Page 1

THE EDUCATION ISSUE

MAY 2018 $3.95 U.S.

scenesarasota.com


Meet Dr. Burr Bakke & Dr. Jill Morris Click to View Video

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SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018


MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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Click to View Portfolio of Homes

MODEL HOME LOCATION: 3839 POMEGRANATE PLACE | 941.928.7991 205 NORTH ORANGE AVENUE, SUITE 102, SARASOTA LICENSE: CGC 1510640

|

MGBBUILT.COM


LUXURIOUS SINGLE FAMILY HOMES WITH THE CONVENIENCE AND PRICE OF A CONDO C L A S S I C C O L L E C T I O N AT G R A N A D A P A R K Nestled in the historic Granada neighborhood between North Siesta and Oyster Bay, Granada Park has one of the highest Walkability Scores of any new neighborhood in Sarasota. Walk and bike to nearby shops, restaurants, grocery stores and more. It’s the perfect choice for those who want to live close to Downtown Sarasota and be West of Trail, and for those who want the convenience of maintenance free condo living but don’t want to share walls. Built with exquisite attention to detail, exceptional quality craftsmanship, superior materials, and unmatched energy efficiency, you’ll delight in these classic homes with high ceilings, rich finishes, gourmet kitchens, indulgent baths, inviting porches and all of the new home luxuries that make your life at Granada Park truly enviable.

CHOOSE FROM SEVERAL CUSTOM FLOOR PLANS & HOMESITES FROM THE LOW $900,000s CALL 941-928-7991 FOR A PRIVATE SHOWING MODEL HOME LOCATION 3839 POMEGRANATE PLACE, 34239


AN EXCEPTIONAL, LUXURIOUS NOT-FOR-PROFIT SKILLED NURSING & REHABILITATION CENTER


MEDICAL CARE & SUPERVISION

SPECIALIZED REHABILITIATION SERVICES

• Accepts Medicare, Insurance and Private Pay Patients

• Through the innovative Bounce Back Rehab inpatient and

• With its 120-bed Skilled Nursing facility, the amenities and services are exceptional

outpatient program, you can Rehab, Recover, Return Home®

• Personal Physicians

• State-of-the-Art Therapy Equipment

• 24/7 RN, LPN and CNA Staffing

• Evidence-based care & Individualized Treatment

• Licensed Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapists

• Physical, Occupational & Speech Rehabilitative Therapies

• Registered Dietician and Nutritional Management

• Case Management to Maximize Benefits

• Social Services

• AJs Fitness, an onsite fitness center, helps you focus on flexibility,

• Full-Time Activities Director

strength training, balance & endurance for those who have

• Interdisciplinary Team of Experienced Professionals

graduated from inpatient or outpatient rehab

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Click to View Video on Hawthorne Village

CALL OR STOP BY FOR YOUR PERSONAL TOUR 5381 Desoto Road | Sarasota, FL 34235 | 941.355.6111 | www.hawthornevillageofsarasota.com


CONTENTS features

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109

44

68

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40 NEW YORK CITY LOVES OUR SARASOTA BALLET By Ryan G. Van Cleave

44 OCEANS FOR ALL Mote’s New Aquarium for Marine Research By Sue Cullen

48 THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION’S COMMITMENT TO COLLEGE EDUCATION By Ryan G. Van Cleave

52 SOARING TO GREAT HEIGHTS Sailor Circus Summer Camp By Anne Weintraub

56 THE BEST PLACES TO TAKE KIDS, TWEENS & TEENS By Ryan G. Van Cleave

68 RAGTIME

36 8

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018

A Historic Look Back at the Here & Now By Steven J. Smith

ON THE COVER Bane Vincent Ventimiglia, 10, at Barnes & Noble. Photo by John Revisky.


Hepatopancreaticobiliary Cancer We speak GI Oncology

Sound like a foreign language? Not to us. We speak GI-Oncology. In fact, Sarasota Memorial is the only regional hospital with expertise in this area of specialized medicine. Our experienced, multidisciplinary team is fluent in gastrointestinal cancer from esophagus to colon, including liver, pancreas and bile system (“hep-ato-pancrea-tico-bili-ary�) cancer. We speak GI Oncology and that translates to the most advanced surgical and nonsurgical treatments, and better outcomes for our patients.

For more information, visit smhspeaks.com/GIonc


CONTENTS departments

70

SOCIAL SCENE

PHILANTHROPY

18 THE LIST

34 FUELING THE EMPOWERMENT

May Events Calendar

24 27 28 29 30

PARTY PICS Pique Nique Sur la Baie CVA Hall of Fame Luncheon SMHF Women & Medicine Luncheon Children First Fairytale Ball JoshProvides Celebration Dinner

38 SPREADING THE WEALTH

Gift ideas for Mother’s Day INHEALTH

85 Pain on the Suncoast: Legislating

Responsible Prescribing By Dr. Fabian A. Ramos 87 Parts vs. the Whole: A Global Approach to Acquiring Beauty in the Age of Social Media By Dr. Sumeet Bhanot

89 LAUGHING MATTERS

The Stink of Success

By Ryan G. Van Cleave

Marcia Jean Taub & Peter Swain By Steven J. Smith

ON THE TOWN

INSIDER 32 THE FIND

OF EDUCATION Ned & Mickey Davis By Steven J. Smith

62 SCENES FROM AN INTERVIEW

The All Star Children’s Center By Gus Mollasis

70 EDUCATION MATTERS Sarasota Youth Orchestra and Education Programming By Ryan G. Van Cleave

81 EAT & DRINK Something to Taco ‘Bout By Rick Dakan

ART & CULTURE 72 BEST SEATS Performing Arts Calendar

74 GET INSPIRED

62

Cultural happenings brought to you by the Arts & Cultural Alliance of Sarasota County

79 LITERARY SCENE A wealth-management book and two thrillers are Ryan’s picks for May By Ryan G. Van Cleave

Be Informed Be Entertained Be SCENE scenesarasota.com

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SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018


Click to View Featured Models


from the executive editor

M

MAY. I THINK ITS WEATHER IS AS CLOSE TO PERFECT AS IT GETS. Its flower, the lily of the valley, promises the return of happiness. Its birthstone, the emerald, is symbolic of love, success and wealth. It is a month in which we celebrate moms, honor our veterans, and start summer vacations. Yes, May is a happy month indeed. Did you know our annual Mother’s Day celebration began in the early 20th century? A woman named Anna Jarvis, who cared for soldiers on both sides during the Civil War, started Mother’s Day Work Clubs to address public health issues. After the War, she wanted to continue honoring mothers because she believed a mother is “the person who has done more for you than anyone else in the world.” So true. After several years of lobbying for a special day for moms, Anna Jarvis must have been so proud when President Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation designating Mother's Day, held on the second Sunday in May, as a national holiday to honor mothers. However, by the early 1920s, she became dismayed over the commercialization of the day by greeting card and floral companies. She wanted it to remain a sentimental day and not have the day exploited. How’d she do? This Mother’s Day, you may want to think about really spending time and talking to you mom about her life, her thoughts and her dreams. You can do that and still give her a beautiful card or give her flowers and take her to a wonderful brunch! I promise you. It will be a day she will always remember. The other special day we celebrate in May is, of course, Memorial Day. It is a day in which the meaning, unless you or a family member have served in our military, seems to have been forgotten by far too many who just view it as a wonderful, long weekend. We can’t let that happen. I admit detachment from the importance of this day for much of my adult life. Having no family members who served in the armed forces, it didn’t hit home that much to me. My life hadn’t changed - my freedom was never in question. My life was never in danger. I never bothered to put myself in the shoes of a service member in harm’s way. I didn’t have to. Life was too good.  Well, life and time has a way of opening our eyes and making us see things a whole lot differently as we grow older. I have such deep respect and appreciation for the incredible sacrifices our military makes for us – an appreciation that became even more ingrained in my soul when I visited Arlington National Cemetery.  I urge you not to make Memorial Day just another barbecue day around the pool with friends. Try to put yourself in the boots of a young man or woman halfway around the world, putting their lives in danger with every move they make. Really think about it. Take your thoughts back in time to wars of old and the incredibly barbaric conflicts of today. Chemical warfare. Nuclear weapons. Guerrilla warfare. Would you like to be staring in the face of a Jihadist with a saber? No, I am sure not.  This Memorial Day, say thanks to a veteran. Place a flag on the grave of a soldier - any soldier. And get yourself an American flag and fly it at half-mast. You can 12

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018

“For the veteran. Thank you for bravely doing what you’re called to do so we can safely do what we are FREE to do.” - Anonymous


Whatever your passion, this is the place.

SarasotaBay Club Luxury Retirement Living On Sarasota Bay Come For A Personal Bay Club Tour – Call Linda Ware or Dana Moe (941) 552-3284 1301 North Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, Florida • Visit Us Online at SarasotaBayClub.com Click to View Video Tour of Residences


from the executive editor have that delicious, charbroiled hamburger right after you do something like that, and I promise you that burger will taste a whole lot better - almost as good as freedom. Teach these important lessons to your children. Tell them never to forget those who have sacrificed for our freedom. Encourage them to study history and better understand the world they live in. Education is the key to our future and our very being. In this, our annual education issue, be sure to read Sue Cullen’s article on the proposed new Mote Science Education facility to be built at the edge of Nathan Benderson Park. Its importance not only to our community but to marine science is enormous. Then, we have stories on Sarasota Youth Orchestra and its summer camp as well as the Circus Arts Conservatory’s Sailor Circus summer camp, both transformative experiences for our kids. We also interview local philanthropists Ned & Mickey Davis, whose philanthropy to at-risk kids and to education is extraordinary. Ryan Van Cleave shares the good news of the Community Foundation of Sarasota County’s commitment to college education through its scholarship program, which is one of the largest in the state of Florida, and includes not only students under 24, but also adults over 24 as well as those with special interests.

Perfect for those times when you don’t want or have time to cook but still crave something delicious. Morton’s kitchen offers an amazing array of gourmet entrees and comfort foods, all prepared from scratch and packaged to go. Save time, money and effort while savoring the city’s best take-out, hands down. Don’t miss our huge selection of freshly made salads too!

Gus Mollasis interviews philanthropists Graci and Dennis McGillicuddy, who are seeking assistance to build the All Star Children’s Center – a campus of hope and healing they believe will become a foster care model for the country – a center that will transform foster care through innovation, science and compassion. It is must-read article that will educate you on the cycle of abuse and why we need this vitally important center. Lastly, we have some fun things to do with your kids this summer, and that includes the library. Check it out. Your local library has so many cool programs, and it’s airconditioned. Happy May!

julie@scenesarasota.com

Historic Southside Village 1924 South Osprey Avenue Sarasota ∙ (941) 955-9856 MortonsMarket.com 14

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018


Where Casual Ambiance

Meets Authentic Italian

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the Locally Owned and Operated Since 1957

OFFERED BY STEPHANIE CHURCH

Vol. 61 No. 5 CEO/President Ronald Milton Publisher/Executive Editor Julie A. Milton Account Executive Linda Krysinski

Click for Video Tour 7251 PLOVERS WAY • Sanderling Club, Siesta Key 3B/3B • 3,000 SF • ½ Acre On Heron Lagoon Offered at $2,720,000

Graphic Designer Darcy Kelly-Laviolette Cover Photography John Revisky Communications Specialist & Editorial Assistant Bobbilynn Hollifield Distribution Dick Jackson

1874 WISTERIA STREET • West of the Trail, Sarasota 5B/3B • 2,638 SF • Seperate Guest House Offered at $1,150,000

Contributing Writers Sue Cullen Bobbilynn Hollifield Jacqueline Miller Gus Mollasis Steven J. Smith Ryan G. Van Cleave Rick Dakan Anne Weintraub Contributing Photographers Nancy Guth Kelly Kearns

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SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018

443 John Ringling Blvd. Ste. #F Sarasota, FL 34236 941.365.1119 | Fax: 941.954.5067 scenesarasota.com RJM Ventures LLC, dba SCENE Magazine of Southwest Florida publishes 12 issues a year. Address editorial, advertising and circulation correspondence to the above address. Sufficient return postage and selfaddressed, stamped envelope must accompany all manuscripts, artwork and photographs submitted if they are to be returned or acknowledged. Publisher assumes no responsibility for care of return of unsolicited materials. Subscription price: $12.95 per year, $19.95 for two years. All contents copyrighted. Reproduction without permission is prohibited.


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social SCENE

Sarasota Veg Fest

THE LIST PARTY PICS

scenesarasota.com

Classic Corvette Show

may 4

The LIST MAY 2018 EVENTS CALENDAR

Palm Avenue First Friday Gallery Walk Palm Ave 6:00 p.m. Enjoy gallery openings, dining, antiques, specialty shops Free | visitdowntownsarasota.com

4–5

Center for Architecture Sarasota

PICK YOUR FAVORITES!

As gala season fades, festivals come roaring into town. Art, music, crafts, seafood festivals and more take over the scene as the weather heats up and we get to enjoy some of the breathing room that the exit of our snowbirds provide. We’ll celebrate Mother’s Day, and we’ll honor the sacrifices made by our military service members. Mark your calendars – there’s still a lot to do in our never-sleepy town!

3rd Annual Modern Show Fundraiser Event info and tickets: cfasrq.org

5

Sarasota Veg Fest Sarasota Fairgrounds 10:00 a.m. Food demos, live music, vendors Free | sarasotavegfest.org

5

St. Armands Circle Classic Corvette Show Circle Park 10:00 a.m. Free | starmandscircleassoc.com

18

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018


social SCENE

WHERE TO GO IN

NOVEMBER Get away before the holiday rush sets in.

Contact Lisa Silvestri to start planning. IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Charity Golf Tournament

1.866.966.6535 Toll Free www.silvestritravel.com FL Seller of Travel #ST39381

SARASOTA SCENE

sponsored events! 4 SARASOTA MEMORIAL HEALTHCARE FOUNDATION | 17TH ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT Laurel Oaks Golf & Country Club 9:00 a.m. Supporting the SMH Physicians Endowment Fund smhf.org

5

TAYLOR EMMONS SCHOLARSHIP FUND 7TH ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF CLASSIC & POKER TOURNAMENT Lakewood Ranch Golf & Country Club Golf: 10:30 a.m. | Poker: 6:00 p.m. Golf: $200/player | Poker: $125/player temmons.org

MICHELLE CRABTREE Broker Associate, REALTOR® A third-generation local and broker associate since 1982, Michelle is dedicated to serving your needs in Sarasota, Bradenton and Lakewood Ranch.

941.724.4663 michelle.crabtree@premiersir.com crabtreehomes.com

PREMIERSOTHEBYSREALTY.COM Each office is independently owned and operated.

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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social SCENE

Harvey Milk Festival

Derby Dreams

5

Sarasota YMCA Going for the Gold: Derby Dreams Ritz-Carlton, Sarasota 5:30 p.m. Kentucky Derby party with dinner, dancing and auctions $400 | sarasotaymca.org

5

The Reserve SRQ 70s Music Video/Dance Party 1322 N. Tamiami Trl 7:00 p.m. Free | thereservesrq.com

7

Siesta Key Chamber 19th Annual Golf Tournament TPC Prestancia 7:30 a.m. $150/player siestakeychamber.com

8

Leadership Sarasota County Outstanding Leadership Awards

20

Art Center Sarasota Beaux Arts Ball

11

White Buffalo Saloon 6:00 p.m. $25 | sarasotatarpontournament.net

Selby Gardens 7:00 p.m. $95 designingdaughterssarasota.com

10

Centennial Park, Venice 11:00 a.m. Free | paragonartevents.com

11

9

Publix, 935 N. Beneva Rd 8:45 p.m. Free | facebook.com/ SpeedChasersFL

2nd Annual Venice Seafood and Music Festival

Five Points Park 2:30 p.m. Free | harveymilkfestival.org

Art Ovation Hotel 11:30 a.m. $65 | sarasotachamber.com

5

5–6

9th Annual Harvey Milk Festival

Van Wezel Grand Foyer 7:00 p.m. Featuring the 10th annual iconcept runway show $175 | artsarasota.org/BAB

Sarasota Tarpon Tournament Kick Off Party & Captain’s Meeting

Speed Chasers of Florida Sarasota Showdown

10 – 12

Greater Sarasota Chamber The Big Idea Luncheon The Francis 11:30 a.m. Guest speaker AG Lafley $40 | sarasotachamber.com

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018

Designing Daughters Bohemian Blooms Gala

12

2018 Sarasota Great Mother’s Day Race Siesta Key Beach 8:00 a.m. $38 | greatmothersdayrace.com

12

ArtCenter Manatee Jazzy Ladies Fashion Show & Luncheon Bradenton Country Club 11:30 a.m. Fashion, lunch and live music $48 | artcentermanatee.org

15

Junior League of Sarasota Annual Dinner The Francis 5:30 p.m. $45 | jlsarasota.org

16

Argus Foundation | Sip & Savor The Field Club 5:30 p.m. Silent auction, wine tasting and food pairing $125 | argusfoundation.org

16

Selby Gardens | Warhol Nights 6:00 p.m. Tour, performance, food + drink $75 | selby.org


social SCENE

Dick Vitale Gala

SARASOTA SCENE

sponsored events! 8 JFCS | 6TH ANNUAL TRIBUTE TO VETERANS SERVICE TO COMMUNITY AWARDS LUNCHEON The Francis 11:30 a.m. $45 | jfcs-cares.org

11

13TH ANNUAL DICK VITALE GALA Ritz-Carlton, Sarasota 6:30 p.m. Supporting pediatric cancer research $1,000 | jimmyv.org

Men Who Cook & Brew

Ringling by the Bay

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Local chefs cook & local breweries showcase their beer $200 | asolorep.org

Buddy Brew Sarasota 9:00 a.m. $50 | agoldphoto.com

21

Humane Society of Sarasota County Photo Shoot Fundraiser

Ringling by the Bay

Sarasota Architectural Foundation Umbrella House Tour

The Ringling 6:00 p.m. Featured band Kettle of Fish $15 | ringling.org

1300 Westway Dr 11:00 a.m. $40 sarasotaarchitecturalfoundation.org

St. Armands Circle Seafood & Music Festival

19

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Second Chance Last Opportunity Git It In Your Soul dance party Laurel Oaks Country Club 7:00 p.m. Celebrating SCLO’s 23rd anniversary $25 secondchancelastopportunity.org

26 – 27

Circle Park 11:00 a.m. Free; VIP $130 | seafoodfestivals.com

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Lakewood Ranch Main Street "A Tribute to Heroes" Memorial Day Parade 6:00 p.m. Free | lwrcac.com

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Selby Gardens Michael’s On the Bay 6:00 p.m.

8:30 p.m. $20 | historicspanishpoint.org

Asolo Rep Men Who Cook & Brew

Historic Spanish Point Full Moon Ghost Tour

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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Everyone cares about Alzheimer’s Disease.

We understand it.

UPCOMING events

Powerboat Grand Prix Festival

JUNE 7 – 10 | AIA Sarasota Design Conference

Come learn about the new Alzheimer’s program opening this spring. Brookdale Sarasota Midtown will soon open its Clare Bridge Crossings program, the only one of its kind in the Sarasota area. Specifically developed to aid with early- to middlestages of dementia, the program is based on research to help sustain cognition impacted in early Alzheimer’s and related dementias.

Wednesday, May 16 | 2 p.m. Limited seating; light refreshments and hors d’oeuvres

For reservations or more information, call 1-888-347-1928. For a Photo Tour, Click Here.

Hyatt Regency Sarasota 8:00 a.m. $225 | aiagulfcoast.org/SDC2018

JUNE 15 | Towles Court Artist Colony Third Friday Art Walks 5:00 p.m. Free | towlescourt.com

JUNE 23 | Bob Rizi Memorial Golf Classic The Meadows Country Golf Club 7:00 a.m. $125 | meadowscc.org

JUNE 27 | Sarasota Powerboat Grand Prix Festival Comedy Night McCurdy’s Comedy Theatre 5:30 p.m. $25 | sarasotapowerboatgrandprix.org

Brookdale Sarasota Midtown Assisted Living 2186 Bahia Vista Street | Sarasota, Florida 34239 Assisted Living Facility # AL7099 146014 SR

© 2018 Brookdale Senior Living Inc. All rights reserved. BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING and BRINGING NEW LIFE TO SENIOR LIVING are registered trademarks of Brookdale Senior Living Inc.

brookdale.com Bringing New Life to Senior Living® 22

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018

S C EN ES AR AS OTA. C OM for the latest social scene party pics. To submit your event for consideration, please send information to scenemagazine@scenesarasota.com


4950 Clark Rd, Sarasota, FL 34233 (941) 924-1211 | www.infinitiofsarasota.com


social SCENE

Sandy Loevner, Kelly Hunt, Cathy Rustin & Jessie Judd Katherine Zimmerman, Wendy Feinstein & Janet Lange

Jacqueline Morton

PARTY pics

Elisabeth Waters & Deborah Blue

PIQUE NIQUE SUR LA BAIE Winefest, in partnership with New College Foundation, brought back a long-time Sarasota favorite – Pique Nique Sur la Baie. Held on the Van Wezel’s south lawn, guests donned fun and fashionable millinery and enjoyed a sparkling wine reception followed by a seated luncheon featuring the gourmet flavors of some of Sarasota’s finest restaurants. Proceeds benefit local children’s charities. To date, Winefest has awarded more than $8.3 million to 84 local disadvantaged children’s charities.

Deborah Blue & Linda Krysinski Lenka Graf & Donna Koffman

24

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018

Karen White Julie Mackie, Elizabeth Fisher & Lisa Budslick


3 STEPS IN FINANCIAL PLANNING CAN MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. By Stuart Dickson | Financial Advisor

Financial planning is not a magic trick. It’s a

Third, take the right amount of risk in all of your

delicate balance of facts, logic, and a unique fit

investments. What is the right amount? Well,

for each person or family.

knowing the right amount is based ontwo primary factors. The first is being clear about

In essence, financial planning is about sound

your personal financial situation – how old you

decision making. How do you make a sound

are, what are your goals, how much income is

decision? These three steps are a great place to

available. The second is ensuring your money is

start.

invested in a portfolio specifically designed for the amount of risk you can handle.

First determine your current tax situation. Few First, things can change your future for the worse

Don’t go another day before making sure your

more than a poor tax strategy. Quite often there

future is in order, and make sure your financial

are missed opportunites to benefit from added

advisor is a fiduciary.

tax-defferral, not to mention being far more efficient in offsetting gains and losses.

Again, financial planning is not about magic. But if you get these three steps right, you can have a

Second Second, review your income. Learn whether

magical future.

your income sources are being used properly. Inflation can cause issues here as well. Know if you have an adequate amount of income and liquidity to meet all of your future needs.

CONNECT: 941-925-2121

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3322 BEE RIDGE RD, SRQ, FL 34239

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V I M V E S TA D V I S O R S . C O M MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018


social SCENE Larry Thompson & Debra Jacobs

Peter Salefsky, Annette Scherman, Lynn Fontana & Chris Pfahler Graci McGillicuddy & Michael Saunders

CVA HALL OF FAME LUNCHEON The sold-out Community Video Archives Hall of Fame Luncheon, now in its 28th year, honors locals who have contributed much to the fabric of our community through the production of a video biography. Hosted by CVA founder and president Annette Scherman and chaired and emceed by Chris Pfhaler, this year’s “Hall of Fame” inductees were Michael Donald Edwards, Sarabeth Kalajian, Murf Klauber and Christine Jennings.

Edward Kalin & Stanley Kane

Bob & Beverly Barnter

Honorees Christine Jennings, Murf Klauber, Sarabeth Kalajian & Michael Donald Edwards

Experience - Expertise

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social SCENE

George Miles, Hannah & Greg McDaniel Pat Jones, Karen Morton & Chris Shivery

David Verinder, Chippy Nalluri & Mason Ayres

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SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018

SMHF WOMEN & MEDICINE LUNCHEON Sarasota Memorial Healthcare Foundation’s 6th annual Women & Medicine educational luncheon was presented by SMH physicians Mauricio Concha, MD, Stroke Neurologist and Medical Director of the SMH Stroke Program, Daniel B. Case, MD, Neurointerventional Radiologist, and Chippy Nalluri, MD, FACC, Cardiologist; they discussed stroke risks that women face, how to recognize symptoms and risk factors for stroke and the treatments that are available. This year’s event raised $170,000 to benefit Comprehensive Stroke Care at Sarasota Memorial.

Pauline Joerger & Flora Major

Co-Chairs Sylvia Taylor, Beverly Bartner & Johanna Gustafsson


social SCENE Dana Buchman & Jessica Rogers

Eleanor & John Maxim, Stephanie & Allen Hochfelder Ron & Elaine Hershberger

CHILDREN FIRST FAIRYTALE BALL More than 325 supporters helped make the wishes of children and families come true at Children First’s Fairytale Ball: If You Had Three Wishes. The evening consisted of dinner, dancing, and opportunities to support the Head Start program through live and silent auctions, a chance drawing, and a challenge match. The funds raised will help the program provide education, nutrition, and health and family support services to more than 700 vulnerable children each year. Donna and David Koffman, Katherine and Frank Martucci, and Jacqueline and Lacy Ray Jr. co-chaired the event. Pete & Joanne Powers

Shari Phillips

Co-Chairs David & Donna Koffman, Jacqueline & Lacy Ray, Jr. with Katherine & Frank Martucci

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social SCENE

Jason Marien

Sharon Nassau & Lynn Bornstein

Dan Vigne, Anne Weintraub & Traci Smullen

JOSHPROVIDES CELEBRATION DINNER This tenth year anniversary celebration, which raised $130,000+ for epilepsy assistance, featured a four-course interactive dinner, live auction and paddle raise challenge. Traci Smullen, Dan Vigne and Anne Weintraub co-chaired the event, and guests were greeted by the organization’s co-founders, Sandi and Nicole Chapnick, as well as CEO Andria Bilan and Board Chair Rose Chapman. JoshProvides offers support for epileptic patients and their families, as well as community education and awareness. Andria Bilan, Sandi Chapnick & Nicole Chapnick with Rose Chapman

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philanthropy

Fueling

THE EMPOWERMENT

OF EDUCATION NED & MICKEY DAVIS BY STEVEN J. SMITH | PHOTO BY JOHN REVISKY

W

hen it came time for Ned Davis and his wife Mickey to find the school that best suited the needs and personality of their son Dylan, the hands down choice was Saint Stephen’s Episcopal School.

“We looked at all the area schools,” Mickey said. “Somebody suggested Saint Stephen’s and I took a tour with my boys. We were so impressed by their whole culture. It was more than just offering a quality education, it was installing a sense of emotional well-being and character building and encouraging kids to take responsibility for themselves.” “Dylan became so happy there that we moved our other son Connor there as well. We have been very pleased with the school and particularly happy with the leadership under Jan Pullen,” said Ned. Sitting on a scenic, gated 35-acre campus, which includes a state-of-the-art athletic complex and performing arts hall, Saint Stephens Episcopal School in Bradenton ranks among the most respected independent college preparatory schools in the nation, providing a world-class education for students in grades Pre-K3 through 12. With a 9:1 student/teacher ratio, students are supported and encouraged by outstanding faculty and a balanced curriculum

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of academic rigor and character development. The School’s rich academic offerings go hand-in-hand with a strong college counseling program. Mickey and Ned also like the emphasis Saint Stephen’s places on improving both the body and the mind, celebrating student achievement in both sports and scholarship. “The school is incredibly diverse, especially for a private school. In a period of this country’s history where different people cannot get along, it is so pleasing to see our kids have all kinds of friends that treat each other with respect,” she said. “Dylan has been in some theater productions and Connor has also won an award for the arts,” Ned added. “So, we want to be supportive of that. The campus and facilities are outstanding, but it is really the teachers and coaches that impress us most about the school.” The couple’s admiration has led to philanthropy. Mickey has joined the school’s board of directors and they have supported the school through the Father Kazar Foundation, which supports scholarships to needy but worthy students. In addition, the couple has not only participated in raising money for — and personally donating to — a new $7 million performing arts center, they also contribute to the school’s annual fund.


philanthropy

For all they’ve donated to Saint Stephen’s, however, the Davises feel they have gotten so much more in return. “I still remember my oldest boy telling me after going to the school for just a couple of weeks that ‘these are my people,’” Mickey said. “This was so wonderful, because he had been a kid who was not happy at school. So, to have him come home and be so happy is a blessing. Both boys are great students. They’re thriving. They’re both honor roll students, and they’ve both become leaders at school. They’re comfortable with getting up in front of a group and speaking. Everything the school does aligns with our personal beliefs at home.” In addition to what they have given to the school already, the Davises want to play a significant role in the future of Saint Stephen’s and would like to deepen the school’s culture of philanthropy. “Ned and I emphatically believe that education is crucial and empowering,” Mickey said. “I’ve had the advantage of being on the board and part of fundraising events, so I’ve heard all there is to know on why we need funds, how important they are and

how they are used. Most people don’t hear all those details. I’d like to help the philanthropic efforts of Saint Stephens by helping them tell that story so donors understand their gifts are essential to the financial well-being of the school. It’s our turn to support the school and come up with a comprehensive plan for the future, so years from now other Saint Stephen’s families have the same educational advantages we’re enjoying.” Mickey hails from Binghamton, NY and understands full well the value of a good education. During her career, she had a hands-on education working with people and developed two of what she calls her greatest assets – networking and social abilities. Always thirsty to learn more, she continued studying through online courses offered at UMass. Ned, who is from Nashville, started a stock market research company — Ned Davis Research — which he grew from five employees to over a hundred. In 2011, Ned sold his business to Euromoney, a European financial publishing company. The two met on a blind date after Mickey’s company moved its home office to Sarasota.

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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These two powerhouses are also quite philanthropic toward other important community needs that speak to their passions and core beliefs. For the past six years, Mickey has served on the Board for the Conservation Foundation of the Gulf Coast. She grew up loving the outdoors, and that love never diminished as an adult. Mickey and her family spend as much time as they can both on the water and in nature. Recognizing her passion for nature, a good friend suggested she get to know the land-saving efforts of the Conservation Foundation. Mickey feels very fortunate to call the Gulf Coast her home and she “hopes to preserve its natural beauty for future generations to enjoy.” Neil Phillips is the co-founder of Visible Men Academy (VMA) in Bradenton. VMA is an all-boys, tuition-free public charter school that provides boys (kindergarten to 8th grade) from low-income communities with outstanding academic, character-building and social education in a nurturing school environment. Its mission is to break the cycle of low expectations and underachievement in this demographic. Mickey became acquainted with Neil when they served together on a non-profit board. She had already been involved with some families who were in need of help in their lives – families Mickey and Ned deeply cared for and welcomed into their home on weekends. However, the Davises realized they could not positively impact these families in a lasting way so given that Neil was already making life-changing impacts on young men, they became involved with VMA. “Neil has an infectious enthusiasm, and he provides these boys with the education they need to succeed. He has demonstrated that his methods work. Visible Men Academy is definitely changing lives,” shared Mickey.

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philanthropy

2018

It’s clear that what is important to Mickey and Ned Davis is that any investment they make in an organization has an impact today and for future generations. What they are doing to help Saint Stephen’s, Visible Men Academy and Conservation Foundation certainly aligns with that goal and makes our community a better place for all of us.


philanthropy

Wealth SPREADING THE MARCIA JEAN TAUB & PETER SWAIN

BY STEVEN J. SMITH | PHOTO BY NANCY GUTH

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philanthropy

M

arcia Jean Taub and Peter Swain tie their joint philanthropic philosophy to some pithy words uttered by the immortal Winston Churchill — “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.”

“My parents donated to them and I have volunteered and donated a considerable amount of money as well,” Taub said.

“Larry Thompson, president of Ringling College, always speaks of that institution being preeminent in the field of art and design,” Taub said. “And I realized that’s a great word for the characteristics of Sarasota philanthropy. We’re very blessed to have so many organizations here that in my mind are preeminent. So, I continue to support Ringling College as well as Selby Gardens, The Sarasota Ballet, Sarasota Memorial Hospital, the Salvation Army and Designing Women Boutique, whose building now has both my mom’s and dad’s names on it. They were the first people to donate an estate to them and kick off their estate division.”

Swain added as a newer denizen to the greater Sarasota community he has taken many of his philanthropic cues from Taub.

Taub’s career followed in the footsteps of her parents, Ron and Ethel Taub, who founded Creative Displays, a point-of-sale advertising company in Chicago. Starting out as a teacher, she went on to several creative design and display roles with Saatchi and Saatchi, London and Max Factor & Company before consulting with Creative Displays. Swain was a founding pioneer in an entirely new business sector focused on the world of advertising media communication. Taub was born in New York City and grew up there and in Chicago. She moved to the Sarasota area in 2008 after her mother died, to help care for her aging father. Swain, originally from Sussex, England, moved to Longboat Key after retiring in 2005. The two met two years ago at a bank luncheon. He asked a question of the speaker and she endorsed it. They have been together ever since and as a couple, have teamed up to give back to a number of deserving organizations in their adopted town. The mission of Designing Women Boutique is to grow funding for Sarasota’s arts and human services organizations through fundraising events and by selling gently used donated and consigned unique designer fashion, furniture, art, and accessories. The organization bestowed over $1,750,000 in grants and re-donations to more than 70 non-profit recipients in its first 14 years of operation. “Designing Women is such a unique way of providing grants to many organizations in the community,” Taub said. “It ties together the message of giving back to the community.” Another organization near and dear to Taub and Swain of late is the Circus Arts Conservatory, which is currently in the midst of a $4 million fundraising campaign to upgrade its facilities. The CAC started out in 1949 as Sailor Circus, a small high school gymnastics class and has grown into a top circus school in the U.S. Students learn circus arts in a safe and nurturing atmosphere. Over the last six decades, thousands of students have completed the Sailor Circus training program. Each year, students train with coaches and volunteers to create performances that have evolved into a major tourist attraction in the Southwest Florida region. The Sailor Circus Academy also offers a summer camp for children ages 6-15, which takes place in one- and two-week sessions during June, July and August.

“The circus appeals to the widest possible cultural audience,” Swain said. “Everybody wants to take their children or grandchildren to it. Aside from that, the Circus Arts Conservatory supports the community in outreaching to the elderly — giving them comfort, attention and good humor — and also to the young with the mentoring, teaching and training they provide. It’s phenomenal. It builds what I believe is most important to education, which is self-esteem, confidence, trust in others and social awareness.” Taub added as a former special needs teacher for children and adults, she knows the ages of 8-18 are so important in a child’s development in terms of confidence and self-acceptance. “What I love to see is kids of all shapes, sizes and backgrounds coming together in the Circus Arts Conservatory,” she said. “They learn to work together and help each other as they perform at so many different functions in our community and even recently on the Mall in Washington, D.C. The Circus Arts Conservatory gave them an opportunity they would not have had otherwise, which is a big reason we donate to them and urge others to do the same.”

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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NEW YORK CITY

LOVES

OUR

S A R A S O TA BALLET

B Y R YA N G . VA N C L E AV E 40

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018


Iain Webb by Matthew Holler The original plan for this article was to write about The Sarasota Ballet’s international intensive summer program, an amazing 5-week opportunity for the aspiring professional dancer. But something quite unexpected happened that redirected the focus of this piece — The Sarasota Ballet was invited back to the Joyce Theater in New York City for seven performances in August of this year.

years ago along with nine other ballet companies, the New York Times sent a reporter down to Sarasota to find out what was going on here. Why? Webb explains: “We were the youngest company. I was the director with the shortest tenure. We had the smallest budget. But we were the ones people were talking about. People were quite literally focused on us.”

Why is this noteworthy? The Joyce Theater is one of the major dance houses of America. It presents companies from all over the world such as Les Ballet Trockadero de Monte Carlo, Eiko & Koma, Paul Taylor Dance Company, Martha Graham Dance Company, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. The Joyce Theater is simply a huge international dance venue that’s synonymous with world-class dance, so performing there is significant.

Not bad for a company founded in 1987 that didn’t even become a full resident ballet company until 1990.

But The Sarasota Ballet was just there in 2016 for an entire week of shows. So again — what’s the big deal? Director Iain Webb notes that the big deal is this: even if you’re a success at the Joyce, you have to wait quite a few years before being invited back. “But they were so excited about what the company’s doing that we’ve been invited back for 2018,” he says. “It’s unheard of to be brought back so soon. It stems from the interest New York City has in what we’re doing.” New York’s been interested in The Sarasota Ballet for some time now. After the company did an event in Washington DC several

“The program that we’re doing there [at the Joyce Theater] sums up the DNA of the company,” says Webb, who is committed to paying particular care and respect to historical works. It starts with a company premiere of Sir Frederick Ashton’s Varii Capricci. Then they’re performing There Where She Loved, a piece by Christopher Wheeldon, one of the most sought-after choreographers of today. “And with Symphony of Sorrows, a piece by The Sarasota Ballet member Ricardo Graziano,” notes Webb, “we’re looking to the future.” But what’s equally as impressive as being invited back to the Joyce so soon is that the company is being allowed to change the lineup for the Saturday performances in order to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Sir Ashton’s passing (to the very day). The performances that day will feature Varii Capricci as well as diverts and selections from his ballets, which will showcase the vast range of Sir Ashton’s choreographic genius. These include Monotones II, MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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the final pas de deux from The Two Pigeons and Méditation from Thaïs. “I’ve been very fortunate,” Webb says. “The people of Sarasota have opened their hearts. They appreciate what I’m trying to do here. And as a result of our company’s success, we’ve been to New York City four times, Washington DC twice, as well as the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival. The dancers and everyone involved feels the same way I do about it—we’re representing the state of Florida. We’re showing the culture of our area.” When asked what brought Webb to The Sarasota Ballet 11 years ago, he jokes that it was “the sunshine and the beach.” But he quickly adds that in those 11 years, he’s only been to the beach four times. What really drew him was that all the other similarly-sized companies were doing the same works. The Sarasota Ballet offered a chance for something unique—they had an interest in presenting a wider, more eclectic repertoire. Thanks to Webb’s relationships with some of the biggest names in the dance world, they’ve been able to expand the repertoire and do things like bring in Sir Anthony Dowell for 10 days to coach the dancers. “I learned more from him during those 10 days then I did during my time with him in the same company, and he was our director!” says Webb. “Both Margaret [his wife and former principal of The Sadler’s Wells Royal Ballet who now serves as Assistant Director of The Sarasota Ballet] and I know that we’ve got something really special, really unique here in Sarasota.” One of the most difficult aspects of Webb’s work is auditioning new dancers. For each of the last three years, 600+ dancers tried out for the few available spots. 600+! “I take it as a big compliment that so many want to come and work with The Sarasota Ballet,” he says. “It’s basically one person’s decision about who gets hired. And it’s made off maybe two hours in the studio. I always tell them all ‘please understand that it’s just my opinion. Others might see things differently.’” The upshot is this. The Sarasota Ballet is making us proud. Again. And if I were a betting man, the next time I get asked to write about their education programming or other bread-and-butter topic, a new WOW opportunity will likely emerge and insist on stealing the show. Well done, The Sarasota Ballet. Well done, Iain Webb. Well done indeed. For more information on The Sarasota Ballet, please visit www.sarasotaballet.org or call 941.359.0099.

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“It’s unheard of to be brought back (to the Joyce Theater) so soon. It stems from the interest New York City has in what we’re doing.” -Iain Webb


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OCEANS

FOR ALL

MOTE’S ICONIC NEW AQUARIUM TO PAVE WAY FOR FUTURE MARINE RESEARCH BY SUE CULLEN

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SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018


R

enderings of the proposed new Mote Science Education Aquarium show it perched at the edge of Nathan Benderson Park’s north lake’s west trail like a majestic four-story ship ready to launch. It is impressive, as is the ambitious plan to double exhibition space and attendance in a high-tech, hands-on learning environment, but it is just the first phase of Mote Marine Laboratory’s long-term vision. The momentous rebirth of Mote Aquarium frees space at its current home on City Island and paves the way to expand its original raison d’être as a nonprofit marine research and exploration organization. “It is our longer-term vision beyond 2020 that is driving the need for us to grow,” said Dr. Michael P. Crosby, Mote’s President and CEO. “We have five campuses from Sarasota Bay to the Keys, and we are talking about growing again in a way that allows us to significantly evolve the City Island campus into an international marine science, technology and innovation center. The essential first step is that we need more space.” While the aquarium is Mote’s public face and a great attraction for visitors, it wasn’t established until 1980, while Mote has been involved in marine research since its founding by Dr. Eugenie Clark in 1955.

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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The aquarium’s mainland rebirth allows City Island to transform into an expanded hub to grow Mote’s research enterprise. That vision encompasses adequate space for additional Mote scientists, visiting scientists from around the world, and science and technology entrepreneurs with the capability to realize the market potential of groundbreaking research. That research includes discovery of infection- and cancer-fighting compounds from the sea, ocean sensing technology and sustainable fish farming methods, which have the potential to impact the quality of life for millions. Mote’s vision for the new aquarium, which is being designed by the CambridgeSeven architectural firm, is equally expansive. It will have public space of 110,000 square feet, significantly larger than the current aquarium’s 66,000 square feet. More than 1 million gallons of seawater exhibits are planned, compared to about 400,000 gallons today, and they are expected to expand on Mote’s current display of more than 100 marine species. They will feature sharks, manatees, sea turtles, otters, seahorses, jellyfish and other marine life as well as ecosystems from around the world. Visitors’ experience will be heightened with augmented reality technology. “When people see it, we want them to go, ‘Wow, that is incredible’,” Crosby said. “The building itself is designed to be an exhibit.” At night, the aquarium’s exterior will display still images and video of marine animals, the ecosystem and research endeavors. “Once people come in the door, they will be warmly embraced or smacked in the face with science. However you look at it, it won’t be your grandfather’s aquarium,” he said. “You will be immersed in science from virtual reality experiences to seeing students actively engaged with their teachers and our scientists in hands-on experience with STEM activities.” Visitors also will be able to participate in interactive teaching labs, onsite diving programs, and discover what it’s like to be a marine scientist by participating in Mote’s citizen-scientist projects. This marine science and research focus expands upon efforts at the current aquarium, which recently completed an every-five-year accreditation by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). A study of 228 AZA member institutions also named Mote the second most research-productive member with its inclusion in 641 research publications, closely behind the Smithsonian National Zoological Park, which had 650 publications. Depending on timely completion of Mote’s $130 million fundraising effort, Oceans for All: Improving Access to Marine Science and Technology (941.388.4441/moteoceansforall.org), construction is planned to begin in late 2019 and be completed by late 2021. To date, funds already have been committed for 20 percent of the new aquarium’s cost. Discussions also are underway with Sarasota 46

SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018


County officials for about five acres of county-owned land in Nathan Benderson Park as the aquarium’s new home. “Our continued discussions have been very positive. I think everyone in the community sees the value when you look objectively at the growth of the community and the growth of Mote,” Crosby said. “It’s not just about science, it’s about the economy and our need for STEM education and STEM workforce development. Both are an important part of our new aquarium, and I think everyone wants to work together to make this happen.” Although Mote’s informal science and ocean literacy education reaches more than 300,000 visitors annually, plans are to expand opportunities to provide area students with a higher level of science education. Hands-on activities in classrooms and interactive labs will be offered to all schools regionally at no cost. “Every child in this region will have the chance to have hands-on STEM opportunities they otherwise would not be able to have,” Crosby said. “They’ll have the opportunity to work with our scientists, and all high school students will have the chance to do hands-on research.” Plans include outreach to students from underserved populations and to those who are underrepresented in marine science and technology. To create Mote Science Education Aquarium, the Oceans for All fundraising effort encompass three sources: individual donors, families and foundations, corporate and organizational sponsors, and local and state government funding. For individuals and families, Crosby said, “Whether you are into supporting conservation, recreational fishing, or paradigmchanging science, we have more than 20 research topics here focused on ensuring we do have oceans for all. We also want

to reach out to those who see a once in a lifetime opportunity to be part of something incredibly important.” Over the past five years, Mote has had nearly 600 active research projects. The Nathan Benderson Park location, with its proximity to I-75, puts 3 million residents within a one-hour drive of Mote Science Education Aquarium. Because its projected attendance numbers are so large, fundraising with large corporate sponsors is an opportunity. Feasibility studies put attendance in the first year at 700,000, double the current level, and the aquarium is built to accommodate 1 million visitors annually. With projected economic impacts of the new aquarium and keeping in mind the longer-term desire to build a “blue economy” with a marine science and technology sector, local and state funding sources are being sought. The aquarium’s construction is projected to generate nearly $280 million in direct and indirect expenditures and employment of 3,123 in total person-years. Ongoing economic impact is estimated at $28 million annually, compared with today’s $12 million economic impact from the aquarium, and employment is expected at 260 direct and indirect jobs. “We are going to do this together. It is going to be a community effort. The community helped build Mote into what it is today, and I can’t underscore enough that it is because we are in such a special community of people, we are very confident that we are going to achieve this goal,” Crosby said. “We are not just doing this to build and operate a new science education aquarium, the broader vision is that this aquarium allows us to have amazing impacts on the economy, the quality of life, and long-term conservation and sustainable use of our oceans.” MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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The Community Foundation’s

COMMITMENT

TO COLLEGE EDUCATION BY RYAN G. VAN CLEAVE

C

ollege is changing,” says Murray Devine, the Communications and Marketing Manager at the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. “Costs are up. The challenges students face are far different than, say, ten years ago.” He’s exactly right. And that’s why the Community Foundation formed a task force about five years ago to figure out how they can get maximum value for their robust scholarship program. They considered student loan debt, graduation rates, and many other issues. The conclusion? A primary area of focus has to be getting students to graduate. While it’s awesome to be able to give students money to attend college, it’s a much more meaningful thing to do all you can to ensure they leave with a degree. Earl Young, Manager of Scholarships & Special Initiatives, reports that last year, they awarded $1.85 million in scholarships to area residents,

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SARASOTA SCENE | MAY 2018

meaning students residing in Sarasota, Manatee, Charlotte, or DeSoto counties. “We’ve got a great scholarship program here,” he says. “It’s one of the largest—if not the largest—in the entire state of Florida.” Young explains that the Community Foundation has three categories of scholarships. The traditional one is for students under 24. The bulk of these are high school seniors, though plenty of opportunities exist to support students already attending college. The second scholarship category is for adults, meaning students 24 and up. Much of the funding here goes to adults seeking a GED, CNA, or other certificate. This category also helps the Community Foundation’s 2-Generation work, where support is given not only to K-12 children but also their parents. The third and final scholarship category is all about special interests. “It’s for students who don’t fit into the traditional or adult learner bucket,” says Young. These scholarships have gone to students as young as 12 and as old as 30 for things like summer camps for performing


artists who intend to become professionals, or special workshops that are vital to a student’s future career. One of the student-centered things the Community Foundation has done, Young notes, is make the application process simple. There’s only one form to fill out. Once that’s done, algorithms identify all the applicable scholarships for that applicant. This is more involved than it sounds—the Community Foundation has 80+ different types of scholarships that have been funded by individual donors or organizations. And most of the awards have specific criteria that is set up by the donor which could include majors they’re studying, activities they engage in, or where they intend to attend college. “I like to say that we’ve got something for everyone,” says Young. Once the application is earmarked to be considered for a particular scholarship, a volunteer committee of 100+ members gets to work, and no fewer than three committee members review every single application before a decision is made. This coming year, the scholarships awarded from the January 1 to March 1 application period will come close to $2 million, reports Young. With the continued commitment in supporting area education, that number is likely to keep growing. That kind of success is a clear testament to how well the Community Foundation and Young are running things.

“We’ve got a great scholarship program here. It’s one of the largest—if not the largest—in the entire state of Florida.” -EARL YOUNG

What do these scholarships mean to the 500+ annual recipients? Just ask Brittani Froug, a Sarasota native who had “huge dreams and aspirations to go to college, to become a professional, and make a positive change in our wonderful community. But realistically, my dreams were always out of reach.” She applied for a scholarship at the Community Foundation and met Earl Young, “who turned my word upside down and advocated for my dreams to become a reality.” She reports: “Today, I am a cardiac nurse at Manatee Memorial Hospital. I am working full time, enrolled in the BSN program at State College of Florida, and working towards transitioning into a pediatric role in nursing in the future. The Community Foundation supported me/my education, both emotionally and financially, through my nursing prerequisites, LPN school, my RN-ASN degree, and now my RN-BSN degree, with a completion date of Summer 2019.” About what the Community Foundation’s help meant to her, she says that “their support gave me the choice to be something important, to make a difference, to contribute to our community through healthcare promotion and competent care at the hospital bedside. It gave me an opportunity to prove to myself that I

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was capable of pushing the limits of my own means and achieve what I set my mind to. And it allowed me to not be a product of my environment, being the first person in my immediate family to receive a college education.” And then there’s Bree Winn, a 29-yearold area resident who had her first son three days after graduating from Palmetto High School. She began working at a Title 1 elementary school in Sarasota County as a kindergarten t e a ch e r i n 2 0 1 3 a n d t a u g h t a Community Foundation-supported Summer Slide Program at the Boys and Girls Club. In working with the Community Foundation, she learned about opportunities for adult learners to get support, and a few months later she had the financial ability to attend USF in St. Petersburg, where she received a master’s degree in Reading Education last year. “I am a first-grade teacher, an after-school ESOL tutor, and the mother of two amazing sons,” she says, “who is pursuing a Doctor of Education degree.”

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Devine notes that Young’s commitment to student success—like that of Froug and Winn—is incredible. “He often knows more about each student than their school guidance counselors. He helps them make a good decision on where to go and what to major in. He helps develop their college/education strategy,” Devine says. “Students write to him all throughout the year. And often after they graduate, they still keep in touch. He really plays an important part in their lives by helping them through the journey of higher education.” It’s that kind of mentoring and genuine concern for a student’s welfare that makes the Community Foundation’s scholarship program what it is—a vital part of our community’s future. For more information on Community Foundation of Sarasota County, please visit www.cfsarasota.org or call 941.955.3000.

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W BY ANNE

G N I R A O S T A E R G TO S T H G I HE

EINTRAU

B

SAILOR CIRCUS

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O

ff of Bahia Vista Stre et, near S High Scho arasota ol, sits a b lu e a nd white tent that is part of th e Circus A Conserva rts tory (CAC fooled. Th ). But don is is no ord ’t be inary tent. which inc It is a tent redible cir u n der cus acts h ages for m ave deligh any, many te d k id s of all years. In summe r, it becom es the pla teens betw ce where een the a kids and g e s o hammock f six and fi s, balance fteen flip on on the low Spanish w wire, spin eb, climb o n a s il ks, maste and rollin r the flyin g globes g trapeze – it becom es CIRCU S CAMP.

SUMMER CAMP Photography by Cliff Roles & Diane Broda

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It’s a place where, only four years ago, a 12-year old boy learned to juggle three balls by his third day of camp, and by his fifth day he replaced them with clubs. Now, at 16, he juggles with balls, clubs, rings and fire and is on his way to competing nationally. The CAC campers are from all over the world; their counselors come from the Sailor Circus. “Our camp program is phenomenal, as evidenced by the number of children who want to come back every year. Due to the arena, costumes and coaches, we offer things other camps do not. The camp is so good that even circus families send their children to CAC’s camp. There is something for everyone,” said Beth Graves, CAC’s marketing director. According to Graves, campers learn life skills such as time management, humility, and interpersonal communications as they develop their abilities, all of which help improve self-esteem. Campers also get the opportunity to serve as ringmasters for the Friday performances. The camp offers two two-week sessions ($575/two weeks) and five one-week sessions ($275/one week). On the last Friday of each session, campers perform their “showcase acts” for family and friends. There is a process on how campers are split into groups for their showcase act groups. On the first day of camp, the camper tries out each different act that is offered for that session. Counselors evaluate each camper at the end of the different events. The students are evaluated on their ability to take direction, natural talents, potential to learn, strength, prior circus or comparable experience and general attitude. The campers also provide the counselors with their top three choices of acts at the end of the experience. Based upon the counselor recommendations and the camper’s interest, the counselors cast the acts for the showcase program. If the camper does not make it into their top choice, they still can practice the activity at camp. Each week, there are themed showcase acts with past themes such as Disney, Shipwrecked, Around the World, Space Week, The Greatest Little Show on Earth, Dancing with the Circus and different holidays, such as Christmas in July. CAC provides the costumes, makeup and props for all performances. “In our camp, kids finish with the glory of sequence, feathers and professional hair and makeup. That’s one of the things that sets us apart. We have the best tools to engage little minds and little spirits,” says Courtney Wyatt, CAC Youth Training Co-Manager. “There’s a place for everyone, no niche goes unused.” Campers begin their day with a warmup and stretches, followed by one to two warmup circus activities, such as low wire, unicycle, trampoline,

hula hooping or juggling, followed by snack, showcase act rehearsal, lunch, theater games, arts and circus crafts, showcase act rehearsal, snack, checkout, group games and dismissal. The first Wednesday of each session is Waterslide Day. Campers get to cool off on a giant waterslide set up outside of the arena and some also ride the aerial straps and flying trapeze. Pre-care and aftercare are available to campers and their siblings for a small fee. For families who cannot afford to send their children to camp, financial assistance is available. The financial aid committee considers documents that serve as proof of hardship, such as tax returns, evidence of state and federal aid and hardship letters. To request the forms, you may contact the CAC office at (941) 5565480. For more information on CAC’s camp, please call Kathy Merritt at (941) 355-9335, extension 321.

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BEST

THE

TO PLACESTAKE KIDS,TWEENS TEENS

&

BY RYAN G. VAN CLEAVE

I

’ve got a problem.

There’s a full range of kid ages to deal with at the Van Cleave house this summer. We have a teen AND a tween. Plus, houseguests will soon be en route with an army of wee ones. So what on earth are we to do when they’re tired of playing Xbox, sleeping until noon, and gobbling animal crackers? What follows are my best picks to take everyone to over the next few months. Maybe I’ll see you there?

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FRUITVILLE LIBRARY/GULF GATE LIBRARY Yeah, I know. Library. Big whoop-dedoo. But Fruitville’s got free wifi, helpful librarians, and a great kid section with lots of space to sit, play, and read. And there’s a lot of impressive programs—Kids Write! Book Club, Anima/Manga Club, Forty Carrots Partners in Play, plus special summer youth programming. And while I’m partial to Fruitville (I drive past it on my way to work), the new Gulf Gate Library might be the crown jewel in the Sarasota County Library System. This amazing building has all you’d want for little ones, but there are oodles of things for older kids here, like Teen Movie Nights, Teen Gaming Nights, Teen Media Mondays, Chess Club, and even a new Gulf Gate Teen Occult Club where they’ll discuss “paranormal topics ranging from extraterrestrial life to the existence of ghosts and more.” Plus, there are books. Loads and loads of good ones. FRUITVILLE: 100 COBURN ROAD/GULFGATE: 7112 CURTISS AVENUE

GULF GATE LIBRARY

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CELERY FIELDS/THE HILL Want exercise? Power up and down those trails on the manmade hill. Want to shoot photos? The last time I was there, I saw bald eagles, great blue heron, spoonbills, sandhill c ra n e s , a n d m o r e . A b o n u s : Audubon volunteers are often at the observation pier to help with spotting and identification. (If your kids don’t like exercise, photography, or wildlife, there’s a lot of Pokémon Go stuff to do here, as well!) 6800 PALMER BOULEVARD

THE RINGLING When they were little, my kids LOVED to go to ROAR/Ringling Order of Art Readers—a free family story time session for preschoolers and toddlers. Plus we’ve gone several times to the Art After Five events on Thursdays (discounted admission to the museum plus family activities) and the Kids Quest museum tours for kids 8-12 (only $2), which give your family admission to the featured venue for the rest of the day. Or try the Museum of Art Mondays (free!), a special art-making program connected to objects you can find in the galleries. This also gives you free admission to the museum. Don’t forget to try out the kid’s playground area by the rose garden. My kids—even at 11 and 14—still insist we go there each time we visit The Ringling. 5401 BAY SHORE ROAD

LEGACY TRAIL Ride, walk, or stroll through 15 miles of well-maintained trail that used to be an old railway line. Smooth pavement. Clear signage. Safe road crossings. Restrooms every few miles. It’s one of the Top 10 Bicycle Trails in Florida for a reason. (The last time I rode there, a bobcat zipped past. So cool!) TRAIL HEADS AT CULVER HOUSE NATURE PARK AND VENICE TRAIN DEPOT

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JUNIOR GOLF CLINIC @ EVIE’S FAMILY GOLF CENTER Every Saturday morning from 9-9:45, there’s a free (no joke—F R E E!) golf clinic for kids age 5-15 run by the Schiavetta Golf Academy. Don’t have clubs? They’ve got loaners. Don’t know what you’re doing when it comes to golf? No worries—they’ll teach kids the proper fundamentals, from swing to stance to posture to etiquette. Best of all, the teachers are PGA Professionals. Afterwards, enjoy a snack in the restaurant. Or play some of the video games in the little arcade. Or give their mini-golf course a whirl. My kids have gone to the junior golf clinic dozens of times and while they’re unlikely to make the cut for the PGA tour, they won’t embarrass themselves if they’re ever out on the links. 4375 BEE RIDGE ROAD

NATHAN BENDERSON PARK If you’re compelled to shop at University Town Center, fine, but make sure you swing by Nathan Benderson Park, just south of the mall. What’s not to like about this? Easy parking. Clean bathrooms. Kid playground. Pet friendly. Walking/riding/jogging trail. Canoe/rowboat/kayak/paddleboard opportunities. And that’s not to mention the many official activities there (Glow Run, Breast Cancer Walk, Superhero 5k, the World Rowing Masters Regatta, etc.). 5851 NATHAN BENDERSON CIRCLE

TREEUMPH! ADVENTURE COURSE Over 10 football fields of challenging terrain and fun aerial experiences? Yes, please! As their websites states: “Suspended logs? Check. Wobbly footbridges? You bet. Zip lines? Absolutely.” Most important, their commitment to safety is first rate. The hook-harness system is super secure. The workers? Impressively safetyconscious and helpful as well. Unless you’re afraid of heights, this is a fun, great workout for people of all ages. 21805 E STATE ROAD 70

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ESCAPE COUNTDOWN SARASOTA Want a fully-immersive entertainment experience? Test your wits and critical thinking skills against one of the themed puzzle-filled rooms. Can you “escape” in an hour or less? Sarasota boasts three escape room companies, but this one’s my favorite. I’d start with Jail Break and then try Mad Hatter or Trouble in Paradise. (Need a break from the kids? Take your sweetie out for the escape-room-for-two experience, “Evening in Paris.”) 6525 S. TAMIAMI TRAIL/INSIDE THE BANK OF AMERICA BUILDING

FAB LAB Most kids don’t get excited about STEM. But at the Fab Lab, science, technology, engineering, and math become cool again. Whether it’s taking one of the summer camps (LEGO engineering, How it’s Made, Escape Room Engineering, Crime Scene Lab, to name a few) or becoming a member and getting unlimited access, this place is a hoot. Try out embroidery machines, 3D printers, mills, routers, laser cutters, and more. Did I mention that this place is high-tech awesome? Kids will love the hands-on opportunity to get creative. 4452 BENEVA ROAD

Whew! It’s going to be a busy summer here for sure. But the good news is that there are plenty of great things to do beyond this list, like hitting up the beaches, hanging out at Jungle Gardens, eating gelato from a Main Street shop, strolling Saint Armands Circle and so much more. If you find anything not mentioned above that’s especially splendid for your kids, tweens, and/or teens, please tell me! I’ll probably add it to a future article here and thank you with a little magazine karma.

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on the town

SCENES FROM AN INTERVIEW special edition

The All Star Children's Center

BUILDING A BRIGHTER FUTURE IN FOSTER CARE by Gus Mollasis

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on the town

B

Y THE TIME YOU FINISH READING THIS ARTICLE, another 60 cases of child abuse will have been reported in the United States. That is outrageous. Any number but zero is too many in a civilized and forward-thinking society.

And zero is the only acceptable outcome for Graci and Dennis McGillicuddy, a giving and loving couple who have devoted many of their years to breaking the cycle of child abuse. It was the McGillicuddys’ passion, financial support and tenacity that built the Child Protection Center in 2010 - a vital organization (on Orange Avenue in Sarasota) that aids in the prevention, intervention and treatment of child abuse. While the agency addresses many important and immediate needs relating to child abuse, the McGillicuddys realized that traumatized children have another need: a place where they feel loved and nurtured, a fostering place where they will feel safe, where the effects of their trauma will fade, and where compassion and new scientific treatments will shine a light on their lives. For Graci and Dennis, they choose not to fill their golden years with the carefree days they’ve earned and deserve. Instead, they choose to spend every day fighting for kids. Rest is not an option; they are laser-focused on building a campus of hope and healing, a campus that will become a foster care model for the rest of our country, a campus called the All Star Children’s Center. And they need your help. The campus will go back in time and share loving and nurturing principles with children who either experienced these vitally important formative principles for only a short time or who never knew them at all. It will also turn the clock ahead by utilizing the latest science and technology to break this heartbreaking cycle of

Adverse childhood experiences (trauma) are the single greatest unaddressed public health threat facing our nation today. – Dr. Robert Block

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on the town

trauma. It is a challenging goal for even the most optimistic among us, but for this passionate and philanthropic couple, failure is not an option.

cars?” As Graci speaks these words from a place deep in her soul, you can feel her pain for these children, so real and so raw.

As they sit together in their beautiful, comfortable and unpretentious Siesta Key home at the end of a long week of busy meetings, their satisfying smiles fade to looks of concern as we began talking about the current foster care system.

“And not only that, try to imagine that in the coming days your future is uncertain. You might have a safe place to live or you might not. Getting enough to eat and having decent clean clothes to wear to school becomes an issue, and that should not be an issue for any child.”

They know all too well the tragic numbers by heart and each of them take their turn reciting them: “400,000 children are in the foster care system in the United States.” “Every 10 seconds a report of child abuse is made.” “80 percent of prisoners were abused as children.” “77 percent of children who die from abuse in Florida are under the age of four.” “50 percent of siblings are separated due to a shortage of foster homes.” These are the sobering numbers which drive this powerhouse couple into action to raise other kinds of numbers—dollars—which they hope will help impact countless numbers of children. Both Graci and Dennis know while these tragic numbers represent the big picture—a failing systemic issue in society—the real number that they are concerned with is ONE. Each one of these numbers is a person with an individual story of a nightmarish tale of trauma. “Can you imagine being taken away from your home in the middle of the night, the home where you grew up, as you watch your parent being arrested while your brothers and sisters are placed in separate police 64

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“Finally, after all that trauma,” Graci pauses, “After all that, can you imagine that nobody even asks you about what happened to you on that night and other nights? Can you imagine that?” It is a scenario that has been played out countless times in America, and it’s a scenario that’s playing out every minute of every day. Both Graci and Dennis know all too well the impact of non-action, the influence of inadequate treatment, and the importance of getting involved today to improve a child’s chance of having a hopeful tomorrow. That is why this couple doesn’t sit still. They’re always in motion, always doing something to help a cause they are passionate about, whether it be raising funds or rolling up their sleeves and doing the hard work to make a positive impact. While they’re well-known in town for supporting many important organizations, their signature causes are Graci’s work at the Child Advocacy Center (a.k.a. Child Protection Center) and now the All Star Children’s Center, and Dennis’s leadership in


on the town Embracing Our Differences, an organization he founded that uses the power of art and education through its annual exhibition and educational programs and initiatives to expand consciousness and open the heart to celebrate diversity. The McGillicuddys have forged many great friendships in town and have received the support of many other community philanthropists for their endeavors, all of whom are very grateful for their efforts. One noted Sarasota philanthropic couple who are among the grateful is Skip and Gail Sack. Skip sums it up this way: “Both Gail and I look up to Dennis and Graci. They are our role models for what it means to give and get involved in what they are giving to. They define the term philanthropy. When they get involved, they really get involved. And not only with money, but with efforts that come from their hearts.” For Graci and Dennis, the passion is evident and measurable; the enthusiasm they share for positive change they hope will be contagious both within the local community and nationwide. They are putting their blood, sweat and tears behind the AllStar Children’s Center, and their belief in its importance is something they feel deep in their bones. The Center will be built under the guidance of the expert eye of Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital, who will help ensure that the latest evidenced-based protocols and treatments will be delivered to all the children on campus and in the outpatient program. It is something that they hope will build a brighter future in foster care and something they both know is too important to put off for tomorrow. Dennis sums up the mantra of the center and the couple’s collective approach this way: “Transforming foster care with innovation, science and compassion. Both Graci and I realize that to break this cycle of abuse, you have to bring science and compassion to it.” The cycle starts when a child is abused by a parent or relative, a high percentage of whom were abused themselves. Foster care agencies struggle to find a place for these children in an already-overcrowded system. Siblings may be separated, deepening the trauma, while extended family members and foster

Come invest with us. Children are our future and our greatest investment, period.” – Graci McGillicuddy

i”

parents lack the resources and the training to deal with traumatized children. Finally, the child’s trauma manifests in a variety of ways, which may lead to multiple foster home placements. It’s a heartbreaking cycle that continues to go around and around, and as clear as it is frustrating, the cycle will continue to repeat itself. Both Graci and Dennis are firm believers in the science component of the treatment that will be offered through the All Star Children’s Center. They know all too well that the old ways aren’t good enough, and that getting it right only part of the time will not do. “I remember a colleague saying to me, ‘If I could put the words child abuse in a bottle and throw it out to sea and fifty years from now someone finds that bottle and says ‘child abuse, what’s that?’ It would be because they wouldn’t know what it is because it doesn’t exist anymore. Then we would have broken the cycle of child abuse.’ That’s my dream.” “I always wanted to create a nurturing, loving place for children to be when they have been taken away from home. However, that would never break the cycle, because no matter how loving and nurturing the home is, without traumabased care it’s going to continue, because children will always have those triggers,” said Graci. “Child abuse is such a dark secret, and therefore it’s easy to sweep under the

table and put out of our minds. The facts are staggering: there are seven reported cases of abuse or neglect every day in Sarasota, resulting in over 1,600 children being in our local foster care system,” Dennis adds. “I’ve been on this mission and path, but because Dennis has jumped in, we are now dealing with it on real scientific basis with which we can break that cycle of child abuse,” added Graci. Dr. Robert Block, the noted former President of the American Academy of Pediatrics, has stated, “Adverse childhood experiences (trauma) are the single greatest unaddressed public health threat facing our nation today.” Now, because of a comprehensive system of trauma-informed care, there is hope. The latest research in brain science has proven trauma can be healed in a relatively short period of time. This science rests on the discovery of neuroplasticity where thoughts and emotions recorded in the brain’s cells are dynamic and can change over the course of lifetime, which contrasts previous beliefs that cells recorded from early childhood experiences remain static. Dennis is excited about the new pathways to hope and healing. “Essentially what it does is create new neuropathways so when a person is triggered into bringing a memory back, instead of going into the flight, fight or freeze mode, this therapy allows the child to develop new neuropathways so that they understand that they have other choices besides fight, flight or freeze.” “You never know what a trigger can be. It can be a smell, like a certain perfume, a sound, such as a melody or song, merely a look, or even a certain word that was uttered when that child was being abused. They can all be triggers. Most importantly, what this means is that if we can help a child trace their trauma to its source, we can work with them to consciously build new habits, responses, choices and new ways of dealing with them instead of repeating the old ones,” Graci adds while sharing a hopeful smile. These are encouraging words, to say the least, from a couple who are as pragmatic as they are passionate in solving this problem that affects so many children and families.

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on the town

“Come invest with us. Children are our future and our greatest investment, period,” Graci says passionately as Dennis looks proudly on, clearly in agreement with his wife’s ardent plea.

Star Children’s Center will provide a time and place for all children to help reverse the trend and heal their trauma with the latest scientific care.

He adds, “There are so many opportunities for people to become engaged in what we are doing. Obviously, we need funding, so we’re looking for people who are willing to donate. Volunteer opportunities; opportunities to collaborate with other organizations; the opportunity to teach people who are going to enter social service to work and deal with child abuse.”

In the film Judgement at Nuremburg, in which judgement was cast on those who participated in the atrocities of Nazi Germany toward the millions of innocent men, women and children, chief judge Dan Haywood (portrayed by Spencer Tracy) said, “Before the people of the world - let it now be noted in our decision here that this is what we stand for: justice, truth...and the value of a single human being!”

Still, with all the hope, science and compassion that this wonderful campus of hope and healing will provide, both Graci and Dennis face the stark reality of what’s at stake. They know the clock is always ticking and that every ten seconds in America a case of child abuse is reported. The time is here and now; there is hope in the future because of the All Star Children’s Center. Ground has been broken on the site, located near 17th Street and Lockwood Ridge Road. Once completed, the five-acre center will provide comprehensive trauma-informed care to as many as 60 children at a time. Fundraising efforts are in full swing, with the goal of raising over $13 million—a goal very much in sight thanks to the generous pledge of $1 million by the Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation to fund a position at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital to design its trauma-informed treatment program, as well as a state grant of $2.5 million for building expenses. And while the capital campaign has been launched and some funds have been raised, much more are needed to complete the ambitious campus that will include an outpatient facility, six licensed foster homes and a community center. The campus will also include a central park, where children can picnic, relax and energize their spirit. A playground will supply all the wonderful opportunities for kids to learn to play and cooperate with others. A children’s boutique will provide children, many of whom enter the foster system with only the worn and often dirty clothes on their back, a chance to pick out some new and clean clothes. Finally, a garden will give foster families and children a chance to grow and pick fruits, vegetables and flowers on campus. Most importantly, the All

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The value of one human being. In a system that too often fails children, it is the value of one single child with his or her own painful journey built on fear and mistreatment that hits Graci McGillicuddy in her core as a caring mother and grandmother. “The reason I’m so absolutely passionate about what we’re doing is I look at each and every child and ask the question, ‘What if this happened to my grandchild? Wouldn’t I want them to get the best care that I possibly could get?’ We just have to take care of our kids. These are our kids. These are our children.” “That’s where the urgency lies. I think every single person needs to realize these horrible things are happening to children; then it may mean something more than 400,000 incidents. What if one of them was your grandchild? Every one of these numbers is a child that we must protect.” Dennis believes this will “clearly be a lifelong undertaking. This is a long-term commitment and we expect to see this work continue long after we’re gone. We just hope to plant the right seeds that lead to Graci’s ultimate dream in which child abuse has been totally obliterated.” The All Star Children’s Center is a dream that must become reality. Just remember: after you finish reading this article, another report of child abuse has been made. The time to help is now. For more information on how you can help, visit allstarchildrensfoundation.org or call 941.349.2770 For questions about programs and services: LindseyM@ascf.care For questions about donations, events or fundraising: BethB@ascf.care


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ESTABLISHED 1973 REBORN AUGUST 2016

| PIANO MUSIC CONTINENTAL CUISINE | FINE WINES | CRAFT COCKTAILS MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE | | ALFRESCO DINING PRIVATE DINING ON- OR OFF-PREMISE CATERING

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Cast of the Theater Latté Da production of RAGTIME. Photo by Dan Norman.

RAGTIME

BY STEVEN J. SMITH

A HISTORIC LOOK BACK AT THE HERE AND NOW

A

lthough the action of the Tony Award winning musical Ragtime takes place at the dawn of the 20th century, Minnesota-based director Peter Rothstein believes its plot and characters could very well spring from today’s headlines. “I’m always looking for works that resonate with our current world,” Rothstein said. “I wanted to do something that was about national identity. To be honest, when I first approached doing Ragtime in 2016 I knew there would be some parallel issues to America 100 years ago, but I didn’t know issues such as immigration, race, police violence and gender would reemerge in our current culture. Ragtime is, sadly, incredibly timely and resonant.” This epic Tony Award winning musical depicts the struggles, successes, hopes and dreams of a white, upper-middle class family in New Rochelle, an AfricanAmerican musician and his girlfriend in Harlem and a Jewish immigrant and his daughter on the Lower East Side. Interwoven with their stories are the newsmakers of the era including Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington, J.P. Morgan and Henry Ford.

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Jared Joseph in Asolo Rep’s production of RAGTIME. Photo by John Revisky


things have changed over the last century and how little has been learned, which spurs them on to hone and focus the material. “So in each production we continue to find more specificity,” he said. “As well as in engaging with new artists, who bring their own life experiences to the work. It all inspires new conversations — specifically in regard to racial tensions, police violence and gender — in each new community, which is what I hope will happen in Sarasota as well.” Rothstein added what he loves so much about this musical is that there is hope — as seen in the transformations the primary characters undergo.

Jade Turner and Alfie Parker Jr. in Asolo Rep’s production of RAGTIME. Photo by John Revisky This particular version of Ragtime, which runs at Asolo Rep from May 1-27, is something of a revival of Rothstein’s scaled down, intimate and elegant 2016 production at Theater Latté Da in the Twin Cities, of which he is the founding artistic director. “Also the 5th Avenue Theatre in Seattle, where I’ve worked quite a bit, asked me to recreate it for them last year,” Rothstein said. “Then (Asolo Rep Producing Artistic Director) Michael Edwards got wind of it and said it sounded like a good piece for Asolo Rep. This version of Ragtime is the Theater Latté Da production of it done in partnership with the 5th Avenue Theatre. We’re sharing some of the costumes and props with them. The cast is a combination of one-third from the Twin Cities production, one-third from the Seattle production and the other third will be actors coming in from New York.”

“So change is possible,” he said. “Compassion can instigate change. Empathy can build a better world. That’s at the heart of this piece and what it builds to is hope for the future — that our children, our youth, are given a voice, a platform, if provided access. What change might they create and what world might they build? Florida is in the global spotlight right now, with its youth in position to initiate significant change.” Sarasota Scene is a sponsor of Ragtime, which opens May 1 at Asolo Rep’s Mertz Theatre, located at 5555 N. Tamiami Trail in Sarasota. It plays through May 27. Ticket prices range from $16-$98, depending upon seat location, day and performance time. For more information or to order tickets, call the box office at 941-351-8000 or 800-361-8388 or log on to asolorep.org.

Rothstein added he has never before worked at Asolo Rep, but his resume boasts successful productions of Other Desert Cities, M. Butterfly and Private Lives for the prestigious Guthrie Theatre, record-breaking productions of Annie, The Wizard of Oz and the world premiere of Disney’s High School Musical, among many others. “As for this upcoming production of Ragtime, it’s such a lovely thing as a director to revisit a show with the same team and continue to learn and finesse what works,” Rothstein said. “It’s been a success in the Twin Cities and Seattle and I think it’s important that we try to understand in these communities — as well as in others — what the conversation is that we’re all having around these issues. And how that informs the work. Because as much as this piece speaks to hope, the issues at the heart of it have been part of our national challenges since the beginning.” Rothstein added the most common comment he and his colleagues get in post-show conversations is how woefully little

Jared Joseph and Danyel Fulton in Asolo Rep’s production of RAGTIME. Photo by John Revisky

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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on the town

Education MATTERS By Ryan G. Van Cleave

SARASOTA YOUTH ORCHESTRA AND EDUCATION PROGRAMMING Regarded as one of the finest youth orchestras in the Southeast, the Sarasota Youth Orchestras (SYO) continues to get area students from third grade to high school interested in classical and symphonic music. The 30-week season that essentially runs right along the academic school year (September through April) is an opportunity for students to expand music skills they already have and learn more about what it takes to be an audience member and a musician. They also learn a thing or two about working in a group while having fun. At the moment, the seven different ensembles (four string orchestras, one wind band, and two full orchestras) have about 350 participants, though the feeder program—the summer music camp—might bring in even more. The summer music camp can accommodate anyone, from absolute beginners to well-seasoned performers. Director of Education Alyson Rozier says that about 50% of brand-new kids who take the summer music camp immediately audition to join the SYO, and another 25% will audition to join the following year. So all told, that’s about 75% who want to be part of the SYO within the first two years alone. Those numbers are quite impressive. One reason for that kind of success is because it’s affordable. People have the misconception that music education has to be expensive. But the entire 30-week season? Only $330. Not $330 per month, but $330 for the entire year. And that includes sectional lessons as well as classes in music theory and general music education. Plus, nearly 60% of students are on some level of scholarship. Rozier explains that the goal is to never turn away a student with an interest in participating, and thanks to generous donor support, that wish is a reality. All are welcome. 70

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“They really know how to make things fun while teaching you things that matter.” -Valerie Van Cleave

Another reason for that kind of success is that kids who like music tend to love it. I mean LOVE IT. I’ve got two daughters (ages 11 and 14), and they’re both going to be participating in the summer music camp this year. It’s one of the can’t-miss things of summer for them. “The sectional instructors are terrific,” says Valerie, my oldest. “They really know how to make things fun while teaching you things that matter.” They’d both like to join the SYO too, but they haven’t yet found the balance between school and studies and having a life yet. Maybe next year? They hope. But even if my kids skip the SYO and simply play in their schools’ bands, they still reap the benefits. How? The SYO students go back to their own school music programs during the year and share what they’ve learned


on the town

with others. Rozier adds that “everything we do here is to make them better players and help make their school music programs stronger. If a school music program needs a sectional coach, we’ll send one out at no cost. If their students require a specialized workshop, we’ll create that. If they need us to come out more than once, we will.” The upshot is this: if school music programs are stronger, the SYO is stronger too. It’s not just my kids who are loving the chance to make music. Cypress Potter, a long-time SYO participant and principal second violinist of the Youth Philharmonic (the top group), says that playing music “means that you have a chance to tell the story that the composer developed years ago. More than that, you now have the privilege of retelling it in your own words, relating to it in your own way, and adding your own thoughts and emotions to the piece.” Kaili Gruwell, an oboe player and SYO member, explains that for her, “music is a way I can express and better myself. I have been playing music for 12 years and it has helped me grow as an individual. I have received many difficult pieces throughout my five years in the SYO program; by putting effort into practicing and performing, I have bettered myself as a musician, which is an awesome feeling. Furthermore, I am not the most social person. However, music has led me to meet lifelong friends, through music programs at school and the Sarasota Youth Orchestra.” Her favorite SYO memory? “The ending of the showcase concert last year. I felt so happy with what we performed on stage. Before the concert, I was still on the fence about majoring in music in college. However, that feeling I got while the crowd was applauding encouraged me to continue. Next year, I am excited to attend the University of Central Florida in Orlando and double major in music and engineering. Not attending rehearsals on Mondays [when the SYO groups meet] will be sad, but I know the program will continue to grow and inspire young musicians, just like it did for me.” Like Gruwell, a few SYO alumni will choose to pursue music performance in college, and a larger number will go into music

education, but just as many will study to be a doctor, lawyer, engineer, or other occupation. Regardless of what major they have, 95% or more still play music in college. And quite a few get scholarship money that way. Rozier explains that “it’s far more important for them to develop a love and appreciation for music than to become professional musicians. As future concert goers, as future parents, they’ll encourage a love for music in the next generation. That’s crucial.” Rozier’s probably right. My mom played music, and it’s no surprise that my brother and I did too, from piano lessons in our youth, to high school band and rock bands in our teens, to my college years playing trumpet in marching band, to my on-and-off again music recording efforts, and my brother’s 20+ year career as a bass player in Chicago area bands. And now my daughters both have the bug (as do my brother’s kids, I hear!). Music matters. It reaches into our lives and powerfully affects us. It can sharpen our thoughts. It can change our mood. It can transform our world and help us relive the past or imagine a new future. Thanks to the SYO, more and more families are positively impacted by the power of music, too.

F O R M O R E IN F O R M AT IO N

about the Sarasota Youth Orchestra or the Sarasota Orchestra’s Education programming, please visit www.sarasotaorchestra.org or call 941.953.3434 MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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arts&culture Larry Hamm’s “The Clown” from Theatre Odyssey’s 10-Minute Play Festival

Artist Series Concerts Artist Series Concerts of Sarasota

Best SEATS PERFORMING ARTS CALENDAR

The Ringling’s Toni Dove:Spectropia. Manatee Performing Arts Center

ARTIST SERIES CONCERTS OF SARASOTA

THE JOHN & MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART

941.306.1200 / artistseriesconcerts.org Pops | Special Performances Showtime! May 13 Hurray for the Red, White & Blue: Capital Brass Quintet and Bob McDonald May 19 – 20

941.359.5700 / ringling.org Historic Asolo Theater Flying on the Wings by I 25 GIRI May 10 On Screen Royal Ballet Live Cinema: Bernstein Centenary May 5 National Theatre Live: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof May 11 National Theatre Live: Young Marx May 25 Royal Ballet Live Cinema: Manon May 26

ASOLO REPERTORY THEATRE 941.351.8000 / asolorep.org Ragtime May 1 – 27

FLORIDA STUDIO THEATRE 941.366.9000 / floridastudiotheatre.org Mainstage Honor Killing Through May 25 Cabaret Shakespeare’s Greatest Hits Through June 10

LEMON BAY PLAYHOUSE 941.475.6756 / lemonbayplayhouse.com The Tin Woman Through May 13 72

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MANATEE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 941.748.5875 / manateeperformingartscenter.com Broadway Series Nice Work If You Can Get It Through May 13 DraMature’s Greatest Hits May 9 Menopause the Musical May 22 – June 3 The Long Reunion May 25 – 27


arts&culture

Sarasota Orchestra

THE RINGLING 941.359.5700 / ringling.org Flying on the Wings by I 25 GIRI May 10 Artist Series Concerts: Red, White & Blue May 19 – 20

SARASOTA OPERA 941.328.1300 / sarasotaopera.org Tony Danza Standards & Stories May 4

SARASOTA ORCHESTRA 941.953.3434 / sarasotaorchestra.org Discoveries City Sounds May 5 Outdoor Pops Field of Dreams May 11 – 12

THEATRE ODYSSEY 941.799.7224 / theatreodyssey.org Ten-Minute Play Festival May 3 – 6

URBANITE THEATRE 941.321.1397 / urbanitetheatre.com Women Laughing Alone with Salad

Through May 6

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Sarasota Opera

VAN WEZEL PERFORMING ARTS HALL 941.953.3368 / vanwezel.org Visit website for complete listing of events

VENICE THEATRE 941.488.1115 / venicestage.com Stage II Debbie Does Dallas: The Musical! Through May 20 Generations Stuart Little May 15 – 20 23rd Annual Loveland Show Unplugged: The Best Day of Your Life May 31 – June 3

THE VENICE SYMPHONY 941.207.8822 / thevenicesymphony.org A Tribute to Music in Cinema May 4 – 5

WESTCOAST BLACK THEATRE TROUPE

Help artist Salvadore achieve his dream. Invest in our community’s professionals one graduate at a time. Investments can be made in the form of recurring or one-time donations, equipment, supplies, and/or scholarships to help students reach their graduation milestone.

Contact Barbara Bourgoin 941-752-5398 or BourgoB@SCF.edu

941.366.1505 / westcoastblacktheatre.org Soul Man Through May 26

To submit your performance season, please send information to SCENEMAGAZINE@SCENESARASOTA.COM

SCF-Foundation.org MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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GET Inspired

ANGELA HARTVIGSEN FINE ARTS PROGRAM SPECIALIST, K-12

Why is arts education important? The arts are powerful modes of selfexpression, but also the window into our culture and humanity. Students gain insight into what forces in history or culture had a hand in shaping that art. Additionally, the arts develop many nonarts-specific skills that are highly sought after in the career realm and in society: creativity, now considered the number one attribute prospective employers seek in an applicant; confidence, perseverance, collaboration and decision-making. Focus and confidence are strengthened for students in all areas of the arts. Lastly, the arts bring joy to the students participating in them and to all who hear, see and experience their work. What is EdExplore? How did it begin and what do you see in the future? EdExploreSRQ is a resource for Sarasota County teachers, principals and parents to identify and learn about experiential learning opportunities available in our area. Featuring hundreds of offerings by local non-profits and individual teaching artists, each EdExploreSRQ “exploration” is reviewed to ensure connections to educational standards. Educators at all grade levels not only expand and enrich their classrooms, they also increase student awareness and access to local arts, cultural and scientific resources. EdExploreSRQ is also a valuable resource for parents seeking to identify unique learning experiences outside the classroom for their children.

HOW DID YOU BECOME INVOLVED IN ARTS EDUCATION? I’ve had amazing models in arts education all my life. Both of my parents were music educators in the Sarasota County Schools; going into music education seemed like the natural path for me. It wasn’t until I’d been teaching music on my own for a few years, however, that I really discovered that sharing a love of music and respect for true artistry was my passion. Now, as Fine Arts Program Specialist for the school district, I am happy to support all of our schools’ talented arts educators and their programs.

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Since being adopted by the district in 2011, the number of EdExplore providers grew from 25 to over 65 and the number of Explorations offered has increased from 50 to over 250, with new explorations being added all the time. My hope is that we will continue to add Explorations in some of the subjects currently less served on the site.


arts&culture

The Patterson Foundation was instrumental in the creation of EdExploreSRQ and it is through their continuing partnership and the support and collaboration of the Community Foundation of Sarasota County, Education Foundation of Sarasota County, the Arts and Cultural Alliance of Sarasota County and the Science and Environment Council of Southwest Florida that the project continues to flourish and make an impact. The Sarasota County Schools maintain and manage the EdExploreSRQ. c o m w e b s i t e a n d t h e C o m m u n i ty Partnership Team. I serve as the point person for management of the website and Sue Meckler is the chair of our Community Partnership Team. What some of your favorite EdExplore moments? Since the Explorations listed on EdExplore could all be described as Experiential Learning, there are too many moments to pick out just one! We have managed to document many of these Explorations in action and to see students gazing up at the ceiling of the Riverview Planetarium or sorting through sea life just caught on the Carefree Learner boat helps me understand why I am so proud of everything we’ve accomplished through EdExploreSRQ. In 2016, over 106,000 students were able to participate in EdExplore Explorations thanks to our foundational partners a n d p a ssi o n a t e p a r tn e r s . Th ro u g h EdExploreSRQ, students have seen plays and ballets, visited museums and Patriot Plaza, learned about the music of the Civil Rights Movement, built a hovercraft and much more. So, I guess my favorite EdExplore moment is that moment when I see learning come to life in their eyes and know that educational spark has been lit.

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ArtCenter Manatee: Mitchell Dean

Art Uptown: Shaman Master

ArtCenter Manatee: Lahita Joseph

MAY 4TH Art Uptown

GET Inspired

CULTURAL HAPPENINGS BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE ARTS AND CULTURAL ALLIANCE OF SARASOTA COUNTY

1367 Main Street

New Artists Exhibit 6 pm - 8 pm artuptown.com

THROUGH MAY 11 ArtCenter Manatee 209 9th Street W Searle Gallery Inspired by Nature: Visions of Five Artists Kellogg Gallery Bright & Bold Open Juried Exhibition Reid Hodges Gallery Annual Student Show artcentermanatee.org

THROUGH MAY 19 Alfstad& Contemporary 1419 5th Street Jorge Blanco alfstadand.com

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arts&culture

Dabbert Gallery: Kasia Bruiany

THROUGH MAY 25 Arts and Cultural Alliance of Sarasota County

Art Center Sarasota: Raymond Lawler

MAY 14 - JUNE 22 North Port Art Center

Patricia Thompson Gallery: Octavio Perez

RINGLING COLLEGE GALLERIES

1226 N Tamiami Trail Sarasota Visual Artists Studios Group Exhibition sarasotaarts.org

Opening Reception May 12, 6:30 - 8:00 pm 5950 Sam Shapos Way Summertime Sizzle northportartcenter.com

MAY 18 - SEPTEMBER 14

THROUGH MAY 25 Art Uptown Gallery

MAY 15 – JUNE 22 Southern Watercolor Society 41st Annual Juried Exhibition ArtCenter Manatee southernwatercolorsociety.org

Richard and Barbara Basch and Willis Smith Galleries Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society: Open Aqueous Show suncoastwatercolorsociety.com

MAY 16 Marie Selby Botanical Gardens

MAY 24 - JULY 6 Art Center Sarasota

900 S Palm Avenue Warhol Nights Featuring Florida Studio Theater 6:00 - 9:00 pm selby.org

707 N Tamiami Trail Florida’s Finest Statewide Juried Exhibition artsarasota.org

1367 Main Street New Vision : New Artists artuptown.com

MAY 2 - MAY 21 Palm Avenue Fine Art 10 S Palm Avenue Annual International Marine Masters Show palmavenuefineart.com

MAY 4 - MAY 28 Dabbert Gallery 46 S Palm Avenue Lavender & Ladybugs, Spring Promise dabbertgallery.com

Patricia Thompson Gallery Illustrations, Octavio Perez ringling.edu/galleries

MAY 18 - JUNE 21

Have an upcoming visual art event? Send your event details to COMMUNICATIONS@SARASOTAARTS.ORG

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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arts&culture

LITERARY Scene By Ryan G. Van Cleave

A WEALTH MANAGEMENT BOOK AND TWO THRILLERS ARE RYAN’S PICKS FOR MAY.

WEALTH UNBROKEN by Rebecca Walser I’m going to be honest—I’m reluctant to review any how-to finance book. Why? Because more so than other literary styles/genres, these are, understandably, polarizing. For every person who swears by the stated advice, plenty will holler equally much about it being fool’s gold. This book by tax attorney, CFP, wealth strategist, and iHeart radio financial advisor Rebecca Walser is no different. Her goal is a big one— map out “how to be one of the few who not only survive but thrives in the coming era of increasing taxes, extreme market volatility, and an aged, debt-ridden America.” Does she deliver? It’s hard to say. The only advice I ever received about preparing for my retirement? Spend less. Max out the 401k. And bank 10% of my take-home pay. Kind of yawner stuff, but it’s what a lot of us were told. Surely there’s more to it, though, right? Enter Walser and Wealth Unbroken. In this book, she discusses things that your own CPA might well have never mentioned. That’s a plus. She’s also a fan of creating a sound tax plan that’s more or less predicated on paying taxes today to avoid higher rates in the future.

THE CONSULTANT by TJ O’Connor While TJ O’Connor has published numerous books already, his latest novel, published by Longboat Key’s own Oceanview Publishing, is his first thriller. O’Connor is an independent security consultant who specializes in anti-terrorism, investigations, and threat analysis, so the level of authenticity and vividness in The Consultant – Book 1 of the Jonathan Hunter thriller series – is understandably quite high.

One of the real virtues of this book is that potentially complex ideas are presented clearly in a conversational style. I also think she does a good job in the first chapter of showing how the world of retirement planning has changed. The days of 30+ years with the same company (like my father and father-in-law enjoyed) are long gone.

The Consultant tells the story of Jonathan Hunter, who, in his own words, is a consultant. “Sort of a handyman for very special clients. Well, one very special client.” But Hunter gets involved on a personal level when his brother sends a plea for help despite having not spoken to him in years. What follows is Hunter stumbling upon a hotbed of terrorist activity by Middle Eastern refugees right here in the U.S. Couple that with Hunter’s spy mentor playing his own high-stakes game with Russian intelligence, and you’ve got a story that cooks along nicely from start to finish.

Is this book for you? Probably so, if you prefer the certainty of life insurance and annuities over stocks and options on indexes. But you might also enjoy this if you want a fresh perspective on American capitalism and taxes.

Hunter’s more Jason Bourne than James Bond, though he’s got a more pronounced sense of humor that many readers will appreciate. O’Connor’s fast-paced writing style will surely please readers, as well.

Rating:

Rating:

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www.TJOConnor.com

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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The debut novel by Michael Jordan (no, not that one—this writer is a longtime trial lawyer from Ohio!) follows lawyer John Coleman as he works to solve the brutal murder of a friend. The manner in which the murder took place has people thinking about the “Torso Murderer,” who killed at least 12 people back in the days of Eliot Ness (the 1930s) but who was never captured. Is this latest murder related? Coleman is determined to find out, even if it means running afoul of a biker gang, a shady ex-cop, and the dead man’s drugloving son. One of the challenges of The Company of Demons is that Coleman, a first-person narrator, can come across as unlikable. For one thing, he makes plenty of bad decisions (drinking, cheating, and avoiding responsibility, to name only a few). For another, he’s full of excuses about these constant bad decisions. Plus, there’s always the question – how does a firstperson narrator end up in the right place at the right time to tell the story?

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www.MichaelJordanBooks.com


on the town

Eat &Drink DELICIOUS DISHES AND DRINKS + THE PERFECT PLACES TO PARTAKE

MAY MAY 2018 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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on the town

Something to Taco ‘Bout By Rick Dakan Tacos, burritos, and other Latin and Tex-Mex cuisine have never been more popular in Sarasota than today, but the sad fact is many of us still end up getting our Taco Tuesday fix from mass-produced fast food joints. It doesn’t have to be that way! For about the same price you and your family can eat a whole lot better than that reheated, microwaved junk. Two new taquerias have opened in Sarasota, each offering a unique and flavorful spin on traditional Latin street food. SCREAMING GOAT TAQUERIA 6606 Superior Ave., Sarasota That’s quite a name. Chef and owner Malin Parker had it in mind for years before he opened the restaurant. The veteran chef had wanted to open a taqueria for at least two decades, and when the name “Screaming Goat” came up as joke with friends, he was in love with it. “I had the name before the goat on the menu,” Parker says. “My wife and friends were dubious, but I loved it. It was funny, creative, and memorable, everything I want our restaurant to be.” At first, he wasn’t even sure he could get a good source of goat meat, but he found it. Now it’s not only going into tacos, but the restaurant serves an Ecuadorian-inspired Slow-Braised

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Goat Barbacoa Stew, a dish you’re not likely to find many places in Sarasota. “People come here and want an adventure in food,” Parker explains. “The more out of the box, the better the response has been.” Screaming Goat is as casual and friendly as a restaurant can get. Order at the counter and build your own delicious creations from the restaurant’s stunning array of fresh, locally sourced ingredients, including beef barbacoa, chorizo, mesquite chicken, and sweet potato, quinoa & lentils. Then make it your own with toppings like pickled red onions, sweet corn relish, spicy mushrooms, cactus paddle-roasted onion, and some of the great, fresh house-made sauces. Or if you prefer, the chefs have six specialty tacos carefully balanced and full of flavor. I particularly loved the Masa-Dusted Cauliflower (a spicy, wonderful vegetarian option) and the rich and flavorful slow-cooked pork of the Cochinita Pibil with avocado-tomatillo salsa, arugula, pickled onion and queso fresco. Although Screaming Goat leans in on the adventure, more traditional taco fans can find plenty to enjoy here as well.


on the town TACOS - TO GO 2773 Bee Ridge Rd., Sarasota Taking over a prime location from a previous taco restaurant, restaurateur Tom Golen opened Tacos - To Go with a distinctive menu that reflects a lifetime of culinary adventure. “I’m just passionate about food,” says the former Wall Street trader. He spent his evenings and weekends going to culinary school and working in New York City fine dining restaurants. “When I retired from the trading floor, I decided to open a small restaurant on Siesta Key.” He had it for three years and recently sold it and opened up this one. “This is much more casual. Half of our customers get their food to go. We want it to be fun, fresh, and Siesta Key centric.” That focus on Siesta Key and the beach is reflected in the menu’s seafood options. Tacos - To Go uses locally sourced ingredients for all its food, including the grouper for the fish dishes. “Everything is from scratch,” says Golen. “I do as much local sourcing as possible, particularly on produce. Nothing is precooked, all made to order, which makes it take a little longer, but you know it’s fresh.” I’m a particular fan of the delicious and refreshing ceviche taco, which is freshmade ceviche served in a hard taco shell. The presence of ceviche highlights the fact that Tacos - to Go has a very eclectic menu. The ceviche is Peruvian. The decadent baleada (grilled tortilla filled with scrambled eggs, refried beans, and I suggest chorizo) is Honduran. The housemade gelatos (try the Kahlua Coffee or Horchata Almond) are Italian. The Latin Wok Stir Fry Bowl is unique, an organic lo mein or rice base with wok-sauteed Latin ingredients brought together to create one of the restaurants most popular dishes. It’s a wonderful, eclectic mix for the adventurous eater, but don’t worry, they do great versions of more traditional tacos too. There’s something quick and satisfying for anyone on the go.

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insider

InHEALTH PAIN ON THE SUNCOAST: LEGISLATING RESPONSIBLE PRESCRIBING By Fabian A. Ramos, MD, FIPP, DABA, DABIPP, DABPM, International Pain Medicine, Fellow of Interventional Pain Practice

Board Certified – American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians, American Board of Pain Medicine, American Board of Anesthesiology

On Monday, March 19, Governor Rick Scott signed Florida House Bill 21 at the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office, allocating more than $65 million to tackle Florida’s continuing opioid problem – an epidemic that ravages our population. According to a report recently released by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, 5,725 people overdosed in 2016, an increase of nearly 35 percent from 2015. Of those, substances that are not prescribed by doctors, such as heroin and carfentanyl, accounted for 406 and 754, respectively. These harrowing numbers pointed to the urgency of prescription reform. HB 21 goes into effect on July 1, 2018, to enact measures that help regulate acute and chronic pain prescriptions of opioids by imposing three main components: 1. Opioid prescriptions written to treat acute pain will be limited to only a three-, seven-, or 10-day opioid prescription when deemed medically necessary. 2. Mandatory physician review of the E-FORCSE (Electronic Florida Online Reporting of Controlled Substances Evaluation) database to determine a patient’s current prescribed medications prior to writing new prescriptions for controlled substances. 3. Authorized physicians are required to complete a board-approved, two-hour continuing education course on prescribing controlled substances.

It is important to understand the difference between acute and chronic pain. Acute pain will subside. Chronic pain is ongoing and often debilitating. One may experience acute pain after a dental procedure, minor injury or surgery. With the new legislation, those suffering from acute pain will be limited to prescription dosages as mentioned above. In a prior step to combat opioid abuse, the Florida legislature created E-FORCSE in 2009 to encourage safer prescribing. As you fill a prescription for a painkiller or opioid, your pharmacist is required to log this data into E-FORCSE. Although the information has been available, it has not been mandatory for all physicians to refer to this database prior to writing a prescription for a controlled substance. When the legislation is enacted, this will be mandated by law. Another element of responsible dissemination of controlled substances by physicians relates to MME (Morphine Milligram Equivalent) per day. This affects those suffering from both acute and chronic pain. The effective milligram dosages has be lowered with the new legislation; another necessary step in proactively managing the risk of instances of addiction and overdose. Will these new requirements be easy to implement? No. Will this new legislation be convenient for doctors and patients alike? No. Will these new requirements save lives? Yes.

With HB 21, the State of Florida is taking steps to curb the opioid epidemic and urge a conservative approach to pain management that focuses on other modalities and interventional procedures. Prescribing opioids should be a last resort. For example, in a practice like the Ramos Center, which serves over 10,000 patients, only 18 percent of the patients are prescribed opioids – and only when deemed absolutely necessary, such as a patient who is diagnosed with intractable pain. There has been a renaissance over the past two decades with the closure of many “pill mills” on the Suncoast. As a result, Manatee County Sheriff Rick Wells reports that in the last six months of 2017, there was a 75 percent decrease in overdoses and deaths, and an 85 percent decrease thus far in 2018. When HB 21 is enacted this summer, we expect an even greater decrease in negative opioid-related consequences.

Fabian A. Ramos, MD, FIPP, DABA, DABIPP, DABPM Ramos Center for Interventional & Functional Pain Medicine 100 3rd Avenue West, Bradenton 5741 Bee Ridge Rd., Sarasota 941.708.9555

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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insider

InHEALTH PARTS VS.THE WHOLE: A GLOBAL APPROACH TO ACQUIRING BEAUTY IN THE AGE OF SOCIAL MEDIA Sumeet Bhanot, M.D., F.A.C.S

What is plump enough, tight enough, how much do you lift? Where do you focus your dollars? Consumers are wondering how to get the most bang for their buck. Is a satisfying result gained by walking into a surgeon’s office and asking, “Hey doc, what can you do for $500?” Do patients want honest results or a deal? These are the things that I ponder. I am a purist. My goal is to do what is right for the patient, not what works for my gain. Beauty is a composition of ordinary parts that together become extraordinary. There is too much general social opinion that creates artificial credibility. What we need is true expert opinion. Using a paintbrush does not make one an artist, as is true with wielding a needle. The answer is balancing perspective and proportions. Knowledge of complex anatomy, symmetry of the facial composition, how much to use, when to stop. Art takes vision, perspective, judgment, creativity, thought, knowledge and execution. My approach is comprehensive, individual and measured. Patients often present with a pressured mindset to achieve their goal with minimal cost. As with “retail therapy,” they are hoping that addressing one feature will make them feel better. Simply fixing puffy eyes may not give them the total look they are seeking. Art isn’t

“We all know beauty when we see it yet it seems so elusive when we try to create it in pieces.” divisible, it cannot be cut up and sold in pieces; the same is true for the face. We all know beauty when we see it yet it seems so elusive when we try to create it in pieces. Encountering what I call the fallacy of equivalent options: people feel that the results of surgical and nonsurgical approaches are the same and that all providers are created equal. Sometimes chasing small budget items ends up costing more than doing it right the first time and it doesn’t last. We consider smooth skin, plump cheeks and lips and tight neck lines victories individually, but we lose the war collectively. As in the children’s book The Emperor’s New Clothes, we all know in our hearts that it

doesn’t look right, just like everyone knew the Emperor was naked, but no one wanted to say it. We all recognize natural beauty yet when we look around we see so many unnatural results. All providers are not created equal, perspective and vision play a large part in outcome. Ultimately, it comes down to a collaborative partnership between the patient and the surgeon. The patient commissions the work while the surgeon’s artistic vision creates the result. My approach to aging faces is to restore harmony to the face by recreating the youthful proportions of volume. I see past the wrinkles, hollows and bags and address the true concern of falling volume with the deep plane facelift. The answer is to address the problem and not the symptoms; it is truly that simple. Changes are dramatic yet the result is very subtle. People look 20 years younger and no one recognizes they have had a facelift. The results are beautiful and natural. Have respect for beauty and know that, as in life, anything that is worthwhile is never quick and easy.

Sumeet Bhanot, M.D., F.A.C.S Bhanot Facial Plastic Surgery 2038 Bee Ridge Rd Sarasota, FL 34239 941.966.3223

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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Pines of Sarasota LOVE LIVES HERE

W

e are all unique; each of us charts our own course through life, discovering our passions, exploring our gifts and creating memories. Though we may take different paths along the way, there is one we all walk — the journey of aging. Regardless of where we start or how our life unfolds, aging is a central part of our humanity. While getting older can open up new, exciting possibilities, it can also usher in challenges that significantly alter our lives. A sudden illness can rob an otherwise healthy person of their vitality and make everyday tasks difficult. A nest egg, diligently cultivated over decades, can run dry. A way of life embraced for years may no longer be sustainable. And yet, the things we yearned for and worked for when we were young haven’t changed: love, friendship, well-being, dignity. These are the qualities that make life worthwhile and, despite the changing circumstances that come with age, they are the qualities we still desire — and deserve. Fortunately for our community, there’s a place dedicated to the belief that our later years can be filled with all those things, and more. For 70 years, Pines of Sarasota has been home to generations of residents hailing from all walks of life. Through each of its services — rehabilitation, skilled nursing, memory care, assisted living and even intergenerational programs — Pines’ compassionate staff helps residents live with dignity, comfort and love. Residents are able to reside in a place built to accommodate their changing needs — while free from worry about outliving their financial resources. As a nonprofit senior care facility, Pines of Sarasota depends on our community’s generosity to ensure its services are available to all who need them. For seven decades, our community’s families, friends and neighbors have been able to depend on Pines of Sarasota. And Pines of Sarasota has depended on our community. Today, you have an unprecedented opportunity to show your commitment to helping seniors live with the love, well-being and dignity they deserve. Pines of Sarasota is in the midst of a multimillion-dollar transformation of its aging campus, beginning with a renovation of the Assisted Living Facility that will provide private bathrooms for each room, a spacious new lobby and the addition of a cafe where residents and families can gather between meals. Every dollar donated to Pines of Sarasota Foundation for this effort will be matched by a $2 donation from the Esther & Harold Mertz Foundation — effectively tripling your contribution.

Contribute to Pines of Sarasota Foundation today by visiting www.pinesofsarasota.org/Love-Lives-Here or calling 941-955-6293. Together, we can show everyone that love lives here, and in your heart.


insider

Laughing MATTERS THE STINK OF SUCCESS by Ryan Van Cleave | Illustrations by Darcy Kelly-Laviolette

G

ood news/bad news.

First, the bad news. I had not-so-covertly hoped to make $11.3 zillion off my online comedy program outlined in excruciating detail last month. To everyone’s surprise, I fell a bit short of that goal, largely because I never got the domain name www.TheGreatBigHaHa.com, since all of my GoDaddy coupons were expired. As someone wise once said, “Hope is tomorrow’s veneer over today’s disappointment.” Note to self: look up the definition of the word “veneer.” Note to self: It rhymes with “beer.” Note to self: Promising! The good news. Now that I’m not lounging poolside by my new mega-mansion in St. Croix, I’m able to contribute to the pages of Sarasota Scene Magazine for another month, which—and let’s be truthful here—means I have yet another chance to win a Pulitzer. Note to self: Send anonymous note alerting the Pulitzer committee! To that end, I did what any good enterprising humor column writer would do. I joined my pal “Steve” on a mission to locate and (possibly) subdue the Florida Skunk Ape. Now the Skunk Ape—A.K.A. “Florida Bigfoot,” “swamp cabbage man,” and “swampsquatch”—is an elusive figure that allegedly haunts the Florida Everglades and has just been named the FBI’s official #1 cryptozoological menace to the state of Florida, according to my friend, who knows things like this. So right about now, you might be thinking that hey, the Everglades are way over yonder. What danger do skunk apes pose to us right here in sunny, skunk-ape-less Sarasota?

The shocking answer? Oodles. Back in 2000, an anonymous woman mailed two photographs to the Sheriff’s Department of Sarasota County that depicted what looks to be a large, foul-smelling, hairy, ape-like creature RIGHT HERE IN OUR BACKYARD, the city of “We Live Where You Vacation” fame. I can’t speak for anyone but as far as I was concerned? I felt super violated and endangered from the moment I heard about this two weeks ago. With such a threat lurking in the suburban shadows right here, how could anyone even think of going to work or school instead of dealing with this crisis-level skunk ape situation? For what it’s worth, the Internet claims that someone was able to figure out who this skunk-ape-photographing woman was but that she preferred to remain anonymous because she didn’t “want any fuss or people with guns traipsing around her house.” That’s understandable. I’m suspicious of people who “traipse” as well. Note to self: look up the definition of the word “traipse.” Is it perhaps related to “trapeze”? I was determined to sleuth out the truth. And who better to embark on such a mission with me than “Ralph” (I will continue to use false names so you won’t be able to tell that it’s my crazy friend “Mike”). “Harry” has a digital camera with a 3x optical zoom, for one thing, and he owns a cooler big enough for a 12pack. Plus, he found a fishing net in his garage that he was 84% sure might be strong enough to “catch us one of them ape folk” and allow us the chance to find out what terrible secrets it was hiding - through enhanced interrogation methods, if need be.

MAY 2018 | SARASOTA SCENE

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insider Seriously, what more do a pair of amateur monster hunters need? It’s quite sensible at this point to wonder: “What type of research does a writer do before going on an adventure such as this that he plans to write about?” Amateur writers might commit to days of research about the cryptid in question and perhaps reach out to an expert, such as Dave Shealy, who first saw a skunk ape in 1974 while deer hunting in the swamp behind his house in what’s now Big Cypress National Preserve. “Why is Shealy considered to be the Jane Goodall of skunk apes?” you might quite reasonably ask. It’s because he said so in an interview on a Bigfoot website about five years ago. “I am the expert,” he explained, “the state and county expert on the Florida skunk ape and have been for years.” Case closed. But this over-the-top commitment to research and planning wasn’t the route I took. Not me. I was content to let my own firsthand facts about the skunk ape tell me all I needed to know. To that end, I showed up at “Roger’s” house with a box of Slim Jims, a Tampa Bay Rays cap, and a broken yo-yo I found under the seat of my car. “Game time,” “Bobby” said, grinning from ear to ear. It was somewhere around this point that “Luke” and I both realized that we had no idea where to look for the skunk ape. So we went to Denny’s. I’m pleased to report that there were no skunk apes at Denny’s (threat averted!), though a beefy Fed-Ex guy kept giving us the eye as we photo-documented all the subjects in our field of vision. “Just in case,” “Zeke” kept saying. He’s cautious that way. The non-cryptid highlight of the Denny’s trip was that the waitress overcharged me for the reduced fat chocolate milk. Blargh! And honestly, as “Will” and I stood in the parking lot in front of his 1977 AMC Gremlin, we confessed that we weren’t all that interested in chasing strange figures through the cypress hummocks in the marsh. That seemed like a lot of work, even for us enterprising potential eyewitnesses. And if Denny’s was skunk-apefree, then what type of danger were we really in after all? Plus I was out of Slim Jims. That’s the exact moment that the skunk came after us. Like it was right out of a Wes Craven horror flick, this 6.5 lb. monster zeroed in and attacked. As the thing waddled up to the rust-bottomed door of “Paul’s” puke-green Gremlin and opened fire, unloading its

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awful scent glands right at us, I couldn’t help but wonder—was this the skunk ape’s revenge? Would we be plagued by odiferous creatures of the forest forevermore like some kind of mythological stink curse for having the hubris to go after a legendary figure like the infamous skunk ape? Note to self: Use more smart-sounding words like “odiferous” and “hubris.” As we lathered the Gremlin down at the nearest sudsand-wash place, we realized the stink had magically disappeared. That’s when “Clark,” the fool, suggested that maybe it’d been a stray cat versus a skunk. This is exactly why I don’t hang out with “Pete” very often. He’s plum crazy. Note to self: Stop hanging out with “Clarence.” Unless he’s buying the chocolate milk. Or bringing Slim Jims.

Want to chase down the mystery of the giant octopus of St. Augustine? Got a hankering to find out if love bugs were really invented in an Orlando lab as a means to stem the mosquito population? Think you’ve got the nobody-knows-but-me 411 on the plague of butt spiders (look it up!) in central Florida? Send all of these beauties to ryan@scenesarasota.com ASAP!


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A community foundation's support of education. Summer camps. Fun places to explore. You can read all about these and more in the May Educat...

May 2018  

A community foundation's support of education. Summer camps. Fun places to explore. You can read all about these and more in the May Educat...