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FRATRICIDE AND FRATERNITÉ: Understanding and Repairing Neighbourly Atrocity

Mellon Sawyer Seminar Series February–October 2010

Human Rights Consortium


VENUE INFORMATION:

All events take place in: Senate House or University of London Malet Street London WC1E 7HU

Stewart House University of London 32 Russell Square London WC1B 5DN

Main switchboard telephone: 020 7862 8000

All events are free and open to all Advance registration recommended Please see www.sas.ac.uk/fratricide.html or contact kirrily.pells@sas.ac.uk


Fratricide and Fraternité

Fratricide and Fraternité: Understanding and Repairing Neighbourly Atrocity John E. Sawyer Seminar Series 2009-2010 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Conference and Seminar Programme February–October 2010

CONTENTS Overview

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Fratricide Conference Programme

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Seminar Series Programmes

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Fraternité Conference Programme

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Speaker Biographies

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About the School of Advanced Study and the Human Rights Consortium

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Human Rights Consortium School of Advanced Study University of London Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU

Cover image: M. Chagall, 'Cain and Abel' (1956), published by Verve, Revue artistique et litteraire (1960), printed by Fernand Mourlot, Paris

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OVERVIEW History is replete with examples of neighbours killing neighbours. This seminar series explores the causes and consequences of neighbourly atrocities across history, cultures, and continents. It seeks to answer two overarching and inter-related questions: (1) what turns neighbour against neighbour? and (2) how do neighbours live together again after atrocity? The seminars will bring together the ten Institutes in the School of Advanced Study (University of London), as well as a range of distinguished British and international scholars, to investigate neighbourly atrocities from an extensive range of thematic, disciplinary, methodological, geographic, and temporal perspectives. Central Questions The series is organised into two parts. The first half examines the causes and manifestations of neighbourly violence. In these sessions, we will answer several troubling questions about neighbourly atrocity: • What causes neighbour to turn against neighbour? • When and why does close proximity lead to barbarity? • Do different ethical and cultural traditions, with their varying obligations towards neighbours, affect the existence or levels of neighbourly violence? • To what extent is there a deep structure or common logic to neighbourly violence that crosses different cultures and historical periods? • What is the relationship between the larger causes of conflict and the local-level patterns of violence? • Why are rape, sexual violence, and sexual mutilation endemic features of so much neighbourly violence? The second half of the series will explore the profound political, social, moral, and cultural consequences of mass violence for individuals and communities. We will answer persistent questions about the possibility of social repair at the local level: • How, if at all, do neighbours live together again after atrocity? • How can cycles of violence in local communities be broken? • How do neighbours understand, interpret, remember, and narrate atrocity among themselves – both individually and collectively? • Do good fences make better neighbours? • What forms of truth-telling and justice, if any, lead to reconciliation at the local level? • What are the factors that enable those who have suffered sexual violence and children born of such violence to be accepted by their families, neighbours, and communities? Comparisons and Thematic ‘Threads’ To answer the central questions, the series is structured thematically and will employ historical, cultural, and disciplinary comparisons both across and within the sessions. Four thematic ‘threads’ will run through the series: Identity. We will explore how identity is both socially constructed and politically manipulated before, during, and after mass violence. Examining how violence and narratives of violence contribute to identity formation will underscore the conceptual and moral difficulties of classifying individuals as perpetrators, victims, bystanders, and rescuers. Agency. The issue of agency is inextricably intertwined with that of identity. Does the focus on elites inadvertently risk denying agency to, and excusing violence by, non-elites? Yet, how should we legally and morally weigh the intra-group pressure (both coercion and conformity) that often pushes ordinary neighbours to participate in violence? Another way agency comes into play is through the depiction of “victims” – particularly women and children – as acted-upon rather than as actors in their own right. Local. The seminar series will examine the local-level dynamics of atrocity and reconciliation, while recognising that the local is inseparably linked to the national and global. Everyday violence. What is the relationship between everyday violence and extraordinary atrocity? At the local level, there appears to be a complicated dynamic as communities move from everyday to extraordinary violence and from extraordinary to everyday violence, with each shaping the other. In the wake of conflict, violence may express itself in new, more insidious forms, like post-apartheid South Africa’s epidemic of sexual violence. Organisers Principal Organiser Lars Waldorf (Senior Lecturer, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York) is assisted by Postdoctoral Fellow Kirrily Pells (School of Advanced Study) and Graduate Fellows Hope Wolf (King's College London) and Paul Moore (Birkbeck).

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FRATRICIDE CONFERENCE PROGRAMME Opening Conference: Fratricide Thursday 25th–Friday 26th February, 2010 Beveridge Hall, Senate House

Thursday 25th February 1:00pm

Registration

1:30pm

Welcome & Introductions Professor Mike Edwards Dean, School of Advanced Study Lars Waldorf Senior Lecturer, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York

2:00pm

Session 1: Fratricide Murderous Brothers in Old Norse Legend and Myth John McKinnell, Emeritus Professor of English Studies, University of Durham Against Post-Ethnic Utopias Linda Martin-Alcoff, Professor of Philosophy, Hunter College/CUNY Graduate Center Discussant: Lars Waldorf, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York Chair: Professor Naomi Segal, Director, Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, School of Advanced Study

3:15pm

Session 2:The Logics of Neighbourly Violence Who Kills? Explaining Differential Recruitment into Collective Violence Omar McDoom, Lecturer in Comparative Politics, London School of Economics Horizontal Inequalities and Conflict Frances Stewart, Director, Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security & Ethnicity, University of Oxford Chair: David Cantor, Lecturer in Human Rights, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study

4:30pm

Tea Break

4:45pm

Session 3: Dossier 710399 & Discussion with Filmmaker Refik Hodzic Refik Hodzic made Dossier 710399, a documentary about the aftermath of the Srebrenica massacre and neighbourly relations in the former Yugoslavia, between stints working for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

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Friday 26th February 10:00am Session 4: Fear Thy Neighbour Where is My Home Now? A Never-Ending War Journey Kemal Pervanić, Author, The Killing Days Naivashu’s Neighbours: Surviving Kenya’s Post-Election Violence Rahab Maina,Visiting Human Rights Defender, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York What it Takes to Heal:Trauma among Internally Displaced Persons in Kampala, Uganda Paulina Wyrzykowski, Senior Research and Advocacy Officer, Refugee Law Project, Makerere University (Uganda) Chair: Par Engstrom, Lecturer in Human Rights, Human Rights Consortium, School of Advanced Study 11:15am Tea Break 11:30am Session 5: Neighbours Revisited Bystanders? Poland and the Holocaust Jan T. Gross, Professor of History, Princeton University Democracy, Mythology and Mourning: On Polish-Jewish Relations Joanna Zylinska, Reader in New Media and Communications, Goldsmiths College Chair: tba 1:00pm

Lunch

2:00pm Session 6: Neighbourhoods Polarisation Takes Place Ralf Brand, Lecturer, Manchester Architecture Research Centre The Urbicide of Beirut: Political Violence, Geopolitical Discourse, and Built Environment during the Two Years' War (1975-76) Sara Fregonese, British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway Chair: Michael Kandiah, Director, Witness Seminar Programme, Centre for Contemporary British History, Institute of Historical Research, School of Advanced Study

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SEMINAR SERIES PROGRAMMES Seminar 1: Neighbourly Denunciation Friday 26th March, 2010 2:00 - 5:00pm Room G22/26, Senate House

2:00pm

Session 1 Spiritual Insecurity and Neighbourly Violence: Resisting Satanic Bloodsuckers in Malawi Adam Ashforth, Professor of Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan Neighbourly Denunciation and State Violence in Germany, 1933-1939 Paul Moore, Sawyer Seminars Graduate Fellow, Birkbeck College Chair: Par Engstrom, Lecturer in Human Rights, Human Rights Consortium, School of Advanced Study

3:30pm

Session 2 Neighbours Denouncing Witches in Early Modern Europe Julian Goodare, Reader in Scottish History, University of Edinburgh “With the Help of the Evil One”:The Moment of Denunciation in Carl Theodor Dreyer's “Day of Wrath” (1943) Claire Thomson, Lecturer in Scandinavian Film & Head of Scandinavian Studies, University College London Chair: Lars Waldorf, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York

Seminar 2: Intimate Atrocities Friday 23rd April, 2010 2:00 - 4:30pm Room G35, Senate House

“Truth in Lies”:The Performativity of Rape and Domestic Violence in Rwanda Ananda Breed, Senior Lecturer in Theatre Studies, University of East London Title tba Chris Coulter, Lecturer, Uppsala University Title tba Jason Hart, Lecturer in International Development, University of Bath Chair: Gill Rye, Reader in French, Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, School of Advanced Study

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Seminar 3: Perpetrators/Bystanders/Rescuers Friday 14th May, 2010 2:00 - 5:00pm Room ST273, Stewart House

2:00pm

Session 1 What Do We Know about Violence Between Neighbours? Stathis N. Kalyvas, Professor of Political Science,Yale University Explaining Divergent Paths of Genocidal Violence Scott Straus, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison A Cultural History Approach to Perpetrators Dan Stone, Professor of Modern History, Royal Holloway Chair: Damien Short, Senior Lecturer in Human Rights, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study

3:45pm

Session 2 A Different Kind of ‘Perpetrator’? Functionaries, Facilitators and Beneficiaries of Nazi Policies of Persecution Mary Fulbrook, Professor of German History, University College London Sons of the Soil: Autochthony, Indigeniety and Violent Politics in Kenya’s Rift Valley David M. Anderson, Professor of African Politics, University of Oxford Chair: Lars Waldorf, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York

Seminar 4: Drawing Lines Friday 28th May, 2010 2:00-4:30 pm Room G35, Senate House

Aftermaths of Partition: Bengal and Bosnia Compared Sumantra Bose, Professor of International and Comparative Politics, London School of Economics Live and Let Die: An Analysis of Separatist Factions Kirstin Bakke, Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, University College London Parading,Territoriality and the Protestant Bands in Northern Ireland Suzel Ana Reily, Reader in Ethnomusicology, Queen’s University (Belfast) Chair: James Manor, Emeka Anyaoku Professor of Commonwealth Studies, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study

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Seminar 5:Truth, Justice, and Reparations Friday 25th June, 2010 2:00 - 5:00pm Court Room, Senate House

2:00pm Session 1 Anger, Pragmatism and Ambivalence:Views on "Victor's Justice" from within the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda Nigel Eltringham, Senior Lecturer in Anthropology, University of Sussex In the Village Where Youth Ruled their Fathers: Justice and Generation in a Postwar Sierra Leonean Community Rosalind Shaw, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Tufts University Reconciliation Australian-Style: Some Truth, Little Justice and No Reparations Damien Short, Senior Lecturer in Human Rights, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study Chair: Avrom Sherr, Director, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies and Woolf Professor of Legal Education, School of Advanced Study 3:45pm

Session 2 The Politics of Aparición in Contemporary Argentina Vikki Bell, Professor of Sociology, Goldsmiths College Through the Land of Pale Hands: Femincide, Social Cleansing and Impunity in Guatemala Victoria Sanford, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Lehman College, City University of New York Chair: Par Engstrom, Lecturer in Human Rights, Human Rights Consortium, School of Advanced Study

Seminar 6:The Everyday Afterwards Friday 24th September, 2010 2:00-5:00pm Room G22/26, Senate House

So that Life Can Go On: Reconciliation and Everyday Co-existence in War-torn Uganda Sverker Finnström, Professor of Social Anthropology, Stockholm University Music in the Everyday Afterwards Rachel Beckles Willson, Reader in Music, Royal Holloway Complicity, Evil and Suspicion: Henri-Georges Clouzot’s Le Corbeau Ginette Vincendeau, Professor of Film Studies, King’s College London Storytelling and Neighbourliness: Community Relations after World War One Hope Wolf, Sawyer Seminars Graduate Fellow, King’s College London Chair: John Irving, Professor and Director, Institute of Musical Research, School of Advanced Study

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FRATERNITÉ CONFERENCE PROGRAMME Closing Conference: FRATERNITÉ Thursday 28th–Friday 29th October, 2010 Beveridge Hall, Senate House Note: This conference programme is likely to be updated. Please check our website for the latest version of the programme at www.sas.ac.uk/fratricide.html.

Thursday 28th October, 2010 9:00am

Registration

9:30am

Welcome & Introductions Professor Roger Kain, Dean of the School of Advanced Study (tbc) Lars Waldorf, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York

10:00am Session 1: Fraternité and Reconciliation Title tba Ashis Nandy, Professor, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (New Delhi) Reconciliation as Ideology and Politics Andrew Schaap, Lecturer in Politics, University of Exeter Revisiting Resentments: A Contribution to the Ethics of Reconciliation Thomas Brudholm, Danish Institute for International Studies Chair: Alessandro Scafi, Lecturer in Medieval and Renaissance Cultural History, Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study 11:15am Session 2: Justice and Reconciliation Title tba Geoffrey Robertson QC, Former Appeals Judge, Special Court for Sierra Leone Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation in Cambodia Alex Hinton, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Global Affairs, Rutgers University Reconciliation’s Revenge: Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts Lars Waldorf, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York Chair: Damien Short, Senior Lecturer in Human Rights, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study 12:30pm Lunch

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1:30pm

Session 3:The Logics of Neighbourly Peace Title tba Kieran Mitton, King’s College London Pasts Imperfect:Working with Former Combatants in Colombia Kimberly Theidon, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University Title tba Miles Hewstone, Professor of Social Psychology, University of Oxford Deference, Dissent, and Dispute Resolution: An Experimental Intervention Using Mass Media to Improve Neighborly Relations in Rwanda Elizabeth Levy Paluck, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University Chair: Maxine Molyneux Professor of Sociology and Director, Institute for the Study of the Americas, School of Advanced Study

3:15pm

Session 4: Poetry Reading Michael Symmonds Roberts

3:45pm

Tea Break

4:00pm

Session 5: After Intimate Atrocities "Truth in Lies":The Performativity of Rape and Domestic Violence in Rwanda Ananda Breed, Senior Lecturer in Theatre Studies, University of East London Bush Wives and Girl Soldiers in Sierra Leone Chris Coulter, Lecturer, Uppsala University

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Friday 29th October Beveridge Hall, Senate House 9:30am

Session 6: Generations The Political Mobilisation of Children Jason Hart, Lecturer, University of Bath Bringing Down the Walls:Teenagers’ Perspectives on Peace Lines in Belfast Madeleine Leonard, Professor of Sociology, Queen’s University (Belfast) Confronting Lebanon's “War of Others”:Transgenerational Forgiveness and Peace-Building amongst Lebanese Youth Craig Larkin, Research Fellow, Department of Politics, University of Exeter “A Stick is Straightened while Still Young”: Reconciling Rwanda's Youth Kirrily Pells, Sawyer Seminars Post-Doctoral Fellow, School of Advanced Study Chair: Corinne Lennox, Lecturer in Human Rights, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study

11:30am Session 7: Memory Greek Theatre, Civil War, and Public Memory Edith Hall, Research Professor in Classics and Drama, Royal Holloway Legacies of Violence and the War over Memory in the Irish Peace Process Graham Dawson, Reader in Cultural History, University of Brighton The Relationship Between Nostalgia, Blame and Belonging in Post-Conflict Bosnia:Who Soured the Milk and Spilled the Honey? Lea Esterhuizen, Independent Consultant Chair: Katia Pizzi, Senior Lecturer in Italian Studies, Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, School of Advanced Study 1:00pm

Lunch

2:00pm

Session 8: Memorialization Aftermaths:The Truth Commission Report, Archives, and Museums in Post-Apartheid South Africa Paul Gready, Professor of Applied Human Rights and Director of the Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York Through A Glass Darkly: Genocide Memorials in Rwanda, 1994-2009 Jens Meierhenrich, Assistant Professor of Government and Social Studies, Harvard University Representing Genocide: Lessons Drawn from Three Projects Undertaken by the Imperial War Museum, 20002007 Suzanne Bardgett, Project Director, Holocaust Exhibit, Imperial War Museum Chair: David Cantor, Lecturer in Human Rights, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study

3:30pm

Tea Break

3:45pm

Session 9: Art and Memory Drawing After Genocide: Art's Location in Contested Fields of Memory Yvonne Kyriakides, Artist and Ph.D Candidate, University of Oxford Music for Remembering and Repair: Cantatas for Ramallah and Rwanda Garrett List, Composer, Musician, and Founder of World Citizens Music Chair: Lars Waldorf, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York

4:45pm

Session 10: My Neighbor My Killer & Discussion with Filmmaker Anne Aghion Anne Aghion’s film, shot over nearly ten years in one community, documents the search for co-existence in postgenocide Rwanda. The film was awarded the Human Rights Watch 2009 Nestor Almendros Prize and was an Official Selection at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival.

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SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES Anne Aghion is a documentary filmmaker whose work has earned her, among other honors, a UNESCO Fellini Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Emmy Award, and the Human Rights Watch International Film Festival’s Nestor Almendros Award for Courage in Filmmaking. My Neighbor My Killer was accepted as an Official Selection at the Cannes Film Festival. Two of her previous films on Rwanda – Gacaca, Living Together Again in Rwanda and In Rwanda We Say…The Family That Does Not Speak Dies – are hour-long works which aired on the Sundance Channel and ARTE among other networks around the world. Both films have been used by peace-building organizations as a tool in understanding “heart and mind” issues in societies recovering from strife. They have also been screened in Rwanda by NGOs as part of their training, and most remarkably, to tens of thousands of confessed genocide killers before their release from prison. Her most recent hour-long film – The Notebooks Of Memory – completes the Gacaca Trilogy. Earlier in 2009, Aghion released the feature documentary, Ice People, which explores the physical, emotional and spiritual adventure of doing science in Antarctica, the earth’s most challenging environment. David M. Anderson is Professor of African Politics and a Fellow of St. Cross College at the University of Oxford. He has published widely on the history of eastern Africa, and is a regular contributor to political analysis on the region. Since 2007, he has edited the Journal of Eastern African Studies. His books include Eroding the Commons: Politics of Ecology in Baringo, Kenya (2002), Histories of the Hanged: Britain’s Dirty War in Kenya and the End of Empire (2005), and The Khat Controversy (2007). A recently completed monograph, Uncivil Society: Politics and Violence in Kenya, will be published in 2010. Adam Ashforth teaches in the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. He has published extensively on state formation and the politics of everyday life in South Africa. He is currently researching responses to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in everyday life in rural Malawi and ethnic conflict in Kenya's Rift Valley. His publications include three books: The Politics of Official Discourse in Twentieth-Century South Africa (Oxford, 1990); Madumo, A Man Bewitched (Chicago, 2000); and Witchcraft,Violence, and Democracy in South Africa (Chicago, 2005) [winner of the Herskovits Award, 2005]. Kristin M. Bakke is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at University College London. Prior to joining UCL, she was a post-doctoral research fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (20072008) and an Assistant Professor in Political Science at Leiden University (2008-2009). Since 2008, she has been a Research Associate at the Peace Research Institute, Oslo. She is currently working on a manuscript called Preserving Peace? Decentralization and Intrastate Struggles, which aims to better understand decentralized states’ diverse capacity to contain the often violent struggles between ethnic minority groups and the states in which they live. The manuscript combines a statistical study of intrastate conflicts with case studies of self-determination struggles in three federations: Chechnya’s relationship to Moscow, Punjab’s relationship to Delhi, and Québec’s relationship to Ottawa. With support from the National Science Foundation (USA) and the Chr. Michelsen Institute (Norway), Dr. Bakke spent ten months conducting fieldwork in Russia, India, and Canada. While the book manuscript explores how conflicts can be avoided, Dr. Bakke is also working on a collaborative project that examines the effects of violent conflicts (with Michael D. Ward, John O’Loughlin, and Xun Cao). Based on surveys carried out in Bosnia and Russia’s North Caucasus region, the project investigates inter-ethnic attitudes in conflict-affected societies. Suzanne Bardgett is Head of Holocaust and Genocide History at the Imperial War Museum. She studied History at Durham University and shortly afterwards joined the IWM, working in the fields of exhibitions, publications and education. She later helped establish and edited the Imperial War Museum Review, an academic journal of articles by the staff of the Museum. From 1995 to 2000 she led the team that created the Holocaust Exhibition at the IWM, the 1200 square metre narrative exhibition which employs film, artefacts, photographs and other evidence to tell the history of the persecution of the Jews and other groups by the Nazi regime. She subsequently directed Crimes against Humanity: an exploration of genocide and ethnic violence, an exhibition using a 30 minute film and interactive videos to shed light on the common features shared by the genocides of the last one hundred years. From 2004 to 2007 she was involved as consulting director in the establishment of the Srebrenica Memorial Room in Bosnia-Hercegovina, a project which drew on lessons learned in both the earlier IWM exhibitions. She is one of the four organisers of the Beyond Camps and Forced Labour conference – an international conference into research into survivors of Nazi persecution which has taken place three times at the IWM in 2003, 2006 and 2009. Her publications include numerous articles about the above and most recently a chapter on the collecting of Holocaust-related artefacts. Vikki Bell is Professor of Sociology at Goldsmith’s College, University of London. Her research interests include: contemporary social and cultural theory and its twentieth century genealogies; feminist theory, ethics and politics; the production and regulation of sexuality, racialised and gender difference; performativity as key concept of critical thought; political rhetorics; transitional justice, especially in relation to cultural processes, theories of democracy and concepts of peace and especially in relation to Northern Ireland; the social and legal regulation of childhood; aesthetics and politics, especially in relation to Argentina. Her publications include: Culture & Performance: The Challenge of Ethics, Politics and Feminist Theory (2007); Feminist Imagination: Genealogies in Feminist Theory (1999); Belonging and Performativity (edited collection) (1999); Interrogating Incest: Feminism, Foucault and the Law (1993). Mats Berdal is Professor of War Studies at King’s College London. He has recently completed Building Peace after War (Routledge, 2009), a critical assessment of international efforts from Cambodia to Iraq to consolidate peace in the

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aftermath of war. His principal research project at the moment is a major study of the UN and the end of the Cold War, a book that covers the immediate post-Cold War period and focuses in particular on the UN's involvement in the mitigation, containment and resolution of civil wars. Recent writings have focused on developments at the UN since the start of the war in Iraq in 2003, NATO at 60, and the political economy of armed conflict. Other research interests include violence in post-conflict societies, the changing character of war, the evolution of NATO, developments in UN peacekeeping and Philip Windsor's contribution to the study of International Relations, in particular his ideas on strategy and war. Sumantra Bose is Professor of International and Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics, whose publications include books on the Kashmir conflict (2003), and international intervention and state-building in BosniaHerzegovina (2002). His most recent book, Contested Lands: Israel-Palestine, Kashmir, Bosnia, Cyprus, and Sri Lanka (2007) is a study of the challenges of making and sustaining peace in the world's most intractable disputes over land and sovereignty. Professor Bose is now working on a major book on contemporary India, focused on social and political transformations in the past two decades and on India's gradual emergence as a global power in the early 21st century. It will be published by Harvard University Press in 2013. Ralf Brand is Lecturer at the Manchester Architecture Research Centre. In his Ph.D. in Community and Regional Planning (University of Texas-Austin) he developed the concept of co-evolutionary dynamics in urban socio-technical assemblages. He employs this angle to investigate contested cities such as Belfast, Beirut, Berlin and Amsterdam. See www.urbanpolarisation.org and www.ralfbrand.com for further information. Ananda Breed is Senior Lecturer at the University of East London. She has facilitated workshops for the UN Special Session for Children, UN Third World Water Forum, and the New York City Hall Forum Theatre and Video Initiative. Ananda has conducted research in Rwanda, Congo, and Burundi. In addition to theatre in relation to conflict, Ananda has codirected a participatory theatre project based on domestic violence in Rwanda which was funded by the Ministry of Justice. She has trained theatre practitioners in participatory theatre methodology for Search for Common Ground in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. She recently facilitated a youth-based project – “Promoting Tolerance and Dialogue Through Interactive Theatre in Eastern Indonesia” – working with artists and educators in four areas of conflict in collaboration with the Center for Civic Education Indonesia (CCEI) and The International Research and Exchanges Board (IREX). Thomas Brudholm is Associate Professor of Minority Research Theory at the University of Copenhagen. His fields of interest include transitional justice, the ethics of reconciliation, and minority-majority relations. Currently, he is combining a study of philosophical concepts of hatred with an exploration of modern and interdisciplinary controversies concerning the nature and significance of hatred in ethnic violence, criminal law and international conflict-resolution. Brudholm is editor and contributor to several books, including The Religious in Responses to Mass Atrocity (Cambridge University Press 2009). In 2008, he published Resentment's Virtue (Temple University Press), arguing the case for the need to take more seriously the significance of the "negative" emotions in post-conflict societies. He has contributed articles to the Journal of Human Rights, Hypatia, Law & Contemporary Problems, and the Hedgehog Review. Chris Coulter is a Researcher and Lecturer at Uppsala University, Sweden and an independent consultant. She has a PhD in Anthropology from Uppsala University where she has specialized on gender, conflict, and post-conflict rehabilitation. Her thematic expertise includes areas such as conflict analysis, humanitarian aid, youth and refugees in war and conflict zones, all with a gender perspective. Issues of femininity, masculinity and violence, as well as the psychosocial effects of war and violence (including the spheres of post-traumatic experiences) is also very much in line with her research. She is author of the book Bush Wives and Girl Soldiers: Women’s Lives through War and Peace in Sierra Leone (2009) and co-author of Young Female Fighters in African Wars: Conflict and its Consequences (2008). Chris has worked mainly in Sierra Leone, but has also carried out several consultancies, assessments, and evaluation assignments on gender issues in Kenya, Zambia, Sudan, Liberia for SIDA and UNICEF. Graham Dawson is a Reader in Cultural History and Director of the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories at the University of Brighton. His research has focused on the interrelation of cultural memory, narrative and identity, and the memory of war in modern times. He is author of Soldier Heroes: British Adventure, Empire and the Imagining of Masculinities (Routledge, 1994), and Making Peace with the Past? Memory, Trauma and the Irish Troubles (Manchester University Press, 2007). He is also co-editor of Trauma: Life Stories of Survivors and Commemorating War: The Politics of Memory (both Transaction, 2004); and, with Louise Purbrick and Jim Aulich, of Contested Spaces: Sites, Representations and Histories of Conflict (Palgrave MacMillan, 2007). His current work explores cultural strategies for dealing with the past in post-conflict cultures, particularly in the aftermath of the Irish Troubles. Nigel Eltringham is Senior Lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Sussex. Between 1996 and 1999, Nigel carried out doctoral research among members of the political class in Rwanda and the Rwandan diaspora in Europe. His research explored how these two constituencies accounted for the 1994 genocide and the ways in which they shared epistemological assumptions and representational practices beyond substantive dissension. The results of this research have been published as Accounting for Horror: Post-Genocide Debates in Rwanda (Pluto, 2004). He has, in addition, published on the dilemmas of researching contexts of violence and genocide (in The Ethics of Anthropology Debates and Dilemmas (Routledge, 2003)). Nigel is currently conducting research on the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (Arusha, Tanzania) supported by the Nuffield Foundation and the British Academy.

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Lea Esterhuizen has focused substantively on state-sponsored violence and genocide as well as the needs and priorities of social entrepreneurs, refugees and children facing violence and deprivation. She has taught in the social sciences at universities in South Africa (University of Cape Town, University of Stellenbosch), and in the UK (University of London: Royal Holloway and the School of Advanced Study). Lea has also worked across a range of sectors (education sector, refugee sector, social entrepreneurship and child rights) and contexts (South Africa, UK, doctoral research in Bosnia Hercegovina and current work in countries across the MENA region). Her passion for participatory work with children on child rights research and action has led her into the work she is currently doing for Save the Children Sweden on their three year project: Civil Society for Child Society for Child Rights in the MENA Region. She is also currently working towards starting a new initiative to enable evidence-to-action projects driven by children and adult collaborators in South Africa. Sverker Finnström is associate professor in cultural anthropology. Starting from 1997, he has conducted recurrent fieldwork in Acholiland, northern Uganda, with a focus on young adults living in the immediate shadows of civil war. Besides his articles, popular and academic, he has authored Living with Bad Surroundings: War, History, and Everyday Moments in Northern Uganda (Duke University Press, 2008), for which he received the 2009 Margaret Mead Award. He divides his time between The Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm University, where he teaches, and The Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University, where he is a researcher in political violence and genocide studies. Finnström currently investigates violent conflict in emerging global realities, with the aim to develop an analytical framework that can advance our understanding of the global travels of war, made manifest in life stories and lived experiences, or what he calls existential fracture lines. Sara Fregonese is currently a British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow at Royal Holloway, Univeristy of London. Her PhD in Geography from Newcastle University in 2008 was entitled “City, war and geopolitics: Political violence and Beirut’s built environment in the Lebanese civil war”. Sara’s empirical research focuses on Lebanon, and adopts ethnographic methods to expose the everyday processes of urban contestation. Her interest develops around three thematic strands: urbicide and the role of the urban built environment in conflict; state and non-state geopolitical knowledges; and the violent geographies of sectarianism and Lebanon’s colonial past. In 2008 and 2009, Sara participated in the project “The Urban Environment: Mirror and Mediator of Radicalisation” (http://tinyurl.com/2avl76) within the ESRC/AHRC+FCO-funded programme “New Security Challenges: A Critical Reassessment”. The project investigates mutual links between urban materiality and social polarisation. Sara conducted fieldwork in Amsterdam, Beirut, and Belfast, Berlin and co-authored an FCO report about the utility of including urban and material aspects into the analysis of social polarisation (http://tinyurl.com/9ja8b7). Mary Fulbrook FBA is Professor of German History and Director of the Centre for European Studies at University College London. She is currently completing a book on generations and violence through the German dictatorships, and a book on Ordinary Nazis: Reflections on Memory, Terror and a Small Town in Poland. She is an expert on the history of the GDR, on which she has written widely, including Anatomy of a Dictatorship: Inside the GDR (OUP) and The People’s State: East German Society from Hitler to Honecker (Yale UP), as well as editing Power and Society in the GDR, 1961-79: The ‘Normalisation of Rule’? (Berghahn). Other books include: A Concise History of Germany (CUP); A History of Germany, 1918-2008: The Divided Nation (Blackwell); German National Identity after the Holocaust (Polity); as well as books on Historical Theory (Routledge); The Two Germanies: Problems of Interpretation (Macmillan); Piety and Politics (CUP); two short sixth-form textbooks on Hitler; and several edited books on European and German history. Formerly the founding Joint Editor of German History and Chair of the German History Society, she has also made a documentary film on the social history of the GDR, and is currently making a film concerning memory, memorialisation and the Holocaust, drawing on oral history interviews in Berlin, Auschwitz and Będzin. Julian Goodare is a Reader in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh. His current research interests are in early modern Scottish government, finance and politics, and the witch-hunt in Scotland and Europe. He is co-editing a book on Scotland in the Age of Two Revolutions (which was also a recent day conference). His own next book will be The European Witch-Hunt for Routledge. He has been Publication Secretary of the Scottish History Society (1989-2002). He was Director of the ESRC-funded Survey of Scottish Witchcraft which went online in 2003. Since 1998 he has been an Associate Editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Paul Gready is Professor of Applied Human Rights and founding Director of the Centre for Applied Human Rights at the University of York. Paul has worked for Amnesty International (on East and Southern Africa, and India) and a number of other international and national human rights organisations, and has wide-ranging experience as a human rights consultant. Most of Paul’s practitioner and consultancy experience has been in Africa, with a particular focus on South Africa. He has served as a member of various advisory groups, for example on human rights and development (Amnesty International Dutch Section, Special Programme on Africa; Novib, Oxfam). His research and project work has been supported by funders including the ESRC, the Leverhulme Trust, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. Linking academia and practice-based work, Paul has published on a number of human rights-related topics, notably transitional justice and human rights and development. His most recent book, Aftermaths: Truth, Justice and Reconciliation in Post-Apartheid South Africa, is due to be published in 2010. Paul is the co-editor of a new journal, the Journal of Human Rights Practice. For over a decade he has also been involved in the development of interdisciplinary, practice-based human rights teaching curricula.

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Jan T. Gross is the Norman B. Tomlinson ‘16 and ‘48 Professor of War and Society at Princeton University. His first book, Polish Society under German Occupation, appeared in 1979. Revolution from Abroad (1988) analyzes how the Soviet regime was imposed in Poland and the Baltic States between 1939 and 1941. Neighbors (2001), reconstructs the events that took place in July 1941 in the small Polish town of Jedwabne. Using eyewitness testimony, Professor Gross demonstrates that the Jews of Jedwabne were murdered by their Polish neighbors “not by the German occupiers, as previously assumed.” The shocking story occasioned an unprecedented reevaluation of Jewish-Polish relations during World War II and touched off passionate debate. In 2004 many of the Polish voices in this debate were published in translation in a collection, The Neighbors Respond. Professor Gross is also the author of several books in Polish, the coeditor of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath (2000), and the coeditor with Irena Grudzinska-Gross of War Through Children’s Eyes (1981). Professor Gross has recently finished a book on anti-Semitism in Poland after World War II and co-authored a study entitled Uncivil Society: Communist Implosion in 1989 (2009). He is now writing a book on the plunder of Jews by the local population in Nazi-occupied Europe. Edith Hall took up a Research Chair at Royal Holloway University of London, where she directs the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome. She has also held posts at the Universities of Cambridge, Reading, Oxford and Durham. She is also Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Archive of Performances of Greek & Roman Drama at Oxford and Chair of the Gilbert Murray Trust. Her most recent book is Greek Tragedy: Suffering under the Sun (OUP 2010). Jason Hart is a Lecturer in International Development at the University of Bath. He is a social anthropologist by training (BA, MA, Ph.D University of London). He joined the University of Bath in September 2009 after seven years as a researcher and lecturer at the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford. Much of Jason’s work has explored the experience of young people on the margins of society and the global economy: relating these to the values, assumptions and approaches of agencies seeking to provide support. This has led to consideration of themes such as protection, child rights, peacebuilding, militarisation and asylum, seeking increasingly to integrate perspectives from anthropology and politicaleconomy. Children living in situations of political violence and forced displacement have been a particular focus of much of his research and writing. Jason has worked in South Asia (Sri Lanka, Nepal, India and Bhutan) and, to a limited extent, East Africa. However, his principal area of interest is the Middle East, particularly Israel / occupied Palestinian territories and Jordan. Since completing his doctorate, Jason has been employed as a consultant author, researcher, evaluator and trainer by various UN and non-governmental organisations. These include UNICEF, Save the Children, PLAN, Care International, and the Canadian International Development Agency. He has also served as an advisor to the UN in the formulation of studies, guidelines and policies. His most recent publications include an edited volume Years of Conflict: Adolescence, Political Violence and Displacement and journal articles in Conflict, Security and Development, Journal of Refugee Studies and International Journal of Children’s Rights. Miles Hewstone is Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Experimental Psychology at Oxford University. He has previously held chairs in social psychology at the universities of Bristol, UK; Mannheim, Germany; and Cardiff, UK. Professor Hewstone has published widely in the general field of experimental social psychology. His major topics of research, thus far, have been attribution theory, social cognition, social influence, stereotyping and intergroup relations, and intergroup conflict. His current work centres on the reduction of intergroup conflict via intergroup contact, stereotype change, and crossed categorization. Professor Hewstone is a former editor of the British Journal of Social Psychology and co-founding editor of the European Review of Social Psychology. He is a past recipient of the British Psychological Society's Spearman Medal (1987) and its Presidents' Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychological Knowledge (2001). Professor Hewstone has twice been a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford (19871988, 1999-2000). He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, the Society for Personality & Social Psychology, and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, and an Academician of the Academy of Learned Societies in the Social Sciences. He was also recently elected to the British Academy (the National Academy for Arts and Social Sciences). Alex Hinton is Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights and Associate Professor of Anthropology and Global Affairs at Rutgers University, Newark. He is the author of the award-winning Why Did They Kill? Cambodia in the Shadow of Genocide (California, 2005) and six edited or co-edited collections: Transitional Justice: Global Mechanisms and Local Realities after Genocide and Mass Violence (Rutgers, 2010); Genocide: Truth, Memory, and Representation (Duke, 2009); Night of the Khmer Rouge: Genocide and Democracy in Cambodia (Paul Robeson Gallery, 2007); Annihilating Difference: The Anthropology of Genocide (California, 2002); Genocide: An Anthropological Reader (Blackwell, 2002); and Biocultural Approaches to the Emotions (Cambridge, 1999). He is currently working on a co-edited volume on the legacies of genocide and mass violence, a book on 9/11 and Abu Ghraib, and a book on the politics of memory and justice in the aftermath of the Cambodian genocide. He was awarded the 2009 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology. Refik Hodzic is a journalist, film-maker and justice activist from Prijedor, Bosnia and Herzegovina. As a journalist he reported for various radio, television and print media in Bosnia, focusing on the legacy of conflict and mass atrocities committed there during the nineties. In 2000, Hodzic joined the Outreach Programme of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, where he served in different positions, including as outreach coordinator in BiH and Tribunal's spokesman. Over the years, Hodzic was active in the field of transitional justice in various capacities, has written extensively on the subject and conceived a number of outreach projects and initiatives focused on dealing with the past in the former Yugoslavia. He is a co-founder of XY Films, a film and TV production company specialising in documentary films and television programs dealing with the impact of war crimes on communities in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Hodzic wrote and

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directed the award-winning documentary films Justice Unseen and Statement 710399 and a number of other documentaries and television series. He is currently involved in developing outreach strategy for the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. Stathis N. Kalyvas is Arnold Wolfers Professor of Political Science and Director of the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence at Yale University. He is the author of The Logic of Violence in Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and The Rise of Christian Democracy in Europe (Cornell University Press, 1996), and the co-editor of Order, Conflict & Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He has received several awards, including the Woodrow Wilson Award for best book on government, politics, or international affairs (2007), the Luebbert Award for best book in comparative politics (2008), the European Academy of Sociology Book Award (2008), the J. David Greenstone Award for best book in politics and history (1997), and the Gregory Luebbert Award for best article in comparative politics (2001 and 2009). He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. He is currently researching various aspects of conflict, including the dynamics of violence and participation, and the evolution and transformation of civil wars. Recent articles include “The Dynamics of Violence in Vietnam: An Analysis of the Hamlet Evaluation System (HES)” (with Matt Kocher; Journal of Peace Research, 2009) and “Ethnic Defection in Civil War” (Comparative Political Studies, 2008). Yvonne Kyriakides is a Saatchi and Saatchi Prizewinning artist who trained at Goldsmith’s College and the Royal College of Art. She has exhibited work internationally at venues including the ICA, Whitechapel Gallery, Eagle Gallery, and the Sharjah Biennale. She has enjoyed collaborations with Theatre de Complicite. Her current AHRC funded research at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, University of Oxford, investigates responses to genocide in contemporary art practice. Her book, My Czech grandmother: A story, was published in 2005. Craig Larkin is a Research Fellow in Politics at the University of Exeter working on an ESRC-funded project, “Conflict in Cities and the Contested State: Everyday life and the possibilities of transformation in Belfast, Jerusalem and other divided cities.” The project focuses on divided cities as key sites in territorial conflicts over state and national identities, cultures, and borders. A team of researchers from the Universities of Cambridge, Queen’s Belfast and Exeter, lead the multidisciplinary initiative that includes architecture, urban studies, politics, geography and sociology. His doctoral thesis “Memory and Conflict: Remembering and Forgetting the Past in Lebanon” examined issues of identity, trauma and memory, and approaches to conflict resolution in post-war Lebanon. Garrett List was born in Arizona in 1943, brought up in Southern California from 1950-64 and came of age as an artist in New York City in the 1960’s and 1970’s. His apprenticeship as a trombonist was completed at the Juilliard School of Music; as an artist with the likes of John Cage and friends, Karl Berger and the Creative Music Studio MEV in its NYC version. In Belgium for the last (almost) 30 years, List has worked in the theater with Max Parfondry and Jacques Delcuvellerie; as a performer creating different ensembles; The Real Live Orchestra, The Garrett List Ensemble, The Collective du Lion and recently The International Riffing Society; as a composer continuing with works such as the 24 composition suite Music for Trees (1986-89) or a series of cantatas; Au Cœur du monde (text: Blaise Cendrars 1980-98), La Cantate de Bisesero (Rwanda 94 with Delcuvellerie and Mathias Simons 1998-2000), and Etat de Siège (with Mahmoud Darwich 2002-05). He is the founder of World Citizens Music. Madeleine Leonard is a Professor of Sociology at Queen’s University, Belfast. Her main research interest is in teenagers’ experiences of growing up in politically sensitive societies and she has been researching the perceptions and experiences of Catholic and Protestant teenagers living in interface areas in North Belfast. She has recently extended this research interest to Cyprus where she has carried out research on Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot teenagers’ attitudes and experiences of growing up in the divided city of Nicosia. She is currently researching teenagers’ perceptions and experiences of Belfast as a ‘shared city’ as part of an ESRC project “Conflict in Cities and the Contested State” (www.conflictincities.org). She has used a range of research methodologies, including writing exercises, maps and focus group interviews. Rahab Maina is a counsellor and the executive director of Naivasha Disadvantaged Support Group, a community-based organization in Naivasha district in Kenya. The organization’s main objective was breaking the culture of silence and stigma surrounding sexual abuse. In 2008, during Kenya’s post-election violence, she assisted the communities that were targeted for brutal evictions by members of her community, the Kikuyu. Maina assisted the police in evacuating trapped people and also helped in the identification of dead bodies at the morgue. As a result of these activities, her house and office were broken into and her property looted and vandalized by my neighbours. Maina writes that “up to today, I have never come to terms how former neighbours and friends who had co-existed for many decades could turn into killing machines and murder 45 people and displace more than 15,000 people just in a span of 2 days!” She is writing a book, A Day in January, that will try to give a real account of what happened in Naivasha. Linda Martín-Alcoff is Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College/CUNY Graduate Center. Her books and anthologies include Thinking From the Underside of History co-edited with Eduardo Mendieta (Rowman & Littlefield, 2000), Singing in the Fire: Tales of Women in Philosophy (Rowman & Littlefield 2003),Visible Identities: Race, Gender and the Self (Oxford 2006), Feminist Epistemologies co-edited with Elizabeth Potter (Routledge 1993), Real Knowing (Cornell 1996), and Identity Politics Reconsidered co-edited with Michael Hames-Garcia, Satya Mohanty and Paula Moya (Palgrave, 2006); and Constructing the Nation: A Race and Nationalism Reader co-edited with Mariana Ortega (SUNY 2009).

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Omar McDoom is Lecturer in Comparative Politics at the LSE. He has previously held research fellowships at Harvard University, the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and at the University of Oxford. He has worked as a Policy Officer for the World Bank, a Legal Officer for the Government of Guyana, and on electoral missions for the OSCE and UN. His research interests include: African Politics, in particular the Great Lakes comprising Uganda, Burundi, Rwanda, and Democratic Republic of Congo; civil wars; ethnic conflicts; and genocides. He is presently working on a book entitled: Why They Killed: Security, Authority, and Opportunity in Rwanda's Genocide. John McKinnell is Emeritus Professor of medieval literature at Durham University, where he has worked throughout his academic career, though he has also participated in teaching exchange programmes at the universities of Bonn, Cagliari, Mauritius, Reykjavík and Rome ('La Sapienza'). His main research area is Old Norse literature, and particularly Old Norse mythological poetry and pre-Christian religion; his books in this area include Meeting the Other in Norse Myth and Legend (D.S. Brewer, 2005), Both One and Many: Essays on Change and Variety in Late Norse Heathenism (with Maria Elena Ruggerini; Il Calamo, 1994) and Runes, Magic and Religion (with Rudolf Simek and Klaus Düwel; Fassbaender, 2004). He has also published many articles on Old Norse poetry, one recent example being “’Am I my brother’s keeper?’ Murderous Brothers in Ynglingatal and Elsewhere,” in Between Paganism and Christianity, ed. Leszek P. Slupecki and Jakub Morawiec (Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Rzeszow, 2009: 116-130); a collected volume of some of these papers will be published later this year by Toronto University Press. His secondary research area is late medieval drama, especially the historical reconstruction of early performance, and he has also written on early dramatic and para-dramatic performance, on Chaucer and on Old English poetry. He is married with three adult children, and lives in Durham. Jens Meierhenrich is Assistant Professor of Government and of Social Studies at Harvard University. He is a member of Harvard University’s Committee on Human Rights Studies, and has conducted field research in several international organizations as well as in South Africa, Rwanda, Japan, Cambodia, Germany, and Argentina. He recently served in Trial Chamber II of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and has previously worked with Luis Moreno Ocampo, the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. Meierhenrich is the author of The Legacies of Law: Long-Run Consequences of Legal Development in South Africa, 1652-2000 (Cambridge University Press, 2008 and is currently completing a genocide trilogy, comprising The Rationality of Genocide; The Structure of Genocide; and The Culture of Genocide (all forthcoming from Princeton University Press). He is also preparing, for Oxford University Press, Genocide: A Reader as well as Genocide: A Very Short Introduction, and finishing a book on judicial responses to the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, entitled Lawfare: The Formation and Deformation of Gacaca Jurisdictions in Rwanda, 1994-2009. Work in progress includes an edited volume on international courts (with Dinah L. Shelton) and a co-authored volume, The Darfur Proceedings: The Prosecution of International Crimes at the International Criminal Court (with John Hagan and Alex de Waal). Paul Moore is a Graduate Fellow for the Fratricide and Fraternité seminar series. He is currently completing a PhD at Birkbeck College on the subject of German popular opinion of the Nazi concentration camps in 1933-1939, as part of the six-member AHRC-funded research project “Before the Holocaust: Concentration Camps in Nazi Germany, 1933-1939”. His thesis will be the first to focus specifically on the German public’s knowledge, perception, discussion and opinion of the central sites of terror during Hitler’s dictatorship. He has organised and taught an MA course at Humboldt University in Berlin, and currently teaches and lectures at Birkbeck College on European history since 1800. He has presented papers at conferences in the UK and Germany. His article, “‘And what concentration camps those were!’ Foreign Concentration Camps in Nazi Propaganda, 1933-1939” will be published in the Journal of Contemporary History in 2010. Ashis Nandy is a political psychologist and sociologist of science who has worked on cultures of knowledge, visions, and dialogue of civilizations. At present he is Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for the Study of Developing Societies and Chairperson of the Committee for Cultural Choices and Global Futures, both located in Delhi. Nandy has co-authored a number of human rights reports and is active in movements for peace, alternative sciences and technologies, and cultural survival. He is a member of the Executive Councils of the World Future Studies Federation, the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative, the International Network for Cultural Alternatives to Development, and the People's Union for Civil Liberties. Nandy has been a Woodrow Wilson Fellow at the Wilson Center, Washington, D.C., a Charles Wallace Fellow at the University of Hull, and a Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities, University of Edinburgh. He held the first UNESCO Chair at the Center for European Studies, University of Trier, in 1994. Elizabeth Levy Paluck is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University. She conducts field experiments in the United States and Africa to test initiatives for prejudice and conflict reduction and political education and civic engagement. Her work has focused on the effects of the mass media, education, and interpersonal communication. She received her PhD from Yale University. Kirrily Pells is the Postdoctoral Fellow for the Fratricide and Fraternité seminar series. Her PhD thesis focused on rightsbased approaches with children and young people in post-conflict situations, with a case study on Rwanda. She has been a consultant for Save the Children UK, Save the Children Sweden, CARE International and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. She has also worked with organizations operating at the community-level in both Rwanda and Bosnia. Publications include: “We’ve Got Used to the Genocide; It’s Daily Life that’s the Problem,” Peace Review 21(3) (2009) and “’No One Ever Listens to Us’: challenging obstacles to the participation of children and young people in Rwanda,” in B. Percy-Smith & N. Thomas, eds. A Handbook of Children’s Participation: perspectives from theory and practice (Routledge, 2009).

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Kemal Pervanić was born in Bosnia in 1968. His parents were Muslims. He lived in his village until it came under attack by the Bosnian Serb nationalist forces in the spring of 1992. Following a brief but brutal genocidal campaign, Kemal and his older brother Kasim ended up in a concentration camp close to their village, where rape, torture and murder were daily occurrences. After two and a half months of brutality Kemal and Kasim were transferred to another camp called Manjaca, where they were incarcerated for further four and a half months. After his release, Kemal moved to the UK in early 1993. Since then he has been involved in a number of human rights campaigns, such as Protect Darfur and the Responsibility to Protect. He has spoken at a number of conferences on issues relating to genocide and human rights and he also contributes to TV and radio programmes about Bosnia, The Hague war crimes trials and issues such as citizenship. Kemal is the author of the book entitled The Killing Days: My Journey Through the Bosnian War. Currently he is studying for an MA in Conflict Resolution at the University of Bradford. Suzel Ana Reily is a Reader in Ethnomusicology at Queen’s University, Belfast. She has been conducting research on Brazilian musics since the early 1980s. Her main focus has been the musical traditions of southeastern popular Catholicism, the topic of her book Voices of the Magi (Chicago 2002). She has also written about various popular styles, such as bossa nova and musica sertaneja, as well as issues pertaining to the development of ethnomusicological research in Brazil – a central concern of her edited volume Brazilian Musics, Brazilian Identities (BJE 2000). She is also interested in the ways ethnomusicologists and anthropologists might use hypermedia, and she has been involved in the construction of a website based on John Blacking's ethnographic material, titled “Venda Girls' Initiation Schools”, while also overseeing the student-led Music Making in Belfast Project. Her most recent hypermedia venture involved the representation of the Holy Week celebrations in Campanha, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Dr. Reily acted as co-editor of the British Journal for Ethnomusicology (1998-2001) and since 2003 she has been acting as website reviews editor for the Yearbook of Traditional Music. Michael Symmonds Roberts has won the Whitbread Poetry Award, and been shortlisted for the Griffin International Poetry Prize, the Forward Prize, and twice for the T.S. Eliot Prize. He has received major awards from the Arts Council and the Society of Authors. His continuing collaboration with composer James MacMillan has led to two BBC Proms choral commissions, song cycles, music theatre works and an opera for the Welsh National Opera – ‘The Sacrifice’ – which won the RPS Award for opera. His broadcast work includes ‘A Fearful Symmetry’ - for Radio 4 - which won the Sandford St Martin Prize, and ‘Last Words’ commissioned by Radio 4 to mark the first anniversary of 9/11. He has published two novels, and teaches at the Writing School of Manchester Metropolitan University Geoffrey Robertson QC has been counsel in many landmark cases in constitutional, criminal and media law in the courts of Britain and the Commonwealth and he makes frequent appearances in the Privy Council and the European Court of Human Rights. He is founder and head of Doughty Street Chambers. He has maintained a wide advisory practice and has served part-time as a UN appeal judge at its war crimes court in Sierra Leone. In 2006, he chaired a Commission of Inquiry into the United Nation’s internal justice system. In 2008, the UN Secretary General appointed him as one of the three distinguished jurist members of the UN’s Internal Justice Council. Mr. Robertson is the author of Crimes against Humanity – The Struggle for Global Justice, published by Penguin and the New Press (USA); The Justice Game (Vintage) and Robertson and Nicol on Media Law (Sweet & Maxwell). Mr. Robertson has written an extensive introduction to Geoffrey Robertson presents The Levellers – The Putney Debates (Verso, 2007); the foreword to Torture (Human Rights Watch/ Macmillan) and A Question of Zion (Professor Jacqueline Rose/ Melbourne University Press) and is a contributor to Human Rights in the War on Terror (Cambridge University Press). Victoria Sanford is a Visiting Scholar at Columbia University’s Center for International Conflict Resolution and a 2009 John Simon Guggenheim Fellow. She is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Lehman College and a member of the doctoral faculty at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Her research focuses on genocide, feminicide, collective memory, community reconstruction, human rights and international humanitarian law during internal armed conflicts and in post-conflict countries. She is the author of Buried Secrets: Truth and Human Rights in Guatemala (Palgrave Macmillan 2003), La Masacre de Panzós: Etnicidad, tierra y violencia en Guatemala (FyG Editores, 2009), Guatemala: Del Genocidio al Feminicidio (FyG Editores 2008),Violencia y Genocidio en Guatemala (FyG Editores 2003), and co-editor with Asale Angel-Ajani of Engaged Observer: Anthropology, Advocacy and Activism (Rutgers University Press 2006), among other publications. While at Columbia, she is writing The Land of Pale Hands: Feminicide, Social Cleansing and Impunity in Guatemala. Andrew Schaap is a Lecturer in contemporary political theory at the University of Exeter. He is author of Political Reconciliation (Routledge, 2005), editor of Law and Agonistic Politics (Ashgate, 2009), and co-editor, with Danielle Celermajer and Vrasidas Karalis, of Power, Judgment and Political Evil: In Conversation with Hannah Arendt (Ashgate, 2010). Andrew’s previous research drew on the work of Hannah Arendt to develop an ‘agonistic’ conception of reconciliation as a political undertaking. His current research investigates how Arendt’s thought has been received by radical European philosophers such as Giorgio Agamben, Jacques Rancière, Antonio Negri, Claude Lefort and Jean-François Lyotard. Rosalind Shaw is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Tufts University, and has carried out field research in Sierra Leone (1977-present), Nigeria (1982-85), and Bangladesh (1988). She is the author of Memories of the Slave Trade: Ritual and the Historical Imagination in Sierra Leone (University of Chicago Press, 2002) and co-editor of Localizing Transitional Justice: Interventions and Priorities After Mass Violence (Stanford University Press, 2010), Syncretism/Anti-Syncretism: The Politics of Religious Synthesis (Routledge), and Dreaming, Religion and Society in Africa (E.J. Brill, 1992). Recent awards and fellowships include a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research and Writing Grant, a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellowship at the US Institute of Peace, and a Carr Center for Human Rights Policy Fellowship at Harvard

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University. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Transitional Justice. Her current research includes a book project on local, national, and international practices of post-war memory, justice, and social recovery in Sierra Leone, tentatively titled Demobilizing Memory. Damien Short is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights and Course Convenor of the MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study. He previously served as Senior Lecturer in human rights at Roehampton University, London and Convener of the Erasmus Mundus MA Human Rights Practice. Prior to that, he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Sociology and the Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex. He has published many articles on indigenous peoples, reconciliation and on the social construction of land rights. His interests include sociological and anthropological approaches to human rights, indigenous rights, reconciliation initiatives and genocide studies. A monograph titled Reconciliation and Colonial Power: Indigenous Rights in Australia (Ashgate) was published in March 2008. He is currently working on a new monograph titled Genocides? for Zed Books. Dan Stone is Professor of Modern History at Royal Holloway. His research interests include historiographical, literary and philosophical interpretations of the Holocaust; comparative genocide; the history of anthropology, race theory and eugenics; the cultural politics of the British far right; and philosophy of history. His monographs include Constructing the Holocaust: A Study in Historiography (Vallentine Mitchell, 2003) and History, Memory and Mass Atrocity: Essays on the Holocaust and Genocide (Vallentine Mitchell, 2006). He has edited and co-edited several collections, including, most recently, The Historiography of Genocide (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). Scott Straus is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies and Director of the Human Rights Initiative at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His primary research interests include the study of genocide, violence, human rights, and African politics. Straus is the author of The Order of Genocide: Race, Power, and War in Rwanda (Cornell University Press, 2006), which received the 2006 Award for Excellence in Political Science and Government from the Association of American Publishers, and, with Robert Lyons, Intimate Enemy: Images and Voices of the Rwandan Genocide (MIT/Zone Books, 2006). He is currently finishing, with Lars Waldorf, a co-edited volume entitled Reconstructing Rwanda: State Building and Human Rights after Mass Violence. He is also the coauthor, with David Leonard, of Africa’s Stalled Development: International Causes and Cures (Lynne Rienner, 2003). Straus has also published in World Politics, Politics & Society, Foreign Affairs, Genocide Studies and Prevention, and the Journal of Genocide Research, and he has received grants from the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the United States Institute of Peace. In 2009, he was awarded the university-wide, William Kiekhofer Distinguished Teaching Award. Frances Stewart is Professor of Development Economics and founding Director of the Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity (CRISE) at the University of Oxford. Her research and publications focus on horizontal inequalities; poverty and human development; group behaviour; and causes and consequences of conflict. Her most recent monograph (with others) is Horizontal Inequalities and Conflict: Understanding Group Violence in Multi-Ethnic Societies (Palgrave Macmillan 2008) and her recent co-edited collections are Defining Poverty in the Developing World (Palgrave Macmillan 2007) and Globalization,Violent Conflict and Self-Determination (Palgrave Macmillan 2006). She currently serves as the President of Human Development and Capability Association. Kimberly Theidon is a medical anthropologist focusing on Latin America. Her research interests include critical theory applied to medicine, psychology and anthropology; domestic, structural and political violence; transitional justice; reconciliation; and the politics of post-war reparations. She is the author of Entre Prójimos: El conflicto armado interno y la política de la reconciliación en el Perú (Instituto de Estudios Peruanos, 1st edition 2004) and Intimate Enemies:Violence and Reconciliation in Peru (Stanford University Press, forthcoming). She is currently involved in three research projects. She is completing research on "Transitional Subjects: the Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration of Former Combatants in Colombia," in which she works with former combatants from the paramilitaries, the FARC and the ELN. In Peru, she is conducting "El Dorado: Coca, Conflict and Control in the Apurímac and Ene River Valley," an ethnographically grounded study of alternative development and forms of governmentality in the foremost coca growing region of Peru. Additionally, she directs the project "After the Truth: The Legacies of Sexual Violence in Peru. Dr. Theidon is an associate professor of anthropology at Harvard University, and the director of Praxis Institute for Social Justice. Claire Thomson is Lecturer in Scandinavian Film and Head of Scandinavian Studies, University College London. Her doctoral and postdoctoral projects explored the role of the visual arts and literary genres in shaping and reflecting (post)national identities in Scandinavian and Scottish culture. Her current research centres on posthumanist theory and eco-criticism in cinematic and literary contexts. Thompson is interested in how texts function as spaces (or maybe machines) for the negotiation of collective identities; what kinds of imagined communities emerge after the nation state and how can we understand their entanglement with more-than-human entities? Thompson edited the anthology Northern Constellations: New Readings in Nordic Cinema (Norvik Press, 2006) and her work on Nordic and Scottish literature and film has appeared in various books and journals including New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film, Synsvinkler: Tidskrift for nordisk sprog og litteratur, Scandinavica, and Language and Literature. Ongoing projects include a volume on the film Festen, and an anthology of eco-critical essays on Nordic culture, in collaboration with Christopher Oscarson of Brigham Young University.

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Fratricide and Fraternité

Ginette Vincendeau is Professor of Film Studies at King’s College London. Her research interests are in French cinema, especially popular genres (thriller, film noir, heritage, comedy) and stars, as well as European cinema. She is also interested in issues of film history, national identity, trans-national cinema and women's cinema. She is currently working on the cinematic representation of the South of France and envisages, in the longer term, to work on the representation of Paris in the cinema and on French film noir. She has written widely on French cinema including The Companion to French Cinema (Cassell/BFI, 1996) and editing The Encyclopedia of European Cinema (Cassell/BFI, 1995). She is the series editor of the Cine-Files, French Film Guides series at I.B. Tauris and regularly reviews films for Sight and Sound, BBC Radio 3, Radio 4 and the BBC World Service. Lars Waldorf is Senior Lecturer in International Human Rights Law at the Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York and Principal Organizer for the Fratricide and Fraternité seminar series. He works on mass violence, post-conflict recovery, transitional justice, and international criminal justice. He ran Human Rights Watch's field office in Rwanda from 2002-2004 and reported on genocide trials at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. He has authored numerous chapters, journal articles, and reports on Rwanda, and is currently writing a book on Rwanda's community genocide trials (gacaca) with generous support from the United States Institute of Peace. Recently, he co-edited two books: Localizing Transitional Justice with Rosalind Shaw and Pierre Hazan (Stanford University Press, 2010) and Disarming the Past: Transitional Justice and Ex-Combatants with Pablo De Greiff and Ana Patel (SSRC, 2010). He is currently completing a coedited volume with Scott Straus entitled Reconstructing Rwanda: State Building and Human Rights after Mass Violence. Rachel Beckles Willson is Reader in the Department of Music at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her research interests lie primarily in twentieth-century music historiography and the anthropology of music (particularly in connection with colonisation). She has published extensively on music in Cold War Hungary, and more recently on the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra. Since Summer 2008 Rachel has been working on a project funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and based in Berlin. Provisionally entitled Music, the Palestinians, and the Missions of the West, the resultant book will examine musical encounters between Palestinians and western visitors to Palestine from 1830 to the present day. Hope Wolf studied History (BA) and English (MPhil, ‘Criticism and Culture’) at Cambridge University. She is now completing a PhD in English Literature, supported by an AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award between King’s College, London and the Imperial War Museum. For the past three years she has lectured and convened the second-year undergraduate course in ‘First World War Literature’ at King’s. She has published in the Times Literary Supplement and Routledge Contemporary Theatre Review, and has presented papers at Museum and University conferences in the UK and USA. Hope is committed to interdisciplinary research, and is interested in the mediation of conflict in Literature, LifeWriting, Film and Museum exhibits. Her thesis explores an archive of approximately 20,000 letters: all written between 1963-4; all responding to a set of requests the BBC published in the national and international press for "vivid" remembrances of the 1914-18 period. These letters would be used to produce an ambitious twenty-six part documentary series, ‘The Great War’ (1964). The thesis reads these predominantly anecdotal letters alongside twentieth-century and contemporary theories of “myth”, “humour” and “immediacy”, and discusses the complex ways in which they give and hold back information. Paulina Wyrzykowski is a Senior Research and Advocacy Officer at the Refugee Law Project, Makerere University. A lawyer and social worker by training, she focuses on issues related to transitional justice and forced migration, including the relationship between the psycho-social needs of individuals affected by conflict and the legal remedies available to them. Over the years Paulina has worked with refugees and torture survivors in Uganda, Egypt, and Canada, where she practiced as a refugee lawyer. Paulina is also the author of The Year of Numbers, a novel set among the forced migrants in Cairo. Joanna Zylinska is a cultural theorist writing on new technologies, ethics, cultural studies and feminist theory. She is Reviews Editor for Culture Machine, an international peer-reviewed journal of cultural studies and cultural theory. Her research interests focus on new technologies and new media; debates around subjectivity and the body, including the discourses of the 'cyborg' and the 'post-human'; digital art and bioart; photography in the digital age; the ethical implications of new technologies; the relationship between culture, ethics and politics; and Polish-Jewish relations. Dr. Zylinska is currently working on a new conceptualisation of bioethics, conducted via an engagement with the work of Levinas, Derrida, Stiegler, Agamben and feminist ‘science and culture’ studies. She is also looking at different forms of bioart, and the aesthetic and ethical issues it brings up. Publications include: Imaginary Neighbors: Mediating Polish-Jewish Relations after the Holocaust (2007), a collection co-edited with Dorota Glowacka, and The Ethics of Cultural Studies (2005).

www.sas.ac.uk

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Fratricide and Fraternité

ABOUT THE SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDY AND THE HUMAN RIGHTS CONSORTIUM The School of Advanced Study The School of Advanced Study at the University of London is the only institution of its kind in the UK nationally funded to promote and facilitate research in the humanities and social sciences. The School brings together the specialised scholarship and resources of ten prestigious postgraduate research institutes to offer academic opportunities, facilities and stimulation across a wide range of subjects for the benefit of the national and international scholarly community. Collectively, the ten Institutes of the School organise an enviable programme of events spanning the humanities and social sciences. Each year around 1,400 separate events - including seminars, lectures, conferences and workshops - attract over 30,000 audience members drawn from around the UK and internationally as well as the London area. The majority of these events are open to the public and free to attend. The School also manages major collaborative events on a regular basis, working with private, public and charitable organisations, from the local Bloomsbury Festival, to the Screen Studies Group, one of the world’s largest networks of screen media scholars. For more information about these events and to view the full calendar of future seminiars and conferences, please visit www.sas.ac.uk/events/list/sas_events. Event videos and podcasts online Selected School events are recorded and available to view online and download from www.sas.ac.uk/video.html. Mailing list To receive information on events of interest to you please sign up to our mailing list by emailing SAS.events@sas.ac.uk or via the School’s website at www.sas.ac.uk.

The Human Rights Consortium The Human Rights Consortium, founded in 2009 at the School of Advanced Study, brings together the multidisciplinary expertise in human rights found in several institutes of the School, as well as collaborating with individuals and organisations with an interest in the subject. The main aim of the Consortium is to facilitate, promote and disseminate academic and policy work on human rights by holding conferences and seminars, hosting visiting fellows, coordinating the publication of high quality work in the field, and establishing a network of human rights researchers, policy-makers and practitioners across the UK and internationally, with a view to collaborating on a range of activities. For more information, please visit www.sas.ac.uk/human_rights.html.

Senate House Cloisters © University of London

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MEMBER INSTITUTES OF THE SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDY: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

www.ials.sas.ac.uk

Institute of Classical Studies www.icls.sas.ac.uk

Institute of Commonwealth Studies

www.commonwealth.sas.ac.uk

Institute of English Studies www.ies.sas.ac.uk

Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies www.igrs.sas.ac.uk

Institute of Historical Research www.history.ac.uk

Institute of Musical Research

www.music.sas.ac.uk

Institute of Philosophy www.philosophy.sas.ac.uk

Institute for the Study of the Americas www.americas.sas.ac.uk

Warburg Institute

www.warburg.sas.ac.uk


Human Rights Consortium School of Advanced Study University of London Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU E: HRC@sas.ac.uk W: www.sas.ac.uk/human_rights.html


Fratricide and Fraternite  

School of Advanced Study Mellon Sawyer Seminar Series Programme Feb - Oct 2010

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