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IN NEW YORK

MAY 201 3 NO. 15

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THOM Browne AMERICA’S MOST PROVOCATIVE DESIGNER

THE PASSION OF

BRANDUSA NIRO: FASHION WEEK’S MVP/BAD BOY ERIC FISCHL PLUS: Bohemia Luxuria: Inside the Home of Haute Hippie, Jack and Anjelica Revisited

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CONTENTS | May 2013

Page 54:

The Passion of Thom Browne

12 EDITOR’S LETTER 14 SCHOOL DAZE Charlie Campbell’s latest shenanigans. By Peter Davis.

104 ASK ANNELISE Dating guru Annelise Peterson answers our readers’ questions.

FEATURES 54 THE PASSION OF THOM BROWNE The revolutionary and reclusive designer opens up about his path to success and venturing into womenswear. By Darrell Hartman

70 FASHION’S QUEEN B She’s been called the Wizard of Oz for her behind-the-scenes take on all things fashion. We talk to the founder and Editor in Chief of The Daily, Brandusa Niro.

We go inside the home of Haute Hippie’s Trish Wescoat Pound and Jesse Cole and take a look at other bold-faced names who have embraced the boho lifestyle. By Delphine Barguirdjian

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AN LE

74 A HAUTE AND HIPPIE HOME

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CONTENTS | May 2013

Page 32:

Lorenzo Martone pops a wheelie.

Page 24:

Tyler Thoreson makes SCENE’s Cut.

FASHION Leisure Society’s Shane Baum. By Eliza Krpoyan

22 JEWELRY These rings pack one big punch.

24 THE CUT Gilt Groupe’s Tyler Thoreson shares his style must-haves.

26 INSPIRED BY Power couple of yesteryear, Anjelica Huston and Jack Nicholson.

SOCIETY 30 TED ON THE TOWN A trip down 80s memory lane. By Ted Gushue

32 UP NEXT Lorenzo Martone’s chic bikes. By Delphine Barguirdjian

34 WORK OF ART A chat with Eric Fischl and an excerpt from his controversial memoir, Bad Boy. By Delphine Barguirdjian 08

SCENE MAGAZINE

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52 ART CALENDAR

38 HOT SPOT Cocktail time calls for one of Rogue and Canon’s distinct and tasty drinks. By Carson Griffith

40 SOCIAL CALENDAR The social scene ahead. By Eliza Krpoyan with Guest of a Guest

This months art auctions and exhibitions.

NIGHTLIFE 98 PARTIES

HOME

This month’s hottest happenings. By Delphine Barguirdjian

44 PRODUCTS Add a touch of rustic to your home with these wood-crafted pieces.

102 BEST DRESSED Our pick of the most stylish party-goers. By Eliza Krpoyan

46 NINA FREUDENBERGER The designer dishes on her must-have pieces for every room in the house. By Eliza Krpoyan

48 AT HOME WITH We visit the home of fashion designer Gretchen Jones. By Eliza Krpoyan

MARTONE: ZEPH COLOMBATTO

20 INFLUENCER

ON THE COVER

THOM BROWNE wears his own pieces. Photographed by AN LE ; styled by MARCUS TEO .

MAY 2013

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CONTRIBUTORS | May 2013 An le An Le came to the U.S. when he was

only 15 years old to pursue his dream as an artist. He fell in love with photography unexpectedly during his senior year of high school while he was playing around with his aunt’s digital point and shoot camera. Le graduated from Savannah College of Art and Design with a Bachelor of Fine Art degree in photography in June 2012. He was named as the grand winner of the New Exposure award by Vogue, Red Camera and Bottega Venetta. He has lived in New York since September of 2012. I just went to Craft recently and enjoyed the food there. I also like this random Japanese restaurant called Mikado—they have some cool rolls. Work of Art: An artist’s whose studio I’d want to have a peek inside would be Joel Peter-Witkin. Get out of Town: Antarctica, because I like the cold and how “simple” the color palette is. Hot Spot:

annelise peterson Annelise Peterson is currently

editor in chief peter davis Publisher Joseph Meyer art director dean quigley senior editor delphine barguirdjian associate editor eliza krpoyan marketing manager jacqueline curley Fashion news editor david yi Fashion Market editor benjamin-émile le hay editor at large zandile blay society editor ted gushue arts editor william corwin european editor tom sykes fact checker Ida Griesemer interns Jacqueline Aqel, mila hall CONTRIBUTING WRITERS jared baumeister, corbin brett chamberlin, darrell hartman, rachelle hruska, Stephanie Newhouse, beth landman, Martin Marks, Annelise Peterson, anna preston gelderd, ray rogers, daniel edward rosen, daniel scheffler, rebecca suhrawardi, zachary weiss CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS an le, Jonathan Bookallil, Tommaso Cardile, sophie elgort, richard gerst, Hanuk Hanuk, Josh Lehrer, Danielle Levitt, Marie-Noyale, Ben Pope, ned & aya rosen, Ben Fink Shapiro, Victoria Stevens, Alexander Thompson

the Director of Client Relations at Net-a-Porter. Prior to this, Peterson founded her own boutique consultancy, which catered to luxury lifestyle and fashion brands, drawing upon her executive experience with brands like Calvin Klein and Valentino. A California native, Peterson holds a degree in Economics from Barnard College and is a licensed, non-practicing yoga instructor.

CONTRIBUTORS june ambrose, Stephen Drucker, Miguelina Gambaccini, Good Days by Unruly Heir, Lorenzo Martone, Lucy Sykes Rellie, Euan Rellie, Amy Sacco, Kate Schelter, Arden Wohl, marcus teo

OBSERVER MEDIA publisher jared kushner CEO Joseph Meyer President Mike Albanese editorial Director Ken Kurson

Hot spot :

Vin et Fleurs. 37 Extreme Actives moisturizer and great lingerie. Time Traveler : The Heights—my college go-to on 110th street.

Have to Have :

vice president of sales and marketing david gursky classified advertising director ken newman Director of marketing and events zarah burstein controller mark pomerantz general counsel laurence rabinowitz

ycle This ec

azine

Have to Have: Time Traveler:

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scene magazine

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SCENE Magazine is published by the Observer Media Group at 321 W. 44th St. 6th Floor, New York, NY 10036; (212) 755-2400; visit us online at SCENEinNY.com or follow us on Twitter @SCENEinNY

Hartman: neil rasmus/bfanyc.com

ag

Anything Santa Maria Novella. Bemelmans Bar. Get Out Of Town: Fly-fishing with Dad at Dunton Hot Springs, Colorado.

founding publisher julie dannenberg

M

Style.com and a freelance writer for publications including The Wall Street Journal, Artforum, and Town & Country. He is also a cofounder of the travel website Jungles in Paris. He lives in downtown Manhattan and spends as much of summer as he can in his home state, Maine.

production director ed johnson advertising production lisa medchill

Please R

Darrell Hartman Darrell Hartman is a contributing editor at

may 2013

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EDITOR’S LETTER | May 2013

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Clockwise from left:

1. On set with An Le 2. With Isabel Wilkinson at No. 8 3.

Haute Hippie’s Trish Wescoat Pound and Jesse Cole. 4. Natalie Keyser on the Thom Browne set 5. With Brandusa Niro at The Daily’s 10th anniversary party

SCENE and her enthusiasm and opinions will leave you wishing you had her on speed dial. We also visit the home of Haute Hippie’s power couple Jesse Cole and Trish Westcoat-Pound who bring the Bohemia Luxuria aesthetic to the masses in both their inimitable clothing line and their luxurious, yet laid back lifestyle. And in an Haute Hippie mood, we provide a guidebook to the fabulous and famous people who have made La Vie Boho as stylish as it gets. With that, I am off to plan a trip to Tangiers while scouring eBay for a vintage Yves Saint Laurent caftan to Peter Davis Davis, wear while shopping for beaded bracelets. Editor in Chief

1. & 4. AN LEE; 2. & 3.: BFANYC.COM; 4. PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM

bought my first Thom Browne jacket years ago. It’s grey with black grosgrain ribbon trim and reminds me of what I might have worn had I gone to boarding school in England as opposed to New England. “Why doesn’t your jacket fit?” my mother asked, eyeballing the shrunken dimensions of my Thom Browne. “That’s the point,” I responded, tempted to pull out the Bergdorf Goodman bill as proof of what this schoolboy look had cost to achieve. I was an early fan of Browne’s clothes and my closet today is filled with his perfectly cut button down shirts, many stamped with a label marking the year it was produced, making me something of a very expensive archivist of the designer. When First Lady Michelle Obama wore Thom Browne to the inauguration, I was thrilled and tempted to tell critics of my teensy blazers, “Told you so!” With shows that can verge on cuckoo, the endlessly creative Browne is an artist who has polarized the fashion world. People either love his collections or love to hate his provocative point of view. Yet despite any negative reviews, his unique eye has changed men’s fashion (Browne predicted the Mad Men look before the show was even a pilot) and won him lucrative deals with Moncler and Brooks Brothers, for which he designs the wildly popular Black Fleece line. Now Browne is bringing his surreal sensibility to women. Writer Darrell Hartman picks the designer’s brain and photographer An Le, a dynamo of energy and over-the-top ideas, shot a series of striking images that are now my favorite portfolio ever published in this magazine. Another fashion force is my former boss, Brandusa Niro, the creator and Editor in Chief of The Daily, the most read and discussed magazine during Fashion Week. Brandusa is one of my favorite people in the city —lunch with “B” is a delicious feast of juicy gossip and the latest scoop on who’s chic and what to expect next on the runways of New York, Paris, London and Milan. The oracle of Seventh Avenue, Brandusa is also an enigma. She keeps a low profile and I’ve often thought of her as the Wizard of Oz of fashion—masterminding a stylish spectacle from behind a (couture) velvet curtain. I convinced Brandusa to talk candidly with MAY 2013

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SCHOOL DAZE | May 2013

Bodega Bust Charlie Campbell enters the black market by peter davis

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next month How will Charlie Campbell pay back his debts? 14

nlike my classmate richie revson, I was not a spoiled kid. Richie’s parents bought him a train that he could drive around the massive perimeter of their land in Bridgehampton. My mode of transportation was a skateboard that I purchased with the money I made running a gambling racket at Barclay School. I never had an allowance. I raked in the bulk of my spending cash running errands for my mother at odd hours. “Will you go get me every edition of Vogue—French, British, Japanese—and five packs of grape bubble gum?” my mom would beg, usually after 10 p.m., “You can keep the change.” She would fork over $200, having no clue what anything cost. After my Barclay recess casino was busted and my porno ring dismantled, I struggled to find a means to make bank to support my gummy bear addiction and guarantee I didn’t miss a month’s issue of Thrasher magazine. I sat, suffering from major depression, in class one day. “Home is where the heart is,” my annoying music teacher Ms. Nichols chirped in her sing-songy voice for no apparent reason before the bell rang. That day, I decided to take her words to heart. After school that afternoon, I grabbed an L.L.Bean tote bag and filled it with stuff I knew my mother could not live without: her bars of black soap, the Fracas perfume she kept stockpiled in the linen closet, tubs of Greek yogurt and other supermarket/drugstore products like shampoo, bags of Tate’s cookies and Tampax. “What are you doing with Mrs. Camp-

bell’s things?” the cook Maya asked me with fear in her voice. I ignored her and stocked my bookshelves in my bedroom with the goods. I grabbed some white Dean & Deluca paper bags from the pantry and piled them on my desk next to a Fisher Price cash register that I had never, ever played with. I taped a sign to my door that read “Charlie Campbell Madison Avenue,” which I knew my mother would relate to. I was ready for business. Around 6 p.m., when Bergdorf Goodman was probably closing, my mother returned home. It was only a matter of minutes before I heard her voice bellow down the hall. “Where on earth is all my Fracas?” From the kitchen, Maya pleaded to no one, “I don’t know anything. I didn’t see anything.” My mother came charging into my room, clutching my store’s sign between her blood red nails. “Where is my perfume?” she demanded as if someone had kidnapped a puppy. “What is going on in here?” Her eyes darted around the room, which had been transformed into a high-end store with each item price marked. “They want us to learn commerce at school,” I explained smiling. “Will you get your money and shop? Unfortunately, we don’t take credit cards.” Before she suffered withdrawals from a lack of Greek yogurt, my mother grabbed her green Hermès wallet and rushed back, spending about $500 to buy her own stuff. “I expect every cent of this money back,” she warned, annoyed that she had to carry four heavy bags weighed down with her “necessities.” Before she and Maya could re-stock her stash, I was in the elevator. I raced to Minnie Alfred’s toy store where I grabbed the latest video game. “Charles Campbell?” Mrs. Alfred, the store’s owner asked me as I put the game on the counter. “It’s your mother on the phone.” With those words, I dropped the game and bolted for the door.

illustration by jason katzenstein

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FASHION

YOUR FASHION FORECAST AND UP-TO-THE-SECOND STYLE SCOOP by Eliza Krpoyan

Scalamandre Zebra cocktail slipper in white and in red, stubbsandwootton.com

COURTESY OF STUBBS AND WOOTTON

SHOW YOUR STRIPES

When the red sauce, celebrity and socialite-packed Italian restaurant Gino’s closed, Manhattan (and the ghost of Frank Sinatra) was devastated. Now, Stubbs & Wootton and Scalamandre are releasing these slippers with the famous zebra that hopped on the eatery’s walls the way Upper East Side grand dames once table-hopped.

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FASHION

STEP AND REPEAT

This year marks the 35th anniversary of one of Ferragamo’s most distinguishable shoes, the Vara. In celebration of the bow adorned mid-heel, the fashion house will launch L’icona, Italian for “the icon.” Ferragamo has teamed up with 20 of the world’s most fashionable women—many of whom have graced the covers of SCENE—like Jessica Hart, Olivia Palermo, and Elettra Weidemann and others including Miroslava Duma, Camilla Belle, Lauren Santo Domingo, Chiara Clemente and Alexandra Richards. These trendsetters have created custom Vara or Varina—a ballet flat version of the latter—designs MARINA LARROUDE based on their style aesthetic. The beauties were captured by renowned photographer Claiborne Swanson Frank and beginning this month, Ferragamo will release the sureto-be iconic portraits—three on May 1 and one each day following—with video content and quotes. The custom shoes the ladies have created will also be available for purchase. Visitors can opt for their style inspiration’s creations or can choose to design their own unique color combination with a choice of summer inspired colors. Ah decisions, decisions! FERRAGAMO.COM

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PAPER DENIM & CLOTH

YES After a seven year hiatus, Paper Denim & Cloth is back! The label with a cult following hasn’t skipped a beat—since its relaunch, celebs including Sarah Jessica Parker, Jessica Alba, Sienna Miller and Anne Hathaway have been rocking the designer duds. Some of the most popular pieces include the Lexington Sweater and EZE Skinny Slouch—a distressed boyfriend jean (inset). While the relaxed fitting denim is currently all the rage, Alex Gilbert Gaines, the genius behind the label, explains it’s not just a trend. “I love our boyfriend jeans because they are made with rigid and not a stretch denim. As a purist they feel timeless to me—a classic American jean. We will always have a boyfriend jean in every collection.” As for how to wear a pair, the designer suggests dressing them up with chic ankle boots or throwing them on with a pair of flats for a casual look. AVAILABLE AT CURVE NEW YORK, 83 MERCER STREET, PAPERDENIMANDCLOTH.COM

TO THE DRESS With wedding season in full-swing, Anthropolgie’s one-stop bridal shop, BHLDN is the ultimate destination for brides-to-be and their guests. The bridal boutique offers the same ethereal and feminine designs you’d expect from the brand for the special occasion. Fashion houses who normally wouldn’t design bridal gowns have created styles for the on-line destination with Chicago and Houston based stores. Some favorites include Catherine Deane, Anna Sui and Tracy Reese. While the dresses stay true to each designer’s signature style, they meld perfectly into the bohemian-chic esthestic that Anthropolgie is famous for. After all, it’s a day you want to remember for the rest of your life, so why wear a gown that isn’t truly a reflection of your boho-self? Also be sure to visit the site’s blog for inspiration and all things wedding. BHLDN.COM

MARINA LARROUDE PHOTO BY CLAIRBORNE SWANSON FRANK

EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN

Warm Welcome

MAY 2013

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FASHION | Influencer

Leisure society neptune in bone and gold

Leisure society Brighton in tortoise and gold

rebecca minkoff collaboration cornelia in blue and silver

Eye Eye, Captain

rebecca minkoff collaboration cornelia in red and silver

Shane Baum’s Leisure Soceity offers sleek, high-end frames

A

fter seeing a void in the luxury marketplace for eyewear, Shane Baum set his sights on crafting the most luxurious lenses one could dream of. In 2011 he launched Leisure Society to bridge the disconnect a person wearing the most expensive fashion labels faces when sporting a less expensive pair of glasses. Today Baum creates frames for both optical and sun protection with materials including pure titanium plated in 12 to 18 karat gold, diamonds, Buffalo horn inserts, and Japanese cotton-based acetate. A-listers including Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Grant and Kristen Stewart have all been spotted sporting the luxe lenses. Baum has also collaborated with designer Rebecca Minkoff—with whom he shared a CFDA class. “We really hit it off and have been friends for years, and thought it would be amazing to collaborate on a line together. This wasn’t a collaboration where

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we just slapped our names on the temples of eyewear. We really locked ourselves in a room together for days on end and drew the frames,” he says. The hard work paid off: the duo presented a collection of thirteen frames in twelve colors ranging from bold blues, to bright reds to green camouflage. When asked if they will work together again in the future, Baum tells us that while he has in fact, just renewed his agreement with Minkoff, fans can look forward to more collaborations: “There are some exciting ones in the works, but nothing I can reveal just yet,” he says. So what can this visionary tell us about what’s in store? “The future holds promising opportunities internationally, with a recent success in Japan. The sky is the limit and I look forward to what is to come with Leisure Society and the other brands I contribute to.” With offices in the U.S. and Vienna, and selling points worldwide, expect to hear a lot more of Baum in the future.

rebecca minkoff collaboration Chelsea in tortoise and gold

Leisure society cornell in bone and silver

Leisure society santorini in bone and gold

may 2013

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FASHION | Jewelry

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RINGLEADERS Draw in the drama with these full-finger metals 22

SCENE MAGAZINE

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1. “Lorenzo” Ring Diamond,18K Gold and Silver Ring by Plukka, plukka.com 2. Articulated Maia Ring in Sterling Silver by Pamela Love, barneys. com 3. Pave Hinged Plate Ring by Eddie Borgo, bergdorfgoodman.com 4. Double Cage Ring in Sterling Silver by Pamela Love, barneys.com 5. Bronze Hinged Butterfly Ring by Bernard Delettrez, editorialist.com 6. 18K White Gold with Black Rhodium Pave Grey Diamond Bondage Ring by Loree Rodkin, loreerodkin.com

MAY 2013

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Rock Tradition.

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FASHION | The Cut

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Gilt Groupe’s Tyler Thoreson gives us the lowdown on the designers and products that make his cut WHO ARE YOUR FAVORITE DESIGNERS? Michael Bastian, Scott Sternberg, Billy Reid, Dries Van Noten, Miuccia Prada, Raf Simons and Umit Benan. WHO IS YOUR STYLE INSPIRATION AND WHY? Jack Nicholson circa 1974. The man understood that dressing well should be fun. WHAT IS YOUR GO-TO SHOE FOR A NIGHT OUT? My favorite is a pair of navy velvet slippers by Michael Bastian for Stubbs & Wootton. WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRIZED PIECE OF CLOTHING? On the assumption that something doesn’t still need to be in one’s possession in order to be prized: my late, great Duckie Brown for Penfield windbreaker. It was pure sartorial perfection rendered in black nylon, and I left it in the penthouse suite of the Palace Hotel after the Style.com “Women of Fashion” party we hosted with Kanye West in 2009. It’s been almost four years, and thinking of it still fills me with a longing that’s more than a little embarrassing.

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a passionate collector of vintage timepieces. Right now my collection stands at one (a Rolex GMT-Master), but I hope to double or maybe even triple it. WHAT DO YOU NEVER LEAVE HOME WITHOUT? A kiss from the kids, and a reminder that they’re the motivation behind everything that I do. WHAT ITEMS ARE YOU COVETING RIGHT NOW? An early ‘60s Rolex Explorer, a mid ‘80s Maserati Quattroporte, anything from Mark McNairy’s fall Billionaire Boys Club collection, and a bottle of Pappy Van Winkle 20. DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE IN THREE WORDS: St. Paul meets St. Tropez. WHAT COLOGNE DO YOU WEAR? I do like a squirt of Terre d’Hermès after a workout. Which means that I end up wearing cologne about once a week. WHAT'S THE ONE GROOMING ITEM YOU CAN'T LIVE WITHOUT? I’m pretty low maintenance, but I do always try to have some John Allan’s Matte hair product around.

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DO YOU COLLECT ANYTHING? I’m

1. Jack Nicholson at the Academy Awards in1976 2. Oyster Perpetual GMT-Master II 40mm, stainless steel, rotatable black ceramic bezel, 24-hour hand and independently adjustable 12hour hand with an Oysterlock bracelet by Rolex, rolex.com or 800-36-ROLEX 3. “Plaid Camper”shirt in black; “Big Pimpin” Coat in charcoal, “Boo Boo Double Knee” pant in dark kelly green Bee Line by Billionaire Boys Club,bbcicecream.com 4. Duckie Brown Vintage, duckiebrown.com 5. Matte water-based pomade by John Allans, johnallans.com 6. Terre d'Hermès, usa. hermes.com 7. Michael Bastian by Stubbs & Wootton, Stubbs & Wootton stores

TYLER THORESON PHOTO BY JOSEPH D'ARCO FOR STYLECASTER; JACK NICHOLSON PHOTO BY PHOTOSHOT/GETTY IMAGES; DUCKIE BROWN PHOTO BY DAN LECCA

TYLER THORESON

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FASHION | Inspired By 1

ANJELICA HUSTON

01. "CASTINA" BAG IN NUDE SHIMMER LEATHER WITH CHAINS BY JIMMY CHOO

jimmychoo.com A fringe bag perfect for discos and trips to Marrakech.

“IT’S EASY TO FEEL LIKE YOU’VE GOT NOTHING TO WEAR, BUT IT’S ALSO A SIGNAL OF IDENTITY PROBLEMS. IF YOU’VE GOT A WELL-DEVELOPED SENSE OF IDENTITY, YOU TEND TO KNOW WHAT’S YOU NO MATTER WHAT THE TRENDS. NOTHING I BUY EVER LOOKS NEW, BECAUSE I HAVE MY LOOK DOWN, AND IT’S CLASSIC.”

02. PRECISION INK IN ABYSS BY

sephora.com Her strong features are always accented with rich liners.

ILLAMASQUA

03. THE ELLA RING BY MASONHARLIE masonharlie.com Anjelica loves her ring snaking around her finger.

04. TIFFANY & CO. BEAN EAR CLIPS IN

18K GOLD BY ELSA PERETTI ,

tiffany. com The American actress is a fan of her close friend Elsa Peretti’s designs.

05. BERBÈRE CUFF IN BLACK GOLD FULLY SET WITH DIAMONDS BY REPOSSI

repossi.com Anjelica keeps it simple with statement jewelry.

06. SILK TWILL SCARF BY HERMÈS usa. hermes.com The beauty wears Hermès scarves as turbans and around her neck. sephora.com This model’s pale skin is offset by a vibrant red lip.

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JACK AND ’JELICA WE REVISIT HOLLYWOOD’S HOTTEST 1970S COUPLE FOR THEIR TRIED AND TRUE STYLE CUES 26

SCENE MAGAZINE

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JACK NICHOLSON PHOTO BY TIME LIFE PICTURES/GETTY IMAGES

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ANJELICA HUSTON PHOTO BY TERRY O'NEILL/GETTY IMAGES; TIFFANY & CO. EARRING PHOTO BY JOSH HASKIN; REPOSSI PHOTO BY NICKLOAS LORIEUX; HUSTON QUOTE FROM HARPER’S BAZAAR, SEPTEMBER 2006

07. LIPSTICK IN BOX BY ILLAMASQUA

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JACK NICHOLSON

01. INDIAN COTTON SHIRT IN DEEP jcrew. com Jack’s casual staple, the plaid shirt.

PACIFIC PLAID BY J. CREW 7

02. GD-BOT2-6 LOAFER BY CARLO

carlopazolini.com An easy fit—no laces required.

PAZOLINI

03. RED HOOK ON BLACK ROPE miansai.com Hooked on Jack.

BRACELET BY MIANSAI

04. LUDLOW TUXEDO JACKET AND PANT For a man who goes to a million Oscar ceremonies.

05. PERSOL STEVE MCQUEEN

sunglasshut.com Jack is never withouth a pair of sunglasses. SUNGLASSES

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06. “LOVE THY NEIGHBOR”

N°5.2.

BLACK FRAME WITH BEADS BY WESTWARD LEANING JACK NICHOLSON PHOTO BY TIME LIFE PICTURES/GETTY IMAGES

ANJELICA HUSTON PHOTO BY TERRY O'NEILL/GETTY IMAGES; TIFFANY & CO. EARRING PHOTO BY JOSH HASKIN; REPOSSI PHOTO BY NICKLOAS LORIEUX; HUSTON QUOTE FROM HARPER’S BAZAAR, SEPTEMBER 2006

IN ITALIAN WOOL BY J. CREW JCREW.COM

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“WITH MY SUNGLASSES ON, I'M JACK NICHOLSON. WITHOUT THEM, I'M FAT AND 60.”

westwardleaning.com Because the man can’t simply have one pair.

07. THE ART OF SHAVING’S CLASSIC HORN SHAVING SET

theartofshaving.com The Academy Award winner always keeps his famous face smooth.

08. "HUSHABYE BABY" AMERICAN FELLING AXE BY BEST MADE

bestmadeco.com A movie memento —a shiny axe. SCENEINNY.COM

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SOCIETY THE PEOPLE, PLACES AND PARTIES

FASHION FIXATION

The Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of Art will celebrate punk fashion this spring with the exhibition PUNK: Chaos to Couture COURTESY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID SIMS

Dress by Rodarte (American, founded 2005) Vogue, July 2008

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SOCIETY | Ted on the Town

Throwback Thursdays The revival of popular ‘80s restaurant lutèce

takes New Yorkers for a stroll down memory lane

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Cuisine: “You, my friend, are in for quite a treat,” he beams as I stood, mouth agape, at the foot of a culinary legend. Lutèce was before my time, I’d always wished I could have experienced the restaurant that gave legendary New York Times food critic Mimi Sheraton so much agony and ecstasy. Lutèce is a restaurant whose reputation spanned generations, serving as a character in today’s Mad Men as well as yesteryear’s American Psycho. Even the plates and flatware are original, which proves a fun talking point with my tablemate and hot shot Christie’s auctioneer, Lydia Fenet , who could only speculate as to their value. Lydia and I have no issue however ascertaining the value of the impeccable wines we would be sipping: NV Henriot Blanc de Blancs champagne, a 2000 Trimbach Clos

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Bfanyc.com

Mark Wahlberg and 50 Cent; Anna Wintour; Julie Delpy

emories of months well spent are rarely linear. For me they tend to look like amorphous blobs with hulking protrusions signifying highlights and cavernous gaps evidencing moments I’d rather not exist. In the past I’ve always attempted to write this column as something of an enumeration of what had been worth doing, from start to finish. This month I’m going to change that pattern, starting with a New York evening that truly blew me away: The University Settlement’s one night resurrection of André Soltner ’s legendary restaurant Lutèce. I arrive a few minutes late at 83 Mercer, a sprawling SoHo loft owned by the French Culinary Institute, the very same institute for which Soltner serves as Dean of Classical

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by Ted Gushue


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Sainte Hune Riesling, a 2000 Château Léoville Barton, and a special taste of a 1957 Château Haut Brion (which I am told to guess the age of ) each of which pairs famously with the menu, an exact recreation from Lutèce’s heyday. It also bears mention that the meal ends with a fast-paced auction raising over half a million to fund the University Settlement’s charitable interests. I won’t even mention Jacques Torres , or the calories he foists upon me with his unavoidable dessert. The night carries on into a blissful inebriation that leads me and a few dinner guests back to the penthouse loft at The Soho Grand Hotel to pay homage to the legendary disco diva and drag queen den mother Susanne Bartsch , who hosts a fête fit for a king, or mainly queens, under the perfectly starry night. It is a uniquely 80s way to cap off a uniquely 80s evening. Next on my list is the ineffably awesome New Yorkers for Children Gala, a highlight every year not only because it is a genuinely worthwhile event, but also because the women go above and beyond the call of duty to break out the most impressively sexy gowns you’ve ever seen. Case in point: supermodel Hilary Rhoda dressed in floor length Valentino: “Oh this old thing?” she demurs as we gawk. It isn’t just the supermodels who are dressed to impress. Rent The Runway’s Lucy Sykes Rellie is in black Valentino (who is the benefit’s sponsor) and celebrity stylist Lauren Powell wears a Rorschach test leopard Alaia. I am a bit let down by the menu this year, but it hardly matters; I’ve been seated with a slew of future supermodels including the delightful Martha Hunt , a blonde beauty who is all too quick to flip me the bird while I test out my newly downloaded iPhone app: Vine, the video version of Instagram, which I’m totally obsessed with. Next on my laundry list is a trio of Andrew Saffir ’s cinema society soirées. Normally I’m blessed with these artfully executed events once or twice a month at most—this time around however, I’ll be busy sussing out the scene at nearly every theater in town for the premieres of Trance, Mud, and Pain & Gain (sponsored by Montblanc, Fiji Water, and Men’s Fitness respectively). For the sake of brevity I’m going to assemble everything I’ve learned from these parties in bullet points below: Rosario Dawson is flat out hot. She has no qualms bearing all for director and ex-beau Danny Boyle. She also isn’t averse to talking about trimming her lady bits. • Anna Wintour is a Matthew McConaughey fan. • Reese Witherspoon insists that she has the utmost respect for law enforcement and will do her best to refrain from pulling the Reese Witherspoon card next time her husband gets pulled over by the cops. • I have an open crush on Julie Delpy. • Same with Greta Gerwig. • Fiji water through a straw is a little weird, but I’m into it. • 50 Cent is still relevant. • Isaiah Whitlock Jr. knows how to rock a boldly patterned blazer and is open to bonding over boldly patterned blazers. • Kane Manera has the listing of one of the most incredible penthouse triplexes on the market at 497 Greenwich Street. He tells me my bid is a bit under market and advises against lodging it. • Lisa Maria Falcone wears what appears to be a Hershey’s kiss wrapper. It’s cool though; she financed Mud, which is amazing. • Harlow is one of the most incredible new spots I’ve been to on the UES. • No one can ever accuse Mark Wahlberg of being a stone cold celeb while he is on the verge of tears introducing Pain & Gain just hours after the Boston Marathon bombing. • If you have to get stuck in an elevator, there are worse people to be stuck with than Sir Patrick Stewart and Paul Haggis. Just saying. • Matthew McConaughey isn’t exactly “in” to you asking if he’ll let you a play bongo on his washboard abs. • Scenesters Johannes Huebl and Olivia Palermo are ubiquitous—in a really good way.

1. Caroline Winberg 2. Rosario Dawson 3. Reese Witherspoon, Matthew McConaughey 4. Arielle Patrick 5. Chefs at the revival of the 80s restaurant Lutèce 6. Cindy Sherman 7. Jenna Lyons 8. Greta Gerwig, Mickey Sumner

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“lutèce is a restaurant whose reputaion spanned generations, serving as a character in today’s Mad Men and Yesteryear’s American Psycho.”

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SOCIETY | Up Next

SPRING CYCLE

Lorenzo Martone’s stylish bikes have the town talking and gawking BY DELPHINE BARGUIRDJIAN

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ZEPH COLOMBATTO

W HAT INSPIRED YOU TO GET INTO THE BIKE BUSINESS AND LAUNCH

I had the idea in April 2011 when I moved to the West Village and had to store my bike in the living room for everyone to see. I noticed there was something wrong, something about the aesthetic. I felt there was no fashion filter to the bike I was riding. Basically, I had a design epiphany! I’ve worked in public relations for over 10 years and love it, but everyone in New York is multitasking, getting involved in new things. And I had the design itch so I went for it! WHO IS YOUR CUSTOMER? Anyone who appreciates design. We make bikes for men and women and in different sizes, so basically anyone can become a Martone Cycling Company rider. There is one thing: my customer is someone who likes compliments. I’ve noticed that the people who ride our bikes get a lot of attention from others on the street. Also good for flirting! WHEN DID YOUR LOVE AFFAIR WITH BIKES START? I got my first bike for Christmas when I was a kid, and if you see the pictures of that night you would think I had won the lottery. I’ve loved biking ever since. It’s such an awesome way to connect with your environment. You can explore the city on it and see it at its best. Now, since I started making them, I fell in love with so many other layers of the project. I love MARTONE CYCLING COMPANY?

Top: Lorenzo Martone with the Men’s Grand; above: Martone Cycling Company’s Men’s Gramercy and Mercer bikes 32

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the sustainability aspect: it’s a noise, gas, electricity-free object that takes you from A to B very efficiently. I also love how nostalgic and romantic they are. There is a reason why bikes have been around since the 1800s—they are perfect. DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE BIKE IN THE COLLECTION? It would be like asking who my favorite child is. So no, I do not have a favorite. Personally, I have been riding the gold bike and it’s quite fun. When the sun reflects on it, it’s as if the bike has its own aura. So many people in the street ask me about it. The white is also a favorite, especially among chic editors. WHERE DO YOU GO FOR A LEISURELY BIKE RIDE IN THE CITY? I never get tired of the trail along the West Side Highway. I ride it both for leisure and to get around. I can go from my place in the West Village to uptown in 20 minutes, all while enjoying the beautiful views of the river. WHAT DIRECTION DO YOU SEE YOUR BUSINESS GOING? I definitely hope to open our own Martone Cycling Company shop in N.Y. and other key bike cities. We are gearing towards “active wear” as well. I’ve already designed locks, helmets and am working on bike-inspired apparel. I will try a pop up this summer and we’ll hopefully have our own permanent store next year. MARTONECYCLING.COM

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SOCIETY | Work of Art

Born to be bad boy Eric Fischl on the creative process and why he finds Damien Hirst depressing by Delphine Barguirdjian

eric fischl’s memoir hasn’t even hit bookstores, but already the painter is making waves in the art world with revelations of his promiscuous past and the boldly critical statements aimed at his contemporaries. Named after the infamous work that propelled him to art-world stardom, Fischl’s memoir is also an account of all that being an artist encompasses. Touching on everything from a painter’s creative process to maneuvering the social art scene, Bad Boy comes off as part tell-all, part portrait of an artist. SCENE caught up with the Sag Harbor-based Fischl to get his take on what it means to be an artist in the 21st Century. Why now? Was this memoir something you’d always

I had no intention of writing this. I play tennis with Michael Stone [who co-wrote the book] and he wanted to write something about CalArts, exploring the preponderance of young precocious people who show up at one place at one time. He interviewed a lot of artists, but didn’t know a lot about art so he came to me with questions. I kind of laid it out and we got deeper into it, going into the creative process. When his publisher said we should focus on just one artist, we made it more personal and it turned into a memoir. But if [Stone] had approached me at first to tell me he wanted me to do a memoir with him, I would have said no.

wanted to do?

WHo is bad boy’s intended audience? The focus of the book is to give people a window into the creative process, to demystify things that are falsely obscure and over-romanticized. People say they don’t know anything about art because they can’t draw a line—I wanted to reach out to that population as well as art students who will go on to become professionals. I wanted to shed light on the external pressure of making art and the professional aspect to it.

contemporaries, calling damien hirst ”shallow“ and

Yes, I guess I probably am burning bridges here. But they are the most public examples of something I’m criticizing, which is their approach to art and

jeff koons’ work as ”all smoke in mirrors.”

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What about their approach do you take issue with?

I don’t know where to start! There’s a lot I find fault with. Aesthetically, Jeff Koons’ objects aren’t compelling—they stand in for an experience that isn’t coming from the object. There is a literalness to it that is devoid to what I value more, which is empathetic and transcendent experience. They are not objects to empathize with. You don’t trade spaces with the work; the objects are not to reflect on, but to reflect by. It’s a very decadent kind of thing. The scale of production is also an example to which it is consumable and can be manufactured. Damian Hirst’s dot paintings are as dumb as they get. He produces them by the truckload and people buy them. And why? They are about the emptiness of art. It’s not that it’s not right, it’s just incredibly depressing. We are way too polite. Artists make art out of profound belief of something, so lets make it seem like it matters. In fact, the most difficult part of writing the book is becoming public in that way. I have already been dealing publicly with my biographical past life and so it was easy to go into that again. You talk about how professionalism and the high stakes of sales changed the art world in the 80s, turning artists into rock stars. Do you think the art world has changed much since then?

These days the institutions and galleries are less important, art fairs are more important. Short term, short hit, sensational aspect. That’s how people buy art nowadays—buy it fast and it doesn’t even leave their storage warehouse before they sell it off again. continued on page 36 >

“Damien Hirst’s dot paintings are as dumb as they get. he produces them by the truckload and people buy them. but Why?”

Courtesy of Random House

you take a couple stabs at some of your

marketing. They are the greatest examples and greatest targets.

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Joyce Pensato, Installation View, Petzel New York, 2012

Courtesy of Random House

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Eric Fischl, Self Portrait: An Unfinished Work, 2011. Oil on linen, 204 x 274 cm.

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Adapted from BAD BOY: MY LIFE ON AND OFF THE CANVAS Copyright © 2013 by Eric Fischl. Written with Michael Stone. Published by Crown Publishers, a division of Random House, Inc.

I

finished Bad Boy in 1981 and showed it the following spring at Ed Thorp’s, where it made a splash with critics and the public alike. But I didn’t stick around for the fallout. Exhausted from the effort of putting up a show, I took off to Europe with April, landing first in Venice. Later on we discovered St. Tropez. We’d been driving around northern Italy, making our way along the coast to Aix-en-Provence, which April was eager to show to me. We stopped over in Ramatuelle, a pretty village outside St. Tropez, where an art dealer I knew had invited us to visit with his family. They introduced us to the beach life there, and we fell in love with it.

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of passage that would influence much of my later work. More about that later. Meanwhile, the experience of being on a beach in St. Tropez and seeing nude men and women interacting socially was both an inspiration and an assault on my puritanical American background. I had mixed feelings about what I was witnessing: the confrontation with what was taboo, the absurdity of the taboo, and the absurdity of the scene itself. Seeing naked people behaving as though they were clothed had an undeniable element of comedy to it. There was also a racial element to it. You had these African men combing the beach, hawking baubles and approaching wealthy, fancy white women lying naked in the sun. As the men crouched down close to them to show their wares, their proximity created an uncomfortable tension with the husbands or boyfriends and even me. It’s one thing to be naked on the beach with your wife. But the dynamic becomes different, more complicated, because of how Americans have mythologized the potency of black men. Later, when I painted these kinds of scenes, I thought I was capturing something that was particularly French or European, the way the foreign eye of David Hockney had captured Los Angeles. But what it made me realize was that I’m an American wherever I go. I’m not particularly worldly or sophisticated. Though I’d painted many of my subjects naked and grown up in a house with parents who often went around without their clothes, I was shocked by my first visit to a topless beach. My mother’s nakedness had made me uneasy. And I’d used nakedness in my paintings to highlight psycho- logical stress. It was very different from the open feeling the French were expressing. They undressed to unwind, to free themselves from the constraints and conventions of everyday life. The only person who was self-conscious was me. I was the one responding to their naked- ness with a mixture of irony, titillation, and disapproval. I tried to capture this in St. Tropez, a large square canvas I painted when I returned to New York in the fall. The picture looks like a typical beach scene. Set against a rectangle of sky, a sliver of sea, and a broad expanse of white sand dotted with orange parasols, a chic blond woman in her thirties lounges in the foreground, her naked body propped up on one elbow and torqued at an unnatural angle. Standing behind the woman, a naked pubescent girl—likely the woman’s daughter—and a tall, whippet-thin black man form a shadowy triangle with her. The picture is trying to locate the blurry line between the private and public spheres, the natural and the artificial, the prurient and the appropriate. Though nothing much seems to be happening, the scene radiates a kind of inner tension for me. Both the child and the black man are looking at the back of the woman and she is oblivious to them both. Holding a bottle of suntan oil, her face hidden behind sunglasses, she gazes at something outside the picture frame. The girl smiles boldly but it’s a forced, precocious gaiety. Her posture betrays the anxiety of her age—she’s on the brink of becoming a woman— and she fusses with her ears, adjusting, it seems, a pair of earrings. The man—possibly an attendant or the woman’s lover or merely a stranger—is the most disconnected of the three. Clad in a sarong— he’s the only one in the picture wearing clothes—he’s turned his body away from the others and placed his hands on his hips. Despite the festive setting, this is not a jolly or even a relaxed group. (Several characters in the

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Courtesy of Random House

e also fell in love with their home, a beautifully restored villa, parts of which dated to the eleventh century, with a walled-in courtyard and a gorgeous magnolia tree. Over the course of the next several summers, we rented it in exchange for drawings. After leaving St. Tropez, we drove to Aix. But since April’s last visit, the town had been overrun by condos and suburban sprawl, so we quickly headed back to St. Tropez. There our lives settled into a cozy routine, one that we would repeat over the next nine years. Mornings tended to be lazy. After late coffee, there was tennis and going to market, and around noon we’d hit the beach. It was six weeks during which April and I could be alone with each other, rediscover each other and what we were thinking. We hardly saw anyone else—1983

was still precomputer and precell—and didn’t give out our phone number. That time of year—May to June—the beach was never crowded, but there were always enough people around to make things interesting. Surrounded by unclad sunbathers, armed with my little camera, I would shoot picture after picture as the people lolled and gabbed, read and slathered sunscreen. My camera was so innocuous, they paid little attention to me. Even if they caught me photographing them, they almost never expressed concern or disapproval, perhaps because the French are inherently exhibitionistic/voyeuristic. The beach was a revelation. Had I not experienced it, I would never have thought to paint it. We’d go every day. April would read, we’d talk, and I would photograph. I never questioned why someone doing something unusual held me spellbound. I trusted my instincts and just took the photo. Back in my studio, months and even years later, as I went through the photographs, I would become once again entranced by that gesture. What photography did for me was capture the body in motion. I wasn’t interested in big motions like running or jumping, but small gestures like someone shifting their weight or leaning forward. These small movements were the trigger for narratives. This woman twisting and bending was longing for something. This man turning away was afraid. And because these beachgoers were unself-conscious and unaware of being watched, their body language often betrayed how uncomfortable they were with their physicality. I often felt that I was witnessing minidramas between the body and the soul, the inside and the outside, being played out at that interface where skin touches the air and light. What St. Tropez gave me was a way of painting people, of viewing their bodies as a currency of exchange—the dynamic relations that take place between people at the most basic, physical level. Naked, stripped of social indicators, they revealed attitudes and intentions hidden from everyday cosmopolitan life. I felt as if I’d stumbled into a primitive fantasy world, my Tahiti. At other times, though, their naturalness seemed incredibly false. Their nudity struck me as so brazen and inappropriate, it felt forced, even farcical. And later, as our vacation wore on, tourists, mainly Americans—loud, obnoxious “garmentos” in their cowboy hats and bling—added another layer of artificiality and hedonism to the scene. I felt as if I was at the circus. Degas, Beckmann, and Goya had haunted places like this—carnivals, dance halls, cabarets, fantastic settings where the normal mores of society were suspended—and made paintings full of parody and pathos. It was incredibly stimulating for me. April and I tried different beaches, but we always returned to La Voile Rouge. I loved the red-and-white color scheme of the umbrellas and matelas. I also liked the music, much of it a kind of pop-flamenco provided by the Gipsy Kings, whom we met and befriended. The group, which would become an international success in the late eighties, was then playing weddings and parties, and sometimes serenading tourists on the local beaches. April and I brought them to New York and tried to introduce them to the music scene. But the trip was a flop. Either our timing was off or our music connections weren’t very good. But we did spend one memorable day with them at a church in Brooklyn—the Kings wanted to hear gospel music—where we witnessed a spiritual rite

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SOCIETY | Work of Art


Joyce Pensato, Installation View, Petzel New York, 2012

background—a solitary jogger, a reader, a woman unpacking her bag—mirror the principals’ isolation.) No one is rollicking through paradise here. No one is luxuriating in—or even noticing—the natural beauty of the seaside. The people in St. Tropez may be naked, but they’re not free. They’re acting according to social codes as well-ordered as the rows of evenly spaced beach umbrellas.

Courtesy of Random House

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fter the success of the Bad Boy show at Ed Thorp’s gallery in 1982, I could no longer ignore the upswing to my career. Increasingly I saw my name included in articles about where the art scene was headed. What’s more, my paintings were in demand by name dealers and collectors alike. From 1982 to 1983, I had one-man shows slated for Sable-Castelli in Toronto, Saidye Bronfman in Montreal, Larry Gagosian in Los Angeles, Mario Diacono in Rome, Marian Goodman in New York, and Nigel Greenwood in London; and I was invited to exhibit in group shows at P.S. 1, the Whitney, and Sidney Janis’s tony gallery on Manhattan’s Fifty-Seventh Street. Around the time of the Bad Boy show, I ran into Jean-Christophe Ammann walking through SoHo. I hadn’t seen him since that fateful studio visit two years before. We stopped to talk and after the usual exchange of pleasantries, the conversation turned to my work. He told me he’d seen my new paintings and that he’d had time to think about what I’d been trying to do. “I misjudged [your old paintings],” he said. “I just hadn’t been able to see it at the time.” It was one of the most gratifying moments of my career. The Sleepwalker show in 1980 had been a hit, and Bad Boy was a home run in terms of the reception it got. There was certainly a lot of positive energy coming out of those first two shows. But success felt uncomfortable to me. Perhaps that discomfort was a form of self-preservation, a way of countering my manic sense of hubris and guilt, the dark side of my competitiveness. All I know is that rather than creating a sense of elation, my success stirred up old fears and insecurities in me. I didn’t really believe I deserved the rewards I was suddenly getting. But those feelings did nothing to curb my ambition. After the Bad Boy show, I went in search of a new gallery, one that had the prestige and resources to carry me to the next level. I wanted to be seen as one of the artists creating the conversation of the eighties. I felt there were two galleries associated with the best of my generation. One was Metro Pictures, started by Helene Winer and Janelle Reiring, and the other was Mary Boone’s. Metro was mostly showing conceptualist artists, many of them women. Mary had the male painters. I asked David Salle to intercede on my behalf. In early 1983, David brought Mary to my small Reade Street studio to meet with me and to view my current work. But she didn’t love the paintings I had up, and the tensions that are a part of almost any studio visit— the mutual expectations of artist and dealer, the desire of the artist to please, the dealer to respond, especially when the artist is friends with other artists already at the gallery—made Mary wary. She left on an inconclusive note.

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hat spring the eminent Spanish curator Carmen Jimenez put up Tendencias en Nueva York, an exhibition in Madrid featuring what she believed to be a new wave of American art. David, Julian, Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf, Susan Rothen-

berg, Bryan Hunt, and I were among the nine painters and sculptors invited to show. April did not join me on this trip. She felt hurt that she hadn’t been asked to be a part of the show, and has never been comfortable as a tag- along. As soon as I touched down at Madrid-Barajas Airport, though, I regretted that April hadn’t come. This was no ordinary event. The show’s organizers had not only flown us firstclass and installed us at the Palace, the city’s poshest hotel, but they’d also arranged a series of receptions, dinners, and entertainments worthy of a state visit. Our little downtown art scene had suddenly become an international phenomenon. One of the highlights of the trip was meeting Bryan Hunt. Roughly my age, Bryan exploded on the New York art scene in the late seventies. Linked to a group of artists who were exploring sculpture and illusion, he manipulated materials to create images like bronze waterfalls and lakes. I’d seen and admired his work in gallery shows and at a recent Whitney Biennial. Bryan had a reputation as a wild man—harddrinking, outspoken, combative, larger than life. I re-

of their youth was driving the country into the future. They were eager to connect to the outside world through the arts, as well as to showcase their artists’ fresh voices of liberation. All the artists were feted for four days straight. The Spanish live their lives according to a schedule unlike anywhere else I’ve been. Stores open at eight a.m. and close at noon for lunch and siesta, then reopen at four p.m. and close at eight p.m. Dinner doesn’t begin before ten, and more often midnight. The day ends around four in the morning. When you add to this the generous amounts of cocaine that were handed out to us during our stay, we slept very little and ran around Madrid with a manic high. On our last night in Madrid, a grand party was held in our honor at a private home on the outskirts of the city. Our host was a prominent commodities trader rumored to be a partner of the American tax evader Mark Rich. A fleet of limos picked us up at our hotel and ferried us to a gated enclave. The property was completely enclosed within high brick walls punctuated by lookout towers. Armed guards patrolled the perimeter, carrying machine guns. When we arrived, our names were checked against a list and our car scanned for bombs. Finally the gates parted and we drove up a long road to a contemporary house filled with steel and glass. A glass igloo sculpture by the Italian artist Mario Merz stood in the middle of the driveway. Our host had a penchant for exhibiting his art collection in un- usual places. He’d stuck a huge steel Richard Serra sculpture in the middle of a tennis court and placed a large photo collage by the British duo Gilbert and George on a wall obscured by a steel beam. With seeming disregard for its structural integrity, he’d cut holes in the beam so that viewers could see more of the piece. Encouraged to explore the house, I stumbled into the spa; just outside a steam-room door hung an El Greco. Later I found a sublime Giorgio Morandi still life mounted to the inside of a closet. The party itself was surreal. A glamorous crowd milled around— some dancing, others naked. The waiters Eric Fischl, carried trays of champagne and offered St. Tropez,1982. Oil on canvas, 84 x 84 inches guests a choice of cocaine or heroin. I was never formally introduced to our host, but from time to time a short, thin member hearing about him at the Odeon, where he’d man in a silk smoking jacket would sidle up to me had dustups with Richard Serra and Larry Gagosian. and ask if I needed any- thing more. The way he What I didn’t know was how much fun he could be. said “more” made me curious what he could posAt the opening dinner in Madrid, our hosts treated sibly have in mind. us to an exhibition of flamenco—an incredible show, in I am sure there was some lesson to be taken the middle of which Bryan, stoned and inspired, got up from the scene. Commerce corrupts art, or corrupt onstage and started dancing, delighting the Americans commerce corrupts art absolutely. But whenever I present but horrifying our Spanish hosts. Not knowing ran into Bryan and the other American artists we Bryan, they felt he was parodying the other performers. would start laughing, enjoying the thrill of our new In fact, he was only trying to show his appreciation. But success. We were on a joy ride, and the world was it ended the evening’s entertainment abruptly. putting on a show for us. A group of us left together and decided to hit the And there was another sensation, one I didn’t clubs. Bryan was really feeling it now and wanted to identify at the time: the queasy exhilaration and continue dancing. It took some time to hail a cab, and shared intimacy of a group losing its innocence. by the time we did, Bryan had already become a legMaybe it was the guns or the audacity of the end among Madrid’s demimonde. Our cabbie asked if money and trinkets and drugs showered on us, Bryan wasn’t the famous American flamenco dancer. but you can’t rub shoulders with that kind of lifeSpain was in the midst of a renaissance. Franco was style, I realized later, without some of it rubbing dead. People were waking from a nightmare of represoff on you. sion and backwardness, reaching out from their forced isolation. Their economy was growing and the energy sceneinny.com

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SOCIETY | Hot Spot

Going Rogue New Greenwich Village haunt Rogue & Canon is known for its impressive bar selection, but surprises patrons with an equally delectable menu by Carson Griffith

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Rogue & Canon 128 West Houston Street 646.398.8700 rogueandcanon.com

Clockwise from top: dining room; fully-stocked liquor bar; and a gun lamp at Rogue & Canon

around 11,” explains Swet. As for who’s strolling in to browse the brews, the co-owners said it’s a wide range of just about everyone, with some familiar faces thrown in. “We’ve grown a bit of a following,” says Poston, who also worked at the Waverly Inn and Balthazar before venturing out on his own. “You have all different people,” says Swet, a Freemans veteran. “You have the people who have been here for 20 years to young couples to students to New York Rangers.” The biggest surprise to some isn’t a guaranteed good cocktail; it is the food that comes with it. “The food I think is the surprise, because the bar gets all the attention,” says Poston, mentioning the Hangover Lo Mein served in a Chinese take-out box as a fan-favorite. Another dish worth name-checking: the Rogue Burger, served with peanut butter and crispy pork belly. While both owners juggle Rogue & Canon with their other properties, it’s Swet who spends

“The Hangover Lo Mein served in a chinese takeout box [is] a fanfavorite. another dish worth namechecking: the rogue burger, served with peanut butter and crispy pork belly.” the most time on location. And like him, he feels the restaurant and bar is just one more option for their clients to choose from. “I think it’s just what you feel for that night as a New Yorker,” he says about the differences in his venues. “I’m all different things.” And aren’t we all?

Courtesy of Rogue & Canon

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hat does it take to get a drink in this town? Just good taste and some insider knowledge, if Rogue & Canon co-owners Johnny Swet and Larry Poston have something to say about it. Together, the pair has opened two venues this year: the swanky Cole’s in Greenwich Village and its more rugged older brother, Rogue & Canon. Everything about Rogue & Canon, the West Houston bar and restaurant, is an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting’s nightmare: the room’s biggest attraction is a long, winding mahogany bar topped with shelf after shelf of seemingly never-ending liquor. A warm amber glow permeates the entire room, putting patrons into a warm, fuzzy lull. And the menu tempts with a tongue-twisting litany of cocktails, like the Midnight Train to Georgia and the Slow & Low. “We have six different kinds of Bloody Marys,” boasts Poston of the restaurant’s growingly popular weekend brunch. But the real brains behind the boozy madness is Johnny Swet, who is known in the industry for his focus on mixology; something he brought to another one of his projects with Poston, the rooftop bar JIMMY at The James Hotel. “I tend to the bar program and all the consulting stuff,” Swet, a friendly, yet slightly quiet, bearded fellow says of his part of Rogue & Canon. “I stay in my wheelhouse; I do what I do.” Meanwhile, Poston, who met Swet when the two worked together at Pastis in 2000, is a natural born entertainer. “I was a maître’d for a really long time, so one of the things I do is the social aspect,” he explains. There’s no need to start planning now to get a table for next year; Rogue & Canon’s seating policy is as relaxed as its atmosphere, which encompasses an upscale bar scene, decorated personally by the owners with hand-picked photographs and paintings, and exposed brick walls. “For the most part, walk on in,” instructs Poston. “It seems to work.” That doesn’t mean you might not want to call ahead—just to be on the safe side. “We have a nice happy hour right after work, then we get a lull, but then we get a nice little buzz around 8 or 9, then get another hit may 2013

4/26/13 1:15 PM


Life’s Better Together at the Top!

Experience a naturally inspired getaway at one of the most esteemed lodges in the country—Skytop. This grand historic estate features the very best in accommoda�ons, fine dining and limitless recrea�on throughout 5,500 pris�ne acres of breathtaking vistas nestled in the picturesque Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania.

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SOCIETY | Social Calendar with Guest of a Guest

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THE MET GALA

This year’s Costume Institute Benefit will be co-chaired by Rooney Mara, Lauren Santo Domingo, Riccardo Tisci, and Anna Wintour with Beyoncé Knowles as an Honorary Chair. 6:30pm, invitation only. at the metropolitan museum of art, 1000 5th avenue, metmuseum.org

Beyoncé Knowles arriving at last year‘s Costume Institute Benefit

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THE EVENT WILL HONOR OVER THIRTY ARTISTS FROM THE AMERICAS WHO ARE REPRESENTED IN THE TATE’S PERMANENT COLLECTION. PROCEEDS WILL SUPPORT THE TATE. 10pm, tickets $200. at skylight

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at moynihan station 360 west 33rd street, artistsdinnerafterparty.eventbrite.com

AILEY AT THE APOLLO SPRING GALA BENEFIT

A one-night-only joint performance by the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and Ailey II. The performance will be followed by a gala dinner and dancing with music provided by the renowned DJ Kiss. Proceeds from the event will provide much needed scholarships to talented students of The Ailey School as well as Ailey’s Arts In Education & Community Programs. These programs serve more than 100,000 youth annually—including Ailey Camp and the Ailey at the Apollo. 7pm, tickets start at $350. at the apollo theater, 253 west 125th street, 212.405.9031, alvinailey.org 40

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NYC BALLET SPRING GALA

Natalie Portman at last year’s NYC Ballet Spring Gala

This year’s event will celebrate the 25th Anniversary of The American Music Festival. The evening will begin with cocktails and performances and will be followed by a supper ball on the theater’s Promenade and Terrace. 5:30pm. at the david h. koch theater, 20 lincoln center plaza, nycballet.com

BEYONCE KNOWLES PHOTO BY JOE SCHILDHORN /BFANYC.COM; JUSTIN DAVIS AND TONI BRAXTON PHOTO BY DARIO CALMESE; TATE PHOTO COURTESY ARTIST JIM LAMBIE; NATALIE PORTMAN PHOTO BY KENNETH ARCARA

TATE AMERICAS FOUNDATION HOSTS THIRD ARTISTS DINNER AFTER-PARTY

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TASTE OF TRIBECA PHOTO BY JACK BERMAN; HILARY RHODA PHOTO BY KEN ARCARA

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FRIEZE ART FAIR

A contemporary art exhibition showcasings works by over 1,000 artists from 180 galleries around the world. Visitors can also enjoy Frieze Talks, a program of debates, panel discussions and keynote lectures. through may 13, fri.-sun., 11am7pm, mon., 11am-6pm. tickets start at $42. at randall’s island park, friezenewyork.com

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The Webby Awards honors Internet excellence, including outstanding websites, apps and social media. This event will be hosted by comedian Patton Oswalt. Winners will be expected to give a traditional acceptance speech limited to five words. 7:30pm, invitation only. at cipriani, 55 wall street, webbyawards.com TANENBAUM 2013 AWARDS CEREMONY

This nonprofit organization with a mission to combat religious prejudice celebrates their 20th year. Tanenbaum will honor New York Times bestselling author Reza Aslan and FJC, A Foundation of Philanthropic Funds. 6:30pm, tickets start at $350. at the plaza hotel, 768 fifth avenue, tanenbaum.org

SPONSORS FOR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY AWARDS DINNER

This awards ceremony will mark the 50th Anniversary for the non-profit organization which provides educational and career opportunities to over 10,000 young people from underserved and underrepresented communities worldwide. 6pm, tickets start at $300. at cipriani, 55 wall street, seo-usa.org

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THE 17TH ANNUAL WEBBY AWARDS

AMERICAN IMAGE AWARDS

The 35th annual awards presentation by the American Apparel and Footwear Association will honor Rebecca Minkoff as Designer of the Year and Wes Card as Man of the Year. Proceeds from the evening will benefit the Wounded Warrior Project, a nonprofit with a mission to bring awareness and aid to the needs of injured service members. 6:15pm, tickets: $1,250. at the intrepid, 700 west 46th street, wewear.org

Pastries fron Taste of Tribeca

TASTE OF TRIBECA PHOTO BY JACK BERMAN; HILARY RHODA PHOTO BY KEN ARCARA

BEYONCE KNOWLES PHOTO BY JOE SCHILDHORN /BFANYC.COM; JUSTIN DAVIS AND TONI BRAXTON PHOTO BY DARIO CALMESE; TATE PHOTO COURTESY ARTIST JIM LAMBIE; NATALIE PORTMAN PHOTO BY KENNETH ARCARA

Hilary Rhoda at the MoMA Garden Party in 2012

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This outdoor food festival—now in its 19th year—includes a wine tour, activities for children and samplings from nearly all of downtown’s critically acclaimed restaurants. One ticket provides six tastings. All proceeds from the event will benefit the arts programs at local public schools PS 150 and PS 234. 11:30am-3pm, tickets start at $45. on duane street (between greenwich and hudson), tasteoftribeca.com

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A CARTIER-SPONSORED EVENING OF COCKTAILS AND DINNER IN THE ABBY ALDRICH ROCKEFELLER SCULPTURE GARDEN. THE EVENT WILL HONOR MICHAEL LYNNE, ANNA MARIE SHAPIRO, AND EDGAR WACHENHEIM III. PROCEEDS FROM THE PARTY WILL BENEFIT THE MUSEUM’S GENERAL OPERATING FUND. 7pm, tickets start at $150, at the museum of modern art, 11 west 53 street, moma.org

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THE SOCIETY OF MEMORIAL SLOAN-KETTERING CANCER CENTER

This annual dinner will honor Jamie Niven, a longstanding, 40 year-member of the Special Projects Committee. The event will include dinner, dancing and musical entertainment, sponsored by Harry Winston. 7pm, Tickets start at $500. at le Cirque, one beacon court, 151 east 58th street, mskcc.org

For more event listings please visit the website of our co-writers at guestofaguest.com

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www.galleristny.com

Your view inside the global art world. CONTACT: SPENCER SHARP, 212-407-9377, SSHARP@OBSERVER.COM

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home

interior design trends from the experts

Floor plan Walls arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only areas of the home getting a splash of color. UK company Farrow & Ball offers floor paints in 132 colors to add a contemporary pop to any space.

Photo courtesy of Farrow & Ball

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HOME

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These rough-edged furnishings bring the great outdoors inside

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1. Dylan tall end table by Made Good, madegoods.com 2. Driftwood Chandelier by Canopy Designs, abchome.com 3. Natural Cherry Edge Bowls by Goodwood, abchome.com 4. Arm chair in pine by Jose Zanine Caldas, r20thcentury. com 5. Dining table made with a solid walnut elliptical slice by Christian Wassmann, r20thcentury.com

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MAY 2013

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Looking forward to Producer, Patricia Wattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual

Fred & Adele Astaire Awards Monday, June 3rd, 2013 NYU Skirball

Rita and Fred Honoring excellence in Dance and Choreography on Broadway and in Film. The 2013 Douglas Watt Lifetime Achievement Award to Marge Champion The 2013 Outstanding Achievement in the Preservation of Musical Theater Award to Theodore S. Chapin For info and tickets www.nyuskirball.org/calendar/astaire Sponsor: Antonio Vendome Art: Don Duga, DonDuga@juno.com Art Direction: Andrew@blacktiemagazine.com

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HOME | Designer

The Dillon townhouse in Hell's Kitchen, NYC, designed by Haus Interior, hausinterior.com

Nina Freudenberger

the Interior designer and founder of haus interior takes us inside the chic hellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen townhouse she designed and shares her must-haves for the home Photography by Colin Miller 46

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may 2013

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Ladies boots, lechameau. co.uk 2. Festival Feast Rug by Eskayel, dorisleslieblau. com 3. Abstract #6 by Jenna Snyder-Phillips, jennasnyderphillips.com, hausinterior.com 4. Ladder Chair by BDDW, bddw. com 5. Large Paloma Towels, jaysonhome.com

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HAT IS YOUR MUST-HAVE ITEM FOR

A beautiful set of simple ladder back chairs around the dining table. BEDROOM: A soft rug from Eskayelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;this amazing company in Brooklyn produces the most beautiful and bold pattern carpets with a muted color palette that makes it perfect for a bedroom. BATHROOM: Cotton Turkish towels by Jayson Home. I fell in love with these towels in Turkey when I visited last year. There is something more elegant about these than your typical terry cotton towels. LIVING ROOM: A chaise lounge in the corner for reading. Flair carries some of the most beautiful vintage furniture in NYC. GUEST ROOM: Crisp, white, ironed sheets by Olatz. MUDROOM: A few pairs of Le Chameau leather lined rainboots for guests. I suggest having a few sizes for when guests visit so that they can take a stroll no matter what the weather is like. FOYER: A piece of art by Jenna Snyder Phillips. She is an incredible artist with a wide variety of work, her abstracts add the perfect splash of color in the entry. KITCHEN: Stunning cutting boards by Lostineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they are hand-made with a leather strap detail, ideal for entertaining and serving the perfect charcuterie plate. EK

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THE... DINING ROOM:

SCENEINNY.COM

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HOME| At Home With

Southern comfort Eclectic fashion designer and Project Runway winner Gretchen Jones opens the doors to her humble abode by Eliza krpoyan

PHOTOGRAPHED By Maia Harms

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designer Gretchen jones

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or the past two-and-a-half years jewelry and clothing designer Gretchen Jones has called Brooklyn home. The Colorado born and Oregon raised East Coast transplant says that she’s always wanted to live in New York City and Brooklyn seemed the most fitting for someone from rural environments. This bohemian beauty’s roots are also the inspiration behind her decorating and designing aesthetic. “I think that living in both natural settings [Colorado and Oregon] infused my aesthetic with eclectic and organic taste. I like things to be mismatched and textural, which inevitably makes its way into my own work,” says Jones. Her aesthetic combines 1970s romantism with all-American styles, earthy colors and patterns—both in her personal space and in her designs. Jones’ namesake Spring and Summer 2013 women’s contemporary line is made predominantly from natural and ethically sourced materials. Working mainly with leather, wool, bamboo, organic cotton, wood, brass and gemstones, the eco-friendly designer also prints her custom patterns digitally to reduce water waste. Her collection of apparel includes draped silhouettes, southwestern prints and free-flowing shapes. Jones also muses by symbiotic relationships between fashion, art, music, literature and nature with her folk interpretation of classic styles. This season’s collection, for example, pays homage to American folk singer and continued on page 50 >

Jones in the living room of her home in Brooklyn

may 2013

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THE PREMIER DESTINATION FOR THE DECORATIVE ARTS ANTIQUES | BESPOKE | MODERN

JOHN ROSSELLI BK ANTIQUES DUANE ATLANTIC GALLERY ANDREW RAQUET LLC BUNNY WILLIAMS ERIC APPEL ANTIQUES ROARK BALSAMO ANTIQUES

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LIZ O’BRIEN SOLAR ANTIQUES LEE CALICCHIO LTD LUCCA & CO ROBERT ALTMAN JEAN KARAJIAN GALLERY NIALL SMITH ANTIQUES C.J. PETERS DORIS LESLIE BLAU

4/25/13 3:57:47 PM


HOME| At Home With

“I don’t really shop for home goods, when I’m out and about and something special catches my eye, I pick it up. Flea markets and thrift shops tend to be my favorites.”

Jones’ Brooklyn digs 50

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human rights activist Joan Baez and her album “Any Day Now.” In her home, Jones displays artwork that she’s collected over the past decade from different artists around the nation. And when asked where she shops for home furnishings, she answered like a true Brooklynite. “I don’t really shop for home goods, when I’m out and about and something special catches my eye, I pick it up. Flea markets and thrift shops tend to be my favorites,” says Jones. As far as what she believes makes a house a home, Jones tells us, “Living in it! I don’t like over-designed or over-cleaned homes—they feel sterile. I like houses to feel like nests; filled with things that are special to its owner and cozy enough to sink into!”

may 2013

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PROMOTION

DESIGN STAR ANDREW FLESHER INTERIORS 445 Park Avenue, 9th Floor www.andrewflesher.com andrew@andrewflesher.com 212.393.9380

Q&A WITH ANDREW FLESHER What made you decide to pursue a career as an interior designer? I always thought I’d be an architect. When I was in grade school and Andrew Flesher other kids were outside playing, I was drawing houses on graph paper. I spent four years in college at the University of Minnesota studying it, but eventually found my way to interior design. Interiors felt more creative to me and less about physics. However, my architectural background strengthens my skills as an interior designer. I believe an excellent interior starts with an excellent shell. That’s how I approach every project: from the walls, in.

Spaces designed by Andrew Flesher Interiors

How would you describe your interior design style? It’s hard to put a label on my style because I like so many different things, and often times the direction of the project is driven by the client and their needs. If I had to use four words to describe my aesthetic, they would be: tailored, classic, timeless and quality. I love nothing more than something beautifully crafted and luxurious materials. Where do you turn for inspiration, design and otherwise? Travel is very important to me but it’s not necessary to take a trip every month. Walking around New York city, I can get inspired by anything from the colors of the foliage and nature in Central Park to the colors of a weathered stucco building on the Lower East Side. Keeping my eyes open to my environment everyday adds to my experience and can’t help but influence my designs. Do you have any rules you follow when designing? The only rule I believe in is that there are no rules. Nothing bores me more than expected, formulaic, cookie cutter design. I still learn something on every project and put it in my memory bank. When I stop learning it means I’m not trying anything new. Is there one essential product that you believe every home should have? Fortuny fabric! Even if you can only afford a pillow, I believe every house—modern or traditional—should have some. There’s a subtle mystique to the way it’s made that no one else has been able to duplicate, and it gets better with age. How does your design improve a client’s experience in their home? One of the highest compliments I’ve received from a client is when she told me that living in one of my interiors is a privilege—that the beauty that surrounds her gives her energy to go out and face the world. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SUSAN GILMORE AND KAREN MELVIN

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HOME | Art Calendar Through

May

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THE POP OBJECT THE STILL LIFE TRADITION IN POP ART ACQUAVELLA GALLERY 18 East 79th Street, 212.734.6300

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART may 9—aug 14 PUNK: Chaos to Couture

may 15—aug 18 Search for the Unicorn: An Exhibition in Honor of The Cloisters’ 75th Anniversary 1000 Fifth Avenue 212.535.7710

MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

may 10—jan 5 XL: 19 New Acquisitions in Photography may 22—sept 9 Ellsworth Kelly: The Chatham Series 11 West 53rd Street 212.708.9400 auction houses

BONHAMS

may 14 Contemporary Art may 15 African, Oceanic and Pre-Columbian Art may 22 American Art 580 Madison Avenue 212.644.9001

PHILLIPS

may 17 Contemporary Art may 23 Latin America 450 Park Avenue 212.940.1300

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SOTHEBY’S

may 14 Contemporary Art Evening Auction may 16 African, Oceanic and Pre-Columbian Art may 21 The Andy Williams Collection of Navajo Blankets may 22 American Art may 28—29 Latin American Art 1334 York Avenue 212.606.7000

DOYLE NEW YORK may 8 European, American, Modern & Contemporary Art may 22 Important English & Continental Furniture & Decorations/Old Master Paintings 175 East 87th Street 212.427.2730 galleries

PAUL KASMIN may 8—june 15 Simon Hantai

515 West 27th Street 212.563.4474

MARLBOROUGH GALLERY may 11—june 29 Endless Bummer II / Still Bummin’ 545 West 25th Street 212.463.8634

From top:

Wayne Thiebaud, Lipstick Row, 1964; James Rosenquist, Dishes, 1964; Roy Lichtenstein, Still Life with Palette, 1972

LIPSTICK ROW PHOTO COURTESY ART © WAYNE THIEBAUD/LICENSED BY VAGA, NEW YORK, NY; DISHES PHOTO BY PAUL MACAPIA, © SEATTLE ART MUSEUM ART © JAMES ROSENQUIST/LICENSED BY VAGA, NEW YORK, NY; STILL LIFE WITH PALETTE PHOTO COURTESY ART © ESTATE OF ROY LICHTENSTEIN

museums

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All looks by Thom Browne, Fall/Winter 2013 Collection, thombrowne. com; On Natalie: grey wool dress and cape, rose cotton tights, red leather shoes with white paint; on Monika: black wool square shoulder blazer, black wool skirt, black cropped beaver fur jacket, black and white lace corset

the passion of

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MOVIE-STAR HANDSOME, MEDIA-SHY AND AN ALLEGED CONTROL-FREAK, DESIGNER Thom Browne HAS AS MANY DIEHARD FANS AS HE DOES CRITICS WHO LOVE TO TEAR APART HIS COLLECTIONS SEAM BY SEAM. BUT AFTER FIRST LADY MICHELLE OBAMA CHOSE A THOM BROWNE DRESS AND COAT FOR THE PRESIDENT’S INAUGURATION, THE DESIGNER BECAME A HOUSEHOLD NAME AND HIS PROVOCATIVE DEBUT WOMEN’S COLLECTION WAS THE HOT TICKET OF FASHION WEEK. Darrell Hartman MEETS Browne IN HIS CHELSEA SHOWROOM AND DISCOVERS WHAT DRIVES THE DESIGNER TO KEEP PUSHING THE ENVELOPE SEASON AFTER SEASON. PHOTOGRAPHED BY

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STYLED BY

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HAIR BY DHIRAN MISTRY MAKEUP BY JASON “SPARROW” WILLARD FOR THE JOHN BARRETT SALON

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On Monika: black

and white wool cropped jacket, black and white wool dress with red pattern; on Natalie: red and white rose strapless silk dress; on both: rose cotton tights and leather shoes with paint

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t occurs to me, as i sit down with the convention-busting designer in his chelsea showroom, that thom browne is a curious mix of soft and hard. For a successful 47-year-old, he comes across as remarkably shy and soft-spoken; his brown eyes are boyish, his stubble and unbuttoned collar easy to interpret as signs of nonchalance. At the same time, as anyone who’s spent time with Browne will tell you, this firm-jawed iconoclast is the opposite of improvised or sloppy. He’s a man who is quietly, intensely in control. Recently, Browne has guided his business into promising new territory. Though his reputation is built on menswear, he designs for women as well—ready-to-wear for Brooks Brothers since 2007, and his own line since 2010. That side of things was all moving along quite nicely until earlier this year, when Michelle Obama wore a smartly tailored navy coat and checked dress, both by Thom Browne, to her husband’s inauguration. It was, as they say, a game-changer. And when Browne unveiled his Fall 2013 womenswear in New York a few weeks later, thousands of eager new eyes were watching. His offbeat stagecraft (it was his first runway-style women’s show) did not disappoint. In a winter forest setting, male models in gray flannel suits lay blindfolded and strapped to plywood beds, “bleeding” under crowns of thorns while the female models walked. Was Browne kinkily suppressing his famous menswear so that the ladies could have their moment? Either way, the clothes seem to have been a hit. In his showroom, Browne walks me through them, with their exaggerated proportions (shoulders are as wide as mantlepieces) and feminine treatments of traditional menswear fabrics. A patchwork cape is cut into a crisp square, and there’s an absolute showstopper of a blood-red dress, with rich, rose-petal-like folds below the waist and a smartly tailored jacket on top. Pointy shoes are splashed with a hardened milky substance—liquid rubber, Browne notes, a flourish that he says led some observers to make some “horrible associations.” But it seems unlikely that Browne didn’t see at least a few risqué readings coming, and he has no particular reason to be bothered. “It took me a couple seasons, but I’ve really figured out what I want to do for girls,” he says. “Whereas with men’s, early on, I really knew what I wanted.” This is the groundbreaking part of the Thom Browne story, because the accepted wisdom had long been that American men also know what they want, and if they were going to come back to tailoring after years in the wilds of business casual, would they really warm to Browne’s radically re-proportioned suits? But look at shop windows anywhere, and you’ll see that Browne’s idiosyncratic take on the JFK-era office drone has totally changed the zeitgeist. “It’s easy to say Thom has changed the silhouette and the proportions of the suit. But what he’s really done is educated people’s eye,” says Michael Hainey, deputy editor of GQ and one of the designer’s closest friends. (Browne designed the wedding dress for Hainey’s wife, fashion executive Brooke Cundiff.) Hainey compares Browne’s designs to the Guggenheim—odd-looking when first unveiled, and then just right. “Thom is sort of ahead of where the world is, and then the world catches up to him.” Before it did, though, Browne endured plenty of resistance, to put it mildly. Playground kids yelled “Peewee Herman!” at him. Deliverymen yelled worse

“i hide behind what i do. I really just like to design and make clothing, and let people be more interested in that than me” —Thom Browne 57

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Red and white sleeveless dress, rose cotton tights, red leather shoes with white paint, red leather bag

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This page, on Monika: white and

red floral jacket, red and white checkered top;

Opposite page, on Natalie: white and

grey lace corset, red leather shoes with white paint

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“THe New York Post took a bizarre interest in his search for new investment, treating his financial straits as a comeuppance of sorts for a ‘control freak.’”

Opposite Page, on Monika: black and

white wool cape, black and white silk dress, black and white silk corset, on Natalie: grey beaver fur coat with petals, grey long silk corset dress

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things. “It’s amazing, the amount of anger a couple of inches would cause,” recalls designer Kirk Miller, who served as Browne’s right-hand man between 2004 (when Browne, whose label began as made-to-measure, launched his ready-to-wear line) and 2006. “But I think he’s always been interested in the bigger picture, and known what it would take to get there.” Browne scored some influential devotees early on, including dapper execs (Estée Lauder’s John Demsey, CAA’s Bryan Lourd) and designers Gilles Mendel and Derek Lam, and as word got around, plenty of master-of-the-universe types came to him asking for a suit. But if they objected too strenuously to having their pants or jackets cropped, the designer sent them elsewhere. “I gave business to a lot of other tailors in town back then,” he admits. Winning the coveted CFDA Menswear Award in 2006 led to gigs at Brooks Brothers and Moncler, but the economic downturn hit Browne’s own label hard. The New York Post took a bizarre interest in his search for new investment, treating his financial straits as a comeuppance of sorts for a “control freak.” “A lot of the naysayers got their claws out. They were saying that going against all the accepted norms was finally catching up with him. I thought it was all so wrong,” Miller says. But Browne got the last laugh, striking a deal in late 2009 with a Japanese company that has helped launch a fruitful new chapter. This spring, he opened a store in Tokyo. The inauguration happened. Browne tells me, a bit cagily, that Saks Fifth Avenue will be carrying his fall collection “in a very supportive way,” and adds that being more established is actually encouraging him to keep pushing boundaries, because now “people know that I’m just not doing things for fun.” There’s a place for Browne on the social circuit if he wants it, but he doesn’t. “It’s just not my thing,” he says. “I hide behind what I do. I really just like to design and make clothing, and let people be more interested in that than in me.” Browne’s boyfriend is Andrew Bolton, the curatorial prodigy behind this spring’s “Punk: Chaos to Couture” exhibition at the Met’s Costume Institute. I ask Browne if he’s ever been called one half of a power couple. “Um, yes,” he admits, laughing nervously. “But we’re far from thinking of ourselves that way. We just do our thing.” Like his partner, Browne is rarely seen along the glitzy byways that attract so many in the fashion business. He “shuts off ” on weekends, and watches old movies by the likes of Kubrick, Visconti, and Antonioni. “I love what I’m doing, but I have other interests. I’d rather not be in fashion all the time.” Unsurprisingly, perhaps, Browne is a man of habit. It’s shown, over the years, in his eating and drinking routines: Pastis, Il Cantinori, the Four Seasons Grill. “Coffee in the morning, champagne at the end of the day,” he says—out of tumblers whenever possible, not flutes. Browne suggests that his need for structure is a holdover from his days as a varsity swimmer at Notre Dame. He runs now, on treadmills, because it’s easier on his knees, and has been known to work out at his local Equinox wearing his own cardigans, Henley shirts, and dress shorts. Committing to the Thom Browne vision has never been a problem for him. One presumes Browne won’t be wearing his women’s looks at the gym anytime soon. Even here, though, he seems willing to toy with the idea. “That would be an interesting story, wouldn’t it?”

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On Natalie:

red and white polyester coat, red and white rose strapless silk dress

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Opposite page:

balck and whilte wool pants, black and white wool jacket, black and white tweed jacket, black and white check tie, rose cotton tights, grey leather shoes with white paint; this page: red and white wool check cape, rose cotton tights, grey leather shoes with white paint

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Red long silk dress, white, grey and red lace corset

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Matthew Peyton/Getty Images

Brandusa Niro

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Fashion’s queen

B

Matthew Peyton/Getty Images

The elusive BRANDUSA NIRO, the Editor in Chief of the dishy style bible The Daily Front Row, has created a publication that has become as ubiquitous during Fashion Week as Anna Wintour’s dark sunglasses. Born in communist Romania, the charmingly upbeat Niro, reveals to SCENE her secret to both tantalizing and teasing Seventh Avenue tastemakers, while remaining everyone’s best friend and making a magazine that all of the fashion world will do anything to be in.

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“When you love something as much as I love fashion and magazines, you owe it to yourself to create your own piece of it [...] For me that labor of love is The Daily.”

W

hat was the inspiration to start The Daily just over a decade ago?

I’ve always had a passion for the behind-the-scenes world of fashion, where this milieu is at its most authentic. The designers and their teams, the retail and media kingmakers, the self-fueling model and agent dynamic, the fashion editrixes—anointed taste makers whose job is to steer the mass toward class, or the other way around, as is the case with those who rely on focus groups rather than creative process! It’s all fascinating to me. It started when I was a tween, growing up in communist Romania, a place without a stich of Chanel in sight, and where all magazines from the western world were strictly contraband. My uncle, the great Romanian actor Toma Caragiu, used to smuggle Elle and Vogue for me from his soirées at the French embassy. Who knew then that Elle’s lead photographer Gilles Bensimon, whose work I adored on those pages would today be one of my closest friends and collaborators? But I digress. When you love something as much as I love fashion and magazines, you owe it to yourself to create your own piece of it, something that is completely new and original, a voice and a look unheard and unseen before. For me, that labor of love is The Daily. How has The Daily changed over the past 10 years? Fashion is serious business, but it is also serious fun! That’s The Daily credo, and foundation. Within this framework, we are evolving constantly, at a very fast pace. Our readers are: the smartest, most sophisticated and influential people in the fashion and media world. Our job is to keep them engaged and excited. So far we’ve done OK with that. Our readers always ask for more. Consequently, we have added magazines outside of our New York fashion week bible, The Daily Front Row. Our most important initiative is The Daily Summer, our weekly magazine published in the Hamptons from May to September. It’s the shop-able, social and ultra-chic sister to our fashion week Daily, with plenty of the humorous kick and fashion edge that’s our signature. It’s our third year in the Hamptons and we have gathered such a huge following over there that we’ve had to increase our circulation by 40 percent this summer. Plus, we now are making the magazine available on the digital newsstand where we average already 3.2 million impressions per issue. My favorite thing is when I get reports from our moles on the scene in Southampton, East Hampton and Amagansett about how fast our mag gets picked up. Everbody says “It’s like candy!” Did you know when you started The Daily that fashion would become such a national obsession and that the web would become such an

I did, actually, in 1998. That year, I launched the first independent fashion newswire, a site that was posting 24/7, like an AP wire but with a sense of fun. We were syndicated in over 300 media outlets. AP was our client as well, right from the start. I believed as early as 1998 that there was an appetite for the fashion insiders, the characters, the process, the news, the front row, the backstage as well as the runway, among readers and viewers everywhere and that the web was the best way to take it to them. Five years later I launched The Daily in print, in 2003. It was the year The Devil Wears Prada was published. And the rest is history. In terms of style, my web roots inform the print Daily, which has the kicky urgency of the web and of TV. Totally short-form, all-access, anecdotal, show-versus-tell, seen, heard, overheard, very visual, sound bite-y and fly-on-the-wall,

Covers courtesy of The daily

important platform?

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the ultimate vicarious experience for the reader. You can be at home in your pajamas and feel like you’ve been brushing shoulders with Michael Kors. You are a true participant. Plus you know every bit of dish that matters. It has grown and evolved tremendously. IMG and the CFDA have done an incredible job building up the scope of the American runway talent and making it possible for it to flourish. There’s nothing more vibrant, buzzier or more exhilarating than New York Fashion Week. We certainly played our part too, by chronicling every second of the week, infusing it with so much colorful, glorious and celebratory energy.

How has Fashion Week changed since you first started?

What have been your favorite Daily covers? I always adore a model or two each season. I love the covers we shoot with these models at couture. Not only are the girls magnificent, but also you capture the exact vision of the designer, at its very best. The clothes, hair, makeup, styling, etc., nothing and no one can replicate that vision, and as such it is the definition of a true fashion moment. The “Chic-i-leaks” cover is a favorite, then there is the one with Miss Piggy sandwiched front row between Anna Wintour and Franca Sozzani, Miss Piggy saying, in a talk bubble, ‘Move over, chérie.’ That is so Daily. And our Tenth Anniversary cover, with the dangling 10 earring on Lindsey Wixson— that cover captures exactly what The Daily is about today: very chic, very luxury, and very, very cheeky. Speaking of, The Daily is known for being funny. How do you balance poking fun at fashion people while still being loved by everyone? Has there ever been a story that has ruffled a lot of feathers? Not that anyone has told me! You know the thing that makes me happy every day? It is how smart and funny and talented most of the people we cover really are. I couldn’t dream of a better readership. The Daily is for them and about them. It’s working perfectly. Yes, there may be a few who can’t take a good joke, like a certain venerable designer who was celebrating an anniversary and we printed a cheeky quote from a movie star guest about what gift he’d give him for his birthday. His publicist called to say he doesn’t like anything funny. Well, in that case, I must paraphrase Miss Piggy and say: “It’s fashion, chérie! You need some joie de Daily!”

Covers courtesy of The daily

As the editor in Chief, you are a bit like the female Wizard of Oz as you don't go to every show and party, though you could sit front row everywhere from Calvin Klein to Céline. Why do you prefer being behind the scenes? I actually sit front row at Calvin Klein every single season. Luckily their show is after we finish shipping our last issue and I adore Francisco Costa. I sometimes make it at Marc Jacobs and to Carolina Herrera and Michael Kors. I wish I could be at more shows, but when I send to press a new issue of a glossy 50-page magazine overnight, covering what happened the day before, I have to approve pages every 15 minutes and then work on the cover, select photos and write the cover lines. I am the only editor who works on the cover with our Creative Director, Guillaume Bruneau. To me, the work we do on covers is what I love the most. So, as always in this life, something’s got to give. Working on The Daily covers trumps going to shows. The rest of the year, I go to fashion and media events very selectively. And I spend nearly every day all year meeting with the subjects of our stories—the designers, creatives, media mavens, top retailers, etc. I do it at lunch, one on one, or at private dinners. This way we can really catch up and have fun. And it is how I get a lot of scoops, I might add. My favorite tables are at Le Bernardin, Il Gattopardo, Armani Ristorante, and Indochine. Last week I discovered a new spot thanks to my friend Alex Gonzalez from Marie Claire—A Voce, in the Time Warner building. What is your first fashion memory? My first Chanel show when I was covering the collections for L’Express, in my early 20s. I have never encountered anything that could top Chanel. Just like there was just one Coco, there is also just one Karl Lagerfeld. Another moment from that same era was my first interview with Valentino during the couture shows in Rome, on the Spanish steps, and in Paris again, with Hubert de Givenchy.

“our tenth anniversary cover [...] captures exactly what the daily is about today: very chic, very luxury, and very, very cheeky.” 73

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Courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

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Courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

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A Haute and Hippie Home

A look at Haute Hippie power couple Trish Wescoat Pound and Jesse Cole’s Upper east side Townhouse What was your inspiration behind your home’s design? We wanted to create a home that was warm and inviting, but still cool and eclectic. We kept things minimal, but with a comforting and relaxed feel. From the subdued hues to the standout photography we wanted a laid-back vibe, which mirrors our lifestyle. How would you describe your home and lifestyle esthetic? Very casual and relaxed. We spend most of our time together since we work day in and day out next to each other, and feel that it is important to be relaxed and calm in all aspects of our life. We always look forward to weekends so that we can escape the city and head to our second home in the Hamptons to just chill. Do you have a favorite room in the house? The kitchen. Our family congregates here and we spend a lot of time cooking, sharing our day’s stories and hearing about our daughter Jillian’s day at Hewitt. The kitchen has an old world esthetic, combined with a modern industrial flair. The windows overlook the garden and cherry trees. You never feel like you are in the city living here. We have a fireplace in our kitchen, which is often the centerpiece for many late nights of wine drinking and Jesse’s storytelling sessions with our closest friends. Some very comical and unforgettable nights!

Travelling is a huge part of our lives. Besides being out in the Hamptons in the summer, we take frequent trips to Europe. We love going somewhere new, we went to Turkey (loved Bodrum) and then ended our trip in the luxurious Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc in the South of France. We also love traveling to Italy. I find that I like to start my trip in an inspiring city or somewhere new and then end up near the water in the lap of luxury.

Where do you travel? What are some of your favorite destinations?

trish: I love to collect paintings, nudes in particular. I have found many of them on Portobello Road in London, which is my favorite place for vintage shopping. I also collect vintage clothing, and I have a dealer in London that I live for! jesse: I feel that I have an amazing eye for Americana and folk art. I search various places for one-of-a-kind objects, anyone who sees my art always asks, “Where did you get that?” My favorite items are a 1950s Eames chair that I restored myself, and the first original wood tennis post from the center court at Wimbledon. It’s the first post on our stairway!

Do you collect anything?

Our office has the same laid-back vibe, but still eclectic. We have an open space so that our employees are able to communicate easily. Our office has a very home-y feel as we have our dogs here and music playing. It is a great place to work and be creative!

Courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

Courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

How does your lifestyle and décor at home carry over to your office?

trish: I feel that I’ve stayed true to my style since launching the brand. At Haute Hippie, we design for our “RoBo” (Rock ‘n Roll Bohemian) muse and are inspired by her lifestyle; what she wears, where she goes, and what she listens to. For me, personally and from a design perspective, which is one and the same, I am conscious of looks that can easily transition from day to night by adding an accessory or changing your shoes. This is how I live my life both at home and in the office.

Do you feel your style has changed or evolved since launching Haute Hippie?

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“WE wanted to create a home that was warm and inviting, but still cool and eclectic.” 4/26/13 2:16 PM


Erin Wasson The model is the face of grungechic brand, Zadig & Voltaire. She has a penchant for suede hats and skinny jeans, and has a half-pipe in the backyard of her Venice, California house.

zoë Kravitz

The daughter of rocker Lenny Kravitz and Lisa Bonet, she lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and is often seen out with her boyfriend, Gossip Girl’s Penn Bagley. She fronts the band Elevator Flight, which performed at South by Southwest, and designs vintage and ethnic-inspired jewelry with Swarovski Crystallized.

uma thurman

The actress grew up with a Buddhist father, who named his sons after Tibetan monasteries. Herself named after a Hindu goddess (“uma” also means “light” in Sanskirt), Thurman hung out with the Dalai Lama when she vacationed in India as a child. Her mother was previously married to LSD guru Timothy Leary.

Bohemia Luxuria

pamela love

The Brooklyn-based jewelry designer loves symbols like dream catchers and pentagrams and gets a tattoo after every season she shows.

Celebrities and moguls who are Living la vida boho

Mary Kate Olsen

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Bfanyc.com

As the grungier half of the Olsen duo, she made ragamuffin chic a trend, stepping out in expensive fringed shawls and oversized sweaters. She’s dated artists like Nate Lowman, and Dash Snow’s brother Maxwell, as well as shipping heir and kite-surfer Stavros Niarchos.

A vegan and animal rights activist (he’s won the PETA Humanitarian award, 2001, and Person of the Year award, 2011) Simmons practices yoga and transcendental meditation. His book—Super Rich: A Guide to Having it All—encouraged charitable acts of giving as a lifestyle.

Olsen: Getty images; bfanyc.com

Russell Simmons


Diane Von Furstenberg

A fan of meditation, von Furstenberg likes to travel to Bali and take hikes around the globe. She is very involved in the Dillervon Furstenberg family foundation, and likes to tweet inspirational quotes. Deepak Chopra is on her speed dial.

Kate Moss

Donna Karan

The designer meditates, practices yoga and champions the benefits of each. She even built a yoga retreat on her compound in Turks and Caicos. Karan also founded the Urban Zen organization, which works to promote holistic health care reform.

The supermodel is credited for ushering in the heroin chic trend of the 90s. She usually frequents music festivals in denim cut off shorts and wellies, while consistently ranking on best dressed lists. She dated Johnny Depp and troubled Brit singer Pete Doherty before settling down with rocker Jamie Hince of The Kills.

Liv Tyler

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Olsen: Getty images; bfanyc.com

James Franco

A former vegan, the daughter of Aerosmith front man Stephen Tyler meditates regularly and helps support the David Lynch Foundation’s efforts to provide transcendental mediation to disadvantaged societies.

A veritable Renaissance Man, Franco is an actor (from the bigbudget blockbuster Spiderman to the indie Spring Breakers), writer (he wrote a short story for McSweeney’s), student (he studied at UCLA, Yale and RISD), teacher (he taught a screenwriting class at UCLA), musician (his band’s name is Daddy) and artist (his Rebel exhibit was displayed at MOCA). Phew.

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real estate the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top listings the professionals who sell them

145 hudson

This spectacular TriBeCa duplex penthouse sheathed in museum-quality, insulated glass offers 360-degree panoramic views of Manhattan and the Hudson River. Bespoke space includes 4,500 squarefoot wrap-around terrace, four bedrooms and four-and-a-half baths. $44 Million

COurtesy of douglas elliman

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For more information, please contact HEATHER MCDONOUGH HENRY HERSHKOWITZ Douglas Elliman, 212.321.7156

4/26/13 12:17 PM


On Real estate Sutton place and beekman One of the most dynamic things about the city is that its neighborhoods constantly evolve while retaining a sense of their history. The Sutton Place and Beekman neighborhoods are primary examples. While they are currently experiencing the addition of new shops and restaurants as well as condominium towers, they have maintained many of the elements that have lured buyers there over the years including historic architecture and the parks with East River views. Sutton Place and Beekman became fashionable in the 20s and 30s when many of their iconic apartments buildings were initially developed. In the decades that followed additional co-ops and condos were built adding greater variety to the housing options. Sutton Place and Beekman have maintained their attraction and today many buyers look to these areas as providing very good value for their investment. Pre-war flagship co-op buildings and lovely townhouses represent excellent value and extraordinary architectural integrity. Trends in these hyper-local residential real estate markets can evolve over time and prices can fluctuate significantly. This is why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to work with a professional broker who is well-informed on current market conditions.

hall f. willkie President Brown Harris Stevens Residential Sales hwillkie@bhsusa.com

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Photography by Francis Hills

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on the market Brown Harris Stevens Richard F. Ferrari Drew Glick rferrari@bhsusa.com dglick@bhsusa.com 212.396.5885 212.396.5883

521 Park avenue Price: $19,950,000 Bedrooms: 4 Bathrooms: 4.5 Apartment perks: This unit, which occupies the entire sixth floor of the building, offers a rare New York commodity—a pre-war condominium on Park Avenue. Built in 1911, the building is graced with a beautiful, neo-classical limestone facade while inside the apartment, the grand exterior is duplicated with a magnificent home that was completely renovated in 2010 using only the finest materials and meticulous attention to detail. Originally a 13-room home, the apartment has been transformed into a 10-room residence consisting of approximately 4500 square feet. This home features about 80 feet of frontage along Park Avenue with a thoughtful layout that optimizes the use of space while providing for elegant and graceful living and entertaining. Neighborhood perks: Located in the Upper East Side on the storied Park Avenue, it is just blocks to The Sherry-Netherland and across the street from the beautiful Christ Church United Methodist. Also nearby is Central Park, the Whitney Museum and the world’s best shopping on Madison and Fifth Avenues. Unlike Fifth Avenue, no bus lines run on Park Avenue which helps lessen the sound of traffic. The living room of 521 Park Avenue

BROKER SPOTLIGHT Louise Devlin Brown Harris Stevens

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson; ldevlin@bhsusa.com; 212.588.5622 Years of experience: My family owned a successful real estate company, so I grew up in the industry. I’ve been at Brown Harris Stevens for 13 years. Greatest accomplishment: I was awarded the Brown Harris Stevens Broker Specialist of the Year for the past two years. Specialty: Being an Upper East Side co-op owner and having an intimate appreciation for my neighborhood, I specialize in, but am not limited to selling Upper East Side condos and co-ops. Best Advice: Know the market! Knowledge is key. Staging and de-cluttering are vital elements to help a potential buyer imagine living in your home! Motto: I pride myself on being an honest and ethical salesperson who believes in smooth transactions without cutting corners. I thoroughly enjoy and am committed to providing exemplary customer service.

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rooms

with aview One Museum Mile at 1280 Fifth Avenue One Museum Mile in Upper Carnegie Hill features a Fifth Avenue presence and proximity to Central Park shared by such renowned institutions as the Guggenheim and Metropolitan Museum of Art. The 113 residential interiors at One Museum Mile were created by Andre Kikoski, who also designed the award-winning restaurant The Wright at the Guggenheim. Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP, served as design architect for the building. SLCE Architects served as architect-of-record.

Located adjacent to the Museum for African Art, One Museum Mile has achieved success with New Yorkers as well as international buyers who are looking for good value on Fifth Avenue, notes Shaun Osher, CEO of CORE, the exclusive sales and marketing firm for the building. They have been drawn not only to the building’s prestigious location on Central Park, but also its superb architecture, amenities and modern interior design. There has been particularly strong demand from families attracted by the building’s expansive

The view from One Museum Mile

residences including a number of combination units, as well as its high-end amenities and proximity to Central Park, according to Douglas Barnes, Managing Director at Brickman, the developer of One Museum Mile at 1280 Fifth Avenue. Amenities include a 24-hour full-service concierge, landscaped roof terrace, rooftop pool and terrace overlooking Central Park, fitness center with terrace, and a residents’ lounge with fireplace. There is also a media lounge and card room, children’s playroom, teen game room, formal conference and dining room on Central Park, on-site parking, bicycle room, cold storage in the lobby, and private storage. A 421a tax abatement is in place. Each apartment at One Museum Mile features an open kitchen and breakfast bar, Bosch dishwasher, Thermador stainless steel oven, cooktop and refrigerator, and a Bosch washer and dryer. Residences currently for sale include twobedroom apartments from 1,284 square feet to 1,699 square feet, and three-bedrooms up to 2,118 square feet. Available combinations include a 3,619-square-foot, six-bedroom residence, and a sprawling eight-bedroom, 4,892-square-foot home. A residence at One Museum Mile

For prices and availability, contact 212.996.1280 or visit www.onemuseumile.com.

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4/26/13 12:20 PM


spotlight: downtown nyc This month, Scene takes a look inside some of the most impressive downtown homes on the market under $5.5 Million

Prime West Village Loft $5,250,000 This spectacular 3,200 square-foot duplex loft is located in Downtown’s most desirable location and features a sprawling three to four bedroom layout and superb luxury finishes throughout! A dramatic entrance leads to a grand-scaled living/dining room with 15-foot ceilings, gorgeous wide-plank flooring and a wood-burning fireplace. The state-of-the-art chef’s kitchen with center-island is open to the entertaining space and features solid Corian countertops, endless custom cabinetry, and top-of-the-line Viking appliances including dual temperature-controlled wine refrigerators. The impressive corner master suite boasts two walk-in closets, and a beautifully renovated en-suite bathroom. Richard Orenstein, Halstead Property, 212.381.4248 or rorenstein@halstead.com

70 Greene Street, #2 $4,200,000 Built in 1860 as a combined residence and storefront for a silk merchant, 70 Greene’s loft condominum has been renovated into two full-floor lofts, a triplex penthouse and a commercial space housing Italian fitness equipment maker, Technogym. Developer Valerio Morabito, architect Joseph Pell Lombardi and the Alveary Architecture design team redefined this SoHo landmark. The unit is off of a private keyed elevator. It is a 2,216-squarefoot, two-bedroom, two-bath loft, crafted with oak finishes, custom-designed appliances features 10’9" ceilings and 8"-wide oak-plank flooring and 30-decibal soundproof thermal windows. Jason Karadus, TOWN, 646.998.7435, jkaradus@townrealestate.com

Huys, 404 Park Avenue South, Residence 11C $4,050,000 This incredible corner two-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath, offers dramatic 11’5” ceilings, south and east exposures, and expansive views over treelined Park Avenue South through dramatically enlarged casement windows. Thoughtfully designed by world-renowned designer Piet Boon, this residence has a light palette of natural Chambolle stone and brushed 6” wide oak plank floors, ceilings with original beams, and signature millwork details throughout. Situated at the corner of 28th Street and Park Avenue South, Huys–pronounced ‘House’–offers 58 finely crafted condominium residences by Kroonenberg Groep, a Dutch Developer. Donna Puzio, Corcoran Sunshine Marketing Group, 212.725.0404, huys-nyc.com

455 West 20th Street, Residence 4C $2,260,000 This building is designed by Beyer, Blinder, Belle Architects, and features interiors by celebrated architect Alan Wanzenberg. The listing offers a very accommodating one-bedroom with abundant southern light and direct views of the Close, a block-long enclosed garden surrounding the property. The gracious master suite features a large walk-in closet, and a five fixture bath with Kohler soaking tub, polished chrome fixtures, and Caldia marble floors and countertops. The open kitchen overlooks a spacious, south-facing living and dining area. Angeli Dahiya, Corcoran Sunshine Marketing Group, 212.727.0455, 455w20.com

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4/26/13 2:39 PM


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NEW YORK CITY

THE HAMPTONS

PA L M B E A C H

All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker. Equal Housing Opportunity Broker.

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4/24/13 10:00:19 AM


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NEW YORK CITY

THE HAMPTONS

PA L M B E A C H

All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker. Equal Housing Opportunity Broker.

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4/24/13 10:00:42 AM


Jenny Park Adam

Erin Boisson Aries

Norah Burden

DUPLEX PH CENTRAL PARK WEST

BEST NEW REVIVAL

FULL FLOOR PENTHOUSE

West 60s/CPW. Co-Excl. Rare opportunity. Grand duplex penthouse with 2 large terraces. Majestic Central Park views. 5,000 +/-SF. 7 "2SUITESlREPLACES$RAMATICENTERTAINING expanse. $35M. WEB# 3476114. John Burger 212-906-9274

East 70s/Madison Avenue. Dramatic renovation of a 7,350SF townhouse on primes Upper East 3IDEBLOCKmOORS STAFFSUITE ELEVATOR  FOOT ceilings in living room. 5+BR and major outdoor spaces. $21M. WEB# 3824199. Paula Del Nunzio 212-906-9207

5733TUNNINGTRIPLEMINTFULLmOORCONDO  panoramic city and river views, 6BR, 6.5 bath, approx 6,637SF, CAC, huge windows, garage, gym, pool, playroom. CD# 07- 0536. $19.5M. WEB# 3636120. Lisa Lippman 212-588-5606 Scott Moore 212-588-5608

PREWAR ELEGANCE

MAGNIFICENT TOWNHOUSE

LEGENDARY LOMBARDY PENTHOUSE

East 70s/Fifth Avenue. The gracious 47â&#x20AC;&#x2122; entrance gallery of this apt opens to a corner LR, library, reception room and FDR. High ceilings. 2BR. Large EIK and staff area. $7.2M. WEB# 3930105. Leslie Coleman 212-906-9387 Mary Rutherfurd 212-906-9211

UES. Historic former home of Andy Warhol. Exquisite 2012 designer renovation. Formal living and dining rooms, den, 4BR, 4.5 baths, stunning new kitchen. $5.795M. WEB# 3930943. Jeannette Bernstein 212-588-5680 Glenn J. Minnick 212-396-5870

UES. Live at the Lombardy and experience hotel LIVINGFROMTHISFULLmOOR"2PENTHOUSEWITH 2 terraces. Apartment owners enjoy full hotel services and amenities. $5.495M. WEB# 3852212. Marlene Marcus 212-906-9244

TWIN TERRACED 8 ROOM TREASURE

QUINTESSENTIALL 2,200SF LOFT

HUGE SIX ROOM ON PARK AVENUE

UES. Tremendous space abounds, both inside and out, from this 4BR, 3 bath plus den home with 2 large private planted terraces. Ideal for grand living and entertaining. $3.25M. WEB# 3610568. Andrew J. Kramer 212-317-3634

Chelsea. Beautiful prewar Chelsea condo 2BR, 2 bath loft with 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122; of oversized windows. Huge GOURMETKITCHEN LUXURYlNISHES MASTERMARBLE bath, 11â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ceiling, $2.85M. WEB# 3860569. Linda Stillwell 212-452-6233 Dennis G. Stillwell 212-452-6234

East 90th St/Park Av. Gracious 6 rm with Park Ave address. 2 huge BR, 1 mdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rm, EIK with W/D. LR has wbfp. Elegant DR. Plenty of closets. FS Emery Roth Co-op. Storage & gym. $2.15M. WEB# 3702357. Edith F. Tuckerman 212-906-9228 Katharine Tuckerman 212-906-9222

Elizabeth Celano

David Cobell

Naomi Davis

Louise Devlin

Craig Filipacchi

Judith A. Furgiuele

Susan Greenfield

NEW YORK CITY

THE HAMPTONS

PA L M B E A C H

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.

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4/24/13 9:54:19 AM


Gail Gros

Mary A. Hall

ENTIRE 14TH FLOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 860 PARK

9 ROOMS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; CENTRAL PARK VIEWS

2BR WITH DEN AND PRIVATE TERRACE

5%30ALATIALFULLmOORPREWAR#O OPON0ARK!VE with private elevator landing, CP and city views, 4BR, 4.5 baths, LR, libr, FDR, EIK with breakfast room, laundry room, 2 wbfp. $13.475M. WEB# 3368386. Cathy Franklin 212-906-9236 Alexis Bodenheimer 212-906-9230

UWS. Elevator opens into your grand home, enormous picture windows, direct Park views, 3BR, BATHS SALON LIBRARY DEN WOODBURNINGlREPLACE  prestigious prewar building. $10M. WEB# 3919691. Elaine Clayman 212-906-9353 Niti Tandon 212-906-9368

,AFAYETTE3TREET0ERCHEDONTHETHmOOR THIS 2,415SF, 2BR plus den, 2.5 bath condo has 2,021SF PRIVATETERRACES CEILINGS GASlREPLACE AND open South, East, and West exposures. Fullservice building. $8.8M. WEB# 3884910. Kyle Blackmon 212-588-5648

Sally Hallows

Siim Hanja

Edward Joseph

DIRECT VIEWS TO FREEDOM TOWER

A COLLECTORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MASTERPIECE

VISIONARY DOORMAN LOFT CONDO

Fifth Avenue. Spectacular SW views from expansive corner Living room, dining area. 2BR, 2.5 baths. En SUITE-ASTERBEDROOMWITHDRESSINGAREAmOOR TO ceiling windows with 9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ceils. Large windowed eatin kitchen. Corp welcome. $4.4M. WEB# 3352176. Daniela Rivoir 212-906-9276

3UTTON0LACE3UPERBLYRENOVATEDLARGE HIGHmOOR  6 room apartment in top Sutton Place building. &INE'EORGIANPANELING STONElREPLACEANDOAK mOORS)NCREDIBLEKITCHEN SEPARATEMAIDSROOM and bath. $3.995M. WEB# 1554106. Armin B. Allen 212-396-5851

Chelsea. Opportunity to combine and create 2,392SF South facing duplex, historic loft in bldg that put the Art District on the map. Exposed brick, beams,12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ceilings, High Line block. $3.6M. WEB# 3835697. Nancy Candib 212-906-9302 Dominic R. Paolillo 212-906-9307

Melinda Mettler

Russell Miller

James Perez

HIGH END APARTMENT, LOW PRICE

GOLDEN AGE 1938 ONE BEDROOM

PARIS MEETS NEW YORK

FiDi. Light spacious tranquil 2,028SF Philippe Starck design, huge master closets to spare 2 full baths + 2 sleeping areas, full-time doorman, pool, roof deck. $1.799M. WEB# 3481381. Brahna Yassky 212-906-0506

Midtown East. 42+SF planted wrap terrace, sunken living room, wbfp w/antique marble mantle, W/D, 1.5 baths in a world class full-service building with a gym, roof garden, storage. $1.35M. WEB# 3908337. Elaine Clayman 212-906-9353 Justine Bray 212-906-9253

Greenwich Village. Classic Village duplex. Large picture windows overlook landscaped garden on both LEVELS RENOVATEDKITCHEN FULLBATHS lREPLACES  2 entertaining rooms. $1.295M. WEB# 3798028. Deborah Gimelson 906-0572 Edward Joseph 212-588-5646

NEW YORK CITY

THE HAMPTONS

Burt Savitsky

Maria Elena Scotto

PA L M B E A C H

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.

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4/24/13 9:54:35 AM


Elyse Harney Real Estate A Tradition of Trust

NE

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Connecticut • New York • Massachusetts

DRAMATIC HOME WITH POND LITCHFIELD, CT. In the heart of the magnificent Historic Milton section of Litchfield, CT this stunning property with a gorgeous pond includes nearly 5 acres abutting Litchfield Land Trust land. Some of the superb features include 4 fireplaces, 4 Bedrooms, 4 Full Baths, tinted plaster walls, wide-board pine floors, chef’s Kitchen, and extraordinary custom details throughout. Additionally, the home has central air, a generator, Living Room with cathedral ceiling, Master Bath with steam shower, top-of-the line mechanicals and appliances, an attached 2-bay Garage, beautiful landscaping, and an adorable Barn. Juliet Moore Web# EH2557

$1,395,000

NE

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MAGNIFICENT GEORGIAN ESTATE LAKEVILLE, CT. Classic Georgian Revival set on over six beautifully landscaped acres with specimen trees and spectacular views of Lakeville Lake. This impressive residence has been completely restored with top of the line appointments for today’s modern living. Period details are found throughout the formal rooms and comfortable informal spaces. The Main Residence includes a Master Suite with builtins, custom-made closets and a sumptuous Bath. There are three additional Bedrooms, all with luxurious en suite Baths. On the Estate is a 2-Bedroom Prairie inspired Guesthouse with a wraparound Porch situated privately from the main residence on the banks of Burton Brook and adjacent apple orchard. Elyse Harney Morris & Tom Callahan Web# EH2658 $1,875,000

COLONIAL REVIVAL LAKEVILLE, CT. This enchanting light-filled Country Home sits on 4.7 beautifully landscaped acres featuring 3 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, and a Family Room with wood-burning fireplace, loft, and private entrance. Enjoy outdoor dining and entertaining on the bluestone Patio or on the screened Porch overlooking the Potager garden and ornamental koi pond. Kathleen Devaney & Elyse Harney Morris Web# EH2673 $835,000

DISTINCTIVE COUNTRY COLONIAL SALISBURY, CT. Beautifully updated with Living Room open to Sun Room Dining and view of private gardens. Four Bedrooms and 3.5 Baths with Master on first floor, and finished lower level, all with central air. Walk to Housatonic River or hiking.

CAPTAIN BENJAMIN LINES HOUSE c.1803 SHARON, CT. Stately and Classic on The Sharon Village Green. This beautiful Historic home features a double Living Room with 2 fireplaces, a Keeping Room/Dining Room with hearth, a Kitchen with fireplace, a west facing Family Room with windows on 3 sides, 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Full Baths, an attached Garage, and .53 acre of lovely lawn.

RENOVATED 1860 FARMHOUSE SALISBURY, CT. This special Historic property includes a 4-BR, 2-BA home that was completely renovated in 2003 with period details; a Guest House/Office with BA, a Three-Story Barn, and 12+ acres. Features include Central Air, a bluestone Terrace, 3 new FPs in Living Room, Kitchen and outside, and views over your beautiful land with a stream running through. Juliet Moore Web# EH2676 $795,000

TREASURE HILL NICHE KENT, CT. Rarely offered on beautiful Treasure Hill. This stunning Contemporary with Guesthouse on over 7 acres, with possibilities of subdivision TBD, is totally private. It affords plentiful wildlife, solitude, open, light-filled rooms, 3 Bedrooms, 2 full Baths, cathedral and vaulted ceilings, separate quarters for guests, many updates. Central air. Thomas McGowan Web# EH2685 $595,000

NE

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SOPHISTICATED FARMHOUSE LAKEVILLE, CT. This home sits on 2 beautifully landscaped acres and features 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, a fabulous Chef’s Kitchen with fireplace opens to the Family Room overlooking the pool with bluestone surround. The landscaping and stone walls define the property and provide privacy. Large deck with seating faces West, perfect for outdoor entertaining. Kathleen Devaney & Elyse Harney Morris Web# EH2665 $1,195,000

Eva Yxfeldt Web# EH2468

Juliet Moore $589,000 Web# EH2653

$565,000

1841 GREEK REVIVAL NORFOLK, CT. Country Chic! Flawlessly converted Methodist Church. Spacious, light-filled rooms, 3 FPs, wood floors and crown molding. Double Living Room, formal Dining, Hearth Room with massive FP. Family Room with wood paneling, bookcases and large windows overlooking lush grounds. Four BRs. 2.5 BAs. In historic village close to Yale summer concerts. Agent/Owner Web# EH2259

$449,000

GRASSY MEADOWS FALLS VILLAGE, CT. This 1820 Greek Revival is beautifully situated on 5.8 acres with distant mountain views. Two Bedrooms with Sitting Room, 2 Baths, a large, bright Living Room with fireplace. The detailed moldings and original eyebrow windows give this home warmth, character and charm. The 2-stall Barn and turnout would make this a wonderful horse property. Elyse Harney Morris & Kathleen Devaney Web# EH2683 $410,000

www.HarneyRE.com Salisbury, CT 860.435.2200

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Norfolk, CT 860.542.5500

Riverton, CT 860.738.1200

Falls Village, CT 860.824.0027

Millerton, NY 518.789.8800

4/24/13 2:23:49 PM


MANHATTAN STYLE 360 DEGREE SKYLINE VIEW

FABULOUS MODERN LOFT

West Village. High-floor stunning, elegant prewar condo with 17 windows of open city views in triple mint condition in a 24 hour service Bing & Bing building. $5.495M WEB# 2530847 Gabriella Winter 212.539.4988

Mercer St. Bright, airy and gracious 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath modern loft available at the celebrated 40 Mercer Residence located in the premier neighborhood of Soho. $4.95M WEB# 2522872 Marie-Claire Gladstone 212.508.7167

SPECTACULAR PARK VIEWS

EXQUISITE IN EVERY WAY

5th Ave. 5 room, 2 BR/2 bath luxury co-op. Direct Central Park views. Open 28’ LR + sun room, High ceils, dining area, window Kit, HW flrs. W/D & small pets permitted. F/S bldg. $3.7M WEB# 2502120 Patricia Cliff 212.836.1063, Jonathan Conlon 212.508.7162

Chelsea. Published Designer Loft. 2 BR, 2 marble baths, 12’ ceilings, twin living areas, Italian kitchen, walk-in closet. Crestron A/V & lighting. Best location. Must be seen. $3.5M WEB# 2550744 Brian Babst 212.444.7960

EAST VILLAGE SANCTUARY

OLD WORLD PREWAR CHARM

E 7th St. This bright & stunning 1,600 SF triplex plus 425 SF private roof deck is a truly majestic home with over 16’ ceilings and offers fantastic S/E/W exposures. $2.9M WEB# 2568740 Emma Hamilton Malina 212.941.2557

Park Ave. 2 BR/2 bath + dining alcove, prewar co-op in elegant full service building. Tree level views, windowed galley Kit, W/D allowed, 9’+ ceilings. 24 hr DM, live-in super & gym. $1.25M WEB# 2471701 Patricia Cliff 212.836.1063, Jonathan Conlon 212.508.7162

FOLLOW THE CORCORAN GROUP

SEARCH BY WEB# ON All square feet is approximate. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker owned and operated by NRT LLC.

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4/24/13 9:55:50 AM


Real Estate According to Roger We sit down with Roger Erickson to learn what it’s like in the day of the life of a top New York real estate agent What is a typical day like as a broker? There is no such thing as a typical day in the life of a residential broker in Manhattan. I get up at 5 a.m. and always practice meditation first thing. Whenever possible I try to hit the gym at least four times a week, and also like to walk to my first appointment or to the office. After that it’s anyone’s guess what the day will bring. What I love about it is that it’s a thrilling business that is new, exciting and challenging every day. And since we are independent contractors, it’s up to us how well or not we do–there’s no blaming the boss in this business. Do you have any personal rules you follow in your business of selling? I believe that honesty is always the very best policy. It’s important to be open and work with everyone in a fair and respectful manner. I enjoy excellent relationships with brokers as I always treat them in a friendly, considerate and fair manner. And of course the same applies to sellers and buyers. I have enjoyed great relationships with buyers and sellers that have lasted over 25 years and continue to thrive to this day. Is there a particular listing you are most excited about? Although it is not one of my most expensive listings, I am very excited about a new listing about to hit the market in 55 Central Park West. This prewar co-op is affectionately known as the Ghostbusters Building as its façade was featured in the movie. Years ago I sold the penthouse there that had been owned by Calvin Klein. It has always attracted a creative and fascinating roster of owners, and that continues to this day. The apartment is a large three bedroom on the 17th floor with the most magnificent views of Central Park. The height of the apartment in the building affords an incredible vista, and it has dramatic city views as well. The master bedroom is on the corner of the building with views both over the park and to the north. I believe this listing will be greeted with a lot of enthusiasm. We are planning to price it at $7,500,000. What, if anything, makes real estate challenging? It is a very competitive business, so being able to establish solid

and trustful relationships with brokers, buyers and sellers is key and extremely important. The ability to be liked and trusted by those you work with is critical. The competitiveness makes the job challenging, but it is also what makes it rewarding when you succeed. What is the most unique feature of any home you have on the market? I have a fantastic apartment for sale on the East River that is as large as a five-story townhouse but is on two floors and located in one of the most highly regarded buildings in town. Not only does it have its own private entrance and a magnificent terrace overlooking the river, but the building is full of amenities such as a swimming pool, basketball court, fitness center, squash court and even a parking garage. These are rare amenities for a grand prewar residence. The apartment has a very unique feature because it was built during the Prohibition—a safe/panic room was added in case of a raid.

Roger Erickson Sotheby's International Realty Senior Managing Director, Associate Broker 38 East 61st Street New York, NY 10065; 917.558.4477 // 212.606.7612 roger.erickson@sothebyshomes.com; www.roger-erickson.com

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4/26/13 2:53 PM


EXCEP TIONA L OFFE R INGS

FULL FLOOR CANDELA PREWAR WITH TERRACES | Web: S0018761 | $22,500,000 Entire 17th floor featuring grand scale rooms, open city vistas, soaring ceilings, five terraces, two fireplaces and views to Central Park. 778 Park Avenue is ready for you and your architect to create the perfect home.

41 WEST 74TH STREET | Web: S0018481 | $20,000,000. 20’ wide townhouse next to Central Park, 9,760± sq ft features an elevator, 12’ ceilings, 4 fireplaces, 5 bedrms an outdoor hot tub on the top floor and a lovely garden.

PREWAR CONDO PENTHOUSE EXTRAORDINAIRE | Web: S0018631 | $22,500,000 Madison Ave & 63rd St. Reminiscent of the Dorchester in London, this mint prewar condo penthouse has a fabulous terrace and large solarium, 4 bedrms each with en suite bath, chef’s kitchen and Central Park views.

760 PARK AVENUE | Web: S0018814 | $19,750,000 One of the finest residences available on Park Avenue. Majestic living room, 10’ ceilings, 2 WBF, wood paneled library, formal dining room, enormous eat-in kitchen, private master bedroom suite, and 3 additional bedrooms.

RIVERFRONT MAISONETTE WITH HUGE TERRACE | Web: S0017605 | $8,750,000 One of the finest prewar, white glove buildings in Manhattan. Grand ±5,200 sq ft, 5-bedrm apt, formal dining room, huge kitchen, 3 fireplaces, central air & humidification, and an architecturally stunning curved staircase.

820 PARK AVENUE | Web: S0018808 | $4,500,000 Located in one of the best neighborhoods in Manhattan, this one of a kind two bedroom home occupies the entire top floor with glorious wrap around terrace.

ROGER ERICKSON Senior Managing Director, Associate Broker 212.606.7612 | www.roger-erickson.com EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE | 38 East 61St Street New York, NY 10065 212.606.7660 | sothebyshomes.com/nyc Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

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4/25/13 12:17:50 PM


THE GO TO SOURCE FOR CUSTOM AND READY MADE LAMPSHADES

Our new Connecticut address is: 154 PROSPECT STREET, GREENWICH, CT (next to Tiger Lily’s) 203.681.2757 21 SPRING STREET, NEW YORK, NY 212.966.2757

WWW.JUSTSHADESNY.COM

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230 CENTRAL PARK SOUTH | Web: S0018806 | $13,950,000 Breathtaking views from this sophisticated and newly renovated prewar condo duplex penthouse. 3+ bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Pamela O’Connor | 212.606.7709

MET TOWER PH DUPLEX | Web: S0018673 | $10,000,000 Penthouse living. Extraordinary 8 room, 3,815± sq ft duplex with unparalleled views. Kevin Brown, 212.606.7748 | Nikki Field, 212.606.7669

SPRAWLING CONDO PH | Web: NY00018858 | $9,950,000 Spectacular 8 room residence with 4 bedrooms, 6.5 baths, maid’s room, 2 terraces, 2 fireplaces. Full service, amenities. Ella Semyonova | 212.400.8778

390 WEST END AVENUE | Web: S0018616 | $9,950,000 Elegant 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath duplex located in the Apthorp. Completely renovated with original details restored. Pauline Evans | 212.400.8740

416 WASHINGTON STREET | Web: S0018854 | $4,450,000 Triple mint 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath home in one of Tribeca’s most sought after luxury condos. Corner unit, 10’ ceilings, pet friendly. Cortnee Glasser | 212.606.7648

FIFTH AVENUE JEWEL | Web: S0018745 | $3,000,000 A divine pied-a-terre or full time residence in a prestigious Emery Roth luxury, white glove co-op. Expansive views, 1 bedroom. Nikki Field, 212.606.7669 | Gillian Friedman, 212.606.7637

LOCAL EXPERTISE. EXTRAORDINARY RESULTS. Our agents are skilled professionals with local knowledge and a dedication to high-quality service for every client. They take great pleasure in discovering the aspects that make each home unique.

125 W 21ST STREET | Web: S0017080 | $2,400,000 High floor, split 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath home with 156± sq ft terrace in The Indigo Condominium. Eric Malley | 212.606.7625

80 CENTRAL PARK WEST | Web: S0018796 | $2,395,000 Spacious 2 bedrooms, 2 baths residence with bright living area, large closets, and generously sized rooms. Pied-a-terres welcome. Dolly Hertz | 212.606.7601

WEST 95TH STREET OFF CPW | Web: S0018811 | $1,695,000 Renovated prewar co-op features 3 bedroom, additional office/den, 2.5 baths, and windowed open chef kitchen. Margaret Cohn | 212.606.7680

345 WEST 55TH STREET | Web: S0018797 | $1,595,000 Traditionally renovated 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, maids/office home in prewar co-op on sought after block. Pauline Evans | 212.400.8740

CHIC ON PARK AVENUE | Web: S0018503 | $1,150,000 Exquisite contemporary prewar 1+ bedroom in modern, coveted co-op on Park Avenue. Mint condition. Anne Corey | 212.606.7733

170 EAST 78TH STREET | Web: S0018505 | $995,000 Elegant prewar 1 bedroom, 1.5 bath apartment in a legendary intimate and much coveted, full service doorman co-op. Mina Atabai | 212.606.7682

MANHATTAN BROKERAGES I sothebyshomes.com/nyc EAST SIDE | 38 East 61St Street, New York, NY 10065 | 212.606.76601 DOWNTOWN | 379 West Broadway, New York, NY 10012 | 212.431.2440 Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

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The Right Broker Makes All the Difference. Over the past 30 years, Stribling brokers have successfully represented the world’s most discerning clients, offering an exceptional level of service, integrity and sophistication coupled with an in-depth understanding of the ever-changing real estate market. Stribling professionals embrace a wide range of tastes and styles, ensuring that each client is matched with the broker who can best assist them in buying or selling their home.

Prewar Upper East Side Triplex Maisonette

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Unique 5000+sf Luxury Loft at East 84th

Magnificent4-5BRwwood-burningfplcs,highceilings & garden in mint condition. $8.5M. Web #3918866. M.Kaiser 212-585-4554/L.Diamond 212-585-4553

An elegant 5-room home built to a grand scale and offering a luxurious lifestyle with hotel services. $8.5M. Web #3613034. Cornelia Zagat Eland 212-452-4384

3BRwCPviewsfrLR,MBR&libr/3rdBR+cityviewsfrFDR, 2BR,kit&maid’s.Pictwndws,CAC,newkit,3.5bths,tonsof clsts.$7.995M.Web#3945011.J.White212-452-4445

4BR,4.5bth,LRwWBFP,EIK,media&lndryrms,office,2 terrs.Crestron&AVsys,electricshades,CAC.FScondo. $10.25M. Web #3866309. A.Lambert 212-452-4408

High Floor Condo with Views at the Siena

3BRs, 3 Baths, 2 Terraces in Midtown

Glamour Personified at The Plaza

Mint Prewar 5BR Condo - Lincoln Center

E70’s.Rarelyavail3BR/3bthinwhiteglvcondo.Grtlight w N/S/E expos, 9.5' ceils, W/D, gym, stor, playrm. Pets ok. $3.35M. Web #3924982. B.Ducrot 212-452-4381

Fireupthegrill&enjoythesunsetfromappx700sfplantedterracewviews,electricity,water&drainage.FSbldgw garage.$2.4M.Web#3844480.J.Perlin212-452-4373

Renovone-of-kind2BRcondo.GrandLRwGrandArmy vus,DR/libr,state-artkit,MBRwenstebth,2ndBRwbth, pwdr. $11M. Web #3927829. S.Ingram 212-452-4453

Magnificentparkblockapt.Sprawling5BR/5.5bth;3660 sf, pvt elev, W/D, 24-hr drmn. $8.8M. Web #3859131. B.Tavakolian 212-434-7062/C.Taub 212-452-4387

Rare in Size, CP Vus & 2 Pvt Terrs on CPS

UWS 3BR Penthouse w Planted Terrace

Dramatic 2BR Chelsea Penthouse

Devonshire House 3BR, 3.5 Bath Condo

51' of CP frontage 16th flr. Arch-designed 10 rm, 4BR, 4.5 bthdplx+maid’s,chef’skit.Drmnbldgwlndry,gar,gym. $6.995M. Web #3944659. M.Perry 646-613-2651

New. 2 penthouses combined. LR/DR w fplc, EIK, 4 bth, library/office. Centra Condo, FS bldg 1 block from CP. $3.275M. Web #3875616. G.Calderon 212-585-4528

GorgaptnearHiLine.LRwdbl-hghtceils,vus,csmtwndws, 2balcs,rfterrw360˚vus,kitwtopapplis,W/D.24-hrDM, grdn.$7.5M.Web#3747141.M.Cashman646-613-2616

Opnkitwtopapplis,elegDR/LRs,ampleclsts,custmillwrk, W/D. Drmn bldg w rfdk, gym. $5.4M. Web #3935636. K.Wallison917-742-3136/R.McCain917-363-3272

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Historic and Incomparable 5 Room Home This magnificent 2BR/2 bath apartment features floor-to-ceiling French doors in the parlor opening unto an iron lacework balcony facing the Gramercy Park, architectural details, high ceilings, 2 wood-burning fireplaces, a loft-like dining room, and windowed kitchen. $6M. Web#3971041. Barbara Evans-Butler 212-452-4391

Fab BPC Penthouse w River & Park Views

10 Park Avenue Prewar Perfection

6000 SF Riverdale 5BR, 4.5 Bath Home

Country Living in Emerson Hill, Staten Island

2BR,2.5bth,lrgLR,openEIK.10’ceils,flr-to-ceilwindows, W/D.FSbldgwgym,playrm.$2.295M.Web#3787811. S.Song 212-434-7060/K.Younger 646-613-2731

Triplemintsplit-2BR,2bth,step-dwnLR,opnchef’skit.Beaut design&layout.Numerousclsts.$1.625M.Web#3875711. S.Sumser646-613-2741/L.Jaffee646-613-2739

Cathed ceil fyr, LR w WBFP, wndwd loggia, wrap terr, loftstylekit;libr,FR,den,2cargar,grdns.$3.7M.Web#1219436. P.Browne347-234-8709/J.Rowe646-327-8792

Harborviews,pvtneighborhood,countrysetting.4BR,4 bth.Prestigious,urbanoasis.5minstoVZBridge.$995K. Web #1203092. C.McCarthy Turer 917-664-4449

CHELSEA 340 WEST 23RD STREET 212 243 4000 · TRIBECA 32 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS 212 941 8420 · BROOKLYN 386 ATLANTIC AVENUE 718 208 1900

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Marketplace

This Season is in Good Hands.

I can help put you in Good Hands® and help coach you with your insurance needs. BARBARA A. GRIMALDI (212) 759 3920 227 EAST 56TH ST NEW YORK BGrimaldi@allstate.com Insurance subject to availability and qualifications. Life insurance and annuities issues by Allstate Life Insurance Company, Northbrook, IL and Lincoln Benefit Life Company, Lincoln, NE. In New York, Allstate Life Insurance Company of New York, Hauppauge, NY. Property-casualty insurance products issued by Allstate Fire and Casualty Insurance Company, Allstate Idemnity Company, Allstate Insurance Company, Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Company, Northbrook, IL and Allstate New Jersey Property and Casualty Insurance Company, Bridgewater, NJ. © 2009 Allstate Insurance Company.

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NIGHTLIFE WHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUT, THE SCENE GETS GOING

Page 100:

Harry Brant twirls his way out of the Save Venice Gala

BFANYC.COM

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VENETIAN NIGHTS

New Yorkers step out to show their support for children and the arts

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NIGHTLIFE | Parties 1

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ballers new york Academy of artsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tribeca Ball

The New York Academy of the Arts honored Bob Colacello at the Tribeca Ball. Hosted by Van Cleef and Arpels, the evening benefitted the Academy of the Artsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; scholarships and public programming. Parker Posey, Chelsea Handler, Cindy Sherman, Glenda Bailey, and Mary Kate Olsen with boyfriend Olivier Sarkozy came out to show their support.

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1. Mary-Kate Olsen, David Kratz 2. Misha Nonoo and Alexander Gilkes 3. Anna Scott Carter, Alexis Bryan Morgan 4. Tamara Mellon 5. Diane von Furstenberg 6. Cindy Sherman 7. Andrew and Andrew 8. Bob Colacello, Jessica Hart 9. Matt Lauer, Annette Roque 10. Stefano Tonchi, Eileen Guggenheim 11. Andres Serrano, Valerie Cooper

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Fresh direct

Joe Fresh celebrates its first anniversary

Canadian fashion retailer Joe Fresh celebrated its successful first year in New York with a party and runway show at their flagship store on Fifth Avenue. New York notables, including Fiona Byrne, Dani Stahl, Mickey Boardman and Steven Rojas, showed off the brand’s Spring collection, strutting their stuff down the escalator-turned-runway (taking a cue from Louis Vuitton’s Spring 2013 show, perhaps?). The man who started it all, Joe Mimran was also on hand to help toast Joe Fresh’s first American birthday. 5

1. Louge "Dapper Lou" Delcy 2. DJ Kitty Cash 3. Hannah Bronfman, Brendan Fallis 4. Joe Mimran 5. Ari Seth Cohen, Steven Rojas 6. Lynn Yaeger 7. Dani Stahl 8. Claire Geist 9. Dee Jackson, Vashtie Kola

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NIGHTLIFE | Parties 1

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Child’s play New Yorkers for children gala

Always a spring hit, the New Yorkers for Children gala brought bold-face names to the Mandarin Oriental for a night to support youth in foster care. Presented by Valentino, the 10th annual Fool’s Fête treated guests Rebecca Minkoff, Emmy Rossum, Alina Cho, Jill and Harry Kargman, Julie and Billy Macklowe, amongst others, to a night of dinner, dancing and a silent auction. Event producer David Stark designed over the top floral centerpieces for the occasion, while guests followed suit in bright, colorful attire to ring in the new season.

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1. Olivia Palermo, Johannes Huebl 2. Erin Heatherton 3. Nicky Hilton 4. Emmy Rossum 5. Stephen and Christine Schwarzman 6. Harry Brant 7. Crystal Renn 8. Daniel Benedict, Andrew Saffir 9. Julie Henderson 10. Lucy Sykes

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THe Committee’s salon series at no. 8

SCENE’s very own Peter Davis offered up his editing expertise in a conversation with Newsweek and The Daily Beast’s fashion editor, Isabel Wilkinson. Organized by The Committte, which has partnered with Amy Sacco’s hot spot No. 8 to host salon series gathering diverse communities, guests enjoyed cocktails as Davis recounted his professional trajectory, along with some fun anecdotes. 1. Ashley Noor, Federica Amati, Kristina Davis 2. Ben Shor, Andrew Freston 3. Isabel Wilkinson 4. Tiffany Frasier, Adam Crocker 5. Zeph Colombatto, Michaella Stacey 6. Arielle Patrick, Peter Davis 7. Logan Samuelson, Michael Colgan, David Jon Acosta

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THESE A-LISTERS BECKON A SECOND LOOK BY ELIZA KRPOYAN

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HUDSON, DELEVINGNE, EVE: PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM; AL OTHERS: BILLY FARRELL/BFANYC.COM

DRESSED TO THE NINES

BILLY FARRELL/BFANYC.COM

JULIA RESTOIN ROITFELD

HILARY RHODA

OLIVIA PALERMO

NIGHTLIFE | Best Dressed


BILLY FARRELL/BFANYC.COM

HUDSON, DELEVINGNE, EVE: PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM; AL OTHERS: BILLY FARRELL/BFANYC.COM

SCENEINNY.COM

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ANNIE GEORGIA GREENBERG

KATE HUDSON

ALICE EVE

JESSICA HART

HARLEY VIERA-NEWTON

ALEXA CHUNG

POPPY DELEVINGNE

NICOLE TRUNFIO


ASK ANNELISE

FROCK FOUL A late night at the Boom Boom Room wrecks havock on this party princess’ borrowed dress BY ANNELISE PETERSON

Q:

I borrowed an amazing lace Alessandra Rich dress for a benefit and decided to wear it again the next night to a friend’s blowout birthday bash at the Boom Boom Room. My Cinderella frock has to be returned in 24 hours. But now it has two cigarette burns and smells of Moët? What do I do?

SINCERELY, CINDERED ELLA

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dearest cindered ella, Isn’t it fun to play princess for an evening in a borrowed Alessandra Rich dress? The “Pretty Baby” lacey silhouette from Spring 2013 will sweep any woman off her stilettos! Although I don’t frown upon renting-the-runway on the rare occasion, always remember that it’s a privilege that carries accountability for the garment. After all, Cinderella hurried home from the Prince’s ball to avoid her horsedrawn carriage being transformed back into a pumpkin at midnight. Tsk, Tsk. Sounds like somebody needs to go back and re-read her Brothers Grimm. Although your dress does not have the option, coming clean with the fashion house is your best solution in this unfortunate circumstance. Let them know how truly sorry you are, and

offer to purchase the dress at full retail. Even if you have to take a second job at Papaya King to pay off your American Express bill, I suggest that you assume responsibility for your careless nuit blanche at the Boom Boom birthday bash. The truth hurts—in this case both the designer who loaned you the dress as well as your pocket book—but it can also set you free from your guilt and transform you from Cindered Ella into a mature adult. Honest actions to remedy the situation smell sweeter than Chanel No. 5 to cover up a smoked-out, ANNELISE PETERSON champagne soaked cocktail and charred lace.

SUBMIT YOUR OWN QUESTIONS TO ANNELISE AT ASKANNELISE@SCENEINNY.COM

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M arioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seat tle 206.622.6161

John de Mederios Pal m Beach 561.659.5424

online at w w w.lorrynewhouse.com

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SCENE Magazine May 2013