75 Mary Brazelton (Cambridge) This event is part of the Comparative Histories of Asia Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15775

Brave New World: The Patriarchate of Jerusalem at the end of Late Antiquity (650–800) Daniel Reynolds (Birmingham) This event is part of the Classical Archaeology Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15780

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

61


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Medical Education and Provincial Identity in Manchester, 1750–1850 Alice Marples (Manchester) This event is part of the British History in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15719

Institute of Modern Languages Research

Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation – Kerstin Hensel and Jen Calleja

Seminar

This Encounter focuses on Kerstin Hensel’s narration Tanz am Kanal (1997) and Jen Calleja’s translation, published earlier this year as Dance by the Canal by Peirene Press. Dance by the Canal tells the story of a woman who fails to find her place in society – neither in communist GDR nor in the capitalist west. Her refusal to conform to the patriarchal structures of both societies forces her into ever-increasing isolation. Kerstin Hensel was born in 1961 in Karl-Marx-Stadt in former East Germany and studied in Leipzig. She has published more than 30 books, including novels, short story collections, poetry, and plays. She has won numerous prizes, including the Anna Seghers-Preis as well as the Lessing prize for her entire body of work. Jen Calleja is a literary translator from German into English, a writer, editor, and musician. She is currently Translator-in-Residence at the British Library. This event is sponsored by the Keith Spalding Bequest Fund and is part of the Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation Seminar Series. Free https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/encounters

18:00–19:30 Gordon Room, G34 (Senate House)

Institute of English Studies

Hilda Hulme Memorial Lecture 2018

Lecture

Dame Gillian Beer is one of the leading scholars of Victorian literature and culture with a worldwide reputation that extends in wider fields in the humanities. Her landmark book of 1983, Darwin’s Plots, which created a new field of evolutionary studies, has been described as one of the foremost books of cultural and literary criticism of the last quarter century. It has been reissued twice, in 2000 and 2009. Her interdisciplinary interests extend to nineteenth-century wave theory, Virginia Woolf and David Hume, and Vernon Lee and war. Her book Alice in Space: The Sideways Victorian World of Lewis Carroll won the Truman Capote Prize in 2016. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15762

17:00–19:00 IALS Lecture Theatre

SAS Central

Living Frankenstein

Special event

Dare to join us for the third in our Living Literature series, an epic thriller brought to life through immersive performances, talks, workshops, and activities. Listen to chilling ghost stories by candlelight as our experts set the scene of that night in the ‘year without a summer’ at the Villa Diodati, where the first version of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was created. Tread carefully through Victor Frankenstein’s rooms in Ingolstadt, relive the birth of the monster, and learn about the scientific and medical innovations of the period that provided inspiration for Shelley. Listen to talks and join in with activities led by expects in the Gothic, learn how Shelley’s Frankenstein has inspired popular culture since its publication in 1818, and more! £20 | £10 advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15476

18:30–21:45 Senate House

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School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

Thursday 24 Institute of Classical Studies

Who are the 'Romans' in the Roman Empire?

Seminar

Myles Lavan (St Andrews) This event is part of the Ancient History Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15789

16:30–18:30 Room 349 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research

American Democracy at the Scopes Trial

Seminar

Tom Arnold-Forster (Cambridge) This event is part of the North American History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14167

17:30–19:30 IHR North American History Room (Senate House) The Warburg Institute

Readings in Neoplatonic Scholarship

Seminar

Part of a series of readings of seminal texts by Damascius, Olympiodorus, Porphyry, and Proclus and an ongoing exchange that includes Harold Tarrant, Dilwyn Knox, and Peter Singer, among many other regular and occasional contributors. For details, see page 28. This event is part of the Neoplatonic Studies Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13820

17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute

Institute of Modern Languages Research Seminar 19:30–20:30

‘The Story of Pinocchio’: An Italian Folktale Down the Ages Katia Pizzi (IMLR/London) Hosted by Friends of Italian Studies. Fee applicable https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15665

University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NZ

Friday 25 The Warburg Institute

The Warburg Institute Open House: Opening Doors | Moving Ideas

Open house event

This open house for prospective postgraduate students will feature talks by Guido Giglioni on the MA in Cultural and Intellectual History 1300–1650 and Joanne Anderson on the MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture, which is offered in conjunction with London’s National Gallery. The day includes tours of the Institute’s famous library, including an introduction to its unique classification and arrangement of human culture and expression, and tours of the Aby Warburg archive and photographic collection, which is of great interest to contemporary artists and scholars of art. There will be a showing of Judith Wechsler’s film on the life of Aby Warburg, and an informational session on studying at the Warburg and the funding opportunities available. Refreshments and lunch will be provided. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15792

10:00–16.15 Warburg Institute

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

63


May

Events calendar May

Institute of Modern Languages Research Half-day workshop 14:00–18:00 Gordon Room, G34 (Senate House)

Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 246 (Senate House)

Embodied Encounters and the Senses in Modern Languages This half-day workshop will explore research across languages as an embodied, sensory process. Scholars working across a range of contexts will focus particularly on questions of positionality and the role the senses play in our experience of the languages and cultures we research. We will explore the opportunities and challenges of carrying out projects – and sharing findings – with an ethnographically informed attention to the self and the senses. This event is part of the Open World Research Initiative ‘Cross-language dynamics: reshaping community’ strand. This event is generously supported by the Institute of Advanced Study at the University of Warwick. Fee applicable advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas. ac.uk/events/event/15458

Roman Matrons and their Political Influence through Social Networks during the Late Republic Leire Lizarzategui (University of the Basque Country) This event is part of the Postgraduate Work-in-Progress Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15330

Institute of English Studies

Finnegans Wake Research Seminar

Seminar

This reading group has been running regularly since 2007. It studies James Joyce’s final work, Finnegans Wake, at a close level of detail. Discussion is focused on the text and attention is also paid to Joyce’s manuscripts. The group hosts a blog to record its discussions. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12580

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

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Tuesday 29 Institute of Latin American Studies

Visualizing Blackness in Latin America and the Caribbean, Sixteenth-Nineteenth Centuries

Two-day conference

Recent years have witnessed a rich wave of scholarship examining representations of Blackness in the visual cultures of the Atlantic world. This avenue of enquiry is particularly germane to Latin America and the Caribbean, home to the world’s largest African diasporic populations. While the theme of black people’s invisibility is deeply inscribed in both the history and scholarship of the region, the study of visual and material culture presents new avenues for understanding both the complexities of the black experience and the ways in which notions of Blackness and peoples of African descent have indelibly shaped the cultures and societies of Latin America and the Caribbean. This conference brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars working across the fields of visual and material culture, art history, cultural studies, and history to explore the multiplicity of meanings ascribed to Blackness across the region; from early modern, colonial conceptions rooted in lineage and bloodlines, to the pseudo-scientific construction of race as an immutable, material, and biological ‘fact’ in the nineteenth century. The aim is to explore the myriad ways in which Blackness is configured and remade, through representations of Afrodescendants in the visual arts, and the production and use of material culture in black self-fashioning and collective identities. Sponsored by the Institute of Latin American Studies and the Cassal Trust. £30 | £15 advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15252

10:00–16:00 Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research

The City: Myth and Materiality

One-day symposium

This one-day symposium organized by the Association for Literary Urban Studies in collaboration with the Institute of Historical Research with the support of the Turku Institute for Advanced Studies will explore the intersection of literary studies and urban history, examining a range of historical periods and geographical areas. £25 advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15674

10:00–17:00 IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar

Remaking the Old Palace of Westminster: Politics and St Stephen’s Cloisters, 1512–1660

IHR Past and Present Room, N202 (Senate House)

Elizabeth Biggs (York), Elizabeth Hallam Smith (York/Houses of Parliament) This event is part of the Parliaments, Politics and People Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15848

The Warburg Institute

The Courtauld and the Warburg: Complementarities

Lecture

Elizabeth Sears (Michigan) This event is part of the The Director’s Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15801

17:15–19:15

17:30–18:30 Warburg Institute Institute of Philosophy

Epistemic Dilemmas

Seminar

Nick Hughes (Durham) This event is part of the Logic, Epistemology and Metaphysics Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14063

17:30–19:30 Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of English Studies

Hacking Moby-Dick

Seminar

Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15621

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House) School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Institute of Historical Research Seminar 19:00–20:30 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Is it all about the Money? Joan of Navarre and the Economic Element of Wueenship Elena Woodacre (Winchester) This event is part of the London Society for Medieval Studies Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14675

Wednesday 30 Institute of Philosophy

London Aesthetics Forum

Seminar

Keren Gorodeisky (Auburn) This event is part of the The London Aesthetics Forum Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14081

16:00–18:00 Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies

The Reception of a Roman Villain: The Story of Catiline

Lecture

Mathilde Skoie (Oslo) The story of Catiline and his conspiracy has been a popular tale throughout history. As the primary sources of the affair, Cicero’s Catilinarian speeches and Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae have been on the school curriculum from antiquity to today: we find Catiline and his conspiracy used in everything from declamatory exercises, Jesuit drama, and YouTube reenactments. His name has even been used as a paradigm for nouns in the first declension. And major figures like Ben Jonson, Voltaire, Ibsen, and Salieri have found inspiration in his story. We mostly find Catiline cast in line with the negative presentations of Cicero and Sallust. But there are also more subversive voices, and every so often there have been attempts to rehabilitate Catiline, though perhaps not as many as one might expect. One of these subversive voices is the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen in his very first drama, Catilina (1850). The speaker will take a closer look at some of the issues that are at stake in the reception of Catiline with Ibsen´s drama as her primary example. In the process, she will explore some more general questions about the reception of historical figures. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15803

17:00–19:00 Room 349 (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research

British Policy towards Northern Ireland

Seminar

Timothy Hurley (KCL) This event is part of the Contemporary British History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15162

17:00–19:00 IHR North American History Room (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:30–19:30 IHR Past and Present Room, N202 (Senate House)

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Memory and the Languages of Loss in Seventeenth-Century Life Writing Kate Hodgkin (UEL) This event is part of the Psychoanalysis and History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15582

School of Advanced Study


May

Events calendar May

The Warburg Institute Evening event 18:00–20:00 Warburg Institute

Burckhardt at 200: Interpreting the Italian Renaissance Past, Present, and Future A two-day conference on the legacy of Jacob Burckhardt organised by the Warburg Institute and the University of York will open on Wednesday, 30 May, with a launch event at the Warburg Institute starting at 6 pm. Speakers include Peter Burke (Cambridge), Jonathan Jones (art critic for The Guardian and former judge of the Turner Prize); and Martin Ruehl (Cambridge). For information on the conference, see page xx. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15784

Institute of English Studies

Propositions for the Pretext

Seminar

Laura Elliot and Angus Sinclair This event is part of the Contemporary Innovative Poetry Research Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12503

18:00–20:00 Room 234 (Senate House)

Thursday 31 The Warburg Institute Two-day conference 09:00–17:00 British Academy, 10–11 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH

Burckhardt at 200: The Civilization of the Renaissance Reconsidered The bicentenary of the birth of the Swiss scholar Jacob Burckhardt (1818–1897), author of The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (1860), seems an appropriate moment at which take stock and consider whether or not the idea of an ‘Italian Renaissance’ is still a hermeneutically helpful one. This conference will task an interdisciplinary team of scholars of Renaissance studies as well as of Burckhardt himself to interrogate both the Swiss historian’s own agenda and the contemporary validity and helpfulness of the label ‘Italian Renaissance’. Specific reference will be made to the themes treated in his classic account: the state as a work of art; development of the individual; revival of antiquity; discovery of the world and of man; society and festivals; morality and religion. This event is convened by Simon Ditchfield (York), Michelle O’Malley (The Warburg Institute), and Stefan Bauer (York). Speakers include Stefan Bauer (York), Robert D. Black (Leeds), Jill Burke (Edinburgh), Virginia Cox (Villa La Pietra, NYU Florence), Wietse de Boer (Miami), Marco Gentile (Parma), Mary Laven (Cambridge), Mikkel Mangold (Basel), Giuseppe Marcocci (Oxford), Sarah Ross (Boston College), Nicholas Terpstra (Toronto), Joan-Pau Rubiés (Pompeu Fabra), Will Stenhouse (Yeshiva), Christine Tauber, (Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversität), Claudia Wedepohl (The Warburg Institute) and Barbara von Reibnitz (Basel).

Launch event: Burckhardt at 200: Interpreting the Italian Renaissance Past, Present, and Future The conference will open on Wednesday, 30 May, with a free launch event at the Warburg Institute starting at 6 pm. Speakers include Peter Burke (Cambridge), Jonathan Jones (art critic for The Guardian and former judge of the Turner Prize); and Martin Ruehl (Cambridge). See page xx for further details. Fee advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15784 Standard Admission: £95 for both days | £50 for one day Concessions: £36 for both days | £20 for one day

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Institute of Advanced Legal Studies One-day conference 09:45–17:30 University of Westminster, London

Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Ways of Knowing: Epistemology and Law This conference will provide a forum for presentations and discussion on the place, significance, and further potential of epistemology within socio-legal studies. Hosted by the Westminster Law & Theory Lab in association with the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. Fee applicable advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15568

The Black Atlantic Footballer

The Court Room (Senate House)

This conference will bring together academics, sports engagement agencies, and groups involved in shaping the contemporary British sports landscape to discuss issues around the themes of representation and mobility in the football industry. Influenced by the work of Paul Gilroy, the event will explore research from across the ‘Black Atlantic’ to draw together conversations across Africa, Europe, and the Americas through a focus on a shared relationship to the Atlantic. Sponsored by the Society for Latin American Studies and the Coffin Trust. £15 | £10 advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15612

Institute of Historical Research

Layers of London: Come and Add Your Voice to London’s History

Workshop

The Layers of London project is creating a groundbreaking interactive online map of the city through the contributions of individuals, community groups, and schools. The result will be a dynamic website allowing millions of users to explore and engage with London’s history. The project involves people across London’s 32 boroughs and beyond adding information as well as helping to create historic map layers. On 31 May, we’re asking individuals to turn up with a memory, a photograph, or a piece of research (for example, a short history of a building, a street, or an event) that you think should be part of the project. Participants can also try their hand at creating a layer of London’s history made up of aerial photos taken by the RAF in the 1940s. There are two sessions available: Session 1: 12:30–13:10 Session 2: 13:20–14:00 Places are limited to 14 per session. Free advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15647

One-day conference 11:00–18:30

12:30–14:00 IHR Research Training Room, N318 (Senate House)

Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 349 (Senate House)

Falerii Novi – High Resolution Ground-Penetrating Radar Survey and the Study of a Roman City Martin Millett (Cambridge) This event is part of the Ancient History Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15790

The Warburg Institute

Readings in Neoplatonic Scholarship

Seminar

Part of a series of readings of seminal texts by Damascius, Olympiodorus, Porphyry, and Proclus and an ongoing exchange that includes Harold Tarrant, Dilwyn Knox, and Peter Singer, among many other regular and occasional contributors. For details, see page 28. This event is part of the Neoplatonic Studies Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13820

17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute

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Institute of English Studies Lecture 18:00–20:00 Chancellor’s Hall (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

2018 John Coffin Memorial Annual Irish Studies Lecture The Struggle for Ireland's Soul: Catholics under the Penal Laws Ian McBride (Oxford) The persecution suffered by Irish Catholics during the ‘Penal Times’ ranks alongside the Great Famine and the Easter Rising as one of the central components of the Irish national story. Following the final defeat of the Catholic nobility and gentry by William III’s forces in 1689–91, a massive programme of social and cultural engineering was conceived. The Protestant ruling class embarked upon a great experiment: to legislate the religion of an entire people out of existence. Remarkably, however, there is no systematic study of how the eighteenth-century penal code was implemented, or how it reshaped Catholic Ireland. The most obvious explanation for this silence is that the maintenance of an underground church in defiance of the state did not facilitate the keeping of regular records. To find solutions to this problem, historians must travel to Rome, where they will discover exceptionally rich archives never properly exploited by Irish scholars. Thousands of letters from Ireland survive in the Vatican, in Propaganda Fide, and the Irish colleges. They enable us to understand how the Irish priesthood survived, and they offer rare glimpses of the religious experiences of ordinary people. More surprisingly, they reveal how the Roman authorities and their allies in the continental colleges sought to reform a national church that they sometimes regarded with hostility and despair. The event will be followed by a wine reception hosted by the Irish Embassy. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15657

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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June

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June

Events calendar June

Friday 01 Institute of Modern Languages Research One-day symposium 09:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

Institute of Latin American Studies Special event 12:30–17:30 Bloomsbury Room, G35 (Senate House)

Institute of Modern Languages Research Workshop 14:00–16:00 Room 246 (Senate House)

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Iberian Sound Cultures Kathleen M Vernon (Stony Brook), Richard Elliot (Newcastle), Sally Faulkner (Exeter), Samuel Llano (Manchester), Eva Moreda (Glasgow), Sarah Wright (RHUL), João Silva (Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Tom Whittaker (Warwick) Recent years have seen a growing interest in ‘sound studies’, a field that addresses the role of the auditory in culture and society. This one-day symposium seeks to establish a dialogue between sound studies and Iberian cultural studies. It intends to examine the place of sound both across a range of Iberian contexts (architecture, geography, acoustic environments) and media (sound technologies and sound art, music and film, for example). Using the auditory as a starting point, the workshop will address the following questions: How does sound inform our understanding of Spanish and Portuguese history and, in particular, these countries’ long and fraught road towards modernisation? How might the categories of noise and silence, for instance, enable us to illuminate more fully historical junctures of crisis and contradiction within the Iberian peninsula? How might attendant changes in technology and culture be understood, or indeed rethought, through sound? Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15210

Master Class with Professor Carmen Rial Carmen Rial is a professor at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), a researcher of the CNPq (National Council of Scientific and Technological Development), and director the Center for Visual Anthropology/Research Group on Urban Anthropology/UFSC. She is deputy chair of WCAA and a former president of the Brazilian Anthropological Association. Her work focuses on cultural globalization, transnational migration, gender, consumption, and sport. Her recent books include Migration of Rich Immigrants: Gender, Ethnicity, and Class (with Alex Vailati); Diálogos Antropológicos Contemporâneos (with Elisete Schwade); and Antropologia audiovisual na prática (with Alex Vailati and Matias Godio). £10 | £5 advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15643

‘I Myself Still Remember’: Political Memories in Inter-War Europe In many European countries, the experience of the interwar dictatorships and their bellicose enterprises—such as the Italian Abyssinia campaign during the mid-1930s, the Second World War and the Nazi occupation of Europe in the early 1940s—generated a wave of literary and visual ‘political memories’. The case study of Italian ‘literary memories’ under Benito Mussolini’s dictatorship has previously been explored in terms of the attitudes among broader sections of Italian society towards Mussolini and the fall of his regime (Duggan 2012). However, there remain several gaps in the investigation of ‘memories’ of fascism. For example, the ‘memories’ of fascism understood as a European phenomenon have remained unexplored, as have the different forms through which fascism has been remembered (or rejected) at a regional level in Italy and elsewhere in Europe. Linking with Duggan’s pioneering research but conducting its investigation through different frameworks, this event aims to promote interdisciplinary discussion on the connection between politics, political propaganda, literary and visual memories, and dictatorships. In so doing, it explores the different forms through which ‘political memories’ were produced and their different political meanings, leading to a contribution towards analysis from a fresh and more complete perspective of the political life of twentiety-century Italy, Europe, and beyond, as well as a consideration of the impact of memory in interwar and postwar political ideologies. Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15850 School of Advanced Study


June

Events calendar June

Institute of Classical Studies

Embracing Customization in Post-Conflict Reconstruction

Seminar

Zena Kamash (RHUL) This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15812

16:30–18:30 Room G21A (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 246 (Senate House)

Searching for Wisdom: Semantics of Doors in Parmenides, Aristophanes, and Plato Elia Marrucci (Verona) This event is part of the Postgraduate Work-in-Progress Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15332

Institute of Historical Research

Secrets in the Dutch Golden Age and Where to Find Them

Seminar

Djoeke van Netten (Amsterdam) This event is part of the Low Countries History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14553

17:15–19:15 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House) Institute of English Studies

Charles Peake Ulysses Seminar

Seminar

The Charles Peake Ulysses Seminar is devoted to the line-by-line reading and analysis of James Joyce’s Ulysses. It has acted as a focal point for academic researchers and postgraduate students with research interests in Joyce across London and the southeast and beyond for thirty years. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12518

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

Saturday 02 Institute of English Studies Seminar 14:00–16:00 Room 246 (Senate House)

General Principles vs. Laws of Nature in Thomas Hobbes’s Natural Philosophy Stathis Psillos (Athens), Eirini Goudarouli (The National Archives) This event is part of the Early Modern Philosophy and the Scientific Imagination Seminar (EMPHASIS) Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12551

Monday 04 Institute of Classical Studies

Mithras in Hispania: New Interpretations

Lecture

Jaime Alvar Ezquerra (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) Free advance registration required https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15805

17:00–19:00 Room 349 (Senate House) The Warburg Institute

From Devilry to Divinity: Readings in the Divina Commedia

Seminar

Paradiso, Canto III. Heaven of the moon. Piccarda Donati. A weekly series of public readings of Dante’s work hosted by the Warburg Institute. For details, see page 30. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15359

18:00–19:30 Warburg Institute

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Tuesday 05 Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:00 IHR Wolfson Room, NB02 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR John S Cohen Room, N203 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR North American History Room (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:30–19:30 IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House) Institute of Philosophy Seminar 17:30–19:30

The Third Way: The Archpriest Controversy, Catholic Reform, and the English Benedictines in Spain at the Start of the Seventeenth Century James Kelly (Durham) This event is part of the Religious History of Britain 1500–1800 Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15771

English Designed Landscapes, c.1550–1660: Using 3D-GIS to Recreate ‘Prospects’ and ‘Promenades’ Lizzie Stewart (UEA) This event is part of the Digital History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14033

When the Elders of Zion Relocated to Eurabia: Conspiratorial Racialisation in Antisemitism and Islamophobia Reza Zia-Ebrahimi (KCL) This event is part of the Jewish History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14907

Thatcherism: Ideological Project, Statecraft, or Messy Compromise? Hugh Pemberton (Bristol) This event is part of the Life-Cycles Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13988 Richard Holton (Cambridge) This event is part of The Practical, the Political and the Ethical Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14434

Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of English Studies | Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:30–20:00 Lambeth Palace, Lambeth, London SE1 7JU

New Perspectives on Seventeenth-Century Libraries Robyn Adams (Centre for Editing Lives and Letters, UCL), Katie Birkwood (Royal College of Physicians Library), Jacqueline Glomski (Centre for Editing Lives and Letters, UCL) This meeting will take place in the Great Hall of Lambeth Palace, Lambeth Palace Library, London SE1 7JU. It is a joint meeting with the Friends of Lambeth Palace Library. Those wishing to attend must send their names in advance to Juliette Boyd at juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org or phone 020 7898 1400 no later than Monday, 4 June. Admittance not before 17:15 via the main gatehouse of Lambeth Palace. There will be a reception afterwards to mark the tenth anniversary of the History of Libraries Seminar. This event is part of the History of Libraries Seminar Series. Free advance registration required juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org

Institute of English Studies

Hacking Moby-Dick

Seminar

Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15622

18:00–20:00 Room 234 (Senate House)

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Institute of Historical Research

The Relationship between Churchill and Eisenhower

Seminar

Justin Olmstead (Central Oklahoma) This event is part of the International History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13860

18:00–20:00 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House)

Wednesday 06 Institute of Classical Studies One-day colloquium 09:30–17:00 Room 349 (Senate House)

Moving through Time: Processions from the Classical Past to Byzantium Processions have been fundamental to many cultures as a form of communal activity, both secular and religious. While they are of great importance, they are hard to capture—the sources for different periods offer different kinds of evidence, whether written, visual, or material. The aim of the colloquium is to examine the kinds of evidence available to us from the Greco-Roman and Byzantine worlds—from the depiction of a fifth-century BCE procession in the Parthenon marbles to the Typikon of the Great Church from tenth-century Constantinople. During the course of the colloquium, invited speakers from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds will draw selectively upon a variety of textual, visual, and material evidence in order to introduce a series of case studies that will enhance our understanding of the history of processions and their social and cultural significance in their respective historical context. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15843

Institute of Classical Studies

J. P Barron Memorial Lecture: Socrates, Eros, and Magic

Lecture

Angie Hobbs (Sheffield) At Symposium 203d Diotima claims that the daimon Eros is a clever magician and wizard who philosophizes throughout his life. It is a startling assertion, as Plato is usually highly critical of magicians, and the puzzle deepens when we consider that in the Symposium Socrates is portrayed as a partial embodiment of Eros. Most commentators have either ignored the claim or tried to explain it away. Professor Hobbs argues that a deeper engagement with Plato’s views on magic shows that we should take it seriously. She defines the magician as a being who or which effects a transformation that the audience cannot initially understand. The key question is whether this transformation is only ever a deceptive conjuring trick, and she goes on to argue that Plato thinks that, in rare but important cases, a magician can reveal, rather than conceal or disfigure, the true nature of reality. The daimon Eros, as described by Diotima, is just such a being, and understanding how this is so will teach us much about the nature of both love and philosophy and their capacity to reveal the normally hidden connections that bind the entire cosmos into a whole. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15470

17:00–19:00 Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research Seminar

Hat-Honour, Curtseys, and Handshakes: Changing Styles of Interpersonal Greetings in the Long Eighteenth Century

IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Penelope J. Corfield (RHUL) Please note: this seminar will be followed by an end-of-year party, to which all seminar members are warmly invited. This event is part of the British History in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15720

The Warburg Institute

Botticelli, his Assistants and the Business of the Workshop

Lecture

Michelle O’Malley (Warburg Institute) This event is part of the Re-opening the Workshop Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15722

17:15–19:15

17:30–18:30 Warburg Institute School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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June

Events calendar June

Institute of Historical Research

Pets in the Home in England and Wales, 1837–1955

Seminar

Jane Hamlett (RHUL) This event is part of the Studies of Home Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14686

17:30–19:30 IHR Professor Olga Crisp Room, N102 (Senate House)

Thursday 07 Institute of Classical Studies

Multilingualism and Latinization in Early Roman Hispania

Seminar

Noemí Moncunill-Martí (Nottingham/CSAD, LatinNow project) This event is part of the Ancient History Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15791

16:30–18:30 Room 349 (Senate House) Institute of Modern Languages Research

Friedrich Schlegels Wiener Literaturgeschichtsvorlesungen ‘Geschichte der alten und neuen Literatur’ (1812/14)

Lecture

Andrea Polaschegg (Graz) This event is part of the English Goethe Society Lectures Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12479

17:15–19:00 Room 243 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar

Where Colonial Asylum Provision Met Constitutional Law: Imperial Liberalism in Post-Emancipation Jamaica Christienna Fryar (Liverpool) This event is part of the Modern British History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15691

Education, Poverty, and Health in South Wales during the Interwar Years

IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House)

Russell Grigg (freelance education consultant) This event is part of the History of Education Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14521

Institute of Historical Research

Iwan Morgan Lecture

Seminar

This event is part of the North American History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14168

17:30–19:30

17:30–19:30 IHR North American History Room (Senate House) The Warburg Institute

Readings in Neoplatonic Scholarship

Seminar

Part of a series of readings of seminal texts by Damascius, Olympiodorus, Porphyry, and Proclus and an ongoing exchange that includes Harold Tarrant, Dilwyn Knox, and Peter Singer, among many other regular and occasional contributors. For details, see page 28. This event is part of the Neoplatonic Studies Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13820

17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute

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The Warburg Institute Seminar 17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute

The Karlsruhe Piranesi Albums: Recovering an Eighteenth-Century Antiquarian Enterprise Christoph Frank (Università della Svizzera Italiana) This event is part of the Director's Seminar Series. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/16088

Friday 08 Institute of Modern Languages Research

Surrealism and Music in France, 1924–52: Interdisciplinary and International Contexts

Conference

Paris was the principal centre of surrealist activity and the focus of connections between surrealist literature, ethnology, sociology, visual arts, and music. The links between surrealism and the emerging disciplines of ethnology and ethnomusicology redefined the concept of exoticism in France and were the subject of a good deal of polemical debate. However, connections between surrealism and music have been little explored, although it is clear the movement had a decisive influence on major French composers such as Pierre Boulez, Olivier Messiaen, and André Jolivet. This conference initiates a transdisciplinary and international dialogue and will situate music at the heart of these debates. The event will end with a piano recital of relevant French repertoire by the outstanding young pianist Alexander Soares, including works by Boulez, Messiaen, and Jolivet. This event is organised by the Institute of Modern Languages Research and the Open World Research Initiative (OWRI) Cross-Language Dynamics translingual strand, with support from the Cassal Trust Fund. Fee applicable advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas. ac.uk/events/event/14919

09:30–19:00 Bloomsbury Room, G35 (Senate House)

Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 234 (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 246 (Senate House)

CapiTainS: Challenges for the Generalization and Adoption of Open Source Software Thibault Clérice (Sorbonne) et al This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15813

‘The Wight Stuff’: Assessing the Potential of Late Iron Age and Roman Period PAS Data from the Isle of Wight Stephanie Smith (KCL/British Museum) This event is part of the Postgraduate Work-in-Progress Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15333

Institute of Historical Research

Women’s History in the Curriculum

Seminar

This event is part of the Women’s History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15758

17:15–19:15 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Institute of Modern Languages Research Piano recital 17:30–18:30 Chancellor’s Hall (Senate House)

Surrealism and Music in France, 1924–52: Alexander Soares Recital Join us for a piano recital of relevant French repertoire by the outstanding young pianist Alexander Soares. Praised as a pianist of ‘huge intensity’ (The Telegraph), Alexander Soares is developing a reputation as an artist of formidible technique and virtuosity, with performances of ‘diamond clarity and authority’ (BBC Radio 3 ‘In Tune’). In 2015, his performance in the BBCSO / BBC Radio 3 ‘Boulez at 90’ celebrations received widespread critical acclaim in the press, described as a ‘brilliantly unbuttoned account’ (The Sunday Times) and ‘most memorable of all’ (The Financial Times). Programme: André Jolivet: Piano Sonata no. 1; Olivier Messiaen: Île de feu 1; Olivier Messiaen: Prélude (1964); Pierre Boulez: Douze Notations; Pierre Boulez: Une page d’éphéméride. The recital forms part of a conference organised by the Institute of Modern Languages Research (see page 76). This event is organised by the Institute of Modern Languages Research and the Open World Research Initiative (OWRI) Cross-Language Dynamics translingual strand, with support from the Cassal Trust Fund. £5 advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/14944

Institute of English Studies

Henry James Cambridge Edition: Round Table

Seminar

Philip Horne (UCL), Tamara Follini (Cambridge), Tim Lustig (Keele), Oliver Herford (Birmingham) This event is part of the London Nineteenth Century Studies Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12752

17:30–19:30 Gordon Room, G34 (Senate House)

Monday 11 Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

W G Hart Legal Workshop 2018: Building a 21st-Century Bill of Rights

Two-day workshop

Almost all States have some form of a bill of rights in their national legal system. While their specific content varies, most cover many of the same issues, such as the procedure for amendment, links with international law and institutions, and the status of the bill of rights in relation to other laws. The purpose of this workshop is to fill a significant gap in practice and scholarship and make an original contribution to current debates by bringing together scholars to discuss the construction of an effective twenty-first century bill of rights. Although there has been discussion in the UK concerning the adoption of a ‘British’ Bill of Rights, debate has focused on—and been largely limited to—addressing perceived negative characteristics of the Human Rights Act 1998. Creative thinking about topics such as the process of drafting a bill of rights, the role of human rights-promoting institutions, the extension of human rights law to the private sector, and the experience of other jurisdictions is largely either absent or compartmentalised. Keynote speakers include Judge Tim Eicke (European Court of Human Rights), Harriet Harman QC MP (Chair, Joint Committee on Human Rights); Conor Gearty (LSE); Baroness Onora O’Neill (House of Lords; University of Cambridge); Colm O’Cinneide (UCL); Martha Spurrier (Director, Liberty); and Janneke Gerards (Utrecht). Parallel sessions will cover design and implementation; linkages with international and comparative laws and institutions; populism and the backlash against rights; the protected rights; the bill of rights in the national constitutional order; claimants and respondents; remedies; and rights and civil society. Fee applicable advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15862

10:30–18:00 IALS, Charles Clore House

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Institute of Modern Languages Research One-day symposium 14:00–20:00 Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House)

Global Portuguese This symposium explores the global expansion of Portuguese language, literature, and music. The linguistic impact of the Lusitanians is recognised in South America (Brazil), Africa (Angola, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau, São Tomé and Príncipe, and Cape Verde), and Asia (Macau and East Timor). But Portuguese linguistic impressions have split into areas outside the official empire and we seek to understand the nature of intercultural interactions. How did a country with limited resources make an impression that outlasted successive imperial powers that followed them? How did the Portuguese bridge the cultural gap between themselves and ‘others’? Speakers will use contemporary literary texts, languages spoken in the Lusophone countries, identities constructed, and also live music to bring out the Portuguese imprint in the world. This event is supported by the Coffin Trust Fund. Fee applicable advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas. ac.uk/events/event/15147

Institute of Historical Research

Early Career Researchers Session

Seminar

Arthur Westwell (Cambridge), David Harrap (QMUL) This event is part of the History of Liturgy Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15655

17:15–19:15 IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House) Institute of Modern Languages Research

The Impossible Dialogue between Science and Religion: The Case of Marie-Victorin, Botanist and Christian Brother

Lecture

Yves Gingras (Université du Québec à Montréal) Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15851

17:30–20:00 The Court Room (Senate House) The Warburg Institute

From Devilry to Divinity: Readings in the Divina Commedia

Seminar

Paradiso, Canto XI.Thomas Aquinas. Francis of Assisi. A weekly series of public readings of Dante’s work hosted by the Warburg Institute. For details, see page 30. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15360

18:00–19:30 Warburg Institute

Tuesday 12 Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Past and Present Room, N202 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

‘Ready for Public Use on All Occasions’: The Politics of Parliamentary Record Keeping in the English Revolution Kate Peters (Cambridge) This event is part of the Parliaments, Politics and People Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15849

The Discovery of Pleasure: Female Sexuality in Italy and West Germany in the Long 1970s Fiametta Balestracci (QMUL) This event is part of the History of Sexuality Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13889

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Institute of English Studies

Literary London Reading Group

Seminar

Since 2012, the Literary London Reading Group, an offshoot of the Literary London Society (literarylondon.org) has offered a seminar series that fosters interdisciplinary and historically wide-ranging research into London literature in its historical, social, and cultural contexts. In our sessions we aim to include all periods and genres of writing and representation about, set in, inspired by, or alluding to central and suburban London and its environs, from the city’s roots in pre-Roman times to its imagined futures. This event is part of the Literary London Reading Group Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12747

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

Institute of Classical Studies

New Films, Old Drama: An Evening with Barefaced Greek

Special event

Helen Eastman (Director, Barefaced Greek), Máirín O’Hagan (Producer, Barefaced Greek), Rebecca Scott (‘Athena’), Leon Scott (‘The Watchman’), and James Robson (Open University) Barefaced Greek celebrate classical Greek drama in performance by making accessible short films using texts from Greek comedy and tragedy. These fresh new films (in the original language, with subtitles) produced for online broadcast, aim to reach new audiences internationally, and to inspire a love of Greek language and drama in the twenty-first century. This unique public event will feature a showing of three of Barefaced Greek’s films (Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, ‘The Watchman’ from Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, and ‘Athena and Poseidon’ from Euripides’ Trojan Women) introduced by the company. Cast and creatives will then participate in a Q&A chaired by James Robson of the Open University. The event is generously supported by the John Coffin Memorial Fund. Free advance registration required https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15810

18:00–20:00 Beveridge Hall (Senate House)

Institute of Historical Research Conference Please visit the website for time and venue details

After the Vote: Activism and History, 1918–2018 Laura Beers (Birmingham), Sarah Childs (Birkbeck), Sumita Mukherjee (Bristol) Fee applicable advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15838

Wednesday 13 Institute of Philosophy

London Aesthetics Forum

Seminar

Anna Cristina Ribeiro (Texas Tech) This event is part of the The London Aesthetics Forum Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14082

16:00–18:00 Room 246 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research

Penal Policy Since the 1980s

Seminar

Keir Hopley This event is part of the Contemporary British History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15163

17:00–19:00 IHR North American History Room (Senate House)

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Institute of Historical Research Seminar

Soldiers in Mourning: The Frontline Experience of Death and Bereavement on the Somme, 1916

IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House)

Natasha Silk (Kent) This event is part of the War, Society and Culture Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14639

Institute of Historical Research

Tradition and Invented Tradition in English Moravian History

Seminar

Jim Rollo (Open University) This event is part of the Modern Religious History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15397

17:15–19:15

17:15–19:15 IHR Professor Olga Crisp Room, N102 (Senate House) The Warburg Institute

How X-Ray Imagery Changed the Practice of Art History

Lecture

Sven Dupré (Utrecht/Amdsterdam) Despite experimentation with the use of X-ray technology to analyse paintings in the first decade of the twentieth century by German science laboratories, it was only in the 1920s and 1930s that the technology became more widely and systematically applied to art. Alan Burrough’s acquisition of an extensive archive of X-ray images of paintings was the most important driving force behind this. Burrough’s efforts were inspirational for Kurt Wehlte, who in the 1930s established a laboratory for the X-ray investigation of paintings in Berlin. This talk will explore X-ray investigations that were consequential for art history, focusing on the researchers Christian Wolters and Martin de Wild. The history of X-ray technology applied to art in the 1920s and 1930s shows that it was not simply a matter of art versus science, that is, of eager adoption by scientists embarking on art historical terrain from their recently established museum laboratories versus outright rejection of the technology by artists and humanists. X-ray technology was accepted when it supported a particular style of art history structured around formal analysis. Moreover, the sort of knowledge that early adopters of X-ray technology for the study of art imagined to be required of researchers and students was based on older models of connoisseurship. While connoisseurs like Cornelis Hofstede de Groot saw no use for the technology, other art historians responded that new ways of scientifically examining art in the laboratory required students of art history to learn new ways of seeing. This event is part of the Bilderfahrzeuge Project Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15786

17:30–18:30 Warburg Institute

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:30–19:30 IHR Wolfson Room, NB02 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Babylon in Storage: Canonisation and Decanonization on Berlin’s Museum Island Mirjam Brusius (German Historical Institute London) This talk will be followed by a discussion of Museum Storage and Meaning: Tales from the Crypt (Routledge, 2018), edited by Mirjam Brusius and Kavita Singh. This event is part of the Rethinking Modern Europe Seminar Series and is cohosted by the Imperial/World History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15416

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Thursday 14 Institute of Classical Studies

Religions in Contact

Two-day conference Room 234 (Senate House)

Organised in collaboration with the ARMAAC project (‘Aculturación religiosa en el Mundo Antiguo y la América colonial’), this conference will address processes of religious acculturation in the Ancient World and in Colonial Mesoamerica. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15821

The Warburg Institute

The Art of the Poor in the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance

Two-day conference

The art history of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance has generally been written as a story of elites: bankers, noblemen, kings, and popes and their artistic interests and commissions. Recent decades have seen attempts to recast the story in terms of material culture and include a wider range of objects than are discussed in the traditional surveys of painting, sculpture, and architecture. There are, however, countless modest images, decorated objects, and buildings across Europe that belie this notion, from lead and tin pilgrims’ badges in the Museum of London to frescoed churches commissioned by village communities during the Venetian period on Crete. These works of art were made for the more than 95% of the population who were economically less privileged: peasants, unskilled and skilled workers in the building and manufacturing industries, small-time artisans. They are works that tend not to enter the major art museums and exhibitions of the western world or feature prominently in tourist guide books; they can be found in museums of urban history and archaeology and the closest they come to mingling with ‘real’ art is in shows with an anthropological approach, such as ‘the art of devotion.’ If they are discussed in artistic terms at all, these are often negative: ‘coarse’, ‘crude’, ‘primitive’, or ‘provincial’. This two-day conference at the Warburg Institute will challenge these perceptions. Through a variety of case studies, objects, their functions, and manufacturing traditions will be re-evaluated and established aesthetic judgements and tacit assumptions in scholarship reexamined. This event is supported by the University of London Coffin Trust. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15736

09:00–18:00

09:30–17:30 Warburg Institute

Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30

Hannah Cornwell (Birmingham) This event is part of the Ancient History Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/16029

Room 349 (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies Lecture 17:00–19:00 Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House)

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‘Obligamentum Magicum’: Sacrifice and Law in the ‘Defixiones’ of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire Francisco Marco Simón (Zaragoza) In the early days of the Roman Republic, the ius had been above all a performative utterance solemnly sworn during the course of the sacrifice. The link between law and magico-religious practice in the Roman world appears clearly when considering the notion of obligatio, so inherent to the execration texts (defixiones): the language in many of these texts, especially those deposited within the temples, is markedly bureaucratic and quasi-legal. Considering Roman provincial religion as an ‘open system’ with multiple religious options adaptable to local concerns, cursing can be seen as a semi-institutionalized strategy mainly used by people who were unable to access the legal system in situations of uncertainty and risk. Some of these texts, in the tradition of a genuine devotio hostium, not only adapted the standards of votive religion, but also presented the tablet’s target as a sacrificial victim to the gods, in a procedure of persuasive analogy to stimulate the future action. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15804

School of Advanced Study


June

Events calendar June

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 18:00–19:30 IHR John S Cohen Room, N203 (Senate House) Institute of Modern Languages Research Lecture 18:00–20:00

‘Carry On Sergeant’: Exploring National Service in Personal and Popular Memory Joel Morley (Essex), Peter Gurney (Essex), Matthew Grant (Essex) This event is part of the Oral History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14694

The Contribution of German-Jewish Emigrés to British Culture Jeremy Adler (KCL) Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12467

The Court Room (Senate House) Senate House Library

Saving Gay’s the Word and Being Gay in the 80s

Talk

Hear Jim MacSweeney, manager of London’s leading LGBT bookshop, Gay’s the Word, in discussion with Graham McKerrow on the raid on the shop by HM Customs in 1984 (which saw all of its foreign-published stock impounded) and the wider experience of being gay in 80s London. This event will also launch the Library’s audience response project, inviting all participants who identify as LGBTQ+ to talk about a work of literature that has had meaning in their lives. Free advance registration required http://www.senatehouselibrary.ac.uk/exhibitions-and-events/events/saving-gaysword-and-being-gay-80s

18:00–20:30 Macmillan Hall (Senate House)

Friday 15 Institute of English Studies

Heresy and Borders Conference

Two-day conference

The third biennial conference of the International Society for Heresy Studies will focus on how borders between heresy and orthodoxy are created, maintained, and imagined. The study of borders feels even more urgent in a time of rising nationalism and political promises to ban immigration and erect walls based on imagined boundaries. Borders are, of course, more than lines drawn across maps and between religions: they are blurry spaces of ambiguity and reversibility where identities are constructed and deconstructed. Concepts of separation, threshold, and border have occupied theologians, philosophers, historians, and artists since ancient times and remain dynamic elements in the work of many theorists and creative artists today. The re-examination of borders can demonstrate not only how we have constructed the heretical other, but also can reveal the fragility and arbitrary nature of our own orthodoxies. £60 | £45 advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ conferences/heresy-and-borders-conference

09:00–17:00 Senate House

Institute of Latin American Studies Colloquium Time TBC IALS Council Chamber, Charles Clore House

School of Advanced Study

Brazil and Latin America Organised in collaboration with King’s College London In 2010 Leslie Bethell wrote a provocative essay in the Journal of Latin America Studies titled ‘Brazil and Latin America’. In raising the question ‘Is Brazil part of Latin America?’, the essay generated, and continues to generate, considerable debate. This event aims to explore further the theme of Brazil’s relationship with the rest of Latin America, past and present, by discussing the political, economic, social, cultural, and intellectual relations between Brazil and Spanish America, including how Brazil’s position in Latin America is seen by other nations, both within the region and overseas. The event will mark the publication of a new book of essays on modern Brazilian history and politics by Leslie Bethell in which the first essay is a revised and expanded version of ‘Brazil and Latin America’. Free advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15672

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room G21A (Senate House)

Institute of Philosophy Seminar 17:30–19:30 Room 243 (Senate House)

Further and Further Into the Woods: Lessons from the Crossroads of Cuneiform Studies, Landscape Archaeology, and Spatial Humanities Research Rune Rattenborg (Durham) This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15814

No Provisos: A Critique of Habermas and of Rawls on Religion and Public Reason Gordon Finlayson (Sussex) This event is part of The Practical, the Political and the Ethical Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15857

Saturday 16 Institute of Historical Research Seminar 14:00–16:00 IHR Seminar Room, N304 (Senate House)

Cambridge University, the ‘Latitude-Men’, and the Early Enlightenment: Platonism and its Influence (1640–1760) Mark Burden (Bristol), David Leech (Bristol), Marilyn Lewis (Bristol) This three-year postdoctoral project, funded by the AHRC, aims to examine the philosophical, historical, and educational influence of a small group of Christian Platonist philosophers at Cambridge University, including Ralph Cudworth, Henry More, John Smith, and Benjamin Whichcote. Known as the Cambridge Platonists, they were instrumental in the dissemination and development of Platonist thought in England in the seventeenth and early eighteenth century. Their ideas on religious toleration helped to shape the discourse of freedom across early-modern Europe; their scientific ideas, including powerful critiques of Descartes and Boyle, were well known to the most influential thinkers of the next generation, including Locke, Newton, and Leibniz. This talk will provide an introduction to the key political, educational, and philosophical ideas of the Cambridge Platonists, and reflect upon the project’s recent archival discoveries. This event is part of the Education in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14895

Monday 18 Institute of Latin American Studies One-day conference 10:00–18:00 Room 349 (Senate House)

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Rethinking Ideas of the Body in Latin American History Keynote speaker: Rebecca Earle (Warwick) Rebecca Earle, professor of history at the University of Warwick, studies the history of food, the cultural significance of food, and the cultural history of Spanish America and early modern Europe. Her early work was rooted in a very specific part of the world (southern Colombia). Currently she studies the movement of ideas and practices across larger geographies. £15 | £10 advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15641

School of Advanced Study


June

Events calendar June

Institute of English Studies

Writing Workshop: The Craft of Georgette Heyer

Workshop

Kim Wilkins (Queensland) Georgette Heyer is much loved by readers for her characterisation, her humour, and her rollicking good pace. What can writers learn from Heyer by analysing her creative choices? This workshop will cover structural issues such as plot, pacing, and subplot as well as characterisation issues such as internalisation and supporting cast, to help participants develop their own writing toolkits, no matter what genre they write in. Please read Venetia before attending, as it will serve as the guide book for examples. £50 | £30 advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/ events/event/15595

13:00–17:00 Room G11/12 (Senate House)

The Warburg Institute

From Devilry to Divinity: Readings in the Divina Commedia

Seminar

Paradiso, Canto XVII. Heaven of Mars. Cacciaguida. A weekly series of public readings of Dante’s work hosted by the Warburg Institute. For details, see page 30. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15361

18:00–19:30 Warburg Institute

Tuesday 19 Institute of English Studies One-day conference 09:15–17:30 Senate House (keynote at UCL)

Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:00 IHR Wolfson Room, NB02 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar

The Nonesuch? Georgette Heyer and Her Historical Fiction Contemporaries Plenary speaker: Kathryn Sutherland (Oxford) This interdisciplinary conference is aimed primarily at exploring Heyer’s historical novels, but will also set her work in context with other contemporary female historical fiction writers, such as Norah Lofts, Margaret Irwin, Margaret Campbell Barnes, and Anya Seton, and with contemporary Regency romance. Topics to be explored include sources and influences; critical and popular reception; class, gender, and sexuality; and publishing and marketing histories. The day will include both formal and informal sessions, and provide opportunities for Heyer readers to meet and discuss the impact of her work. £55 | £35 advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/event/6351

Favourite Nonconformist Writers and their Eighteenth-Century Dissenting and Methodist Editors Isabel Rivers (QMUL) This event is part of the Religious History of Britain 1500–1800 Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15772

Constructing the Seapower State: Culture, Identity and Exceptionalism

IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Andrew Lambert (KCL) This event is part of the British Maritime History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14846

The Warburg Institute

De re Mabillonica: The Origins of Palaeography Reconsidered

Lecture

Anthony Grafton (Princeton) This lecture celebrates the publication of a Festschrift in honour of Jill Kraye (Warburg Institute) and will be followed by a reception. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15781

17:15–19:15

17:30–18:30 Warburg Institute

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Institute of Historical Research

Roundtable on Childhood and Youth

Seminar

This event is part of the Life-Cycles Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13989

17:30–19:30 IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 18:00–20:00 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House)

‘Ambulant Amateurs’: The Rise and Fade of the Anglo-German Fellowship Charles Spicer (IHR) This event is part of the International History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/13861

Wednesday 20 The Warburg Institute

The Bernini Workshop (Re)visited

Lecture

Joris van Gastel (Bibliotheca Hertziana, Rome) This lecture is part of the Reopening the Workshop lecture series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15715

17:30–18:30 Warburg Institute

Thursday 21 Institute of Commonwealth Studies | Institute of Latin American Studies One-day conference 10:00–16:00 The Court Room (Senate House)

The Invention and Reinvention of Decolonization: Rethinking the ‘Waves’ Narrative Stuart Ward (Copenhagen), author of British Culture and the End of Empire Dane Kennedy (George Washington), author of Decolonization: A Very Short Introduction Was ‘decolonization’ a European invention designed to ease the ‘White Man’s Burden’ and pave the way for a neo-colonial system of extraction and dependency? Was it a Latin American invention intended to undo ‘the colonial system?’ Or was it an Indian, French Algerian, or Caribbean invention? All the above? None of the above? This two-day conference will consider the received ‘wave’ narrative (first, second, third, fourth waves) currently used to tell the global history of decolonization. Is it still adequate to the task, or would notions such as ‘invention’ and ‘reinvention’ be more useful? This event is jointly organised with the Institute of Latin American Studies. Free advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15629

Institute of Modern Languages Research

Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation – Doerte Hansen and Anne Stokes

Seminar

This event is part of the Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation Seminar Series. Free https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14805

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

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The Institute of Historical Research Panel discussion 18:30–20:00 IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House)

Historical Knowledge and Public History Helen Castor, David Olusoga, Anna Whitelock In this series of discussions organised by the Institute of Historical Research and History Today, leading historians will look at the challenges posed by today’s world for our understanding of the past and explore how the past informs our contemporary understanding. A panel of historians discuss how the opening up of history to a wider audience places special demands on those communicating the past. What are the factors that shape how history is presented in museums, in the media, and online, and who gets to write and present it? Part of the History Today at the IHR: Understanding the Past in the 21st Century series of discussions. £15 | £10 http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/15602

Friday 22 Institute of Latin American Studies | Institute of Modern Languages Research

Global Dominican – Politics, Economics, and Cultural Production £10 | £5 advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15298

One-day conference 10:00–19:00 The Court Room (Senate House) Institute of Classical Studies

Digitising and Annotating the Wood Notebooks (DAWN) Workshop

Seminar

Gabriel Bodard (ICS), Simona Stoyanova (ICS) et al This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15815

16:30–18:30 Room 234 (Senate House) Institute of Historical Research Seminar 17:15–19:15 IHR Pollard Seminar Room, N301 (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Opposition to Coeducation in British Universities, 1860–1935 Emily Rutherford (Columbia) Historians have previously written about gender in British universities as a story of women’s fight for admission to previously all-male institutions. But this narrative has obscured the stories of those men and women at universities across the UK who fought equally hard to preserve singlesex institutions and forms of sociability. This talk describes a world of single-sex higher-education institutions and academic communities in early-twentieth-century Britain, seeking to understand the political and identity categories actors themselves used and why they were ideologically and emotionally committed to single-sex higher education. It takes up three very different cases: the students at the late-Victorian, coeducational University of Manchester who consistently rejected suggestions that they combine their men’s and women’s student unions; the educational reformers who tried to bring the domestic science movement to the Edwardian University of London; and the male classicists at interwar Oxford and Cambridge for whom ideals of ancient pederasty were critical to their defense of single-sex education. Understanding why these actors were committed to gender segregation helps us to grasp why gender segregation has in fact proved such an enduring force in education in modern Britain—with consequences that persist to the present day. This event is part of the Women’s History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15759

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Events calendar June

Monday 25 Institute of Historical Research Conference 09:00–17:00 IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02 (Senate House)

Negotiating Networks: New Research on Networks in Social and Economic History Keynote address: Sheryllynne Haggerty (Nottingham) This conference will bring together scholars working on networks in social and economic history with a particular focus on those using Social Network Analysis (SNA) in their research. SNA has become increasingly popular as one of the key digital tools for historical research in recent years. We would like to encourage conversation and an exchange of ideas between researchers using this methodology. Fee applicable advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/ event/14831

Institute of English Studies

Introducing Mulk Raj Anand: The Colonial Politics of Collaboration

Seminar

Anna Snaith (KCL) This event is part of the Comparative Modernisms Serminar Series. Free advance registration required angeliki.spiropoulou@sas.ac.uk

16:00–18:00 Room G3 (Senate House) The Warburg Institute

From Devilry to Divinity: Readings in the Divina Commedia

Seminar

A weekly series of public readings of Dante’s work hosted by the Warburg Institute. For details, see page 30. Paradiso, Canto XXXIII. The Empyrean. The vision of the Trinity. Free https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15362

18:00–19:30 Warburg Institute Institute of Historical Research

The History of Food Banks

Seminar

Alex Murdoch (London South Bank) This event is part of the Voluntary Action History Seminar Series. Free https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/14178

18:00–20:00 IHR Seminar Room, N304 (Senate House)

Tuesday 26 SAS Central

Final Report Launch: The Human Mind Project

Project report launch

The Human Mind Project was launched in 2013 with the aim of providing an interdisciplinary research hub to facilitate innovative approaches to the study of the mind. The Project, which came to an end in 2017, highlighted the importance of developing a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to understanding the life and activity of mind and brain, integrating science and the humanities. This event launches the Project’s final report. Speakers will include the Project’s leader, Colin Blakemore, and its manager, Mattia Gallotti (LSE). This event is for all those with an interest in the future of research into the human mind. Fee applicable advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15833

17:00–20:00 Room 349 (Senate House)

Wednesday 27 Institute of Modern Languages Research

Respecting Communities in International Development: Languages and Cultural Knowledge

One-day conference

Free advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15854

09:00–18:00 The Court Room (Senate House) 88 

School of Advanced Study


June

Events calendar June

Institute of Philosophy

London Aesthetics Forum

Seminar

Amy Kind (Claremont McKenna) This event is part of the The London Aesthetics Forum Seminar Series. Free https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14083

16:00–18:00 Room 246 (Senate House) The Warburg Institute Lecture 17:30–19:30 Warburg Institute

Reopening the Treasury: Meaning in Materials at San Isidoro de León Therese Martin (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid) This event is part of the Re-opening the Workshop Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15146

Institute of English Studies

Ezra Pound Cantos Reading Group: Canto 90

Seminar

Richard Parker (Birkbeck) The Ezra Pound Cantos Reading Group was formed in 2006. At each meeting, a speaker introduces a canto, followed by discussion. Speakers and members range from internationally established Pound critics to poets, postgraduates, independent scholars, and Pound enthusiasts. All are welcome. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15689

18:00–20:00 Room 234 (Senate House)

Institute of Modern Languages Research Seminar

Networks in Exile Gisela Holfter (Limerick/IMLR) Free https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/12539

18:00–20:00 Room G21A (Senate House)

Thursday 28 The Warburg Institute Lecture 17:30–18:30 Warburg Institute

School of Advanced Study

Architecture without Architects: Early Cinquecento Veneto Literati as ‘Directors’ of the Refashioning of Their Own Houses Guido Beltramini has been director of the Centro internazionale di studi di architettura Andrea Palladio in Vicenza since 1991. His interests centre on Renaissance architectural history, with a particular emphasis on Venetian architecture and on the culture of the Antique in the Renaissance. He has been Craig Hugh Smyth Visiting Fellow at Villa I Tatti, Florence; Kress Foundation Fellow at the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies at Columbia University; and Mellon Senior Fellow at the Canadian Center for Architecture. He has taught at the University of Ferrara and the University of Milan, and in 2017 was Andrew W. Mellon Inaugural Visiting Professor at the V&A Research Institute. His most recent book is The Elusive Face of Andrea Palladio (2017). His curated exhibitions include ‘Pietro Bembo e l’invenzione del Rinascimento’ (Padua, 2013), ‘Aldo Manuzio’ (Venice, 2016) and ‘Orlando Furioso 500 Anni’ (Ferrara, 2016–17). This event is part of the The Director’s Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15713

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Friday 29 Institute of Classical Studies

The Digital Rosetta Stone Project

Seminar

Monica Berti (Leipzig), Franziska Naether (Leipzig), Eleni Bozia (Florida) This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15816

16:30–18:30 Room 234 (Senate House) Institute of English Studies

Finnegans Wake Research Seminar

Seminar

This reading group has been running regularly since 2007. It studies James Joyce’s final work, Finnegans Wake, at a close level of detail. Discussion is focused on the text and attention is also paid to Joyce’s manuscripts (copies of which are displayed on a screen). The group hosts a blog to record its discussions. This event is part of the University of London Finnegans Wake Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12581

18:00–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

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July

July

Events calendar


July

Events calendar July

Monday 02 Institute of Historical Research

Colophons and Scribal Cultures across the Early Modern World

One-day workshop

Funded by the Power and Postan Fund of the IHR. Speakers: Christopher Bahl (SOAS/IHR), Liesbeth Corens (Oxford), David Zakarian (Oxford), Arthur Dudney (Cambridge), Stefan Hanß (Cambridge), Laurenz Kern (Freie Universität Berlin), Olly Akkerman (Freie Universität Berlin), Hanna Murphy (KCL), Nur Sobers-Khan (British Library), Torsten Wollina (German Orient-Institute) Researchers have increasingly used codicological and material data to explore social and cultural histories of manuscript circulations. Yet, the main proliferators of the written word—scribes, copyists, and transcribers—are often overlooked due to missing biographical information and a lack of cross-disciplinary methodological approaches. As ‘finishing strokes’ (Gacek, 2009) of the texts and major markers of scribal activity, colophons constituted crucial paratextual elements that allowed a scribe to address himself as a significant element of the cultural production of a text. By addressing the role of the colophon as a person’s signature, this cross-disciplinary workshop reconsiders the personal stories of the production and circulation of early modern manuscripts. It will bring together researchers working on languages and regions ranging from Europe to the Middle East, South Asia and the Americas, to study the parameters of these ‘professional signatures’. The aim is to historicise ‘colophons’ and offer a fresh perspective on how they served as central tools of identity-making among professional scribes and thereby shaped manuscript cultures over time and across different regions. Free advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15754

09:00–19:00 IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02 (Senate House)

Thursday 05 Institute of Modern Languages Research

Language and Identity in Francophone Canada | La Langue et l’Identité dans la Francophone Canadienne

Two-day conference

Krista Byers-Heinlein (Concordia), Matthew Hayday (Guelph), Leigh Oakes (QMUL), Sherry Simon (Concordia) Supported by the Canada-UK Foundation, Cassal Endowment Fund and the Quebec Government Office. £100 | £50 two days | £60 | £30 one day advance registration required https:// modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15671

09:10–20:00 Room 243 (Senate House)

Friday 06 Institute of Classical Studies

The Women in Classics Wikipedia Group

Seminar

Emma Bridges (ICS), Claire Millington (KCL) This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15817

16:30–18:30 Room 234 (Senate House)

Saturday 07 Institute of English Studies

Isaac Newton as Mathematical Reader and Annotator

Seminar

Benjamin Wardhaugh (Oxford) This event is part of the Early Modern Philosophy and the Scientific Imagination Seminar (EMPHASIS) Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12552

14:00–16:00 Room 246 (Senate House)

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July

Events calendar July

Tuesday 10 Institute of Advanced Legal Studies One-day conference 09:30–17:30 IALS, Charles Clore House

Post-Legislative Scrutiny Parliament has a responsibility to monitor the extent to which the laws it has passed are implemented as intended and have the expected impact. Such postlegislative scrutiny is an essential tool for increasing government accountability and is part of its oversight role. Outside the UK, and despite its importance, it is not uncommon for this process to be overlooked: in some countries, laws may be passed but not applied, secondary legislation may not adopted, or insufficient information may be available to assess the actual state of a law’s implementation and its effects. Implementation is a complex matter depending on the mobilisation of mechanisms, funds, and different actors. Implementation does not happen automatically, and several factors can affect its course, including changes in facts on the ground, diversion of resources, deflection of goals, resistance from stakeholders, and changes in the legal framework of related policy fields. This one-day conference, cosponsored by the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and the Westminster Foundation for Democracy, will explore post-legislative scrutiny and related issues. Fee applicable advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15677

Institute of English Studies

Eton College Library and its Young Collectors

Seminar

Michael Meredith and Rachel Bond (Eton College Library) Speakers will explore the roles of Eton College library and the Savile Society, Eton’s bibliophile club, in forming the collecting habits of young people. This event is part of the Book Collecting Seminar Series. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/12739

18:00–20:00 Bloomsbury Room, G35 (Senate House)

Friday 13 Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 234 (Senate House)

Digital Classics Graduate Students: Presentation and Discussion of Student Projects This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15818

Tuesday 17 Institute of English Studies Four-day conference 11:30–13:00 Senate House

School of Advanced Study

ISLE 5: The 5th International Conference of the International Society for the Linguistics of English Plenaries: Anita Auer (Lausanne), Ilse Depraetere (Université Lille 3), John McWhorter (Columbia), Peter Trudgill (East Anglia/Fribourg) This conference organised by the Survey of English Usage and University College London, and hosted by the Institute of English Studies, will explore areas of research pertaining to English linguistics such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics, language change and sociolinguistics. Please note that International Society for the Linguistics of Engish (ISLE) membership is a prerequisite for participation at the conference. See www.isle-linguistics.org. Fee applicable advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15699

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Events calendar July

Wednesday 18 Refugee Law Initiative

RLI 3rd Annual Conference: ‘Refugee Protection in a Hostile World?'

Two-day conference

The theme of the 3rd Annual Conference of the Refugee Law Initiative, ‘Refugee Protection in a Hostile World?’ reflects on the apparent strengthening of longstanding currents of anti-refugee feeling and other forms of instability in the world. This trend raises urgent questions about refugee protection globally, as well as the interaction between global politics and refugee law. The conference provides a dedicated annual international forum to share and debate the latest research and cutting-edge developments in refugee protection. This year’s event will build on the success of previous conferences that united academics, practitioners, policymakers and students in considering pressing challenges to refugee law. An optional one-day workshop on issues relating to internal displacement follows the conference. £120 | £100 | £75 advance registration required https://rli.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/14941

09:00–17:00 Beveridge Hall (Senate House)

Friday 20 Refugee Law Initiative Workshop 09:00–17:00 Beveridge Hall (Senate House)

Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 234 (Senate House)

Revitalising IDP Research: 20 Years of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement Refugee Law Initiative, University of London The 20th anniversary of the adoption of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement offers a unique opportunity to reflect not only on their influence on internal displacement globally but also on the global state of research and practice on internally displaced persons. This workshop will provide a forum for researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and students to come together to present, debate and reflect on this field and its future. It offers the chance to begin developing new research and policy agendas and collaborations. The workshop follows the Refugee Law Initiative’s annual conference, which takes place 18–19 July. £70 | £55 | £40 advance registration required https://rli.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/14942

Tensions of Standardization and Variation in the Encoding of Ancient Scripts in Unicode Anshuman Pandey (Michigan) This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15819

Monday 23 Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 234 (Senate House)

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At and Above the Axis: Computational Approaches to Literary Reading and Marginalia Steven Olsen-Smith (Boise State University; general editor of Melville’s Marginalia Online) Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15523

School of Advanced Study


July

Events calendar July

Friday 27 Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 16:30–18:30 Room 234 (Senate House)

Backoff Lemmatization for Ancient Greek with the Classical Language Toolkit Patrick J. Burns (NYU) This event is part of the Digital Classics Seminar Series. Free https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15820

August Please note that there are no events scheduled for August 2018.

School of Advanced Study

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Events calendar July

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September

September

Events calendar


September

Events calendar September Wednesday 05 Institute of Historical Research Two-day conference 09:00–17:00 IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02 (Senate House)

Motherhood, Loss and the First World War Conference and Public Lecture The extraordinary death tolls suffered on the fighting fronts of the First World War gave rise to devastating and unprecedented levels of loss for individuals and communities across Europe and the wider world. Indeed, bereavement became so widespread during the conflict that it can rightly be regarded as one of the defining experiences of the war. Historians have had relatively little to say about wartime loss, however, and the bereaved have not been widely acknowledged or remembered during the centenary commemorations of the conflict. This two-day conference will bring historians and community groups together to explore maternal bereavement as a result of the war, an experience that was understood to be particularly painful and difficult to come to terms with. The conference will be staged as part of an ongoing community project on motherhood, loss, and the First World War funded by the Ministry of Housing, Communities, and Local Government and organised by the Big Ideas Company, the London Centre for Public History, and the Institute of Historical Research. Fee applicable advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15858

Monday 10 Institute of Classical Studies

Drawing on the Past: The Pre-Modern World in Comics

Two-day conference

This two-day conference on comics and the pre-modern world is aimed at academics, teachers, and artists. It will range widely in its chronological and geographical scope, from the Bronze Age onwards, through Classical Antiquity, the Near East, Mesoamerica, and beyond. The concept of comics itself is similarly broadly interpreted, covering different traditions including (among others) the American graphic novel, the Franco-Belgian tradition, and Japanese manga, and comics as a medium through which to conduct as well as express academic research.  Free advance registration required https://drawingonthepast.wordpress.com/

09:00–17:00 Woburn Suite, G22/26 (Senate House)

Friday 14 Institute of English Studies One-day conference 09:30–18:30 Gordon Room, G34 (Senate House)

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The Book as Cure: Bibliotherapy and Literary Caregiving from the First World War to the Present Organised by the History of Books and Reading (HOBAR) research collaboration at The Open University. A one-day conference exploring the legacy of bibliotherapy from WW1 to the present. Led by three members of The Open University’s Department of English and Creative Writing, Siobhan Campbell, Sara Haslam, and Edmund King, this event will contribute to and shape understanding of the therapeutic importance of books across disciplines and help to generate further focused research in the Humanities and beyond. Free advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15638

School of Advanced Study


September

Events calendar September

Institute of Modern Languages Research

La Portraitomanie: Intermediality and the Portrait in NineteenthCentury France

One-day workshop

This one-day workshop assembles nine scholars from disciplines including art history, history, journalism and literature who are currently collaborating on a special journal issue of L’Esprit créateur on the topic of intermediality and portraiture in 19th-century France. The aim of the workshop is to illuminate through various disciplinary perspectives how the concept of the portrait is shaped by different media forms and styles, which continuously redefine notions of identity, celebrity, expressivity and resemblance in 19th-century French visual culture. Fee applicable advance registration required https://modernlanguages.sas. ac.uk/events/event/15549

10:00–16:00 Room 246 (Senate House)

Tuesday 18 Institute of Modern Languages Research Seminar 18:00–19:30 Gordon Room, G34 (Senate House)

Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation – Julya Rabinowich and Tess Lewis Julya Rabinowich is one of the most prominent writers living and working in Austria today. Her work responds to the European refugee experience, but also engages intensively with the Austrian cultural heritage of the fin de siècle and beyond. She writes weekly columns addressing current issues for the Austrian newspaper Der Standard. Tess Lewis has translated numerous books from the German and French, including Austrian authors Peter Handke, Alois Hotschnig, Doron Rabinovici, and Maja Haderlap’s Angel of Oblivion, for which she won the 2017 PEN Translation Prize. Works by Julya Rabinowich she has translated include her debut novel Spaltkopf [Splithead] for Portobello Books in 2011 and an excerpt from her 2012 novel Die Erdfresserin [The Earth Eater]. This event, part of the Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation Seminar Series, is sponsored by the Ingeborg Bachmann Centre for Austrian Literature and Culture at the IMLR. Free https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15594

Thursday 20 Institute of Latin American Studies

The Legal Cultures of the Subsoil Launch Event Free advance registration required https://ilas.sas.ac.uk/events/event/12723

Launch event 17:00–20:00 The Court Room (Senate House) Senate House Library Talk 18:00–20:30 Chancellor’s Hall (Senate House)

School of Advanced Study

Deeds Not Words: In Conversation with Helen Pankhurst Part of the ‘Rights for Women’ exhibition. Free advance registration required shl.whatson@london.ac.uk

Register for events online: www.sas.ac.uk/events

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Events calendar September Saturday 22 Institute of Historical Research

Suffrage Bloomsbury Walking Tour

Walking tour

Led by Matthew Ingleby (QMUL) Free advance registration required https://sas.ac.uk/events/event/15839

Please visit the website for time and venue details

Saturday 29 Institute of Classical Studies

Stoicon 2018

One-day conference

A variety of plenary speakers will be invited – a mixture of academics, popular authors, psychotherapists, and practitioners – who will address the topic of how Stoicism might inform people’s lives today from a range of angles. A number of smaller group workshops will be offered running in parallel in the afternoon, which will enable group discussions and practical exercises. Sponsored by the Institute of Classical Studies and the Institute of Philosophy. Further details at http://modernstoicism.com/save-the-date-stoicon-2018-inlondon/ Fee applicable advance registration required https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15825

09:00–18:00 Beveridge Hall (Senate House)

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A broad range of seminar series are organised in the School and Senate House Library. Many of our series are supported by and organised in collaboration with other institutions and organisations. All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise stated. Dates and times are given below where known and were correct at the time of going to print. These seminars are listed in the calendar where further details are known. Due to the nature of series events, these may be subject to change.

Institute of Classical Studies Contact: valerie.james@sas.ac.uk Ancient History Thursdays at 16:30–18:30 Dates: 10, 17, 24, 31 May; 7, 14 June

Ancient Philosophy Mondays at 16:30–18:30 Date: 14 May

Classical Archaeology Wednesdays at 17:00–19:00 Dates: 2, 9, 16, 23 May

Digital Classics Fridays at 16:30–18:30 Dates: 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 June; 6, 13, 20, 27 July

Mycenaean Wednesdays at 15.30–17.30

Seminar series

Seminar series Charles Peake Ulysses Seminar Fridays at 18:00–20:00 Dates: 4 May; 1 June

Comparative Modernisms Mondays at 16:00–18:00 Date: 25 June

Contemporary Innovative Poetry Research Wednesdays at 18:00–20:00 Date: 30 May

Early Modern Philosophy and the Scientific Imagination Seminar (EMPHASIS) Once a month on Saturdays at 14:00–16:00 Dates: 5 May; 2 June; 7 July

Ezra Pound Cantos Reading Group Second Wednesday of the month at 18:00–20:00 Dates: 9 May; 27 June

Finnegans Wake Research Seminar The last Friday of the month at 18:00–20:00 Dates: 25 May; 29 June

Hacking Moby-Dick Tuesdays at 18:00–20:00 Dates: 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 May; 5 June

Literary London Reading Group The second Tuesday of the month at 18:00–20:00

Date: 16 May

Date: 12 June

Postgraduate Work-in-Progress

London Old and Middle English Research Seminar (LOMERS)

Fridays at 16.30–18.30 Dates: 4, 11, 18, 25 May; 1, 8 June

Once a month on Wednesdays at 17:30–19:30 Date: 16 May

Institute of English Studies

Media History Seminar

Contact: ies@sas.ac.uk

18:00–20:00

London Beckett Seminar

Date: 4 May

Once a month on Fridays at 18:00–20:00

Modernism Seminar

Date: 11 May

Saturdays at 11:00–13:00

Book Collecting Seminar

Date: 12 May

Tuesdays at 18:00–20:00 Dates: 8 May; 10 July School of Advanced Study

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Seminar series

Seminar series Nineteenth Century Studies Seminar

History of Libraries

Fridays at 17:30–19:30

Once a month on Tuesdays at 17:30

Dates: 11 May; 8 June

Dates: 1 May; 5 June

London–Paris Romanticism Seminar

History of Liturgy

Once a month on Fridays at 17:30–19:30

Once a month on Mondays at 17:15

Date: 18 May

Dates: 21 May; 11 June

Institute of Historical Research

History of Political Ideas

Contact: ihr.reception@sas.ac.uk Archives and Society Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 17:45 Date: 8 May

British History in the Long Eighteenth Century Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 17:15 Dates: 9, 23 May; 6 June

British Maritime History Once a month on a Tuesday at 17:15 Dates: 22 May; 29 June

Comparative Histories of Asia Fortnightly on Thursdays at 12:30 Dates: 9, 23 May

Contemporary British History Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 17:00 Dates: 2, 16, 30 May; 13 June

Digital History Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 17:15 Date: 5 June

Education in the Long Eighteenth Century Once a month on a Saturday at 14:00–16:00 Dates: 19 May; 16 June

History of Education First Thursday of every month at 17:30 Dates: 3 May; 7 June

History of Gardens and Landscapes Fortnightly on Thursdays at 18:00 Dates: 10, 24 May; 7, 21 June

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Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 17:15 Dates: 2, 16, 30 May

History of Political Ideas / Early Career Seminar Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 17:15 Date: 9 May

History of Sexuality Seminar Once a month on Tuesdays at 17:15 Dates: 15 May; 12 June

International History Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 18:00 Dates: 8, 22 May; 5, 19 June

Jewish History Once a month on Mondays at 17:15 Dates: 21 May; 5 June

Life–Cycles Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 17:15 Dates: 8, 22 May; 5, 19 June

London Group of Historical Geographers Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 17:15 Dates: 1, 15, 29 May

London Society for Medieval Studies Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 19:00 Dates: 1, 15, 29 May

Low Countries History Fortnightly on Fridays at 17:15 Dates: 4, 18 May; 1 June

Media History Once a month on Thursdays at 18:00 Date: 4 May

School of Advanced Study


Modern British History

Studies of Home

Fortnightly on Thursdays at 17:15

First Wednesday of every month at 17:30

Dates: 10 May; 7 June

Dates: 2 May; 6 June

Modern French History

Voluntary Action History

Fortnightly on Mondays at 17:30

Fortnightly on Mondays at 17:30

Dates: 14 May

Dates: 25 June

Modern Religious History

War, Society and Culture

Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 17:15

Once a month on Wednesdays at 17:15

Dates: 16 May; 13 June

Dates: 13 June

North American History

Women's History

Fortnightly on Thursdays at 17:30

Fortnightly on Fridays at 17:15

Dates: 10, 24 May; 7 June

Dates: 8, 22 June

Oral History

Institute of Latin American Studies

First Thursday of every month at 18:00 Dates: 14 June

Parliaments, Politics and People Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 17:15 Dates: 1, 15, 29 May; 12 June

Psychoanalysis and History Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 17:30 Dates: 16, 30 May

Public History Seminar

Seminar series

Seminar series

Contact: ilas@sas.ac.uk Latin American Anthropology 17:30–19:30 Date: 10 May

London Andean Studies Wednesdays at 17:30–19:30 Dates: 2, 16 May

Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 17:30

Institute of Philosophy

Dates: 2, 23 May

Contact: philosophy@sas.ac.uk

Religious History of Britain 1500–1800

Logic, Epistemology and Metaphysics

Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 17:15

Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 17:30–19:30

Dates: 8, 22 May; 5, 19 June

Dates: 1, 15, 29 May

Rethinking Modern Europe

London Aesthetics Forum

Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 17:30

Fortnightly on Wednesdays at 16:00–18:00

Date: 13 June

Dates: 16, 30 May; 13, 27 June

Society for Court Studies

The Practical, the Political and the Ethical

Fortnightly on Mondays at 17:15

Fortnightly on Tuesdays at 17.30–19.30

Dates: 4 June; 17 Sept

Dates: 8, 22 May; 5, 15 June

Sport and Leisure History Fortnightly on Mondays at 17:15 Dates: 14 May; 11, 25 June

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Seminar series

Seminar series The Warburg Institute Contact: warburg@sas.ac.uk Director’s Seminar Occasional Thursdays at 17:30–19:30 Date: 17, Tues 29 May; 7, 28 June

From Devilry to Divinity: Readings in the Divina Commedia Mondays at 18:30–19:50 Dates: 14, 21 May; 4, 11, 18, 25 June

Maps and Society Occasional Thursdays at 17:30–19:30 Date: 17 May

Neoplatonic Studies Group Thursdays at 17:30–19:30 Dates: 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 May; 7 June

New Dialogues in Art History Occasional Wednesdays at 16.00–17.00 Date: 23 May; 27 Jun

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School of Advanced Study


The School of Advanced Study draws on its research and teaching expertise to provide a programme of discipline-specific, generic and online research training to support the development of the scholars of tomorrow. The School’s programme of personal development and transferable skills training is available in the form of weekly workshops commencing in the autumn. This general training is complemented by a set of research methodologies courses and specific training in the software and management information tools required to enable students to complete their research effectively.

Face-to-face training Making the most of the expertise available in the School and the University of London, the institutes between them also provide well-established discipline-specific research training in core humanities disciplines. Training in aspects of history, for instance, is extensive, notably in the Institute of Historical Research (IHR), which offers a comprehensive programme of short courses in research skills for historians. Taking advantage of the unparalleled availability of historical expertise in the University of London and the wealth of archival materials in and around the capital, the Institute’s long-established and highly successful courses are widely recognised as the best means of developing and extending both essential and more specialised research skills. The IHR training programme is primarily aimed at postgraduate historians, but also welcomes established historians and independent researchers and writers. Further historical skills courses run by the Warburg Institute include classes in medieval and Renaissance Latin for historians and a programme of training in resources and techniques (jointly with the University of Warwick), which provides specialist research training for doctoral students working on Renaissance and early modern subjects in a range of disciplines. The London Palaeography Summer School run by the Institute of English Studies provides training in that key skill. Extensive training for students of cultures and literatures is offered by the Institute of Modern Languages Research, whose well-established and popular programme, comprising a series of Saturday workshops, is offered to any postgraduate student working in modern languages or a related discipline (for instance, film or art history). Most of the School’s training is available to postgraduate students across the UK, much of it free of charge. Details of all the research training courses provided are available at our website: sas.ac.uk/supportresearch/research-training.

Online research training In addition to the face-to-face training we offer, the School’s Postgraduate Online Research Training (PORT) website provides free online resources including tutorials, handbooks and multimedia. PORT complements postgraduate study, providing training packages that can be accessed anywhere, at any time, and undertaken at any pace. It provides the building blocks for humanities research generally, as well as for particular humanities disciplines and specific topics. Designed to meet the needs of twenty-first-century researchers, PORT offers specific skills-based programmes as well as more general guidance. For further information, please visit port.sas.ac.uk. For a printed copy of our research training handbook or for further information, please contact us: E: sas.info@sas.ac.uk P: +44 (0)20 7862 8823

For further details on the training sessions listed here, or to register, please visit sas.ac.uk/research-training. 105

Research training

Research training


Research training

Research training School of Advanced Study Contact: kremena.velinova@sas.ac.uk SAS PhD Graduate Forum 14:00–16:00 | Room 234 (Senate House) Date: 16 May A regular, interdisciplinary seminar for PhD research students at the School of Advanced Study, to encourage student contact and academic debate. Presenters: Margaret May, MRes student (Institute of Modern Languages Research): Salt-crushers and Scraps of Silk: Unregarded Domestic Objects and the Invention of Identity in Works by Three German-Jewish Authors Jordon Houston, MPhil/PhD student (Institute of Classical Studies): Provincial Spectacle and Political Promotion: The Costs of Entertaining the Masses of Imperial Rome All SAS PhD students are strongly encouraged to attend. Free advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15708

Institute of Advanced Legal Studies Contact: ials.events@sas.ac.uk How to Get a PhD in Law: The PhD Journey: Researching, Disseminating, and Publishing in the Digital World 10:00–16:00 | IALS, Charles Clore House Date: 11 May The Institute of Advanced Legal Studies welcomes postgraduate research students from across the UK to this specially tailored day of presentations, library tours, and networking opportunities. Sessions will include: The PhD in Law in the Digital World (Judith Townend, Sussex) Legal Writing (Lisa Webley, Westminster) Disseminating your Legal Research (Nora NiLoideain, IALS) Getting your Research Published in Journals (Jane Winters, SAS) What Books are Law Publishers Looking to Publish? (Sinead Moloney, Publisher, Hart Publishing, Oxford) Publishing in Open Access Online Law Journals (Steven Whittle, IALS) Tips on Keeping Up-to-Date with your Topic after Completion (Laura Griffiths, IALS) An optional tour of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies Library led by senior library staff. Staff and students of SAS should contact belinda.crothers@sas.ac.uk to book a place. £100 | £75 advance registration required https://ials.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13844

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IALS PhD Masterclass: Careers – Academia, Legal Practice, NGOs 14:00–15:15 | IALS, Charles Clore House Date: 24 May Panel session. The IALS PhD Masterclass is an opportunity to discuss PhD research with colleagues, with expert input from senior academics experienced in PhD research. Free advance registration required ials.events@sas.ac.uk

Socio-Legal Sources and Methods in Social Welfare and Family Law 10:30–17:00 | IALS, Charles Clore House Date: 18 May Jointly organised by the British Library, the Socio-Legal Studies Association, and the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, this day is aimed at PhD/MPhil researchers, early career academics, and policy researchers. Sessions include: Sources and Methods in Family Justice (Anne Barlow, Exeter and Julie Doughty, Cardiff ) Socio-Legal Research with Vulnerable Subjects (Jaime Lindsey, Essex and Rosie Harding, Birmingham) Researching Social Justice in the Aftermath of Disaster (Ed Kirton-Darling, Helen Carr, and Laura Bates (all Kent) Family and Welfare Law: Researching the Social Context at the British Library and the Social Welfare Portal (Jonathan Sims and Ben Hadley, British Library) Sources of Social Welfare Law in the LSE Library (Maria Bell, LSE) £80 | £70 | £55 advance registration required https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15339

Summer School: Course in Legislative Drafting 2018 09:30–14:30 | IALS, Charles Clore House Date: 25 June – 22 July The aim of this course is to encourage modern drafting techniques with an emphasis on effective and user-friendly legislation, and to expose drafters to a variety of drafting styles, thus allowing participants to select elements that best suit their national laws and their own tradition, culture, and jurisprudence. The course is suitable for both experienced and inexperienced drafters. £5,350 (includes tuition, two textbooks and course materials) OR £6,900 (includes all the above plus a single room with shared facilities, buffet breakfast, and dinner from 25 June to 22 July inclusive at a University of London hall of residence Places on this course are by application only http://ials.sas. ac.uk/study/courses/legislative-drafting-course

School of Advanced Study


Research training

Research training Institute of Classical Studies

Institute of English Studies

Contact: valerie.james@sas.ac.uk

Contact: iesevents@sas.ac.uk

Digital Approaches to Ancient Text

London International Palaeography Summer School 2018

11:00–17:00 | Room 246 (Senate House) Date: 2 May

10:00–17:00 | Institute of English Studies (Senate House)

This one-day training event is targeted at research postgraduates, early career researchers, and interested colleagues in classics and related disciplines. The workshop will introduce participants to a range of digital approaches to ancient text, language and literature, including digitisation and correction, markup (such as EpiDoc), scholarly annotation, name extraction, linguistic encoding, querying, and publication. Hands-on practice of a few key methods will be offered. No previous digital experience is assumed, but participants will need to bring their own laptop, and install some software in advance.

Date: 11–15 June

Free advance registration required valerie.james@sas.ac.uk

Programming for Classicists 11:00–17:00 | Room 234 (Senate House)

The London International Palaeography Summer School is a series of intensive courses in palaeography and manuscript studies. Courses range from one-half to two days in length and are led by experts in their respective fields from a wide range of institutions. Subject areas include Latin, Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, Early Modern English, German, and Greek palaeography, as well as illumination, illuminated manuscripts, codicology, diplomatic, manuscript editing, and liturgical and devotional manuscripts. Fees start at £45/£50 for a half-day. See website for details advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/study-training/study-weeks/londoninternational-palaeography-summer-school

The London Rare Books School

Date: 30 May

12:00–17:00 | Institute of English Studies (Senate House)

This one-day training event is aimed at postgraduates, early career researchers, and interested colleagues in classics and related disciplines. The workshop will introduce the use of the Python programming language and regular expressions for processing text and data, with particular focus on classical languages and common cultural heritage data sets. This is a hands-on workshop. No previous digital experience is assumed, but participants will need to bring their own laptop, and install some (free) software in advance.

Date: 18 June – 6 July

Free advance registration required by 14 May valerie.james@sas.ac.uk

Summer School: Achaemenid Communications Week 10:00–16:00 | Room G21A (Senate House) Date: 21–25 May This study week is aimed at students, early career scholars, and university staff interested in the study of Achaemenid Persia, and the use of language in ancient empire.

The London Rare Books School (LRBS) is a series of three week-long intensive courses on a variety of book-related subjects taught in and around Senate House, and — for the first time — at the University of Reading. The courses cover a broad range of topics, from the book in the ancient world to modern scholarly editing practices. Courses are taught by internationally renowned scholars using the unrivalled library and museum resources of London. Timetabled ‘library time’ allows students to explore the rich resources of the University’s Senate House Library, one of the UK’s major research libraries. There is also an evening programme with an opening reception and talk, a book-related guided walking tour, and a reception hosted by a major London antiquarian bookseller. Fees from £520/£650. See website for details advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/study-training/study-weeks/londonrare-books-school

Each morning, Prods Oktor Skjaervø (Harvard) will give a three-hour lesson in Old Persian language and script, and each afternoon a workshop will be held considering the use of language in an area of the Achaemenid Empire, and more general concerns. Confirmed speakers include: Christopher Tuplin (Liverpool), Eleanor Robson (UCL), Lindsay Allen (KCL) and Jan Tavernier (UC Louvain). £100 | £20 advance registration required https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15828

For further details on the training sessions listed here, or to register, please visit sas.ac.uk/research-training. 107


Research training

Research training Selling Rights Short Course 10:00–17:00 | Room 243 (Senate House) Date: 4–5 June This course is aimed at staff handling rights for literary agencies and publishing houses and will cover the rationale for selling rights as well as the practicalities – checking control of the rights and maintaining an accurate database of submissions and sales, as well as key activities such as researching particular markets, identifying potential licensees and building personal contacts at book fairs and on sales trips. The sale of rights is crucial to the activities of literary agencies and publishing houses, and can be a major factor in building an author’s career and maintaining author loyalty. For publishers, the sale of rights can also have a major influence on the overall publishing decision and on their profitability. The course will address a range of different rights categories, from English language deals in the UK and abroad, translation rights, serial rights to newspapers and magazines as well as non-print rights such as radio and audio rights, film and television rights and merchandising. It will cover the rationale for coedition versus licence deals, and offer practical advice on how to achieve the best deal and finalise appropriate licence contracts. The final session will cover electronic publishing and will aim to distinguish between arrangements which are sales channels to market, and those which are true electronic licensing deals. Tutors have a wide range of experience in different sectors of the book industry: Juliet Pickering (Agent and Vice-Head of Books at Blake Friedmann Agency) Lynette Owen (Copyright and Rights Consultant, formerly Copyright Director at Pearson Education UK, General Editor of and contributor to Clark's Publishing Agreements Diane Spivey, (Contracts Director, Hachette Group UK, contributor to Clark's Publishing Agreements

eve of the 200th anniversary of her birth in 2019. Directed by the internationally celebrated scholar, critic and teacher Isobel Armstrong, the Study Week will bring together Eliot experts and postdoctoral and graduate students. The internationally renowned scholars leading discussions will be Ruth Abbott, Rosemary Ashton, Laurel Brake and Hilary Fraser. Dame Gillian Beer will deliver the 2018 Hilda Hulme lecture as part of the week. £300 advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/study-training/study-weeks/ nineteenth-century-study-week

T. S. Eliot International Summer School Institute of English Studies (Senate House) Date: 7–15 June The T.S. Eliot International Summer School welcomes everyone with an interest in the life and work of this Bloomsbury-based poet, dramatist, and man of letters. The Summer School brings together some of the most distinguished scholars of T.S. Eliot and modern literature. This year’s programme features an opening address by award-winning Irish novelist Colm Tóibín, a poetry reading by Dame Carol Ann Duffy, and lectures and seminars by John Xiros Cooper, Anthony Cuda, Frances Dickey, Mark Ford, Lyndall Gordon, John Haffenden, Dame Hermione Lee, William Marx, Seamus Perry, Jahan Ramazani, Ronald Schuchard, and Hannah Sullivan. Highlights include excursions to Burnt Norton and Little Gidding as well as walking tour of Eliot’s London. £600 advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/study-training/study-weeks/tseliot-international-summer-school

Institute of Historical Research Contact: ihr.training@sas.ac.uk

This course is being run conjointly by the Centre for Publishing at University College London and the Institute of English Studies in the School of Advanced Study. It is one of the first initiatives of the Bloomsbury Chapter, which is being developed by the two institutions to encourage cooperation in research and teaching.

Creating and Maintaining an Online Academic Profile (2)

£399 advance registration required https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/study-training/short-courses/ selling-rights-short-course

This workshop provides an overview and step-bystep guide to creating an online research profile using Wordpress. The workshop is designed for postgraduates with little or no knowledge of Wordpress, but it is also suitable for those with some knowledge who would like advice on writing blog posts and developing an online presence. Free advance registration required https://www.history.ac.uk/research-training/courses/ creating-and-maintaining-online-academic-profile

Summer School: Nineteenth Century Study Week 10:00–16:00 | Room 243 (Senate House) Date: 21–25 May This annual study week, which launches this year, will be dedicated to celebrating and understanding the great nineteenth-century writers who made Bloomsbury such an intellectual and artistic powerhouse. In 2018, the series will be launched with George Eliot, on the 108 

14:00–17:00 | IHR Research Training Room, N318 (Senate House) Date: 14 June

School of Advanced Study


Databases for Historians (3) 10:30–17:00 | IHR Research Training Room, N318 (Senate House) Dates: 7 August The aim of this course is to provide participants with an introduction to database techniques appropriate for historical research, with a focus on the concepts of good database design and the creation of high-quality historical data. The course is taught through a mixture of formal lectures and ‘hands-on’ practical classes that provide practical guidance on the use of commercially available database software packages. The module covers a broad range of skills and techniques, including data manipulation (searching, sorting, and editing records), modelling historical data for computer-based analysis, methods of data collection and data entry, and principles of coding. The remainder of the course considers the general presentation and publication of historical research findings in terms of the design and production of tables, charts, basic figures, and associated graphics. The module does not require any previous specialist knowledge of computing or training in mathematics, though a working familiarity with Microsoft Windows is necessary and it would be advantageous for participants to take the IHR’s free online course Designing Databases for Historical Research in advance of the start. The course is open to postgraduates, academics, and all who are interested in using databases to organise or analyse historical data.  Places are strictly limited and early application is strongly recommended. £265 SAS students receive a 50% discount on all IHR research training courses. Advance registration required ihr. training@sas.ac.uk.

Historical Research on the Internet (3) 10:30–17:00 | IHR Research Training Room, N318 (Senate House) Date: 4 June This intensive one-day workshop introduces the principal online resources available to historical researchers and shows how to make best use of them in pursuit of primary sources and secondary literature. The tools available online to the historical researcher are immensely diverse and constantly expanding. Internet resources have become an integral feature of many parts of the process of research for most historians: online bibliographies and library catalogues have made the gathering of secondary literature far easier, and the growing mass of digitised primary source material has not only greatly increased ease of access, but opened up the evidence to new and very powerful types of computer-assisted analysis. Topics covered will include: search techniques (Booleans, wildcards, and choosing search terms); search engines (making the best use of Google and non-specialist tools); reference tools; secondary sources (bibliographies, library catalogues, and accessing full text online); primary sources (locating traditional archival sources and digital/digitised sources); debate, discussion and publication online; and database deposition

and data archives. The course covers British, European, and world history from the Romans to the present, but with an emphasis on resources in English. Computers will be provided and there is no need to bring your own laptop. £100 SAS students receive a 50% discount on all IHR research training courses. Advance registration required http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/12611

History and LIS Professionals CPD Workshop 10:00–17:00 | IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02 (Senate House) Date: 27 June A one-day workshop and continuing professional development opportunity for librarians and information professionals in higher education. The workshop will explore the changing role of the history subject librarian within the context of a focus on functional roles and broad subject support. Bringing together historians and librarians, this workshop will share best practice and explore how history librarianship can be supported and innovation encouraged in this field. Travel bursaries are available on application. Fee applicable SAS students receive a 50% discount on all IHR research training courses. Advance registration required http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/15859

London History Day School 09:00–17:30 | IHR Wolfson Room, NB01 (Senate House) Date: 22 June The day school is open to all those keen to expand or update their skills in local history research. Presented in association with the Centre for Metropolitan History (CMH), the day school will feature tutors from the principal archives and research units concerned with London. The course shall cover the incredibly rich and abundant history of London and its surrounding area, exploring both its identity as a capital city but also the special qualities of its many constituent towns, villages and suburbs. Participants will have ample opportunities to discuss their own work with each other and with the experts; the aim is to provide a showcase for London local history and a forum for the exchange of ideas, views and approaches. £75 | £60 SAS students receive a 50% discount on all IHR research training courses. Advance registration required http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/12615

For further details on the training sessions listed here, or to register, please visit sas.ac.uk/research-training. 109

Research training

Research training


Research training

Research training Methods and Sources for Historical Research (4) 10:00–17:00 | IHR

Migrating Texts. Innovation and Technology in Subtitling, Translation and Adaptation

Date: 16 July

10:00–18:00 | Room 243 (Senate House)

Original research on primary sources lies at the heart of the historian’s enterprise, yet the techniques necessary to locate and obtain archival materials are rarely taught and can be hard to acquire. This course aims to equip historical researchers with the skills they will need to find and gain access to all the primary source materials they require for their projects. The course is primarily aimed at those engaged in research degrees in history or related disciplines, but is open to all researchers wishing to expand their skills and knowledge in original source materials. Over the course of a week (Monday–Friday), participants will learn, through an intensive programme of lectures and visits to repositories in and around London, how to combine online tools and traditional archival search techniques to locate and obtain evidence. Institutions visited will include the British Library, the National Archives, a number of other major national repositories, and a wide range of smaller and more specialised archives.  £265 SAS students receive a 50% discount on all IHR research training courses. Advance registration required ihr. training@sas.ac.uk.

Date: 4 May

Institute of Modern Languages Research Contact: kremena.velinova@sas.ac.uk Before, During and After the PhD 11:00–18:00 | Room 243 (Senate House) Date: 9 June Sessions will include: Overcoming the Fear of Writing (Jane Everson, RHUL/IMLR) The PhD Viva (Benedict Schofield, KCL) Applying for Academic Jobs, Writing a CV and the Job Interview (Benedict Schofield, KCL) Publishing in Modern Languages (Emily Morrell, SAS Publications) Careers for Modern Language Graduates: NGOs, Public Policy and Publishing (Lucila Granada, Policy Worker/ Campaigner Working in the Voluntary Sector, Emily Morrell, SAS Publications, Kathryn Phillips-Miles, Freelance Translator) Free advance registration required https:// modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14048

IMLR Graduate Forum Monthly on a Thursday at 18:00–19:30 | Room 243 (Senate House) Date: 10 May

Workshop Leaders: Carla Mereu (Bristol), Katie Brown (Bristol), and Kit Yee Wong (BBK) In the last decades, advances in digital communications and innovative technologies have deeply transformed the way texts are created and travel across material, linguistic, spatial and temporal boundaries. What tools were available to translation practitioners before the digital revolution? What can we learn from the transition from analogue to digital production? How has online software reformed translators’ access to work and their modus operandi? How has the job market adapted to the demand for a new profile of translator who is at the same time a language-cultural expert and tech-savvy? What new forms of adaptation are available today? Our workshops will consist of a morning session on subtitling and an afternoon session on translation and adaptation. Each session will feature short presentations from a mixture of academic and industry speakers, hands-on activities and Q&A time with participants. Free advance registration required katia.pizzi@sas.ac.uk

Researching Multilingually: Possibilities and Complexities 11:00–17:00 | Room 243 (Senate House) Date: 5 May Workshop Leader: Prue Holmes (Durham)  "Am I allowed to include literature in Turkish?" "What if I conduct my interviews in Mandarin but have to write my thesis in English?" "If I include data in Hindi, how will this affect my word count? How will the thesis be examined?" "Do I transcribe first, then translate, or the other way round?" If you encounter one or more of these questions in your research, then this workshop is for you! This workshop will draw on the experiences and reflections of researchers involved with AHRC-funded projects to explore the possibilities for and complexities of what is termed ‘researching multilingually’ — how researchers draw on their own linguistic resources, and those of others, when undertaking research involving more than one language. Workshop participants will be invited to explore and apply these insights to their own research projects. The workshop aims to support developing researcher awareness with regard to practices of researching multilingually and in this way, work towards a more clearly articulated ‘researching multilingually’ methodology. Free advance registration required katia.pizzi@sas.ac.uk

Free advance registration required https:// modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/13876 110 

School of Advanced Study


Institute of Philosophy

New Dialogues in Art History

Contact: ip@sas.ac.uk

Monthly during term-time on a Wednesday at 16:00–17:00 | Classroom 1, The Warburg Institute

15th Annual London / Berkeley Philosophy Graduate Conference

Date: 23 May; 27 June

10:00–18:00 | The Senate Room (Senate House) Dates: 16–17 May Free advance registration required https://philosophy.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14265

The Warburg Institute Contact: warburg@sas.ac.uk Arabic Philosophy Reading Class Mondays at 17:00–18:30 | The Warburg Institute Dates: 14, 21 May; 4, 11, 18, 25 June; 2 July Charles Burnett (Warburg) Basic reading knowledge of Arabic required. Please contact Charles Burnett before attending your first class. Free advance registration required charles.burnett@sas.ac.uk

Classical Greek Reading Class

A seminar group exclusively for postgraduate students, New Dialogues in Art History was established with the goal of fostering a stronger sense of community among art history PhD students who use the Warburg Library for their research. Run by Warburg research students, sessions take place in an informal atmosphere. There are two 20-minute papers per session with a further 20 minutes for questions and roundtable discussion. Sessions conclude with refreshments and further discussion. Research students are invited to present papers that focus on any art historical aspect, time period, or topic. In order to allow time for the selection process, applicants wishing to present at a specific session should submit their proposals a month in advance. As the group is ongoing, successful applicants may be offered a presentation date a few months in advance or be placed on a waitlist. Proposals may also be considered for a conference at the end of the academic year. Applicants are therefore asked to indicate their general availability when submitting a proposal. Research students enrolled at any institution are welcome to submit a proposal. Please send proposals (max. 250 words) and a short bio to: NewArtDialogues@gmail.com. Free advance registration required NewArtDialogues@gmail.com

Alternate Wednesdays at 12:00–13:30 | Room 308, The Warburg Institute

Renaissance Latin Course

Dates: 9, 23 May; 6, 20 June; 4 July

11:00–15:00 | The Warburg Institute

Charles Burnett (Warburg) Please contact Charles Burnett before attending your first class. Free advance registration required charles.burnett@sas.ac.uk

Date: 10–21 Sept

Esoteric Traditions and Occult Thought Reading Group Fridays at 13:00–14:15 | The Warburg Institute Dates: 11, 18, 25 May; 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 June; 6 July Charles Burnett (Warburg), Liana Saif (Oxford) This group reads texts in Arabic and Latin, spanning the early Islamic period to the Renaissance. Translations will be provided. Please email charles.burnett@sas.ac.uk for further details before joining the group. Free advance registration required charles.burnett@sas.ac.uk

The course is designed for beginners and focuses on Latin texts from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century, drawing on a wide range of sources: the sophisticated Latin of the humanists; various forms of technical Latin (medical, philosophical, theological, etc.); and macaronic jumbles of Latin and the vernacular. One of the principal aims of the course is to help students develop the ability to read primary sources in the original Latin. Students who wish to brush up their Latin are welcome to register, but they should be aware that the course content will be at beginner level. £225 | £180 for LAHP-funded students | free for Warburg students advance registration required http://www.sas. ac.uk/events/event/15640

For further details on the training sessions listed here, or to register, please visit sas.ac.uk/research-training. 111

Research training

Research training


Research training

Research training Resources and Techniques for the Study of Renaissance and Early Modern Culture 10:30–17:00 | The Warburg Institute Date: 14–17 May Co-directors: Raphaële Mouren (Warburg Institute) and Ingrid De Smet (Warwick) This programme provides specialist research training to doctoral students working on Renaissance and Early Modern subjects in a range of disciplines at universities across the UK and the rest of the world. The programme draws on the combined skills of the staff of the Warburg Institute and the University of Warwick, in electronic resources, archival sources, manuscripts, books, and images These are two of the major centres in Britain for the study of the Renaissance and the Early Modern period. £125 | £60 for Warburg or Warwick students advance registration required http://www.sas.ac.uk/events/ event/15511

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School of Advanced Study


The Book as Cure: Bibliotherapy and Literary Caregiving from the First World War to the Present 14 September 2018, School of Advanced Study, Senate House, London CFP deadline: 4 May 2018 This one-day event, part of the annual programme of the History of Books and Reading (HOBAR) research collaboration at The Open University, explores in the centenary year of the war’s end the legacy of wartime bibliotherapy. It brings together early career researchers and advanced scholars with practitioners, policy makers, charities, and representatives from the culture and heritage industries to foster an interdisciplinary dialogue about the curative power of reading during and after the war. How is that curative power understood now? How was it understood in 1914? How has it been managed since in the voluntary sector and in institutions? In what ways does the legacy of First World War bibliotherapy remain active in contemporary policy-making in the charity sector, and in work with veterans and settled refugees? Led by three members of The Open University’s Department of English and Creative Writing, this event will contribute to and shape understanding of the therapeutic importance of books across disciplines and help to generate further focused research in the Humanities and beyond. Proposals of 300 words for 20-minute papers by Friday, 4 May 2018 are welcomed from PhD students, ECRs, and established scholars working in the field. There will be a dedicated PhD/ECR panel during the day. Topics include the healing book; creative and expressive writing interventions; reading, writing, and trauma; author-based studies on literary caregiving of any type; hospital, prison, and asylum reading/libraries and mental health/wellness; curating generative archives; documenting resilience and identifying outcomes. Proposals and enquiries may be sent to the conference organisers: Siobhán Campbell (Siobhan.Campbell@open.ac.uk), Sara Haslam (Sara.Haslam@open.ac.uk), and Edmund King (Edmund.King@open.ac.uk). School of Advanced Study

Watching the Transnational Detectives: Showcasing Identity and Internationalism on British Television 8–9 November 2018 CFP deadline: 8 June 2018 Organised by the School of Histories, Languages and Cultures of the University of Hull with support from the Multilingualism: Empowering Individuals, Transforming Societies project (part of the AHRC’s Open World Research Initiative). A recent article in the Evening Standard posed the question, ‘Is it a coincidence that just as governments are seeking to close their borders, television is opening them?’ (15 March 2017). Indeed, in postBrexit Britain, television viewers have access to an ever-increasing number of foreign language programmes. And ‘with the boom in streaming services, a single TV drama can cross borders like never before. Yet still, telling local stories appears to be the secret to international appeal’. But what is the relationship between the local, national, and transnational that is presented on screen? And how do these dramas influence viewers’ perceptions of the countries, nationalities, and languages that are depicted on screen? This conference will address these questions by focusing on popular global crime dramas that are available with English sub-titles to British viewers. Although work has been done on the crime genre in literature and on film in different language contexts, there is little work available on the reception of these television programmes in a transnational context. The conference will therefore explore the way in which ideas of national identity and nationhood are interrogated through crime drama series when watched in Britain and thus outside of their original national context. The conference will address, but not be limited to, the following areas and contexts:

• •

 ulture, heritage, preservation, and promotion: C ways of screening the nation  alter Presents, BBC4, Sky: successful W broadcasting strategies 113

Calls for papers

Calls for papers


Calls for papers

Calls for papers • • • • •

 otions of cultural value and the place of the N middle-brow in national, international, and transnational TV contexts T he local in the national, the national in the transnational: crime drama as ‘a site where the construction of everyday life may be examined’  ultural identities: local, national, transnational, C and ‘other’ identities as represented in crime drama T ravelling ideas: which ideas and stereotypes of ‘the nation’ persist in and are reinforced in the viewer by such series? S elling the nation, consuming the nation: crime drama as cultural ambassador or promotional tool?

We invite proposals of up to 300 words on these and related topics, for papers of 20 minutes. Proposals should be sent to Angela Kimyongür (a.m.kimyongur@hull.ac.uk) by Friday, 1 June 2018.

History Day 2018 27 November 2018, Senate House, Malet Street, London CFP deadline: 8 June 2018 History Day is an annual one-day event bringing researchers together with information professionals from libraries, archives, and research organisations. In addition to an open fair of history collections, the day includes talks on research subjects, collections, and methodology. This year, the History Day team is inviting talks from librarians, archivists, museum, and other information professionals, taught and research students, academic staff, and private researchers. Possible topics include but are not limited to:

• • • •

 sing collections for research and other U projects  ow you recommend starting research and H identifying repositories  rojects aimed at helping researchers find and P use resources E xamples of collaboration between researchers and information professionals

Talks should be aimed at a general audience, and cover a broad rather than specialist subject. Papers covering multiple repositories are especially welcome. We invite abstracts of maximum 200 words for 15-minute individual or group presentations. Those interested in shorter talks can be matched with other speakers. These talks are part of History Day, and will be scheduled throughout the event. Abstracts should be sent to: historyday@london.ac.uk.

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School of Advanced Study


Postgraduate study in the humanities at the University of London

The School of Advanced Study at the University of London brings together nine internationally renowned research institutes to form the UK’s national centre for the support and promotion of research in the humanities. The School offers full- and part-time master’s and research degrees in its specialist areas, some of which are available via distance learning. LLM in Drafting Legislation, Regulation, and Policy LLM in International Corporate Governance, Financial Regulation and Economic Law LLM in Legal Translation MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture MA in Cultural and Intellectual History 1300–1650 MA in Garden and Landscape History MRes in Historical Research MA/MRes in The History of the Book MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights – Latin American Pathway MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies MRes in Latin American Studies MRes in Modern Languages A range of MPhil and PhD programmes in a range of humanities subjects, including art history, classics, Commonwealth studies, English language and literature, history, Latin American studies, law, and modern languages. Some of these can be completed via distance learning.

For further information: sas.registry@sas.ac.uk www.sas.ac.uk/graduate-study


How to find us

How to find us Unless otherwise stated, all events are held within the University of London precinct in Bloomsbury, central London. Most events take place in or around Senate House (south or north blocks) or Stewart House (room numbers are preceded with ST), which is adjacent to Senate House. The University of London takes its responsibility to visitors with special needs very seriously and will endeavour to make reasonable adjustments to facilities to accommodate such needs. If you have a particular requirement, please discuss it with the event organiser ahead of the event date. Senate House University of London Malet Street London WC1E 7HU Stewart House University of London 32 Russell Square London WC1B 5DN Charles Clore House Institute of Advanced Legal Studies 17 Russell Square London WC1B 5DR The Warburg Institute Woburn Square London WC1H 0AB

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School of Advanced Study


SAS Publications

Shaping the humanities research agenda

New Publications We Mark Your Memory: Writings from the Descendants of Indenture Edited by David Dabydeen, Maria del Pilar Kaladeen, and Tina K. Ramnarine April 2018 978-1-912250-07-3 £11.99 (pb) A dramatic new volume of writing on the forgotten history of indentured labour and labourers. With work from established and upcoming authors from around the world, this book combines short stories, poetry and non-fiction essays to commemorate indentured labour on the anniversary of its abolition.

Women and the Law Susan Atkins and Brenda Hoggett August 2018 978-1-909646-18-6 £25 (pb) £15 (eb) In this revised and updated edition of the classic reader ‘Women and the Law’ (originally released to critical acclaim in 1984), Susan Atkins and Brenda Hoggett examine the way in which the law treats women— at work, in the family and in matters of sexuality and fertility.

Brazil: Essays on History and Politics Leslie Bethell May 2018 978-1-908857-54-5 £25 (pb) This volume is the first collected compendium of the work of Professor Leslie Bethell and consists of seven essays on major themes in modern Brazilian history and politics: Brazil and Latin America; Britain and Brazil (1808–1914); The Paraguayan War (1864–70); The Decline and Fall of Slavery (1850–1888); The Long Road to Democracy; Populism; The Failure of the Left.

A Nicaraguan Exceptionalism? Debating the Legacy of the Sandinista Revolution Edited by Hilary Francis November 2018 978-1-908857-57-6 £25 (pb) An interdisciplinary work, this book brings together historians, anthropologists and sociologists to explore the multifarious ways in which Nicaragua’s revolutionary past continues to shape public policy and daily life in the country’s tumultuous present.

T: +44(0)20 7862 8753 | E: sas.publications@sas.ac.uk | Buy online at sas.ac.uk/publications Kindle and epub editions are available for selected books. Access free PDF downloads of books published by the Humanities Digital Library: humanities-digital-library.org


School of Advanced Study Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU United Kingdom

Senate House Library Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU United Kingdom

E: sas.info@sas.ac.uk T: +44 (0)20 7862 8833

E: senatehouselibrary@london.ac.uk T: +44 (0)20 7862 8500

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School of Advanced Study Events Brochure May-September 2018  

Hundreds of events highlighting the latest research across the humanities hosted by the School of Advanced Study

School of Advanced Study Events Brochure May-September 2018  

Hundreds of events highlighting the latest research across the humanities hosted by the School of Advanced Study

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