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Sean Chia portfolio


Sean Chia December 2012


contents

profile

SELECTED WORK

the gastronomical monastery

6

medical-agrotourism facility

reading the monongahela

14

environmental centre

taman kampong: a glimpse of potentiality

20

mixed-class/mixed-use hybrid development

the alexandra cyclery

28

integrated centre for cycling

inhabitation: new life zone at lembu square

36

atmosphere: response and construction

46

backpackers’ hostel

hideout for landscape photographers

OTHER

take one

58

20x60x3000

60

installation

bamboo construction

acknowledgements


profile Sean Chia was born in Singapore and graduated in May 2012 with a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture (Honours, First Class) from the National University of Singapore. Besides being placed on the Dean’s List throughout the course of study, he received the Board of Architect’s Prize in 2009/2010. Presently an Architectural Intern at WOHA Architects, his past experiences includes an exchange programme at Carnegie Mellon University in USA, a teaching assistant for a course on Strategies for Sustainable Architecture, as well as a student delegate at the 24th World Congress of Architecture, UIA2011 Tokyo. His predominant architectural interests lie in critical design thinking, experiential process and formal legibility of the built environment. Intrigued by the potential of real-world architectural inquiry and exploration, he aspires to further his education at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.


SELECTED WORK


the gastronomical monastery

type/year third-year project, ba (arch) nus, 2011 course/instructor ar3102, patrick chia (adj. prof., nus) location dempsey hill, singapore program medical-agrotourism facility with accomodation

“Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food.”

Eating is an intrinsic constituent for living and is executed on a daily basis. By harnessing this premise, nutrition becomes a quintessential element in the pursuit for health. However, eating today has been eroded by socio-economical forces into a mere vehicle to satisfy hedonic desires. This disjunction in the wholesomeness of food results in detrimental repercussions in one’s state of health. The role of the facility is thus to rekindle our otherwise devolved attitude towards food through an augmented reharmonisation of the food cycle ― where growing, cooking and eating is celebrated. Emphasis on the different processes are played out in a hierarchy reverse to the existing realm whereby consumption is deemed the most important activity in nutrition. The idea of a spectacle and promenade is exploited through a careful calibration of axes, light, and spatial-volumetric gradations.

6

- Hippocrates, 460-359 B.C.

Appropriate technologies has been called upon in the building to suggest the notion of wholeness: biological digesters complete the food cycle by breaking down waste from the building into compost that feeds the roof farm, and radiative cooling pipes are casted into the screed to utilise the cool-pool formed by the building. Similarly, an attempt to reflect this idea is reflected in construction details. Resonating with context and perpetuating the message of food as medicine, the independent production and consumption of food on-site serves as a critique of the commercialised state of dining establishments in the vicinity, allowing for the potential of sparking an interest in wholesome eating and organic produce. Ultimately, the healing of the body is only temporary ― but changing our attitude towards health is forever.


a hierarchical reversal of the food consumption process and formal strategies to create spectacle through views and sequence 7


8


0

1

5

10M

longitudinal section across meditation tower, roof farm, kitchen, transitory pathway, and reception

9


OFFICE MEETING

A’ ±0.00 LOBBY +3.50 m

±0.00

ROOF FARM +3.50 m

CSR

MDF

+3.50 m

STAFF ENTRANCE +3.50 m

+3.50 m

N

2F PLAN (1:200)

0

2

10

20M

B’

INFRASAUNA TREATMENT

CONSULTATION

LIBRARY

±0.00

A’ A REBIRTH CANAL KITCHEN +1.00 m

MEDITATION TOWER

+3.50 m

REFECTORY +0.50 m

EMERGENCY / SERVICE ±0.00

+3.50 m

MECHANICAL: BIOLOGICAL DIGESTER

MECHANICAL: RADIATIVE COOLING

N

1F PLAN (1:200)

B

top: ground floor plan above: basement plan 10

0

2

10

20M


SECTION DETAIL BB’

0

1

5

10M

above: section across roof farm, refectory, kitchen, and accommodation below (clockwise): kitchen, guestroom cluster, meditation tower

11


COMPOSITE R.C. + STEEL DECK ROOF SLAB

LH SERIES LONGSPAN OPEN-WEB STEEL JOIST for column-free receoption space

R.C. FLAT SLAB roof farm and garden

STRUCTURAL R.C. COLUMNS open kitchen and refectory

HIGH -PERFORAMANCE CONCRETE meditation tower and elevator shaft LOAD-BEARING R.C. WALLS room partition

RETAINING WALL subterreanean structure

ALUMINIUM CANOPIES WITH STEEL SUBSTRUCTURE

CUT & COVER METHOD subterrenean structure

exploded structural axonometric 12

R.C. FLOOR SLAB


SECTION BB’ DETAIL SCALE = 1:20

STAIR DETAIL SCALE = 1:5

ASSEMBLY BREAKDOWN SCALE = 1:75

ALUMINIUM LOUVRES

STEEL SUBSTRUCTURE WITH AIRCRAFT CABLE IN TENSION

LANDING

TREADS STACKED THROUGH INNER COMPOSITE COLUMN

TREAD EXTENDS TO FORM TABLE TOP

BALUSTRADE AND HANDRAIL

SECURED TO CONCRETE BASE

top: construction detail of typical guestroom above: customised stair-table-parasol contraption 13


reading the monongahela

type/year third-year project, b.arch, carnegie-mellon university, 2010 course/instructor 48300, jennifer gallagher (adj. prof., cmu) location pittsburgh, pennsylvania, usa program environmental centre with outdoor classroom and accommodation

The dichotomy between the perception of the natural as opposed to the reality of the man-made is explored in this project. The essence of an intricate reading of site and landscape is distilled into discrete sequential phenomena that in return, through architectural articulation, begins to read the landscape.

Topographically challenging, the site spans approximately 2.3km² of extensive trails, steep valleys, and a stream. The project is located next to a delta of this stream. Although one perceives the site to be natural, it is in fact highly constructed. This dichotomy is expressed by the created artefact ― a box wrapped in a skin of leaves. Upon first glance, it appears to be a natural object; the rectilinear outline of the artefact however undermines this observation, resulting in an appreciation of the natural-artificial duality. Correspondingly, the goal of the architecture is to suppress, augment and finally reveal on-site elements, switching between the established notions and states of the perceived-natural/reality-artificial duality. A view becomes a message when it is manipulated: upon entering the building, the vista is reduced to just that of the river, but subsequently, the full picture is revealed.

14

A terraced plaza with habitable space that varies proportionally with the tide results in a greater awareness of the fluctuations of the river that otherwise goes unnoticed by the casual visitor. A sudden blast of locomotive noise sweeps through this funnel-shaped plaza, interrupting the tranquil panorama and immediately dissolving the illusion of one’s immersion in nature, while exposing a vestige of Pittsburgh’s rarely noticed and illustrious past. Lastly, an awakening of the senses is necessary for these experiences to be apparent, and thus the approach to the building requires one to wade across ankle-height water of the river on approach to the centre. As much as the site fuels the architecture, the latter has the ambition of bestowing lessons to its visitors through an orchestration of experiences made possible by the very landscape that they are situated in.


artificially natural or naturally artificial?

15


x

N

0’

site studies on topography, vegetation, views, trails, and other natural and man-made phenomena 16

20’

40’

80’


!

!

!

!

diagrams depicting empirical engagement of site phenomena via architectural apparatus 17


B

C’

A

5

4

5

7

3 6

1

2

B’

C

A’

1

ADMINISTRATIVE

2

INDOOR EXHIBIT + LEARNING AREA

3

OUTDOOR LEARNING AREA

4

DINING

5

CLASSROOM

6

MEDIATHEQUE + LIBRARY

7

ACCOMMODATION

0’

10’

N

20’

0’

40’

10’

20’

40’

SECTION AA’ 1” : 10’

0’

10’

20’

40’

SECTION BB’ 1” : 10’

0’

10’

20’

40’

SECTION CC’ 1” : 10’

plans and sections 18


perspectives and 1/10� scale model 19


taman kampong: a glimpse of potentiality

type/year fourth-year project, ba (arch) nus, 2012 course/instructor ar4102, bobby wong (assoc. prof., nus) location lippo karawaci, tangerang, indonesia program mixed-class/mixed-use hybrid development

While popular belief holds that it is impossible for people of different economic classes to mix harmoniously in the same neighbourhood, the scheme challenges this assumption through a typological modification of the prevailing middle-class housing model. In this experimental housing project, the two communities are not segregated, but instead brought together, creating a heterogeneous body where residents co-exist symbiotically and ultimately eradicating the societal divide between multi-level income groups.

As a socially-responsible developer, Lippo decides to approach urbanisation from a fresh perspective. Instead of evicting residents from kampongs (a local type of informal settlement) to urban peripheries, a new type of residential development will be built on the acquired land that comprises of both original kampong residents as well as the influx of middle-class residents. The impetus grounding this seemingly imprudent proposition leverages on the interdependent nature of the kampong and middle-class residents, where localised retail and service providers within the kampong are a perfect match with the incessant desire of the middle-class for bargains.

In a single built structural unit, both middle-class and kampong residents are provided for. With issues of privacy and vehicular access considered, these units are calibrated and mirrored in two axes to form an aggregation of four kampong sub-units, generating an enclave. A bi-dimensional tessellation of these units results in the creation of two fronts: a “middle-class street” and a “kampong street”. Since the latter is a front to a multiplicity of warungs (localised shops), it has the duality of being a “market street”, creating an enticing belt of convenience for the middle-class to enjoy.

When the high cost of past governmental projects is juxtaposed against the skyrocketing demand for themed middle-class estates, the latter becomes a potential platform for alleviating the former.

To bring connection of the two classes beyond the kampong street, each unit is further calibrated to allow interaction on a more intimate scale between the servant’s domain (a feature characteristic of the typical Indonesian middle-class house), and the former kampong residents.

A survey of floor plans from existing estates reveals little difference between the themed houses. This skin-deep characteristic allows for a modification of the houses to form infrastructure for self-help housing by the kampong.

As neoliberal capitalist forces continue to exacerbate the richpoor divide not only in Indonesia, but throughout the world as well, could Taman Kampong form the basis of a possible solution to a more equitable urbanisation?

20


what if property developers could expand more equitably?

21


?

typical middle-class house: different facades but similar floor plans

opportunity for intervention beyond the facade

floor plan folded to form L-shaped unit

structural elements extended to form infrastructure

$

self-help infill by kampong class; middle-class facade re-applied

22

$$$

two classes housed in a single, compact unit


st re et ng

se rv

ice

st re et

se rv

ice

st re et

ka m po

-c la ss st re et le m id d

st re et ng ka m po

newly-formed hybrid estate via bi-dimensional tessellation privacy upheld through access calibration middle-class can still uphold their pristine front image kampong dwellers can still enjoy community living

4m

4m

6m

9m

6m

typical middle-class terraced housing estate uni-dimensional tessellation

developable and expandable housing for kampong community mini-enclaves evoke ‘togetherness’ reminiscent of the past

hierarchy of streets expressed through road width overall more defined neighbourhood

?

expandable housing unit for k community centralised service core

integrated m-c & k housing w/ distinct access for both classes

x

interaction between m-c & k limited to k street lack of immediate dialogue between m-c & k

o

x

introduction of shared void facilitates both interaction and ventilation

issues of access and privacy must still be upheld void further shaped to provide required privacy

m-c service core positioned as a privacy barrier void forms a ‘negative lock’ that separates and joins

diagrams depicting modification of existing middle-class houses, self-help unit and neighbourhood formation strategies 23


sectional cut across both streets depicting the relationship between the two classes

perspective of middle-class street

24


0

1

5

10M

perspective of “market” street

25


A’

B’

B

A

N

0

neighbourhood plan depicting contrasting qualities of each street 26

1

5

10M


neighbouhood axonometric 27


the alexandra cyclery

type/year fourth-year project, ba (arch) nus, 2011 course/instructor ar4101, dr. tan beng kiang (snr. lect., nus) location alexandra, singapore program bicycle retail, repair and recycle facility with integrated learning workshop and museum

Following an extensive group study of the 26 kilometre-long Singapore-Malaysian railway site, the core of this project is a simultaneous contextual response to both the past and future. A historic spur line is manifested in the form of a building that recalls its illustrious past, and reinforces the future cycling network through the introduction of new type of programme.

In 2020, seven years after the rail corridor has been endorsed by the Urban Redevelopment Authority, it has subsequently developed into a bustling cycling link from the northern-most part of the island right down into the heart of the city. Like a seed, the rail corridor has sparked the birth of an intricate network of cycling paths. Cycling for the majority is now more than just a means of recreation; it is part of everyday life. A characteristic unique to the site at Alexandra is the businesses being located immediately adjacent to the rail corridor. We could start to imagine these businesses exploiting the traffic on the rail corridor, serving cyclists with retail, repair, F&B, etc.

28

When we talk about Singapore as a bike-savvy nation, in contrast to a car-savvy nation, we are talking about more than just bike shops. How do we then address this intent? Perhaps a greater understanding of the bicycle, and a deeper appreciation of cycling and how things come together would allow it to do more for us. We could thus imagine a Learn, Build and Ride workshop — a cyclery: The Alexandra Cyclery, a one-stop destination for cycling that simultaneously performs as a programmatic syphon, piquing curiosity while linking people with the magical realm of the rail corridor.


what can this land become?

29


FUTURE GREEN CORRIDOR

EXPUNGED BRANCH LINE

AUTOMOBILE OBSESSION

?

Q U N

TIN GG IP AR K

EE SW

Woodlands Town Garden

A Y

IKEA

AH

24.2km

RU M

QUEENSWAY SHOPPING CENTRE

BRICKWORKS ESTATE

Kranji Road

23.7km

ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL

22.5km

Kranji War Memorial

JALAN

Mandai Estate

21.3km

ALEXANDRA VILLAGE INDUSTRIAL ESTATE

REDHILL INDUSTRIAL ESTATE

R O

A D

NEA REGIONAL CENTRE

Stagmont Ring

A L E X A N

D

R A

18.5km

BUKIT M ERAH

Ten Mile Junction

16.7km

Gombak Drive

AYER RAJAH EXP RESSWAY (AYE)

15.6km

RESIDENTIAL

RESIDENTIAL Hillview MRT

DEPOT LANE INDUSTRIAL ESTATE

14.6km

SOUTHERN RIDGES (100m)

12.4km

Bukit Timah Nature Reserve

King Albert Park MRT

11.2km

Holland Road

9.5km

Jalan Jelita

8.6km

7.6km

Buona Vista MRT

Commonwealth Drive

Serviced Access Point 3-5 km; 12-20 mins (bike), 36-60 mins (walk)

6.6km

Jalan Hang Jebat

5.5km

4.0km

Bukit Merah Central Alexandra Village

Access Point

3.0km

Lower Delta Road 2.0km

Kampong Bahru Road 0.0km

1 km; 4 mins (bike), 12 mins (walk) 1.2km

Tanjong Pagar Railway Station

Shelter 500-700m; 2-3 mins (bike), 6-8 mins (walk)

above: locality map indicating site as a linear conduit left: master plan locating access points, service stops and other amenities along the entire 26 km route

right: programmatic diagram — patrons enter clueless and leave enlightened, with the entire rail corridor to savour on two wheels. 30


T HE AL EXAN DR A C YCL ERY L EA R N + B U I L D + R I D E WO R K S HO P

MDF+CSR

museum

12

90

primary reception

40

1797 15

metal workshop powder coating booth

Celerifere

360

frame

180

wheels

180

drivetrain

FITTING FRAME FORK HEADSET STEM

1817 Draisienne

RIMS ROTORS CASSETTE TIRES

1839 MacMillan Velocipede

CRANKSET CRANK ARMS FRONT DERAILEUR REAR DERAILEUR CHAIN

break

1863 Michaux Velocipede secondary/service entrance

180

cafe + books

90

multi-purpose (talks, training)

*

+ outdoor plaza

circa 1870 Penny-farthing 180

controls

180

seat

HANDLEBARS SHIFTERS BRAKE LEVERS PEDALS CABLES HOSES

1885 - 1890 Safety Bicycle

SEAT POST SADDLE FINAL ADJUSTMENTS

rental shower

25

parking

25

360 90

*

recycling receptacle point 90

secondary reception

90

staff office

accessories

HELMET LIGHTS SHADES JERSEY SHOES

alexandra halt

31


AA’ entrance

BB’ assembly area (frame)

longitudinal sections: banking and bending along the branch line, the form evokes site history by capturing both movement and memory

CC’ museum exhibit

DD’ cafe

EE’ secondary entrance + outdoor plaza

FF’ storage and display (seat)

GG’ rental

SECTIONS (1:100)

0

32

1

5

10M


A

x driveway ±0.00 m

Rumah Tinggi Park (0.2km)

shared path ±0.00

MDF

reception +0.60

A’ CSR Celerifere/1797

display store

B

FRAME

metal workshop

assembly area

B’

C

Draisienne /1817

C’

WHEELS

floor plan: assembly line building up bicycle and knowledge along the site

MacMillan Velocipede/1839

DRIVETRAIN

Michaux Velocipede/1863

D D’

cafe

office

outdoor plaza ±0.00

E

E’ reception +0.60

multi-purpose

CONTROLS

Penny-farthing/circa 1870

F’ SEAT

F

Safety Bicycle/1885 - 1890

ACCESSORIES

W oo

dla

nd

s(

20

.2k

m

)

RENTAL (300 BIKES)

G’

1:500 site model

G

FOOD CENTRE

N Ta n

jo

1F PLAN (1:250)

0

2.5

ng

Pa g

ar

12.5

25M

(4

.0k

m

)

33


KALZIP ALUMINIUM ROOFING w/ STRUCTURAL DECKING lightweight free-form roofing system

STEEL PORTAL FRAME w/ LATERAL BRACING for column-free interior space

OVERHEAD BI-FOLD DOORS w/ ALUMINIUM SUNSHADES as shopfront opening and variable sunshading device

EXTRUDED ALUMINIUM HYDROPROOF PROFILE LOUVERS as breathable walls

R.C. FLOOR SLAB

DRYWALL PARTITIONS for flexibility in future space planning

structural axonometric

34


exterior perspective

typical section construction detail

35


inhabitation: new life zone at lembu square

type/year second-year project, ba (arch) nus, 2010 course/instructor ar2102, tsuto sakamoto (asst. prof., nus) location little india, singapore program backpackers’ hostel

The precise identification and augmentation of on-site atmosphere dramatically reverses the established relationship between backpacker and inhabitants of Little India. Belittling views, the notion of contextual association is explored beyond the visual medium.

In this investigation, cooks from a particular restaurant were of interest because they live and work together in the same establishment, leading to a strong sense of camaraderie. In order to encourage a similar level of communal interaction within the backpacker’s hostel, the architecture strives to persuade its inhabitants to leave their individual spaces.

On approach, the backpacker experiences a ‘king-of-the-hill’ moment as he scales the building and overlooks the square, before making his way down into the hostel. He subsequently walks into typical communal spaces, before dropping to his knees to crawl into the more private areas due to the rapidly compressing ceiling heights.

The idea of the ‘squeeze’ is derived from the cooks’ quarters, as well as the densely populated vicinity of Little India. Since interpersonal interaction is encouraged, the spaces for communal activities offer hospitable ceiling height together with natural light and ventilation. Conversely, the spaces which are anti-social in nature are highly compressed and have no visual connection to the outside.

The culmination of this gesture occurs where he sleeps, whereby the basis for such a spatial composition is finally made known to him through a medium that is most obvious ― vision. As he looks out through a narrow slit that separates the roof and floor of the building, he catches a glimpse of the feet of foreign workers congregating over the building.

Formally, one could start to imagine the program being “shrink-wrapped” by the building. A cross-sectional cut through the building reveals backpackers crawling, crouching and living in the minimum possible ceiling heights defined anthropomorphically by the activities in the hostel, while foreign workers congregate on the roof over them. Ultimately, the ‘squeeze’ becomes highly discernable.

36

As much as Lembu Square affords for such a building, the latter offers a landscape punctuated with niches which allow foreign workers who populate the site to better enjoy their Sundays. Beginning with a seat, ingenuity would soon find other uses for this new landscape. They soon learn about the people that live beneath their feet through clues such as smoke from cooking, as well as light that leaks out through the building, completing the dialogue between inhabitants and context.


conceptual diagram: a “shrink-wrap� around inhabitation 37


site

#19 upper dickson road

grocer/wholesale

restaurant/coffee shop

top: mapping of all food and food-related establishments in little india above: front-back polarity of shophouses 38


2F

1F

schematic of cramped dormitory in contrast with spacious kitchen 39


A

A’

N

PLAN 1:75

0

floor plan 40

1

5

10


scheme axonometric 41


SECTION AA’ 1:75

N-W ELEVATION 1:75

0

top: section above: elevation

42

1

5

10


interior perspectives of communal area and accommodation

43


diurnal relationship between building and site 44


models of various scales to verify form and ergonomics 45


atmosphere: response and construction

type/year second-year project, ba (arch) nus, 2009 course/instructor ar2101, erik l’heureux (asst. prof., nus) location pandan reservoir, singapore program hideout for landscape photographers

Two ocular frames, two views, one site and a landscape photographer. Cantilevering over a levee between a vestige of an original mangrove and an artificial reservoir, an atmosphere of optical precision frames discrete components of the landscape. Views, sounds, and smells are calibrated within a singular volume, bifurcated, torqued, and transformed to house a photographer and her obsessions. Water and sky are isolated in doing so, focused carefully through the lens of architecture. Here in an age of digital distraction, the analogue is the prescription for the blasé of Singaporeans and their digital SLRs.

Pandan Reservoir exists as a buffer between the industrial and housing estates in the vicinity. A view of these contrasting estates create a sense of surrealism since one is only used to seeing each estate individually. Meanwhile, seclusion of the site together with sweeping vistas provide an aura of stillness. Conclusively, these atmospheres were thus chosen to drive the architecture. To fabricate an atmosphere of stillness, elements on site were selected to be optically isolated. The building thus frames sky and water, since they were the most prominent on-site. The vastness is further emphasised with the large openings to both of these elements, and they are further amplified by a sequence of volumetric compression and expansion. Surrealism on the other hand, is achieved through a non-visual medium. The building in this case juxtaposes the industrial hum and jungle ambient on-site with the dead silence that one would usually expect in a photographic dark room.

46

These two means of achieving the desired atmospheres are further expressed in other aspects of the scheme. Dali’s paranoiac-critical method is employed by sizing the optical frames of the building in a similar proportion to that of a photograph produced by a 35mm lens, and resultantly heightening one’s sense of surrealism. Lastly, through the instrumentation of nature, the planting around the building isolates site elements in a similar manner as the building, and one would be hit by the realisation that the landscape performs the same way as the building, further adding to the desired atmosphere. On the whole, the careful consideration of site, context and drivers, as well as the calibration and implementation of the desired experiences allow for a thoroughly atmosphericallydriven architecture. As much as the context would allow for surrealism and stillness, the architecture aspires to reciprocate and lend the site similar atmospherics.


47


48


the omnipresent vastness of sky and water on-site

49


50


sections with sightlines depicting isolated views 51


plans 52


exploded axonometric based on programmatic and structural function 53


54


study models depicting the calibration and development of scheme 55


OTHER


take one type: third-year project, ba (arch) nus (on exchange with carnegie-mellon university) year: 2010 location: pittsburgh, pennsylvania, usa program: outdoor site installation

Just as the presence of water signifies life, litter on the once disused slag heap signifies human activity.

Natural regeneration of the wasteland has not only seen a revival in the form of vegetation, but human presence as well. This is evident not only in the garbage strewn on the site, but the numerous trails and desire paths found. In a bid to raise the awareness of this observation to park users, pieces of trash that are usually hidden from view by vegetation are elevated on timber posts. As a result, the magnitude of this phenomenon becomes clear. Instead of seeing just nearby pieces of trash, one now sees all the trash on site in a single visual sweep, creating a sense of revelation and heightening one’s consciousness of the situation. A receptacle in the form of a garbage can is placed within this field to suggest one’s active participation and responsibility for the environment. site plan

58


conceptual diagram

approach from south-eastern trail

59


20x60x3000 type: second-year bamboo construction project, ba (arch) nus year: 2009 location: nus campus, singapore status: dismantled

Through exhaustive experimentation in this project, bamboo was pushed to its limits ― a rigourous study of optical art, tessellating systems and the ruled surface framed our understanding of the geometrical propensities of the material in its natural form. Deception through tectonics, a sensibility derived from the studies, resulted in the eventual manifestation of the structure and its construction.

clockwise, from top left: elevation; construction; tessalation study; plan 60


material testing and devised joinery 61


acknowledgements 2012 taman kampong: a glimpse of potentiality Instructor: Bobby Wong (Associate Professor, NUS) Studio: Anna Chong, Chen Hui Hua, Eugene Tan, Jocelyn Chen, Kelly Koh, Kelvin Ng, Kevin Ong, Valerie Koh, Wang Yi Chao, Yong Xin Miao

2011 the alexandra cyclery Instructors: Dr. Tan Beng Kiang (Senior Lecturer, NUS), Fung John Chye (Adjunct Professor, NUS) Vertical Studio: Tan Ying Yi, Peter Then, Chong Wei Rong, Irvin Chia, Nicholas Teoh, Oscar Korintus, Dolly Foo, Beth Yang, Steve Huang, Selene Gan, Kan Lijing, Zhang Runze, Shen Hewei, Biran He

the gastronomical monastery Instructor: Patrick Chia (Adjunct Professor, NUS), Ben Redmond (WOHA Architects, Adjunct Professor, NUS) Studio: Clarence Fung, Alex Liu, Chen Ee Zhen, Jocelyn Chen, Denise Tan, Teo Xiao Wei, Hannah Young, Teguh Salim, Keith Chen

2010 reading the monongahela and take one Instructor: Jennifer Gallagher (Laquatra Bonci Associates, Adjunct Professor, Carnegie Mellon University) Studio: Dmitri Yakubov, Becky Cole, Chasen Van Lang, Dan Burdzy, Eric Bruner, Sarah Harkins, Talia Perry, John Kim

inhabitation: new life zone at lembu square Instructor: Tsuto Sakamoto (Assistant Professor, NUS) Studio: Bi Hui, Florencia Wibisono, Roy Fong, Fu Maoying, Hendry Octavanus, Ian Wong, Kelly Koh, Kelvin Ng, Ng Min, Ngu Ping Hwei, Ning Xianlin

2009 atmosphere: response and construction and 20x60x3000 Instructor: Erik L’Heureux (Assistant Professor, NUS) Studio: Chan Soon Ming, Germaine Kang, Khoo Shan Hu, Lin Yuxuan, Linda Yuliani, Fauzy Ismail, Nathawut Tangjitpeanshoke, Peter Then, Vedika Saxena, Jessica Wee, Eunice Zhuang

62


*all photographs are by the author, unless otherwise stated.



Sean Chia - Portfolio