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PROSPECTUS

School of Advanced Study Registry University of London Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU Phone: +44 (0)20 7862 8662 or 8661 Fax: +44 (0)20 7862 8725 Email: sas.registry@sas.ac.uk

www.sas.ac.uk Postgraduate PROSPECTUS 2010 Entry


The School of Advanced Study is a unique institution in UK Higher Education, uniting 10 research institutes of international repute, seven of them with significant library resources, to create an outstanding multidisciplinary environment for advanced learning and research in the humanities and social sciences. This prospectus is designed to give an overall picture of the wealth and diversity of academic opportunities that the School offers to intending PhD students, together with the details of a range of different Master’s degrees that are currently on offer. We hope that you will find it interesting and useful, and above all that it may stimulate you to bring your talents to the School and to participate in the vital and exciting enterprise of pursuing and disseminating knowledge. Professor Sir Roderick Floud, Dean August 2009


CONTENTS MAP OF THE SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDY AND UNIVERSITY OF LONDON ABOUT THE SCHOOL INSTITUTES OF THE SCHOOL TAUGHT MASTER’S DEGREES Institute of Advanced Legal Studies LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies LLM in International Corporate Governance, Financial Regulation and Economic Law MA in Taxation (Law, Administration and Practice) Institute of Commonwealth Studies MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights Institute of English Studies MA in the History of the Book The London Rare Books School Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies MA in Cultural Memory MRes in Modern Languages: French, German, Hispanic and Italian Institute of Historical Research MA in Contemporary British History MA in Historical Research Institute for the Study of the Americas MA in Comparative American Studies MA in Latin American Studies MA in United States Studies MSc in Globalisation and Latin American Development MSc in Latin American Politics MSc in United States Foreign Policy MSc in United States Politics and Contemporary History MSc in Latin American Studies (Development) MA in Caribbean and Latin American Studies Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History 1300–1650 RESEARCH DEGREES MPhil/PhD areas of research Research projects A selection of current research student topics Research training LIBRARY COLLECTIONS INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS

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MAP OF THE SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDY AND UNIVERSITY OF LONDON


ABOUT THE SCHOOL The School of Advanced Study brings together the specialised scholarship and resources of 10 prestigious postgraduate research institutes in the University of London to offer academic opportunities, facilities and resources across and between a wide range of subject fields in the humanities and social sciences.

research skills programmes for postgraduate students in their own broad disciplines and in certain very specialist areas. The School also has a programme of general research skills training for its students, complemented by research methodologies courses for those in social science disciplines.

The School is the only institution in the UK that is nationally funded to promote and facilitate research in the humanities and social sciences. Its Institutes are dedicated to supporting the research of national and international academic communities in their respective disciplines. The Institutes undertake and publish academic research, offer an active programme of events, workshops and seminars, and provide research fellowships and resources for networking and research collaboration. They also contribute to the development of their own substantial library collections, which are unmatched anywhere in the world in relation to their specialist subject areas, and other library collections in the University of London.

The School’s central London location allows easy access to the academic, cultural, sporting and other facilities of the University and enables students to take advantage of the rich cultural amenities of London. The Institutes of the School gain greatly from the participation of visiting researchers and guest speakers working in government, diplomacy, business and development, the cultural and heritage industries, other universities and from regular visitors from around the world.

Postgraduate teaching and research training is an important component of the School’s work. The Institutes offer a range of taught Master’s programmes and doctoral supervision across their areas of expertise. Several Institutes have well-established

The Bloomsbury area, where the School is located, is often described as having the greatest concentration of books in the world, made up of the three million volumes of the University of London Research Library Services (which include a number of collections associated with the Institutes), other University of London libraries such as those at the London School of Economics, King’s College and University College London, as well as the collections of the British Library, the British Museum and a host of other specialist resources.

The School registers about 300 Master’s and research students each year, providing students with the opportunity to receive personal attention from leading academics. Over a third of the School’s students are from continental Europe and other overseas countries, contributing to a vibrant global community. As a small and specialised postgraduate institution, its students benefit from a friendly and supportive environment and the opportunity to participate and collaborate in the rich and diverse programme of events and research activities of the School. The School offers a range of online communities for students and researchers, including: • SAS Study Online – a virtual learning environment incorporating study resources, forums and chat rooms for teachers and students. • SAS-SPACE e-repository – a repository of electronic publications produced by the School, including theses and dissertations. SAS-SPACE is a stable, permanent archive for digital scholarly and research materials of enduring value produced at, or in association with, the School of Advanced Study. For more information about the School, please see the website: www.sas.ac.uk.

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INSTITUTES OF THE SCHOOL INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED LEGAL STUDIES The Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) was founded in 1947 as a national academic institution serving all universities through its national legal research library. Its function is to promote, facilitate and disseminate the results of advanced study and research in the discipline of law, for the benefit of persons and institutions in the UK and abroad. Its areas of speciality include arbitration and dispute settlement, company law, comparative law, economic crime, financial services law and legislative studies and law reform.

INSTITUTE OF CLASSICAL STUDIES The Institute of Classical Studies (IClS) is a national and international research centre for the study of the languages, literature, history, art, archaeology and philosophy of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Founded in 1953, it provides an internationally renowned research library available to scholars from universities throughout the world, in association with the Hellenic and Roman Societies. IClS also serves as the meeting place of the main Classics organisations in the UK.

INSTITUTE OF COMMONWEALTH STUDIES The Institute of Commonwealth Studies (ICwS) is the only postgraduate academic institution in the UK devoted to the study of the Commonwealth. Founded in 1949, its purpose is to promote interdisciplinary and inter-regional research on the Commonwealth and its member nations in the fields of history, politics and other social sciences. Its areas of specialism include international development, governance, human rights, north-south relations and conflict and security.

INSTITUTE OF ENGLISH STUDIES The Institute of English Studies (IES), founded in 1999, exists to facilitate advanced study and research in English studies within the University of London and in the wider academic community, national and international. Its Centre for Manuscript and Print Studies covers such fields of study as palaeography, history of printing, manuscript and print relations, history of publishing and the book trade, textual criticism and theory and the electronic book.

INSTITUTE OF GERMANIC & ROMANCE STUDIES The Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies (IGRS) was established in 2004 with the merger of the Institute of Germanic Studies and the Institute of Romance Studies, founded in 1950 and 1989 respectively. Its purpose is to promote and facilitate the study of the cultures of regions speaking the Germanic and Romance languages across a range of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields in the humanities.

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INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH Founded in 1921, the Institute of Historical Research (IHR) is an important resource and meeting place for researchers from all over the world. It provides a stimulating research environment supported by the IHR’s three research centres: the Centre for Local History; the Centre for Metropolitan History; and the Centre for Contemporary British History.

INSTITUTE OF MUSICAL RESEARCH Established in 2006, the Institute of Musical Research (IMR) was set up as a university-wide and national resource with a commitment to foster musical research in all its diversity. The IMR offers a unique meeting point for researchers and postgraduate students across the UK and acts as a hub for collaborative work on a national and international scale.

INSTITUTE OF PHILOSOPHY The Institute of Philosophy (IP) was founded in 2005, building upon and developing the work of the Philosophy Programme from 1995–2005. The Institute’s mission is to promote and support philosophy of the highest quality in all its forms, both inside and outside the University, and across the UK. Its activities divide into three kinds: events, fellowships and research facilitation.

INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF THE AMERICAS The Institute for the Study of the Americas (ISA) was founded in 2004 through the merger of the Institute of Latin American Studies and the Institute of United States Studies, both of which were established in 1965. ISA promotes, coordinates and provides a focus for research and postgraduate teaching in history and the social sciences on the Americas – Canada, the US, Latin America and the Caribbean – and plays a national and international role as a coordinating and information centre for all parts of the hemisphere at the postgraduate level in the universities of the UK.

WARBURG INSTITUTE The Warburg Institute (WI), incorporated in the University in 1944, exists principally to further the study of the classical tradition – those elements of European thought, literature, art and institutions which derive from the ancient world. The classical tradition is conceived as the theme which unifies the history of Western civilisation. The bias is not towards ‘classical’ values in art and literature: students and scholars will find represented all the strands that link medieval and modern civilisation with its origins in the ancient cultures of the Near East and the Mediterranean.

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Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

LLM IN ADVANCED LEGISLATIVE STUDIES

The LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies builds upon the existing resources and staff experience in postgraduate tuition in the field of legislative drafting at the Sir William Dale Centre for Legislative Studies at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. This LLM is a response to the frequent demand – from students as well as from foreign government departments – for a UK-based postgraduate taught programme in the field of legislative drafting in its broader sense.

Distance learning programme

Legislative drafting is often perceived as a technical skill, which one learns on the job. The view of the Sir William Dale Centre, as eloquently put by its founder and its staff in numerous publications, has always been that legislative drafting encompasses the theoretical analysis and practical application of the whole process of legislating. Legislative drafting has evolved to become the bedrock of political, economic and social transformation. It is still, however, relatively unexplored as an academic discipline. The LLM examines issues related to the legislative process, constitutional law, the methods of drafting in a modern democratic context, legislative ethics and law reform.

Teaching methods for the remainder of the course include extensive online materials per session, such as PowerPoint presentations, handouts and a number of academic sources for essential and further reading; online discussions with tutors and fellow students on the traditional LLM and the LLM via distance learning; private reading and independent research; individual tuition and support via email for

The LLM is divided into two pathways: the Common Law Direction and the EU Direction. Part-time students take two courses in the first year of study and one course or two EU modules and the dissertation in the second year of study.

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The LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies has been offered by the IALS with considerable success since 2004. Students will now have the opportunity to study this course in a more flexible manner, via distance learning. It is envisaged that the LLM will include a compulsory weeklong intensive residential course in London. This will give students a chance to meet the tutors and other students, and to start their studies with the maximum level of support.

coursework and dissertation, for which a dissertation supervisor is assigned. Careers The majority of students taking the LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies are legislative drafters, law professionals, government legal officers or consultants in the field of legislative drafting and legislative studies. Some are graduates of law, politics, government or other relevant disciplines who are interested in seeking employment in government, international institutions or international law and consultancy firms. In the past the LLM has been successfully used as a qualification for employment or promotion in government or the non-governmental sector. The vast majority of our graduates are currently employed either in government (local or central) as drafters/legal officers or as drafters in law firms.

Pathway

Courses and modules*

Term

Common Law Direction

Legislative Drafting

Full year

Comparative Legislative Studies

Full year

EU Legislative Studies

Full year

Legislating for EU Membership and Accession (Jean Monnet module)

Spring/ Autumn

Theories of European Integration (Jean Monnet module)

Autumn

Themes of Legislative Studies

Full year

EU Direction

Both pathways

Dissertation

*Please note that the Institute reserves the right to withdraw some elective modules in an academic year, if there are insufficient student numbers choosing these modules.


Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies Degree code: JTALS Structure: Three two-term courses plus a dissertation of 10,000–15,000 words or two two-term courses and two one-term modules plus a dissertation of 10,000–15,000 words. Mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Part-time students take two courses in the first year of study and one course or two modules and the dissertation in the second year of study. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,755; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,380; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,455. Distance learning fees: £4,000 p.a for Home/EU students and £7,500 p.a for Overseas students. Website: www.ials.sas.ac.uk/postgrad/courses/cls_MA.htm

MA IN TAXATION (LAW, ADMINISTRATION AND PRACTICE) The MA in Taxation (Law, Administration and Practice) is an advanced level programme in all aspects of taxation, including tax law, tax administration, tax policy and taxation in practice. It is aimed at those who have decided that they intend to devote a substantial part of their working careers to the field of taxation, whether as government officials, tax advisors or in-house tax specialists. Applications are particularly welcomed from those with several years of experience in the taxation field, whether in government or in the private sector. The degree is not focused solely on UK taxation, and applications are particularly welcomed from overseas candidates. The programme is not limited to tax law, and applicants are not required to have a prior law degree, nor a prior degree or professional qualification in accountancy or taxation. Just as tax in practice attracts bright individuals

from a diverse range of backgrounds, this programme is devised for those who come from a range of academic disciplines. The programme is designed to be completed over one year (fulltime) or two years (part-time). The programme is modular, and each candidate is required to complete 10 modules, most involving approximately 24 hours of classroom time. The teaching is designed to make the degree accessible to those who are working and studying part-time, with all the teaching being undertaken in the evenings, over weekends, or sometimes in ‘block weeks’. There are no core or required courses, and students may choose whatever courses are most appropriate to them from those on offer. The teaching is carried out by some full-time academics, but a large part of the teaching is done by part-time

academics who are also in practice. There are also guest lectures. Knowledge and understanding Students will acquire a detailed knowledge of those areas of taxation law, tax administration and tax practice which they choose to study. They will learn to look at tax problems in a more holistic fashion and apply a policy- and principlesoriented approach. They will also develop their research and writing skills. Students will acquire a sense of having joined an elite of taxation specialists from around the world, and a network of similar individuals whom they may encounter throughout their subsequent professional lives in a range of situations from handling clients jointly to negotiating double taxation conventions across the table from one another.

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Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

MA IN TAXATION (LAW, ADMINISTRATION AND PRACTICE) cont. MA in Taxation (Law, Administration and Practice) Degree code: JTTAX Mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Students must complete ten modules, each comprising approximately 24 hours of teaching time. There are no compulsory courses. Students may substitute a 10–15,000 word dissertation of original work in place of 3 taught modules. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £7,874, Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £3,937; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,721. Website: www.ials.sas.ac.uk/postgrad/courses/MA_tax_law.htm

Modules*

Term

Introduction to the UK tax system

Spring

UK corporate taxation

Spring

UK taxation of trading income

Autumn

UK taxation of corporate finance

Spring

Value added tax International taxation 1: basic principles

Autumn

International taxation 2: double taxation conventions

Spring

International taxation 3: international tax planning

Summer

International taxation 4: advanced tax treaties

Summer

European Community tax law 1: EC laws on all forms of taxation

Autumn

European Community tax law 2: direct tax case law of the ECJ

Spring

Comparative corporate taxation

Summer

The protection of taxpayers

Summer

The ethics of taxation

Spring/summer

Introduction to US international taxation Dissertation *Please note that the Institute reserves the right to withdraw some elective modules in an academic year, if there are insufficient student numbers choosing these modules.

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The legislative studies programme is an innovative course which caters for the lacuna in academic institutions around the world of not offering much-needed training in legislative studies. I am glad to have taken part in this programme and the experience I have gained will transform me into a better drafter. The course is professionally organised, from the material offered through to teaching methods applied, and I would recommend this LLM to all drafters, regardless of their experience and background. The training in structural thinking and writing is of benefit to all students wherever they may end up, whether in drafting, private law practice, the bench or academia.” Mookamedi Morwaagole (Botswana) LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies


Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

LLM IN INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, FINANCIAL REGULATION AND ECONOMIC LAW This new and innovative programme builds on the Institute’s research expertise in company law, corporate governance, international economic law, financial regulation and financial law. The programme is taught by leading academics from the University of London and other European universities. The courses on offer will analyse corporate governance, financial regulation and international economic and financial law from a European and comparative perspective. The main themes covered include the role of international economic organisations in globalised financial markets and the emerging legal and regulatory institutions that govern European financial markets. The European and American legal and regulatory regime will be an important area of focus, including the various institutional models of regulation such as the single regulatory approach of the UK Financial Services Authority. Core courses will focus mainly on an academic analysis of the relevant legal and regulatory concepts and principles. Optional courses offered by legal and regulatory practitioners will address the practical aspects of corporate governance, financial regulation and international financial transactions. The programme is designed for those with a background in law, economics, business and/or other social sciences and for mid-level professionals and academics who wish to develop a specialised understanding of corporate governance concepts and the role of financial regulation in today’s globalised financial markets. The IALS is uniquely qualified and situated to offer this academic law degree programme in London – the world’s leading international financial centre.

LLM in International Corporate Governance, Financial Regulation and Economic Law Degree code: JTICG Structure: Five term-long courses, consisting of two core courses and three electives, plus a dissertation of 10,000–15,000 words. Mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Students must complete five taught modules, including two core modules, and the dissertation. Part-time students are to take three modules in their first year and two modules and the dissertation in their second year. Part time students should take one core module each year. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,900; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,450; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,212. Website: www.ials.sas.ac.uk/postgrad/courses/LLM_ICGFR.htm

Core courses* International Corporate Governance and Transnational Corporations International Capital Markets Law and Securities Regulation Dissertation

Elective courses Bank Corporate Governance The Law of International Trade and Finance International Economic Law and Organisations Money Laundering and Financial Regulation International Commercial Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Extraterritorial US Financial Regulations UK Banking and Securities Regulation Comparative European Banking and Securities Regulation *Please note that the Institute reserves the right to withdraw some elective modules in an academic year, if there are insufficient student numbers choosing these modules.

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Institute of Commonwealth Studies

MA IN UNDERSTANDING AND SECURING HUMAN RIGHTS This degree is aimed at those who are already, or wish to become, human rights professionals or activists. In addition it is suitable for academics, journalists, public servants and employees of intergovernmental agencies. The degree is offered on a 12 month full-time or 24 month part-time basis. In contrast to many other such programmes which place an emphasis on law, this degree is multidisciplinary in character, drawing upon philosophy, history, sociology, anthropology, political science, international relations, cultural studies and development studies as well as law. Lecturers come from both the academic community and among human rights professionals. The degree: • Provides a unique multidisciplinary perspective for students seeking a theoretical understanding of and practical training in human rights. • Offers the opportunity to participate in a voluntary placement programme with human rights organisations. • Provides skills and strategic insight designed to further careers in human rights activism, international law, non-governmental organisations, governmental and intergovernmental sectors, and academia. • Encourages diversity of intake in terms of experience, qualifications and interests to stimulate the learning experience and environment.

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The Institute’s location in London means that the MA programme offers access to a wide range of organisations working in the field of human rights, many of which have a keen interest in the programme and regularly contribute to discussions. These include Amnesty International, Anti-Slavery International, Human Rights Watch, Article 19, INTERIGHTS, Penal Reform International, Minority Rights Group, Redress, Medical Foundation for the Care of Torture Victims, the British Refugee Council and the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative. In addition, we regularly invite journalists and documentary film makers with an interest in human rights to show their films and talk to students about their work. For the voluntary placement with a human rights organisation, students spend on average one working day per week, during the degree, with the relevant agency. Experience has demonstrated that such placements provide students with an advantage in finding good career opportunities on completion of the programme, and also help them gain a valuable perspective during the programme itself. In addition, students participate in an annual study tour to Geneva, meeting with representatives of international and UN bodies, as well as experts from international NGOs.

Curriculum The MA taught modules are interdisciplinary and practiceoriented. The MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights is comprised of Units 1, 2 and 3 which are split over two terms. The autumn term of each of these units is compulsory. Students then select four out of a possible five options in the spring term. As well as the second half of Units 1, 2 and 3, two new optional modules are offered, as well as the internship and the dissertation. The combination of compulsory and optional modules are set out in the table below. Careers Most students take the MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights with a view to becoming human rights activists. Some choose to go on to do further academic study. Former students have secured paid employment with organisations including ActionAid, Amnesty International, AntiSlavery International, International Committee of the Red Cross, Human Rights Watch, Minority Rights Group, Oxfam, Rights and Humanity and UNICEF. On several occasions employment opportunities have arisen as a result of the student placement programme. Many overseas students are seconded to do the degree and after completing the MA return to their jobs in government or the non-governmental sector.


Institute of Commonwealth Studies

MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights Degree code: MTCHR Structure: Three compulsory one-term modules in the autumn term, four out of five possible optional modules in the spring term, internship, and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. Mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. In the first year, part-time students must start in the autumn term with Unit 1, Module 1: Understanding Human Rights I, and Unit 3, Module 1: The Foundations of International Human Rights Law. In the spring term of the first year, parttime students can choose from the options in the table below, with the exception of Unit 2, Securing Human Rights Module 2. In the second year, part-time students must start in the autumn term with Unit 2, Securing Human Rights Module 1 – this is a prerequisite for taking Unit 2, module 2 in the spring term. Part-time students may choose whether to take two optional modules in the spring term of year 1 or 2. Part-time students may undertake more than one internship, e.g. in both years and/or during the summer between years 1 and 2. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,753; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,376; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,429. Website: www.commonwealth.sas.ac.uk/ma_human.htm

Module

Compulsory [C] or Optional [O]

Term

Unit 1: Understanding Human Rights I

C

Autumn

Unit 1: Understanding Human Rights II

O

Spring

Unit 2: Securing Human Rights I

C

Autumn

Unit 2: Securing Human Rights II

O

Spring

Unit 3: The Foundations of International Human Rights Law

C

Autumn

Unit 3: Topics in International Human Rights Law

O

Spring

Optional Module: The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America

O

Spring

Optional Module: Researching Human Rights: Social Research Methods

O

Spring

Human Rights Internship

C

Flexible

Dissertation

C

Summer

The MA in Human Rights at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies provides the perfect balance between theoretical and practical approaches. As a student of the School, I have benefited from access to invaluable academic resources, such as a wide range of bibliographic material, conferences and courses. Guest speakers attend our classes and share with us their experience of being practitioners or academics working on specific areas of human rights. The course also includes an internship scheme and a study visit to Geneva, aimed to help students develop a deeper understanding about the work of UN human rights bodies and international non-governmental organisations. This MA has complemented my practical experience with a solid theoretical foundation. It has broadened my perspective on the field of Human Rights and it has given me the tools and skills to improve my professional development and become a qualified public servant. It has been an enjoyable and rewarding professional and personal experience.” Helietta Gonzalez-Hernandez (Mexico) MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights

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Institute of English Studies

MA IN THE HISTORY OF THE BOOK The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. The University’s location in the centre of London and the unrivalled resources for all aspects of book history within easy reach, together with the expertise which exists in its many colleges and institutes, makes it an ideal place in which to carry out fundamental research of an interdisciplinary nature. The history of the book has been the focus of increasing scholarly attention over the past 20 years. The field has developed through a process of discovering in the book new potentialities for insights into a broad range of scholarly problems. Originally considering mainly physical aspects of the book and the details of its manufacture and trade, scholars have come to see the study of the book as an aid to understanding literary texts and, more recently, as a focus for insight into social, cultural and intellectual processes in history. The history of the book is thus a subject which encompasses the history of literate culture. Its focus includes not only books, but also newspapers, magazines, chapbooks and broadsides. Because the book did not begin with the invention of printing, the programme will also consider the manuscript book in all its forms from the pre-classical, classical and medieval periods.

The book is a material object. One way to study it, therefore, is to study its physical attributes. We can ask what form the book takes in different periods, and how that form developed over time. Because it is a manufactured object, we can also investigate the processes by which it is made. By considering conditions of manufacture, however, we are led not only into discussion of the book as physical object, but also the social, economic and cultural relations entailed in a book’s production. The book is a centre of a web of authors, suppliers, producers, distributors and consumers. It exists in a context of social factors, which inevitably influence its production and distribution. We could investigate a similar network for the production of virtually any other manufactured object, but the book is different from these objects because it also has intellectual content. The book is, therefore, itself an actor in society, although one whose effects are varied, depending on circumstances of production, commerce, tastes and politicoreligious regulations. Over the last 25 years the study of the history of the book has moved towards considering the dynamics of the interaction of the book and society, looking both at the effects society has had on the book, and at the way the book has influenced society.

MA in the History of the Book Degree code: NTEHB Structure: Five taught courses (the two-term core course and four of the optional one-term courses) plus a dissertation of 10,000–15,000 words. Mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months parttime. Part-time students will complete the core course and two optional courses in the first year, the third and fourth options being taken in the second year. It is assumed that during the first year work will have begun on the dissertation. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Fulltime Overseas Master’s students: £10,721. Website: http://ies.sas.ac.uk/ study/MAHOB

Courses Core course Research Methodology

Optional courses 2010–11 Digital Publishing (Autumn) The Medieval Book (Autumn) Textual Scholarship and Contemporary Editorial Theory (Spring) The Italian Book (Spring)

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Institute of English Studies

THE LONDON RARE BOOKS SCHOOL The London Rare Books School offers a range of individual, creditbearing, postgraduate courses in book history and related subjects. The courses are taught intensively in small groups of no more than 12 students. The courses run over five days and consist of 20 hours of contact time in the form of seminars taught by distinguished international scholars. Although based in the Senate House Library in Bloomsbury, we shall use other institutions such as the British Library, the British Museum and the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Taking the courses for credit Any LRBS student who wants to take a course for credit can do so by submitting a pass-quality 5,000 word essay within two months of taking the course (an additional fee will be payable). These credits (in the form of CATS or ECTS points) can then be taken away by the student and used at his or her home university or, alternatively, be accumulated within the London system. This will allow a student to build up credits towards a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma in the History of the Book.

Provisional list of courses for 2010 The Book in the Ancient World Bookbinding Decoration Children’s Books The Early Modern Book in England – Exploring the Evidence A History of Maps and Mapping An Introduction to Bibliography Mapping Land and Sea before 1800 The Medieval Book Modern First Editions Modern Literary Manuscripts The Printed Book in Europe 1450–2000 Type and Its Uses 1455–1830

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Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies

MA IN CULTURAL MEMORY This interdisciplinary programme explores the many different ways in which culture is based on the construction, manipulation and transmission of memories, and the role played by memory in collective and individual identity formation. Cultural Memory is a relatively recent area of inquiry and has been especially productive in relation to the study of local, minority and ethnic communities, resulting in important new work in the areas of postcolonial studies (for example, in Latin America, in Francophone and Lusophone Africa, and in Jewish Studies). It has also been central to examination of the recent resurgence of old, and rise of new, nationalisms, with important work on this subject being carried out throughout the various countries of Europe. The material studied ranges across film, literature, photography, art history, the performing arts, material culture, oral history, anthropology, psychoanalysis, sociology, etc. While the degree centres on the cultures of 19th- and 20th-century France, Spain, Italy, Portugal and Germany, other parts of the world where a Romance or Germanic language is spoken, and other cultures (e.g. the UK, the USA) are also regularly covered. All courses are taught by an unparalleled team of specialists from modern language departments and beyond, across the University of London and other UK universities. Careers This theoretically informed MA will be of interest to those working, or planning to work, in the heritage industry and in the culture industries in general; to those concerned with community and minority rights, and

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MA in Cultural Memory Degree code: GTRCM Structure: Three two-term taught courses: the core course (GT CUL) and the two specialist courses (GT PRI; GT PUB), plus a research project consisting of an oral presentation and a dissertation of 12,000 words (GT DIS). Students also attend a course on Research Skills and Methods. Mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. In the first year, part-time students take the core course, one specialist course and the course in Research Skills and Methods. They may also begin their Research Project in the summer term of the first year of study. In the second year, part-time students take a second specialist course and complete their Research Project. Competence in French, German, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese: Students are not required to have knowledge of any of these languages, but since study of cultures where these languages are spoken is at the core of the MA, students who do have relevant language skills are encouraged to read and cite from as much original material as possible, especially if they intend to go on to further research involving the respective culture. Native speakers of French, German, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese may write one essay per course and their dissertation in the relevant language of study. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £11,232. Website: www.igrs.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate/mamres-programmes/culturalmemory.html

Courses Core course:

Cultural Memory: Theories and Concepts

Specialist course 1:

Public Memories: Nation, Heritage, Local and Minority Communities

Specialist course 2:

Private Memories: the Self, Family, Gender, Ethnicity

Course in Research Skills and Methods Research Project (Dissertation)

with issues of multiculturalism; and to those interested in expanding their cultural knowledge through interdisciplinary, cross-cultural study. The programme equips students with written and oral communication and presentation skills, as well as developing their critical faculties at a high level. It thus provides a

preparation for professional life as well as a training for doctoral research. A high proportion of our MA students go on to doctoral research; others have proceeded to careers in teaching, journalism, counselling, community development, heritage education, museum and gallery administration and project management.


Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies

MRes IN MODERN LANGUAGES: FRENCH, GERMAN, HISPANIC AND ITALIAN The Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies has a strong comparative base in its constituent languages: French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. This MRes has been designed to maximise flexibility of choice and outcome, offering opportunities to those who would like specific training for postgraduate research in modern languages, aiming ultimately at a PhD, those who want to take a challenging end-stopped Master’s and/or those who have one, two or three modern foreign languages. This programme is intended mainly as a route into higher research in which research training is accompanied by two terms of guided essay writing (assessed by essay 1 and essay 2) in addition to the dissertation. The MRes combines a significant research component, which will enable students to demonstrate initiative and creativity, with elements designed to broaden their experience by equipping them with a range of transferable skills. Training, essays and dissertation are taught or supervised, as applicable, by a team of over 40 academics from universities in London and beyond. Their specialisms include postcolonial studies, gender studies, comparative literature, anthropology, art history, city studies, travel-writing, life-writing, philosophy and critical theory. This provides a uniquely rich source of expertise across the interdisciplinary field of modern languages. Teaching and supervising is normally in English, but the subject language may be used by agreement, and native speakers of French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish may write some of their assessments in the language.

MRes in Modern Languages: French, German, Hispanic and Italian Degree code: GTRES Structure: Two essays, one per each term, plus the Research Training Workshops and assignments and a dissertation of up to 40,000 words. Mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Part-time students will normally take the Research Training Workshops and the two essays in year 1, and the dissertation in year 2. Competence in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish: All applicants must demonstrate a high level of competence in written and spoken French and/or German and/or Italian and/or Portuguese and/or Spanish. The level of competence in the modern language will be tested at interview and/or by the submission of a recent uncorrected piece of written work. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £11,232. Website: www.igrs.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate/mamres-programmes/mres-inmodern-languages.html The degree also takes advantage of the rare opportunities for research training and seminar attendance offered by the Institute and the School, the excellent resources of Senate House Library in the field and the exceptional holdings in the 100,000-volume Germanic Studies collection, and the existence in IGRS of Research Centres for Exile Studies, Ingeborg Bachmann Centre for Austrian Literature, Contemporary Women’s Writing and Cultural Memory Studies. Degree structure Students choose two essay topics in advance, according to their specified field, and will be supervised by one or two specialists in this area. Term 1’s work will be more general, term 2 will be more focused, leading to the dissertation which will be the most focused. To give one example, if the chosen field of study is French, students may write essay 1 on ‘French Romanticism’ and essay 2 on ‘The Romantic novel of the 1830s’. Taking

these essays allows students to study one-to-one with an expert in their chosen topic, exactly as they will do for the dissertation, at a more preparatory level. Students have the opportunity, if they wish, to take one essay in one language area and the second essay in another. Alternatively, they may work on comparative topics for each, or indeed both. Students may develop an allied area in their dissertation and continue these studies to a PhD at the IGRS or elsewhere. Alongside essays, students will take the research training workshops run on Saturdays at the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies. The assessment of the Research Training will take the form of a draft bibliography and plan for the dissertation. The Saturday workshops are supplemented with workshops running through the year, on a range of topics from induction to the course, dissertation writing, library induction days.

www.sas.ac.uk

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Institute of Historical Research

MA IN CONTEMPORARY BRITISH HISTORY This degree provides training in and experience of historical analysis of issues of importance for the understanding of contemporary Britain. It focuses upon the study of British history over the past century, but assumes that British history must be understood in relation to other countries and regions, in particular the Empire/Commonwealth, Europe and North America. The programme defines history broadly to include economic, social, cultural, political and diplomatic history. It is designed to provide all students with a common core course which surveys the main features of, and issues in, this range of approaches to British history since c.1900. A second compulsory core course, History in Practice, enables students to discuss major themes in historiography and theory in relation to recent British history, to access and use sources, including documentary, visual and oral sources, and to apply a range of methods including use of IT and oral history.

A third strand allows students to choose a course through which they can specialise either in aspects of British history; Britain’s relationship with other countries (the Empire/ Commonwealth, Europe, the United States); comparisons or contrasts with other countries and regions; or specific themes and approaches to history, such as women’s history, cultural history or the history of the Cold War. Each of these strands is taught over 20 weeks between October and Easter of each year, alongside core courses. Students then undertake a period of independent research for a dissertation. Careers Students from this degree have gone on to PhDs, both at the IHR and elsewhere, and into teaching, publishing, the civil service and other work.

MA in Contemporary British History Degree code: RTCBH Structure: Three taught courses (two core courses and one course from among the optional choices) plus a dissertation of 15,000 words. Mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Part-time students will normally take the two core courses in year 1, and the optional course plus the dissertation in year 2. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £3,910; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £1,955; Fulltime Overseas Master’s students: £10,236. Website: www.icbh.ac.uk/icbh/ postgraduate/MAintroduction. html

Core courses Britain since 1900: Politics, Society, Economy, Culture, International Relations History in Practice

Option courses (not all courses will be available in all years) Political Parties,Voters and Political Culture in Britain since 1900 Ending the Empire: the British Experience in the 20th Century British State Welfare and the State of Welfare in Britain since 1900 Women, Gender and British Society since 1900 Interviewing for Contemporary Historians: a Practical Training Course The City of London 1850–2000 Britain and the Cold War National Museums and National Identity

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Institute of Historical Research

MA IN HISTORICAL RESEARCH This degree enables students to undertake assessed work and independent projects in the historical issues and controversies that interest them most. Students are introduced to key historical approaches, sources and methods and learn to apply them to their particular subject field. The course offers wide-ranging research training, and importance is placed on the use of architecture, material culture, archaeology and literature to aid historical research and understanding. Field trips and museum visits form a key part of the training programme. The degree can be undertaken in any historic area where Institute of Historical Research staff have supervisory competence.

MA in Historical Research Degree code: RTIHR Structure: Two core courses and an option course, plus a dissertation of 15,000 words. Mode of study: 12 months fulltime or 24 months part-time. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £3,910; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £1,955; Fulltime Overseas Master’s students: £10,236. Website: www.history.ac.uk/ degrees

When I arrived in London it was a challenge to adjust to life so far away from my family but my course and the opportunities I have gained by moving here have been well worth it! The Institute of Historical Research is a highcalibre centre for historical studies. It has allowed me to connect with academics, researchers and other students; connections that will be integral to my future goal to work in academia myself. They have also been very welcoming, something which makes the adjustment of any international student much easier! The academic community here is forward-thinking, cosmopolitan and has the ability to help you improve your skills in your chosen field. The task of moving far from home may seem daunting but don’t let it stop you. I took the leap and am extremely happy that I did!” Meghan Fitzpatrick (Canada) MA in Contemporary British History

Core courses Historical Training: Methods and Approaches to Historical Research History in Context: Cities, States and Localities in History Option module: The special project is an original extended assignment based around the individual student’s particular area of interest. It requires students to show that they can analyse primary source material in an effective and convincing way and place it in context to throw new light on a specific historical problem or controversy. The project may focus on a particular historical event or how a particular cultural activity (such as an exhibition, film or play) has interpreted such an event. Students will not be required to attend formal weekly classes but they will attend group discussions on the practical application of historical methods and at least four supervisory sessions.

www.sas.ac.uk

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Institute for the Study of the Americas

MA IN COMPARATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES What does it mean to be American? The aim of this interdisciplinary MA is to answer this question in its truest sense by exploring the Americas plural. Students will take on the study of a region united both in name and historical experience, yet also a region of enormous diversity – of power, language, culture, resources and political systems. The degree provides an opportunity to take courses on Latin America, the Caribbean and the United States, and to consider the transnational linkages that characterise the hemisphere. Students develop an understanding of the development of the western hemisphere in the modern era (1750–2000) founded on a multidisciplinary approach and from a comparative perspective. By the end of the programme they should be able to demonstrate a broad empirical knowledge of North America, the Caribbean and Latin America. They should possess an awareness of the general patterns of difference and similarity as well as of the theories that seek to explain those patterns. Students will simultaneously acquire a more specialised discipline-based knowledge of three distinct regions of the hemisphere. Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a topic within the field of comparative American studies. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

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Group A – United States courses

Course unit value

Term

Cold War US Foreign Policy

0.5

Autumn

Politics of US Foreign Policy

0.5

Autumn

The Rise of the Sunbelt since 1945

0.5

Autumn

American History on Film (University College London (UCL))

0.5

Autumn

Cinema and the Conduct of Conduct (UCL)

0.5

Autumn

Martin Luther King Jr & the Civil Rights Movement (Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL))

0.5

Autumn

US Presidents and the Presidency

0.5

Spring

Post-Cold War US Foreign Policy

0.5

Spring

US Economic Policy from the New Deal to Obama

0.5

Spring

NeoConservatism: Case Study in US Foreign Policy

0.5

Spring

Music of the Americas: Politics, Indigeneity & Performance (RHUL)

0.5

Spring

Violence in the American South (RHUL)

0.5

Spring

Hollywood Genres (UCL)

0.5

Spring

Poetry, Place and Perception (King’s College London)

0.5

Spring

Explaining America: Themes in the Historiography of the United States (UCL)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Group C – Caribbean courses

Course unit value

Term

The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution

0.5

Autumn

Imagining the Modern Caribbean (Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL))

0.5

Autumn

Social Anthropology of the Caribbean (Goldsmiths, University of London)

0.5

Autumn

Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean

0.5

Spring


Institute for the Study of the Americas

Group B – Latin American courses

Course unit value

Term

Indian and Peasant Politics in Latin America: Amazonia (Goldsmiths)

0.5

Autumn

The International Politics of Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

0.5

Autumn

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice

0.5

Autumn

The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution

0.5

Autumn

Text, Image and Texture: History and Archaeology in 16thCentury Mexico (UCL)

0.5

Autumn

Culture and Identity in Brazil Part 1: The Post-Colonial Nation, Slavery and the Indian (King’s) (P)

0.5

Autumn

Development in Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Brazil from Independence to the Present (King’s)

0.5

Autumn

Contemporary Issues in Latin American Economics

0.5

Spring

Democratisation in Latin America

0.5

Spring

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges of Democratisation

0.5

Spring

Music of the Americas: Politics, Indigeneity & Performance (RHUL)

0.5

Spring

Culture and Identity in Brazil Part 2: Contradictions of Modernity (P) (King’s)

0.5

Spring

Brazilian Populism, Culture and the State (King’s)

0.5

Spring

Ten Themes in Modern Latin American History

0.5

Spring

Society and Development in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Brazilian Popular Music Studies (King’s) (P)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Latin American Cultural Studies (King’s) (P)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

The Latin American Colonial Experience (King’s)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Latin American Development: From Liberalism to Neoliberalism (London School of Economics (LSE))

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Nationalism and National Identity in 20th-Century Latin America (UCL)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

MA in Comparative American Studies Degree code: FTCAS Structure: This programme offers courses in the disciplines of anthropology, cultural studies and literature, economics, geography and environmental issues, history, politics and international relations and sociology. Students select a total of six one-term courses (or equivalent) from a group of Latin American, US and Caribbean courses, with at least one course unit from each group. For this MA, courses may be selected from almost the entire range available, to a total of three course units plus a dissertation. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Part-time students will take four term-long courses (or equivalent) in year 1, and the remaining two term-long (or equivalent) optional courses and the dissertation in year 2. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Fulltime Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas. ac.uk/postgraduate_study

Options that require a high level of competence in Portuguese are marked (P).

www.sas.ac.uk

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Institute for the Study of the Americas

MA IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES The MA in Latin American Studies is a long established multi-disciplinary degree on which students from different academic backgrounds have the opportunity to study a wide range of topics in anthropology, economics, environment, history, politics, culture and literature, and sociology of Latin America. The degree brings together the academic expertise of staff of the Institute for the Study of the Americas with that of Latin American specialists from six colleges of the University of London. The programme aims to provide a comprehensive range of specialist courses in the humanities and social sciences, attracting students from a wide range of backgrounds. Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a topic related to at least one of their courses. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

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MA in Latin American Studies Degree code: FTLAS Structure: Students select six one-term courses (or equivalent) from at least two disciplines. One course will be a major area of specialisation which will determine the area in which the dissertation is written. This range of options is the widest available to students wishing to study Latin America at postgraduate level in the United Kingdom. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months parttime. Part-time students will normally take the equivalent of four one-term courses in year 1, and the remaining two one-term courses (or equivalent) and the dissertation in year 2. Language competence in Spanish or Portuguese: Students must have at least a basic reading competence in Spanish or Portuguese prior to enrolment on the Master’s programme. This is a pre-requisite for registration. In order to be awarded the degree, however, students must have an acceptable level of language competence, at A-level standard or equivalent. This can be demonstrated by a test administered by the Institute, either at the commencement of the degree or at completion. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study

Courses

Course unit value

Term

Indian and Peasant Politics in Latin America: Amazonia (Goldsmiths)

0.5

Autumn

The International Politics of Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

0.5

Autumn

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice

0.5

Autumn

The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution

0.5

Autumn

Imagining the Modern Caribbean (QMUL)

0.5

Autumn

Text, Image and Texture: History and Archaeology in 16thCentury Mexico (UCL)

0.5

Autumn

Culture and Identity in Brazil Part 1: The Post-Colonial Nation, Slavery and the Indian (King’s) (P)

0.5

Autumn


Institute for the Study of the Americas

Courses (cont.)

Course unit value

Term

Social Anthropology of the Caribbean (Goldsmiths)

0.5

Autumn

Development in Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Brazil from Independence to the Present (King’s)

0.5

Autumn

Contemporary Issues in Latin American Economics

0.5

Spring

Democratisation in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean

0.5

Spring

Music of the Americas: Politics, Indigeneity & Performance (RHUL)

0.5

Spring

Culture and Identity in Brazil Part 2: Contradictions of Modernity (King’s) (P)

0.5

Spring

Brazilian Populism, Culture and the State (King’s)

0.5

Spring

Ten Themes in Modern Latin American History

0.5

Spring

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges of Democratisation

0.5

Spring

Society and Development in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Brazilian Popular Music Studies (King’s) (P)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Latin American Cultural Studies (King’s) (P)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

The Latin American Colonial Experience (King’s)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Latin American Development: From Liberalism to Neoliberalism (LSE)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Nationalism and National Identity in 20th-Century Latin America (UCL)

My choice to study Latin America at the Institute was based on it being the most internationally recognised institution in the UK specialising in my field of interest. The Institute’s multidisciplinary approach to Latin America means that students are not confined to studying the region through a single discipline. The degree programmes are wide-ranging and we are always encouraged to delve into a broad selection of literature, allowing us to engage with a number of research methodologies. One factor that convinced me that ISA would be the most stimulating environment in which to study Latin America was that while other university programmes only focus on Latin American arts and culture, at ISA there is also a strong emphasis on and concern for policy analysis, social welfare and rights.Yet what makes the Institute most different from other institutions is the closeknit community which is afforded by a small institution, and the key role it plays in promoting discussion on Latin America through its unrivalled programme of public lectures, which attracts prominent speakers and academics from across Europe and the Americas.” Victor Sande-Aneiros (UK) MA in Latin American Studies

Options that require a high level of competence in Portuguese are marked (P).

www.sas.ac.uk

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Institute for the Study of the Americas

MA IN UNITED STATES STUDIES The MA United States Studies is a multi-disciplinary degree programme and the longest-established of its kind in Europe. Students choose a total of three course units from a range of specialist courses in US history, culture, politics and foreign policy and write a dissertation on a research topic of their choice linked to the subject area of one of their taught courses. The degree brings together the academic expertise of staff of the Institute for the Study of the Americas with that of United States specialists from colleges of the University of London. The programme aims to provide a comprehensive range of specialist courses in the humanities and social sciences, attracting students from a wide range of backgrounds. Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a topic related to one of their courses. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

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MA in United States Studies Degree code: FTUSS Structure: Students choose six one-term courses (or equivalent), one of them as their major area of specialisation which will usually determine the area in which they write their dissertation. This range of options is one of the widest available to students wishing to study the United States at postgraduate level in the United Kingdom. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Part-time students will normally take four one-term courses (or equivalent) in year 1, and the remaining two one-term courses (or equivalent) and the dissertation in year 2. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study

Courses

Course unit value

Term

Cold War US Foreign Policy

0.5

Autumn

Politics of US Foreign Policy

0.5

Autumn

The Rise of the Sunbelt since 1945

0.5

Autumn

American History on Film (UCL)

0.5

Autumn

Cinema and the Conduct of Conduct (UCL)

0.5

Autumn

Martin Luther King Jr & the Civil Rights Movement (RHUL)

0.5

Autumn

US Presidents and the Presidency

0.5

Spring

Post-Cold War US Foreign Policy

0.5

Spring

US Economic Policy from the New Deal to Obama

0.5

Spring

NeoConservatism: Case Study in US Foreign Policy

0.5

Spring

Music of the Americas: Politics, Indigeneity & Performance (RHUL)

0.5

Spring

Violence in the American South (RHUL)

0.5

Spring

Hollywood Genres (UCL)

0.5

Spring

Poetry, Place and Perception (King’s)

0.5

Spring

Explaining America: Themes in the Historiography of the United States (UCL)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring


Institute for the Study of the Americas

MSc IN GLOBALISATION AND LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT This degree examines the theoretical issues raised by globalisation and the variant ways in which different Latin American societies have reacted to it. It also explores the degree to which contemporary indices of globalisation are continuous with earlier forms of Latin America’s global incorporation. The degree takes as its central concern the ways in which Latin American development is bound up with global processes. Alongside the development of techniques, skills and knowledge relevant to the interests and research needs of individual students, the programme aim to equip students for both independent research and analysis in primary and secondary material, and writing at an advanced level. It will also foster students’ intellectual development and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional and personal development.

MSc in Globalisation and Latin American Development Degree code: FTGLD Structure: All students take a compulsory core course in Globalisation and Latin American Development: Latin America in the 21st Century and choose a further four one-term courses (or equivalent) from a selection in the disciplines of Anthropology, Economics, Environment, History, Politics and Sociology. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Part-time students will normally take the core course and the equivalent of two one-term optional courses in year 1, and the remaining two one-term (or equivalent) optional courses and the dissertation in year 2. Competence in Spanish or Portuguese language: Students must have at least a basic reading competence in Spanish or Portuguese prior to enrolment on the Master’s programme. This is a pre-requisite for registration. In order to be awarded the degree, however, students must have an acceptable level of language competence, at A-level standard or equivalent. This can be demonstrated by a test administered by the Institute, either at the commencement of the degree or at completion. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study Course listings overleaf

Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a topic related to globalisation or development in Latin America. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

www.sas.ac.uk

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Institute for the Study of the Americas

MSc IN GLOBALISATION AND LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT cont. Compulsory course Globalisation and Latin American Development: Latin America in the 21st Century

Optional courses

Course unit value 1.0

Course unit value

Term Autumn/ Spring

Term

Indian and Peasant Politics in Latin America: Amazonia (Goldsmiths)

0.5

Autumn

The International Politics of Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

0.5

Autumn

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice

0.5

Autumn

The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution

0.5

Autumn

Development in Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Contemporary Issues in Latin American Economics

0.5

Spring

Democratisation in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean

0.5

Spring

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges of Democratisation

0.5

Spring

Society and Development in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Latin American Development: From Liberalism to Neoliberalism (LSE)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Careers Many graduates of the Institute have gone on to earn PhDs and work in nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), the charity sector (such as Amnesty International), government (including the Foreign and Commonwealth Office), the media, higher education, museums and libraries, teaching and business (for example, doing country analyst work). Alumni profiles can be found at www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study/alumni-list.htm.

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I chose the Institute for the Study of the Americas to pursue a Master’s because of the Institute’s great reputation and its high level of expertise in the Latin American region. I first came to the Institute to attend a conference regarding the re-election of Lula in Brazil. I thought it was absolutely remarkable; this conference had a great intellectual and emotional effect on me. I found that I was surrounded by a large group of individuals who shared the same interests and passions with regards to Latin America; this provided me with a strong sense of belonging to a community. Believing that it is very important for me, as a student, to be in an environment where there is an air of real enthusiasm, my motivation to pursue my studies increased. I was delighted when I found out about the MSc in Globalisation and Latin American Development; I finally felt that I had found the course for which I was searching. The events organised by the Institute enable lecturers and students to share opinions, to network or simply to socialise. I have also really enjoyed the opportunity to carry out fieldwork for my dissertation and spent five weeks in Maranhão, north-east Brazil, conducting research on biofuel and poverty. It was a fascinating and rewarding experience.” Johanna Kolerski-Bezerra (France) MSc Globalisation and Latin American Development


Institute for the Study of the Americas

MSc IN LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS This degree provides students with an opportunity to develop their general and specialist knowledge of major issues in the politics of Latin America. Students engage with a range of theoretical approaches, and they can take options in the fields of comparative politics, political sociology and international politics. Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a topic relating to Latin American politics. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

Course unit value

Compulsory course The International Politics of Latin America Democratisation in Latin America

0.5

Autumn

0.5

Spring

Course unit value

Optional courses

Term

Term

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice

0.5

Autumn

The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution

0.5

Autumn

Development in Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean

0.5

Spring

Contemporary Issues in Latin American Economics

0.5

Spring

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges of Democratisation

0.5

Spring

Society and Development in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Latin American Development: From Liberalism to Neoliberalism (LSE)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Nationalism and National Identity in 20th-Century Latin America (UCL)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

MSc in Latin American Politics Degree code: FTLPO Structure: The MSc in Latin American Politics consists of six term-long courses (or the equivalent), two of which are compulsory courses: The International Politics of Latin America and Democratisation in Latin America. Students then choose a further four one-term courses (or equivalent) from a selection in the disciplines of politics and sociology. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Part-time students will normally take compulsory course and two one-term optional courses in year 1, and the remaining two one-term (or equivalent) optional courses and the dissertation in year 2. Language competence in Spanish or Portuguese: Students must have at least a basic reading competence in Spanish or Portuguese prior to enrolment on the Master’s programme. This is a pre-requisite for registration. In order to be awarded the degree, however, students must have an acceptable level of language competence, at A-level standard or equivalent. This can be demonstrated by a test administered by the Institute, either at the commencement of the degree or at completion. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study

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Institute for the Study of the Americas

MSc IN UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY This degree provides students with an opportunity to develop specialist knowledge of major issues and theoretical approaches in the study of United States foreign policy. Students examine the main traditions of American political science, international relations and historiography, as well as substantive issues of US foreign policy – the domestic context and policymaking process of foreign policy. The degree aims to enhance students’ understanding of the policymaking processes, ideas, aims and objectives of US foreign policy in the period since 1945, with a particular focus on the post-Cold War era. By the end of the programme, they should be able to relate US foreign policy to the paradigms of international relations, understand the input of the executive and legislative branches and the various agencies of the executive branch, the relative significance of idealism and self-interest in US foreign policy, and assess America’s goals and how far it has achieved them in the international arena since 1945. The programme will also provide students with a multidisciplinary perspective that encompasses area studies, politics and international relations. Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a research topic relating to US foreign policy. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

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MSc in United States Foreign Policy Degree code: FTUFP Structure: Students choose six one-term courses, four of which are compulsory. Students are required to take the following required core courses: Research Methods, Politics of US Foreign Policy, Post-Cold War US Foreign Policy and NeoConservatism: Case Study in US Foreign Policy. In addition, students take two one-term optional courses that allow them to further their knowledge in selected areas of US foreign policy. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months parttime. Part-time students will normally take the core courses in year 1, and the two one-term optional courses and the dissertation in year 2. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study

Compulsory courses

Course unit value

Term

Research Methods

0.5

Autumn

Politics of US Foreign Policy

0.5

Autumn

Post-Cold War US Foreign Policy

0.5

Spring

0.5

Spring

NeoConservatism: Case Study in US Foreign Policy

Optional courses

Course unit value

Term

Cold War US Foreign Policy

0.5

Autumn

US Presidents and the Presidency

0.5

Spring

US Economic Policy from the New Deal to Obama

0.5

Spring


Institute for the Study of the Americas

MSc IN UNITED STATES POLITICS AND CONTEMPORARY HISTORY This degree offers students the opportunity for in-depth study in US politics, foreign policy/international relations, and contemporary history. It is ideally suited for students wishing to have a specialist focus to their study of the United States. The degree also provides training in the methods and concepts of research in US politics, foreign policy, and contemporary history, so it is an ideal preparation for students planning or contemplating progressing to PhD study in these areas. Students engage with a range of theoretical approaches, and can take options in the fields of US politics, foreign policy, and contemporary history. The required core course in Research Methods introduces students to the conceptual and practical tools needed to undertake research in US politics, foreign policy and contemporary history. It examines the main traditions of American political science, international relations, and historiography to illustrate how these disciplines have addressed the fundamental academic questions of what and how to study. In addition, students select specialist courses from the politics and history options listed. Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a topic within the field of the courses taken. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

MSc in United States Politics and Contemporary History Degree code: FTUPH Structure: Students take a total of six term-long course units from the wide-ranging portfolio of options, including a compulsory course in Research Methods. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months parttime. Part-time students will normally take the core course and three optional one-term courses in year 1, and the remaining two optional courses and the dissertation in year 2. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study

Course unit value

Compulsory courses

Term

Research Methods

0.5

Autumn

Cold War US Foreign Policy

0.5

Autumn

Politics of US Foreign Policy

0.5

Autumn

The Rise of the Sunbelt since 1945

0.5

Autumn

Martin Luther King Jr & the Civil Rights Movement (RHUL)

0.5

Autumn

US Presidents and the Presidency

0.5

Spring

Post-Cold War US Foreign Policy

0.5

Spring

US Economic Policy from the New Deal to Obama

0.5

Spring

NeoConservatism: Case Study in US Foreign Policy

0.5

Spring

Violence in the American South (RHUL)

0.5

Spring

Explaining America: Themes in the Historiography of the United States (UCL)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

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Institute for the Study of the Americas

MSc IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES (DEVELOPMENT) This new MSc allows students to specialise in development issues. The core course – Development in Latin America – provides a historical review of Latin American development and introduces students to the theories and concepts that inform contemporary debates and development policy. In addition, students choose specialist courses from a selection of the economics, human rights, politics and sociology options. The programme aims to develop an understanding of the history, theory and evolution of economic development and social change in Latin America in the 20th century, founded on a multidisciplinary approach and from a comparative perspective. By the end of the programme students should be able to demonstrate a broad empirical knowledge of Latin American development from the perspective of at least two disciplines. They should possess an awareness of the general patterns of difference and similarity across the region as well as of the principal theories that seek to explain those patterns. Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a topic relating to Latin American development. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

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MSc in Latin American Studies (Development) Degree code: FTLAD Structure: Students take the compulsory core course Development in Latin America and choose five one-term specialist courses (or equivalent) from a selection of the Economics, Human Rights, Politics and Sociology options. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months parttime. Part-time students will normally take the core course and three optional courses in year 1, and the remaining two optional courses and the dissertation in year 2. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study

Compulsory course Development in Latin America

Optional courses

Course value 0.5

Course value

Term Autumn

Term

Indian and Peasant Politics in Latin America: Amazonia (Goldsmiths)

0.5

Autumn

The International Politics of Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

0.5

Autumn

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice

0.5

Autumn

The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution

0.5

Autumn

Contemporary Issues in Latin American Economics

0.5

Spring

Democratisation in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Society and Development in Latin America

0.5

Spring

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges of Democratisation

0.5

Spring

Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean

0.5

Spring

The Latin American Colonial Experience (King’s)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring

Latin American Development: From Liberalism to Neoliberalism (LSE)

1.0

Autumn/ Spring


Institute for the Study of the Americas

MA IN CARIBBEAN AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES What do the tiny island states of the Caribbean have in common with Latin American giants such as Argentina or Brazil? How do we explain the existence of English, French and Dutch-speaking nations on the South and Central American mainland? Is Cuba Latin American or Caribbean? This interdisciplinary and comparative degree broadens the lens on the region to encompass the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the islands of the Caribbean archipelago. The degree offers a unique opportunity to study differences and commonalities in the histories, politics, economies and cultures of the different linguistic territories of the region, contributing to a broader understanding of issues affecting the region as a whole: colonialism and imperialism; race and ethnicity; economic and social development; the environment; globalisation; migration; cultural diversity; and the local and global currents shaping the region today. The compulsory core courses provide a sound interdisciplinary foundation in the modern Caribbean. Students then choose from a wide range of courses on Latin America and the Caribbean from a variety of disciplines, including political science, history, sociology, literature and economics. The aim of the degree is for students to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and

the Caribbean archipelago from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. All too often ‘Latin America’ and ‘the Caribbean’ are studied in isolation. This degree encourages students to take a more holistic approach to the region, broadening their understanding to encompass not only the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking territories but also the Anglophone, Francophone and Dutch territories of the mainland and islands. By the end of the programme they should be able to demonstrate a broad empirical knowledge of this region from the perspective of at least two disciplines. They should possess an awareness of the general patterns of differences and commonalities in the histories, politics, economies and cultures of

the different linguistic territories of the region, contributing to a broader understanding of issues that affect the region as a whole. They will also be introduced to the principal theories that seek to explain those patterns. Dissertation Students write a dissertation of 12,000 words on a topic that will focus principally on (a) the Caribbean or (b) Latin America and the Caribbean. Group dissertation planning sessions are held during the academic year, followed by individual tutorials with dissertation supervisors. A number of fieldwork grants are offered to enable students to carry out fieldwork for the dissertation.

MSc in Caribbean and Latin American Studies Degree code: FTCALA Structure: Students take a total of six one-term course units (or equivalent), two of which are compulsory: The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution and Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean. The wide range of course options is made possible by the concentration of academic expertise on the region in the Colleges of the University of London as well as in the Institute for the Study of the Americas. Duration and mode of study: 12 months full-time or 24 months parttime. Part-time students will normally take the core course and three optional courses in year 1, and the remaining two optional courses and the dissertation in year 2. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £4,000; Part-time Home and EU Master’s students: £2,000; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,894. Website: www.americas.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate_study Course listings overleaf

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Institute for the Study of the Americas

MA IN CARIBBEAN AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES cont. Compulsory course

Course unit value

Term

The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution

0.5

Autumn

Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean

0.5

Spring

Optional courses

Course unit value

Term

Indian and Peasant Politics in Latin America: Amazonia (Goldsmiths)

0.5

Autumn

The International Politics of Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

0.5

Autumn

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice

0.5

Autumn

Imagining the Modern Caribbean (QMUL)

0.5

Autumn

Text, Image and Texture: History and Archaeology in 16th-Century Mexico (UCL)

0.5

Autumn

Culture and Identity in Brazil Part 1: The Post-Colonial Nation, Slavery and the Indian (King’s) (P)

0.5

Autumn

Development in Latin America

0.5

Autumn

Brazil from Independence to the Present (King’s)

0.5

Autumn

Social Anthropology of the Caribbean (Goldsmiths)

0.5

Autumn

Contemporary Issues in Latin American Economics

0.5

Spring

Democratisation in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Music of the Americas: Politics, Indigeneity & Performance (RHUL)

0.5

Spring

Culture and Identity in Brazil Part 2: Contradictions of Modernity (P) (King’s)

0.5

Spring

Brazilian Populism, Culture and the State (King’s)

0.5

Spring

Ten Themes in Modern Latin American History

0.5

Spring

The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges of Democratisation

0.5

Spring

Society and Development in Latin America

0.5

Spring

Brazilian Popular Music Studies (King’s) (P)

1.0

Autumn/Spring

Latin American Cultural Studies (King’s) (P)

1.0

Autumn/Spring

The Latin American Colonial Experience (King’s)

1.0

Autumn/Spring

Latin American Development: From Liberalism to Neo-liberalism (LSE)

1.0

Autumn/Spring

Nationalism and National Identity in 20th-Century Latin America (UCL)

1.0

Autumn/Spring

Options that require a high level of competence in Portuguese are marked (P).

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Warburg Institute

MA IN CULTURAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY 1300–1650 This 12-month, full-time degree is intended as an introduction to the principal elements of the classical tradition and to inter-disciplinary research in cultural and intellectual history from the late middle ages to the early modern period. Although it is a qualification in its own right, the MA is also designed to provide training for further research at doctoral level. All students take four core courses and two options and write a dissertation as well as two essays. In addition, there is a regular series of classes throughout the three terms on Techniques of Scholarship. Subjects dealt with include description of manuscripts; palaeography; printing in the 15th and 16th centuries; editing a text; preparation of dissertations and photographic images. Some of these classes are held outside the Institute in locations such as the British Library or the Wellcome Library. Students are given the opportunity to examine early printed books and manuscripts. Reading classes in Latin, Italian and French are provided and are intended to help acquire the necessary familiarity with those languages as written in the late middle ages and the Renaissance. Students are also encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include Maps and Society and the History of Scholarship from the Renaissance Onwards.

MA in Cultural and Intellectual History 1300–1650 Degree code: WTWCI Structure: Six one-term taught courses (four core courses and two from among the optional choices) plus a dissertation of 10,000–15,000 words and two essays of 3,000–5,000 words. Mode of study: 12 months full-time. Other language requirements: A reading knowledge of Latin and of one European modern language other than English is required. An understanding of Italian is particularly useful. Fees (2009–10, subject to uplift in 2010–11): Full-time Home and EU Master’s students: £3,995; Full-time Overseas Master’s students: £10,721. Website: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/graduate_studies/grad.htm

Courses The core courses are spread over two terms and deal with: Humanism

Neo-Latin literature, letters, antiquarianism, rhetoric and various aspects of classical scholarship

Italian History

Aspects of late medieval and/or Renaissance social and political history

Iconography

Mythological painting, allegorical figures, historical subjects, altarpieces

Philosophy

The influence of classical philosophy in the Renaissance, studied through commentaries, dialogues and letters, as well as popular works

The optional courses may vary from year to year. Recently offered topics include: Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation Art and Devotion in the Renaissance Renaissance Material Culture Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance The Imagination and its Intellectual Contexts in the 16th and 17th Centuries Music and the Arts and Sciences in the Renaissance

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RESEARCH DEGREES MPhil/PhD AREAS OF RESEARCH The broad areas of doctoral research that are available to students are listed below. Research interests of academic staff in the School can be found at www.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate.html.

INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED LEGAL STUDIES Access to justice

International economic law (IMF & WTO)

Arbitration and alternative dispute resolution

Law and EU reform

Banking and financial law and regulation

Law enforcement

Company and commercial law

Legal education

Comparative law

Legal practice

Discrimination

Legal profession

Economic crime

Legal services

EU criminal law

Legal skills

European integration

The legislative environment

European law

Legislative studies and legislative drafting

Human rights

Taxation

INSTITUTE OF COMMONWEALTH STUDIES Human rights

Globalisation, security and conflict

The foreign and defence policies of Commonwealth countries

The Commonwealth as an international organisation

Politics, governance and development of sub-Saharan Africa

British imperial history, including decolonisation

Transitional justice and access to justice

European colonialism in comparative perspective

The politics, governance and development of South Asia

Postcolonial legacies in the Commonwealth and beyond

Ethnicity: conflict and accommodation in plural societies

Non-governmental public actors, civil society and development

The Mediterranean and the colonial powers

Local government and decentralisation

Twentieth-century British and Commonwealth history

British and Commonwealth intelligence communities

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INSTITUTE OF ENGLISH STUDIES Late 19th and early 20th-century literature

The history of artificial lighting

The literature of the Irish Revival

Anglo-American modernism

The history of the book

Anglo-Irish literature of the 20th century

Business and quantitative book history

Romanticism

The history of authorship and author-publisher relations

James Joyce

The history of individual publishing houses

Modern manuscript studies and genetic criticism

The history of literary agency from the 1880s

Reading notes and marginalia

The history of book and newspaper distribution and selling

Textual criticism

The history of libraries

Reception history

The history of readers and reading

Literary history

INSTITUTE OF GERMANIC & ROMANCE STUDIES French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese studies Literature Cultural studies Comparative and interdisciplinary studies The city (especially Berlin, Barcelona or Trieste)

Women’s writing

The virtual or imagined city

Jewish writing

Borders

Exile writing

The body

Children’s literature

Psychoanalysis

Feminism

German philosophy and history of ideas

Trauma studies

The Futurist avant-garde

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RESEARCH DEGREES MPhil/PhD AREAS OF RESEARCH cont. INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH Urban and metropolitan (especially London) history, including comparative approaches across Europe and elsewhere

History of British politics, political parties, radical politics and trade unionism since 1867

Local and regional history, primarily concerning England and including the impact of towns

Film, media and popular culture

Social, economic and political history of Britain, 1300–1500

Towns in the earlier middle ages

Victorian culture

Aspects of the social and economic history of Britain since the late 19th century, including social and economic policy, women’s and gender history, financial and business history

The experience and impact of empire

Royal and diplomacy since 1900

The history of parliamentary representation in the UK

INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF THE AMERICAS History, politics, foreign policy or sociology of the United States

History, politics, economics or sociology of Latin America

Cultural history of the Caribbean

Comparative Americas in history, politics, economics or sociology

WARBURG INSTITUTE Medieval to early modern art, history, philosophy and science Humanism and history of scholarship

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Arabic and Islamic influences in Europe


RESEARCH PROJECTS Institutes of the School host a number of significant research projects. Recent projects include: INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED LEGAL STUDIES Databases and their role in the prevention of transnational crime Concepts of Professional Competence

INSTITUTE OF COMMONWEALTH STUDIES South-North non-governmental networks, policy, processes and policy outcomes Marine fisheries management and coastal zone communities in the Commonwealth

INSTITUTE OF ENGLISH STUDIES The complete works of John Ford The TS Eliot Editorial Project

INSTITUTE OF GERMANIC & ROMANCE STUDIES Psychoanalysis and the arts and humanities: a multilingual perspective

INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH Early English Laws British History Online

INSTITUTE OF MUSICAL RESEARCH Francophone music criticism, 1789–1914 PRIMO: Practice-as-Research in Music Online

INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF THE AMERICAS The Historical Roots of Social Exclusion in Latin America and the Caribbean Days of Infamy: How the United States Responds to Attack, from the Maine to the Twin Towers

WARBURG INSTITUTE Islam and Tibet: cultural interactions (8th–17th centuries) The correspondence of Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540–1609)

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A SELECTION OF CURRENT RESEARCH STUDENT TOPICS The role of democracy assistance in US foreign policy Migration and identity constructions in an imperial metropolis: the representation of Jewish heritage in London between 1887 and 1956 Money laundering within the framework of the modern globalisation of financial institutions Sixteenth-century Hebrew typography: the Le Bé type specimens in the Bibliothèque Nationale Re-thinking non-judicial human rights protection: the example of the council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights The British and French advertising industries, 1945–65: a comparative study with particular reference to the development of the J. Walter Thompson Company The Senate Foreign Relations Committee and American foreign policy towards Iraq Time use in the city of Buenos Aires: measuring, analysing and valuing unpaid care work Information technology in India’s policy making Globalisation and agriculture in Cuba and Costa Rica The generation of ’68 and the politics of remembrance Impact of Islamic law on the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: the plight of sexually abused children Light and shadow in Dutch paintings of the 17th century and their terminology in contemporary theories about art Repurchase of own shares by a company: are the creditors and the minority shareholders adequately protected Argentine and Chilean diasporas in Britain: How memory of the dictatorships affects identity The role of the company promoter in the London capital market, 1877–1914 The Italian reception of Pliny the Elder’s Account of Ancient Architecture, c.1430–1550 Discussions of textual criticism of the Latin Bible from the 12th to the 15th century The dynamics of forced female migration from Czechoslovakia to Britain, 1938–50 Rights-based approach to health systems: an examination of national antiretroviral delivery in South Africa and India Dancing on the Volcano: Tempo and the end of the Weimar Republic 1928–33 Space, memory and the engagement of everyday practices in Paris: a study of Walter Benjamin’s Passagen-werk The framework of new governance: legal aspects of banking supervision in China during an era of change From substitutes to team members: how women became part of the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force Understanding Cuban economic policy and performance since 1990: a contribution to the theory of economic ‘transition’ English women and their private libraries in the 18th century

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RESEARCH TRAINING The School has a varied and challenging research training programme offered centrally through the School and individually through its Institutes. School programmes The year starts with an intensive induction programme for all new research students. This is followed by a full School programme of generic skills workshops, offering training in such areas as: • Project organisation and management • Applying for research funding • Working in archives • Ethics in research • Surveys and questionnaires • Conducting interviews • Getting research published • Giving a seminar or conference paper • Organising a conference • The PhD viva • Teaching skills for the PhD student • Career development Generic skills training is also available via the Bloomsbury Postgraduate Skills Network, making it easier for our students and those of other Bloomsbury institutions to schedule training at a time convenient for them. Specifically for our social science postgraduates, the School’s Research Methodologies programme provides an introduction to various qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. By the end of the programme, students will have an understanding of different theoretical approaches and of the principles and practice of research design; be aware of multidisciplinary perspectives; be able to interpret and evaluate qualitative and quantitative research, and understand the philosophical and

ethical issues involved in conducting and interpreting research. This firm grounding in social science research principles is then completed by Institute subject-specific methodologies training. Online research training The School also offers online research training: PORT – Postgraduate Online Research Training http://port.igrs.sas.ac.uk This website, run by the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, provides a useful training reference point for all postgraduates, especially those in modern languages, offering as it does extensive research skills tutorials (ranging from topics such as note-taking, to the PhD viva, to applying for jobs in the USA), supplemented by video clips. It also offers a portal to resources in Czech, French, German, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. Library Research Skills Tutorial www.ull.ac.uk/news/lrst.shtml This is the University of London Research Library Services’ online tutorial in the skills needed to conduct postgraduate library-based research in the humanities and social sciences. It includes four modules: Planning Library Research, Using Libraries, Using Resources, and Referencing and Bibliography. Institute research training Several Institutes run subject-specific research training programmes designed especially for the students in their disciplines. In the fertile interdisciplinary environment of the School, the topics and the approach may also be appropriate for students in other disciplines, and Institutes are usually happy to welcome any student in the School.

The Institute of English Studies’ Methods and Resources course comprises two Saturday study days, covering such basics as an introduction to the Senate House Library and the British Library, the use of databases, the basics of research writing and the use of an appropriate style sheet, and the relationship between the MA and PhD. In addition, a six-day course, Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age, run jointly with the Warburg Institute, King’s College London and the University of Cambridge, offers an intensive training in the analysis, description and editing of medieval manuscripts. The Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies has a wellestablished and extensive programme of Saturday workshops which run throughout the year. These are aimed primarily at modern language postgraduates, but students in other disciplines will find specific elements very useful. The varied programme comprises sessions on writing and revising your drafts; choosing, defining and structuring a research project; using specialist libraries and archives (including film); EndNote, database and bibliography building for beginners; theoretical applications; visual culture; working on painting, photography and exhibitions; working across disciplines; organising a conference; writing and submitting a journal article; giving a conference paper; the PhD viva; applying for an academic job; writing a CV; job interviews, and time and stress management.

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The Institute of Historical Research offers a comprehensive programme of short training courses in research skills for historians. Taking advantage of both the unparalleled concentration of historical expertise available in the University of London, and the wealth of archival materials in and around the capital, the Institute’s long-established and highly successful courses are widely recognised as the best means of developing and extending both essential and more specialised research skills. The IHR training programme is primarily aimed at postgraduate historians, but also welcomes established historians and independent researchers and writers of all sorts. Course fees have been set at a level to render the programme affordable to all students. Courses include: • Historical archives • Information technology • Languages • Historical skills Specialist training for historians working in certain areas is offered through the Warburg Institute’s courses, which focus on the training needs of historians of cultural and intellectual history: • Resources and techniques for the study of Renaissance and early modern culture • Techniques of scholarship • Languages (Latin, Renaissance French and Renaissance Italian reading courses) • Palaeography (specifically Renaissance Italian and Latin palaeography)

The Institute of Musical Research coordinates training on behalf of the music research community, taking some of the following sessions out to the regions. Its programme, like all the Institutes’, is responsive to the needs of students, and covers a diverse field effectively. Sessions include the practicalities of PhD study (ethics; planning; funding; viva to publication); music as social phenomenon (social history; social psychology; ethnography); scores (analysis in context and practice; digital and non-digital editing; palaeography); music; narrative; image (film semiotics; intertextuality; readings of images and literature); composers and performers (practice as research; collaborative research; new notations); witnesses (oral history; data through discussion; reception history); sounds (performance studies; analysis of recordings; popular music in performance). The Institute also runs two six-day courses on German reading for musicologists. The Institute of Advanced Legal Studies runs courses open to all law postgraduates on legal research skills and methods (theories of research, reviewing the literature, defining the question, research design, project management); electronic legal research; socio-legal and nonlegal empirical research methods (interviewing; third-party observation, focus groups; grounded theory; policy analysis; survey research; quantitative and qualitative data analysis); legal doctrinal research; and bibliographical and resource skills. Further details on research training are available at www.sas.ac.uk/ researchtraining.html, or contact Rosemary Lambeth (rosemary.lambeth@sas.ac.uk) for more information.

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I chose to enrol on a PhD at the Institute for the Study of the Americas after completing my MA at the Institute. My decision to further my studies was due to both my interest in the field of 19th-century American history and my experiences during my Master’s. The Institute has allowed me to further my interest in the career of President Ulysses S. Grant and the support and direction of the teaching faculty and my supervisor has been invaluable. The Institute provides a wealth of study skill sessions and the support you receive from your supervisor is excellent. I feel that the Institute for the Study of the Americas is an ideal place for research students as the expertise and quality practises that they employ fosters a high standard of study and creates an environment of academic excellence.” Richard Dotor (UK) PhD topic:The southern policy of Ulysses S. Grant 1865–77


LIBRARY COLLECTIONS The libraries and collections of the member Institutes of the School of Advanced Study provide a range of material unmatched anywhere in the world in relation to their specialist subject areas. These resources are further supported by the collections of the Senate House Library, one of the largest humanities and social sciences libraries in the UK. Together, these library collections confirm the School’s invaluable role in supporting the nation’s research and advanced study in the humanities and social sciences. School collections and the Senate House Library together form the University of London Research Library Services: www.ulrls.lon.ac.uk The Institute of Advanced Legal Studies Library has rich collections of legal research materials from all jurisdictions of the United Kingdom, the European Union and countries of Europe, the USA, the countries of the Commonwealth and South America, and of public and private international law, comparative law and jurisprudence. It includes material in western European languages from jurisdictions throughout the world. Institute of Classical Studies Library, including the Joint Library of the Societies for the Promotion of Hellenic and Roman Studies. Classics collection, Senate House Library, with materials on classical philology, Greek language and literature, history of Greek literature by period, Latin language and literature, and the history of Latin literature. There are also related collections on classical art, architecture and sculpture, ancient history and archaeology, catalogues of Greek and Latin manuscripts and facsimiles of some manuscripts, and classical philosophy. The Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library, which covers the fields of history, politics and international relations, as well as agriculture, the environment and social questions. English collection, Senate House Library, covering the medieval period (c.450–1500), the early modern period (c.1500–1700), the 19th to mid 20th century, postcolonial literatures in English, critical theory and comparative literature. The Palaeography and Manuscript collection, Senate House Library, includes original manuscript and archival materials and an extensive bibliography for palaeography and manuscripts. The Germanic Studies collection, Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, covers German, Austrian and Swiss-German language and literature from their respective beginnings to the present day, with particular emphasis on primary texts, journals and reference works. There are significant holdings on 18th-century drama, exile, Expressionism, the George-Kreis, Swiss and East German literature, and substantial manuscript and archive collections. The Romance collection, Senate House Library, also has separate locations for French, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish holdings. Institute of Historical Research Library, a comprehensive collection of the chief printed primary sources for the medieval and modern history of the British Isles and western Europe, their colonial expansion, the subsequent history of North and South America, and international relations and war. History collection, Senate House Library, with a focus on British and European history, early modern studies,Victorian studies, 18th-century studies and contemporary British history. Music collection, Senate House Library, primarily covering the music of Europe and the Americas (North and South) from earliest times to the present, with smaller sections on the music of Africa and Asia, ethnomusicology, popular music and various forms of dance. The scores collection is especially strong in collected editions and historical sets in addition to the substantial holdings of individual loanable works. The collection as a whole is also noted for its strong foreign language component, particularly French, German, Italian and Spanish.

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Philosophy collection, Senate House Library, covering ancient philosophy to the 21st century, works of philosophers in English and European languages, critical texts, and works on themes such as metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of mind, ethics and logic. The collection is especially strong in modern western philosophy, particularly works by and about individual philosophers – British, American and Continental. Latin American/Caribbean Studies collection, Senate House Library/ Institute for the Study of the Americas, has strengths in anthropology, economics, history, literature, politics and sociology. The geographical area covered includes all the countries and territories of Central and South America as well as the islands of the Caribbean (including the English-, Dutch- and French-speaking communities), the islands of the South Atlantic (the Falklands/Malvinas and South Georgia), the Galapagos Islands and the Antarctic territories administered by Chile and Argentina. The United States collection, Senate House Library, is one of the largest general collections on the United States in the country and is unique in keeping holdings in most subjects together, offering interdisciplinary coverage of the history, past and present institutions, and culture of the United States. The collection’s main strengths lie in history and literature, but it also offers good coverage of fine art, architecture, economics, film, politics, religion, Native American and African American studies, and small sections on the history of science, technology, medicine, law and education. The Canadian and Caribbean Studies collections, Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library, hold material relating to history and the broader social sciences, including constitutional, political, demographic, social and economic development. The Warburg Institute Library focuses on social and political history, religion, the history of science and philosophy, literature, books, libraries, education, the history of art, classical art and archaeology. Senate House Library also has general collections on economics, politics, anthropology, film, gender, geography and the environment, comparative literature, religious studies, maps, psychology and theatre studies, amongst other topics.

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I found the Institute of Historical Research a perfect place to study. It has a centre devoted to the history of the metropolis and it is very well networked with archives, libraries, and museums which are useful for my research. The courses on offer aim at developing research skills such as methods and theories, the use of software and databases, and they are crucially oriented at linking the students with the archives. The work that I have been able to carry out in libraries and archives is one of the most fascinating experiences that I have had in the UK. The excellent sources and resources managed by them, the practical organisation of their collections, and the comfort for working they offer, have been crucial in the development of my studies.” Dhan Zunino Singh (Argentina) PhD topic:The history of the Buenos Aires underground railways (c.1880-1940)


INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS Entry requirements The normal minimum entrance requirement for all degrees is a First or Upper Second Class Honours degree from a university in the United Kingdom, or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard (for example a Grade Point Average [GPA] of 3.0 or higher). Applications may also be considered from candidates who do not meet the formal academic requirements, but who offer alternative qualifications and/or relevant experience. English language competency All students whose first language is not English must be able to provide recent evidence (gained in the last three years) that their written and spoken English language is adequate for postgraduate study. This requirement is specified in order to ensure that the academic progress of students is not hindered by language difficulties and that students are able to integrate socially whilst studying and living in the UK. The School regards the following English language test scores or a degree taken in English as the minimum standards for entry to programmes of Institutes of the School: • Common European Framework (CEF) • Master’s applicants – level B2 • research applicants (MPhil/PhD) – level C1, or • a minimum overall score of 7.0, and no less than 6.0 in each category (academic reading, academic writing, listening and speaking), in the International English Language Testing Service (IELTS) test administered by the British Council; or • a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 610 in the paper-based test plus 5 in the test of written English, or a minimum score of 253 in the computer-based test plus an essay rating of 5; Internet based TOEFL with a score of 102; or • a Grade C or above in the Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English; or • a Grade A in the Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English; or • University of Reading TEEP test of proficiency for academic purposes at level 7.5 and above; or • Trinity College English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) at level ISE Level III; or

Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic): • master’s applicants – minimum PTE Academic score of 64 • research applicants (MPhil/PhD) – minimum PTE Academic score of 76; or • A first degree or MA in a relevant subject from an Anglophone country (i.e. where the majority of the inhabitants of that country or region speak English) or from a university in a nonAnglophone country where teaching, written work and examination were mainly in English. The School reserves the right to require, from any applicant, additional evidence of language competence such as a piece of written work and/or an interview. Evidence of an applicant’s English competence should, if possible, be included with the application. For entry to research degrees, it may be acceptable in some circumstances i.e. where the qualifications achieved fall slightly short of the threshold standards, to allow a student to register conditional upon him or her pursuing an appropriate course to raise competence to the required level. This decision will be made by the admitting Institute. Funding The School of Advanced Study offers bursaries for Master’s and doctoral study which cover tuition fees and a maintenance grant, awarded on a competitive basis to students registered at one of the Institutes. The School has been awarded a number of Block Grant awards from the AHRC and for 2010 has four History awards (two Master’s and two doctoral) and one Law award (Master’s) to award. Some of the Institutes also have their own bursaries – see the relevant website for further details. External funding may also be available in certain subject areas and/or for certain categories of student. For example, a number of our students obtain funding from the British Council or the Commonwealth Commission. American students in the School are eligible to apply for US Federal Loans and UK-resident students are eligible to apply for Professional and Career Development Loans.

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INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS cont. Student fees

International students

The fees for 2010–11 have yet to be set. Although the Prospectus details the course fees payable in 2009–10, potential applicants should note that the School does not receive funding for its teaching. Fees for 2010–11 are therefore likely to be significantly higher than those set out below. Applicants are advised to contact the Registry early in 2010 for an update.

The School welcomes applications from international students. Potential applicants should be aware of the impact of the Government’s new Points Based system on their application.

The standard fees for PhD students (at 2009–10 rates) are as follows:

Student category

Fee

Full-time Home and EU

£3,910

Part-time Home and EU

£1,955

Full-time Overseas

£10,236

but there are some exceptions, so please check. Students should ensure that they have the funds available to pay their fees before they embark on the programme. Payment can be made in full or by four instalments. The first instalment is due at or before registration, with the remaining three instalments to be paid by direct debit. Students can pay their full fee by cheque, bank transfer or credit/debit card. Students are liable for the full year’s fees. See the School’s tuition fee policy at www.sas.ac.uk/ postgraduate.html Some Institutes will charge a deposit fee to secure your place. This is usually non-refundable.

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The University of London has been licensed to offer certificates to potential students but this does not provide any guarantee of gaining entry clearance. Students should also note that they will be required to provide evidence of their ability to pay their fee and maintain themselves whilst in the UK. The classification of a student as ‘Home’ or ‘Overseas’ for fees purposes is based on residence in the UK or, for EU nationals, in a member state of the European Economic Area (EEA). Generally any student who has not been ordinarily resident in the UK or, in the case of EU nationals, in an EEA country for at least three years immediately preceding 1 October, or who has been resident primarily for full-time education, will be classified as ‘Overseas’ for fees purposes. Where three-year residence is a requirement, the applicant must normally also have ‘settled status’ i.e. the right of abode in the UK with no restrictions. If you are in doubt, please discuss this with the Registry. Please note that it will be unlikely that nationals requiring a visa will be able to obtain a visa for part-time Master’s degrees as they do not comply with the Immigration Department regulations. For further information see www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/studyingintheuk/.


Disability The School of Advanced Study aims to provide an environment where everyone can access its programmes and activities – conferences, workshops and seminars, library provision (through the University of London Research Library Services), and teaching programmes. This Statement pays particular attention to provision for students taking, or wishing to take, taught Master’s programmes or doctoral study in an Institute in the School. The School welcomes all students who are academically qualified and motivated to benefit from the programmes we offer through the member Institutes. Disabilities can include but are not limited to mobility or dexterity difficulties, long-term medical conditions, sensory impairments, mental health problems and specific learning difficulties (such as dyslexia). Applications If you are considering an application to the School you may find it helpful to discuss access confidentially with the student administrator in the relevant Institute before applying. Application forms and application information can be supplied in alternative formats. When an application form is received, the standard entry requirement assessment is undertaken. So, an initial assessment is made as to whether you satisfy the entry requirements for the programme in which you are interested. With the application form you will receive a monitoring form. The monitoring form invites you to say whether you have special access or support needs and asks that you provide the information on a separate sheet. This information is treated as confidential and is retained by the student administrator in Registry until after your application has been considered on its academic merits. Disability is not a factor in making the judgement about whether you should be offered a place. This Disability Statement, which is also on our website, is sent to any applicant who indicates that he or she has a disability.

can be implemented in a timely fashion. If you already have an assessment of your needs for the purpose of the Disabled Students Allowance, it is useful to send the relevant papers. The Institutes do not always interview applicants before offering a place so you may find it helpful to visit the Institute to discuss your needs and to help you decide for yourself whether the physical and learning environment is right for you. If you visit, you will have the opportunity to meet the academic coordinator for the relevant programme, the student administrator and the disability advisor. Support whilst on course The School of Advanced Study aims to provide support for students with disabilities whilst on course. This is done by providing the appropriate mechanisms that will enable the student to access the course. Students with disabilities are encouraged to have their needs clearly stated in a support agreement that is developed by the disability advisor and the student. This ensures that students do not need to rearticulate their needs to different members of staff and maintains an equitable level of support across the School of Advanced Study. Students do not need to be ‘registered disabled’ to draw on our services though, in order to provide services in the long term, we will need to ask for medical or other evidence as appropriate. We aim to treat every person as an individual, with needs that may differ from those of other people with a superficially similar disability. We do not, therefore, have standard procedures for students with dyslexia or for visually impaired students, for example: each person’s needs are considered individually. The School of Advanced Study has an external disability advisor who can provide advice on course-related study needs; arrange support such as note-takers, BSL interpreters and personal assistants; liaise with tutors and funding authorities; arrange special provision for examinations; and undertake needs assessments for students applying for support through the national Disabled Students Allowances scheme.

If you have indicated that you have a disability which may affect your study, we may ask you to complete a Pre-Entry Support form, which will help us to ensure that support

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INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS cont. Accommodation

How to make an application

University of London Halls of Residence

Applications must be made using the School application form.

The School’s students can apply for quota places in the University of London Intercollegiate Halls of Residence. Students must have been accepted to study on a degree programme within the School to be eligible. Applications must be made through the Registry and early application is advised as places are extremely limited. Application forms are available through the Registry or can be downloaded from the University of London website at www.london. ac.uk/accom. Information on the application process is sent to eligible students during the spring term and made available at www.sas.ac.uk/facstud.html#c706. Further information on halls of residence is available at www.halls. london.ac.uk. Late summer places: from mid September each academic year, students may apply directly to the Residences for unallocated places. Advice and information will be available from the Registry on 020 7862 8661/8662/8663. University of London Housing Services The ULHS provides support and useful advice to students seeking private or temporary accommodation. Applicants with an offer from the School can register to use the online accommodation database at www.lon.ac.uk/accom. Property Management Unit The University of London Property Management Unit manages some accommodation for full-time University of London students. There are no waiting lists for these rooms: http://housing.london.ac.uk/cms.

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This is available from the School Registry at SAS.Registry@sas.ac.uk, or by downloading from the School website at www.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate.html. Completed application forms should be sent to: School of Advanced Study Registry University of London Room 220, Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU Entry requirements for Master’s degrees are described on page 41. It is expected that applicants for research degrees will have discussed their topic of research with a supervisor prior to making a formal application. Details of supervisors and their areas of expertise are available on the web version of this Prospectus at www.sas.ac.uk/postgraduate.html.


Cover design: Calverts Text design and layout: Emily Morrell, School of Advanced Study Publications Printed by Latimer Trend & Co. Ltd. Image credits: p. 3 photo taken by Emily Morrell p. 13, p. 29, p. 30 photos taken by Edward Crowther p. 17 photo taken by Neil Penlington p. 18 photo taken by Olwen Myhill p. 33 photo taken by Alison Stewart p. 34 photo taken by Ian Jones p. 37 photo taken by Sandrine Alarçon-Symonds pp. 11, 21, 24, 38, 40 photos supplied by students pp. 31, 42 Š University of London


PROSPECTUS

School of Advanced Study Registry University of London Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU Phone: +44 (0)20 7862 8662 or 8661 Fax: +44 (0)20 7862 8725 Email: sas.registry@sas.ac.uk

www.sas.ac.uk Postgraduate PROSPECTUS 2010 Entry


School of Advanced Study Postgraduate Prospectus